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SPRING 2013

Full Service: It’s More Than Pumping Gas

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Ask the Experts: Branding 101

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2365 HARRODSBURG RD., SUITE A325 LEXINGTON, KY 40504 PHONE (859) 226-4374 FAX (859) 266-4404 E-MAIL KPMA@KPMA.NET

TABLE OF CONTENTS OFFICERS & STAFF Chairman and President Bob Riley Bob Riley Distributors, Inc. Richmond, Kentucky Vice Chairman Rayburn Doss Doss-Fuelco, Inc. Harlan, Kentucky Secretary and Treasurer Jay Hall Thoroughbred Energy, LLC Lexington, Kentucky Executive Director Brian Clark KPMA Lexington, Kentucky Marketing & Membership Manager Anne Sabatino Hardy KPMA Lexington, Kentucky COUNSEL Government Relations Mike Helton (502) 226-3975

Published March 2013 • Volume 3, Number 1

Legal Counsel Richard Johnson (859) 252-0093 Federal Regulatory Counsel Mark Morgan (202) 364-6767 Member of

Letter from the Chairman.............................................................................5 From the Executive Director.......................................................................7 KPMA News..........................................................................................................9 Full Service: It’s More Than Pumping Gas........................................ 10 Now Available: The Marketer’s Legal Handbook: Essential Contracts for Petroleum Marketers by Richard P. Johnson..... 12 Ask the Experts: Branding 101................................................................ 13

Thank You to Our Advertisers! Adcolor, Inc....................................................................................................................................15 ADD Systems................................................................................................................................11 C&S Canopy, Inc............................................................................................................................8 C.L. McBride Company, Inc..................................................................................................12 H.T. Hackney Co.............................................................................................................................8 Harrell’s Car Wash Systems...................................................................................................17 Heartland Payment Systems.................................................................................................4 Johnson Legal Network, PLLC...........................................................................................17 Jones & Frank.............................................................................................................................. 20 Marathon Petroleum.................................................................................................................6 Mid-Valley Supply........................................................................................................................2 S. Abraham & Sons, Inc...........................................................................................................11 Shield Environmental Associates, Inc............................................................................17 Southern Services, Inc............................................................................................................17 WorldPay.........................................................................................................................................15

KPMA Marketer is published by Innovative Publishing Ink. 10629 Henning Way, Suite 8 • Louisville, Kentucky 40241 • Phone 502.423.7272 • Fax 888.780.2241 Innovative Publishing Ink specializes in creating custom magazines for associations and businesses. Please direct all inquiries to Aran Jackson, ajackson@ipipub.com. www.ipipub.com KPMA MARKETER

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LETTER FROM THE

CHAIRMAN

Strong Focus, Bright Future With this first column, I begin my tenure as chairman of the KPMA. I am truly honored to have been afforded this opportunity to serve by my fellow KPMA members. Two years ago, I was asked to serve as treasurer. The job was described as a summer breeze: present the financial report at three or four board meetings a year, plus a few hours in between. Surprise being the one constant in life, it didn’t really turn out exactly that way.

A new KPMA has emerged during the past 24 months.

by Bob Riley, KPMA Chairman and President of Bob Riley Distributors, Inc., Richmond, Kentucky

influences. In my view, the primary purpose of our group is to provide a vehicle through which petroleum marketers can positively influence legislative and regulatory policy. Likewise, we provide products, services and tools that enable our members to better handle the changing business landscape. Progress in these areas will be augmented by increased membership numbers and engagement and by continuing to build our relationships with legislators and regulators. Obviously, there is a circular relationship and synergy between these two goals, which calls for parallel development.

The past two years have presented extraordinary change for our association. We have moved from being a selfoperated organization to one that is operated under an association-management model. The KPMA used to own an office building in Frankfort, but, as of January, this is no longer true. Building on the strategic plans and goals set out over recent years, our membership has become more engaged. As a group, we have forged ahead together to build a more effective organization to serve our membership. A new day has been ushered in. A new KPMA has emerged during the past 24 months. During these tumultuous two years, the KPMA has been very fortunate to have had the steady hand of our outgoing chairman, Alex Fassas, on the rudder. His steady and thoughtful leadership has been a much-needed element in our organization’s successful journey through this period. As with any new beginning or rededication of efforts, I believe it is always good to look at our organization’s core purposes. Why does the KPMA exist? What is the point? Is it just for the great golf tournaments and the fellowship? While the connections and relationships that are fostered within an association such as ours are valuable and an important aspect of membership, I have always believed that an organization like the KPMA has an intrinsic value to companies in our industry. In today’s business environment, there are many factors that impact how we operate our companies, including legislative and regulatory

Much work has been accomplished this past year: We have established core services, we have developed a sustainable and functional committee structure, and we have initiated a strategic and relational approach toward legislators and regulators. The KPMA is well-positioned to serve existing members, attract new members and lead the industry. In addition, our new staff has been on the road reaching out to potential new members and old faces that haven’t been seen in a while. Their efforts are already producing results. I believe that the new KPMA has a bright future and is well-positioned to accomplish what needs to be done. We have an engaged and vigorous membership. We have two extremely talented and creative staff people in our Executive Director Brian Clark and Marketing and Membership Manager Anne Hardy. If the future got any brighter, we’d all have to wear shades.

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FROM THE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Presence Counts

by Brian Clark, Executive Director, KPMA

Kentucky’s General Assembly wrapped up its spring legislative session in March, and it was indeed a busy time in Frankfort, particularly because this was a short session. What did we accomplish? The KPMA is pleased to report that HB 126 was approved by both the House and Senate. This bill extends the sunset date for the registration of all underground storage tanks and extends the sunset date for applying for reimbursement under the cleanup account. This is very important for our industry in Kentucky to ensure that newly constructed tanks are eligible for coverage, and the KPMA actively worked to help pass the legislation this session. Gasoline wholesalers and retailers utilize the fund to meet the federal financial responsibility provisions required by federal law. Those provisions require the demonstration of $1 million in pollution liability insurance and $1 million in third-party liability insurance. Without the fund, tank owners and operators would be required to seek the insurance on the open market, and that is cost-prohibitive.

The establishment of these dates goes back to 2002, when our industry pushed to have the two accounts of the fund — the financial responsibility account (0.04 cents per gallon) and the clean-up account (1 cent per gallon) — separated. The plan was to separate the two so the insurance account would be able to go on as needed without a sunset date, and the cleanup account would have a definitive end. Unfortunately, that bill was passed with the two accounts separated but still linked by the sunset dates. The KPMA will continue to work with the General Assembly to address the cleanup provisions of this program in the interim, but, for now, the passing of HB 126 ensures the dates are

extended. As a result, owners and operators with new tanks put into service after June 30, 2013, will continue to be able to utilize the fund to meet federal requirements. This success of this effort is a great illustration of why presence counts. Presence — seen through the work of our legislative agents in Frankfort and through the active engagement of KPMA members who engage lawmakers to make their interests known. Presence — evidenced in the sweat equity of KPMA committee members who call on their legislators to voice an opinion. Presence — shown by members taking the initiative to meet and share dialogue with lawmakers about issues of importance to our industry. On February 27, the KPMA hosted a very successful Legislative Breakfast for Kentucky legislators during the session. More than 15 House and Senate lawmakers visited with a dozen KPMA members and staff members, talked about their concerns and shared their perspective on current and pending legislation. It generated tremendous goodwill for our industry and helped to pave the way for further discussion with Kentucky’s legislative leadership. (See more event photos on www.kpma.net.) Again, presence counts. How can you get involved? On May 16, the PMAA will host its annual Day on the Hill in Washington, D.C. This is a perfect opportunity to engage congressional members with your views on critical issues, such as health insurance, E15 and tax reform. For more information and a schedule of events, visit www.pmaa.org. So engage. The KPMA exists to carry the message. By getting involved, you will quickly see the value that comes from adding your voice to the chorus of our industry. There is strength in numbers. And your presence counts.

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Our Mission:

C & S Canopy, Inc. is dedicated to providing our customers with the highest-quality materials and workmanship at fair and market-competitive prices. Our mission is to establish a lasting relationship with each customer by exceeding their expectations in all areas, including service, workmanship and timely installations. This relationship will provide the foundation for repeat and referral business, thereby ensuring the longevity of our company.

OWNERS: Keith Chambers and David Thomas SALES: David Stone – Cell: 205.612.2109

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KPMA NEWS KPMA Press Launches First Two Books The Marketer’s Legal Handbook Launches at M-PACT The Marketer’s Legal Handbook was launched at M-PACT this year and is now available for purchase on www.kpmapress.com or by phone at (859) 219-3571. The Marketer’s Legal Handbook: Essential Contracts for Petroleum Professionals, by Richard P. Johnson, is available for the KPMA-member price of $200 and is also available to nonmembers at a price of $250. State associations interested in bulk purchases or a personal seminar by Johnson may contact Anne Hardy at anne.hardy@kpma.net. For more on The Marketer’s Legal Handbook, turn to page 12. Kentucky TOOLS Reference Handbook Available April 30 As many in the industry are aware, the requirements for operator training in the state of Kentucky are to be completed by the Designated Compliance Manager (DCM) through the Kentucky Tank Operator Online Learning System (KY TOOLS). The KY TOOLS program is a free online course offered by the Kentucky Division of Waste Management’s Underground Storage Tank (UST) Branch. This training can be paired with the Kentucky TOOLS Reference Handbook as an aid, study tool and accessory for DCMs, owners, operators and other individuals who may be working at a site with a UST. At press time, the Kentucky TOOLS Reference Handbook is scheduled to be available by April 30 for purchase on

www.kpmapress.com or by phone order at (859) 219-3571. The cost is $50 for members and $75 for nonmembers.

Adcolor Inc. Andrew Fore andrew.fore@adcolorinc.com

Additional seminars for prospective DCMs will be held around the state throughout the year, and those locations will be announced on www.kpma.net. Please check the site for more information.

Dean Dorton Allen Ford PLLC Bill Kohm bkohm@ddafcpa.com

KPMA and KPMA Press wish to thank the officials of the KDWM and USTB for their invaluable partnership on this project, without which this publication would not be possible. KPMA is dedicated to developing positive relationships with regulators and supporting the industry in its pursuit of high standards.

The Value of KPMA: Advocate, Represent Early in 2013, KPMA launched a new initiative: The KPMA Advocacy Center, which utilizes a tool that allows members to directly, efficiently and personally contact legislative representatives about important issues. The Advocacy Center was utilized successfully in the short legislative session early in 2013 to encourage the passage of HB 126, as well as to invite lawmakers to KPMA’s Legislative Breakfast in Frankfort. Thank you to all members who participated and to the many lawmakers who attended. This year’s turnout was exceptional!

Welcome Our New Members!

Hinkle-Meyer Environmental Services Jenna Daniels jdaniels@hmesllc.com Southern Environmental Services Mike Conner ses@keystops.com Tri County Auto and Oil, LLC Roger & Laura Meador tricountyautoandoil@live.com UBS Jonathan Butcher jonathan.butcher@ubs.com

New KPMA Officers Named KPMA is proud to announce a new slate of officers, who were named at the annual meeting at M-PACT. Thanks to these active members who have committed to leadership with KPMA: Bob Riley, chairman; Rayburn Doss, vice chair; Jay Hall, secretary/treasurer; Jeff Gallic, PMAA director; and Alex Fassas, immediate past chair. To submit news, calendar items or member updates, please contact Anne Sabatino Hardy at anne.hardy@kpma.net or (859) 219-3515.

KPMA is pleased to welcome the following new members; please update your directory.

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Full Service It’s More Than Pumping Gas In the age of the slick c-store model, a small full-service BP station on Tates Creek Road in Lexington stands nearly alone. The station, with years that surpass even its longtime employee Terry Gillespie — who’s been there 40 years — is steeped in a particular way of doing things that Terry says isn’t preserving nostalgia … it’s just doing business the way they know how.

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f the walls of this full-service station could talk, you wonder what kind of tales they’d tell, tales of only a few owners during all the years it’s been running, of the loyal and longtime customers, of a changing world. Thankfully, Terry and his colleague Danny Shouse are willing to share some thoughts on the world as they see it from inside one of the Bluegrass’ few remaining full-serve stations.

Longtime full-service BP station employees Danny Shouse and Terry Gillespie hold a letter of appreciation from one of their many pleased customers.

Before Terry can get too deep into the kind of reminiscing that happens too rarely — something that traditionally happens around the counter at a drugstore or in a place just like this — a customer pulls in, and Terry heads outside to tend to her. At this station, that includes pumping gas, checking the tires and the oil, washing the windows, and generally making sure that the car and the customer are doing 10

K PMA MARKETER

well. Though she could have left as quickly as she arrived, she steps inside for a chat. “These guys, they take care of me,” she says. “They take care of me, my mom, my yard guy. They’re fabulous.” The customer’s name is Debbie Conley Howe, and she’s been coming to this station for more years than she can count. She and Terry compare notes for a minute on what might be an estimated time frame. They give up after some mild haggling and a few laughs. “Well, my dad was in the wholesale tire business, and Mr. Snyder, who used to own this, they used to play golf together, and then he’d sell him tires. I guess I came because it was a family thing,” she said. “And because Terry can fix anything, and he’s honest and really polite. If my mom or I have a problem with anything in any way, shape or fashion, I’ll send her to him. And I don’t have to worry.” Terry beams when she praises his work as a mechanic. Don’t call him a technician; he likes mechanic just fine. Terry thanks her and says he’ll see her soon. Then he turns back with an earnest look. “The biggest thing we’re preserving here, and you can ask anybody around about this —

The limited retail selection at Lansdowne BP serves this customer base just fine.

people know when they come here, that we’re not going to rip them off. We’re upstanding, honest mechanics,” he said. Danny agrees. “I’ve worked at other places around town, and you don’t see what you see here. Here, people will drop off their car, say they need a tuneup, say they need something done, and they just leave it — no questions asked. There’s trust.” The proof is in the satisfaction, to be sure. To illustrate the point, Danny pulls a piece of paper off the wall and holds it up for inspection. It’s a letter of appreciation from a pleased customer.


Likewise, there is a level of commitment and satisfaction from the staff, evidenced by Terry’s long service and Danny’s as well. They don’t just pump gas, though one recent retiree, Troy, was a “career gas-pumper,” according to Terry. They do mechanic work, they run and schedule the customer repairs, they order parts and supplies, and they operate — and sometimes even fix — the touchless carwash.

“These guys, they take care of me. They take care of me, my mom, my yard guy. They’re fabulous.” ­— Debbie Conley Howe, longtime full-service BP station customer The approach isn’t for every business, but this station is proving that there’s still a place for the full-service model. In fact, in the time they’ve been chatting, there has been a stream of customers — more full-serve than self-serve. Jay Hall from Thoroughbred Energy, the KPMA-member company that owns this station, says there are some special things that make it feasible.

Danny and Terry do repairs, change oil, replace tires and more, in addition to offering full service at the pump.

“I think what makes that station work is a combination of several things,” he said. “One, the time that it’s been in business there; two, the neighborhood and lack of competition for that kind of business; and thirdly, the people that work there. They’re trusted, and, between the two, they have 50 or 55 years of experience. People come in asking for them by name, and a stop to get gas turns into a 10-minute conversation with a friend.” KPMA MARKETER

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Now Available The Marketer’s Legal Handbook: Essential Contracts for Petroleum Marketers by Richard P. Johnson Well-written contracts are the foundation of all thriving business relationships. Petroleum professionals need comprehensive agreements to protect the stability of their supplies, the integrity of their brands, and the security of their receivables. With this book, you will learn about the critical contracts, documents and agreements that are essential for business success in the petroleum industry. This book includes sample documents that establish supply relationships and address the nuances of brands and trademarks and the unique obligations that accompany them. It also includes a number of sample contracts and other documents, such as confidentiality agreements, management agreements, service contracts and leases that are more general in nature, which can be

important tools in the petroleum marketing business and other industries as well. In addition, the book features several types of sample documents that can be adapted for use in the purchase and sale of real and personal property, as well as sample documents that address the extension of credit and methods to secure payment, which are ubiquitous to any business. Includes a CD-ROM with electronic copies of the sample documents presented in this book. $250 retail price $200 member price ISBN 978-0-9888381-0-9

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ASK THE EXPERTS KPMA Marketer will periodically spotlight business areas in an “Ask the Experts” forum with a Q&A of member-experts. If you are interested in being featured in an “Ask the Experts” forum, contact Anne Hardy.

BRANDING 101

In the increasingly competitive marketplace of fuel retailing, business owners — from c-stores to marketers to suppliers — are honing their brand and marketing strategies to increase customer loyalty, market penetration and awareness. But it can be tricky. What is a brand, and what kind of media and products are best used to achieve those marketing goals? Two KPMA associate members who specialize in branding answer questions about how to maximize your efforts.

“Each business should strive to have a clear and unique brand position. If you demonstrate a clear and intended positioning (with consistent presentation and messaging), it’s less likely your reputation can be misrepresented or misconstrued.” What is a brand, and why is it important that a business has a brand? More often than not, people think a brand is a logo. Even though a logo (or company identity) is certainly tied to an overall brand position, your brand is not simply a logo or how you look. A brand, in essence, is your organizational reputation, the position you hold in the minds of customers or public at large. Your brand is not your product, your logo, your website or your name. It’s what your customers perceive and feel about you. Your brand can mean one thing to one person and something else to another because, after all, opinions (and emotions) are unique to each person. Each business should strive to have a clear and unique brand position. If you demonstrate a clear and intended positioning (with consistent presentation and messaging), it’s less likely your reputation can be misrepresented or misconstrued. What are the components of a brand, and how is a brand used? In marketing, brand implementation refers to the physical representation and consistent application of brand identity across visual and verbal media. In visual terms, this can include facets of architecture, products, industrial design, vehicle graphics, uniforms, signage, retail design, publications, e-mail signatures, advertising, etc. The list can go on and on. Think of it this way: If customers (or potential customers) have the ability to engage with it, it is branding.

when and to whom you plan on communicating your product or service. Having a clear and concise brand strategy leads to stronger overall brand equity — how people feel about or perceive your product. You should be delivering a consistent and clear brand language through ALL deliverables (website, ads, publications, conversations, etc.). What’s the deal with social media, and how can they be used to increase customer loyalty? Social media are no longer a business consideration. They are a must — like water for brand growth and survival. Branding and social media should go together so well, yet both can be misunderstood or misused. While social media can serve as a gigantic megaphone for your brand, social-media tools can also give a company a golden opportunity to shoot itself in the figurative foot.

Expert: David Caldwell Principal, Advertising + Marketing Services Balance Creative, LLC www.balancecreative.net david@balancecreative.net KPMA Member Since: December 2012

Consistent, reputable information will give your brand credibility on social-media channels. When you have fans throughout five or six different social networks, it’s important for your image to hold true. Ask yourself what people want to know about you. What type of information do you wish to find on others’ business profiles? Along with all of this, in what way can you best express yourself to potential customers and partners whom you’ve never met? Balance Creative is offering special packages for fellow KPMA members on identity and branding packages. Contact David Caldwell for more information.

What is the process of branding and marketing a business? Your brand’s strategy should always be based on company goals. Brand strategy is the how, what,

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ASK THE EXPERTS “Research has shown that vehicle graphics are currently the most cost-effective form of marketing (lowest cost per impression), and this trend will likely not decline in the near future.”

Expert: Andrew Fore Account Management Adcolor, Inc. Digital and Screen Printing www.adocolorinc.com andrew.fore@adcolorinc.com KPMA Member Since: December 2012

Bronze Sponsor

What products does Adcolor produce that might be recognizable to petroleum marketers and convenience-store owners? Adcolor produces a comprehensive collection of products for petroleum marketers and convenience-store owners. Some common products specific to petroleum marketers and convenience stores include: banners; signs (indoor and outdoor); vehicle and fleet graphics; pump toppers and graphics; wall, window, floor and counter graphics; ceiling hangers; shelf talkers; aisle markers; cooler clings; backlit fountain-drink graphics; menu graphics and systems; routercut/dimensional signage (stand-alone, wall, etc.); decals/stickers; exhibit graphics; screenprinted shirts; embroidered shirts; and more! We work with our clients to find the right material and process for their needs, and all products are custom-printed to their specifications. How can the correct products and product placement affect business? Using the correct products and placement can drastically affect business in a positive way. When printed products are done correctly, they make a big difference in how a company is perceived by its clients and the general public. Proper branding and professionally printed products positively affect credibility and a company’s image. For petroleum marketers, putting graphics on tankers is a good way to increase visibility and recognition. They are on the road every day and are seen by thousands of consumers: Why not cover the tanker with a branded message and take advantage of the daily exposure for your brand? A consumer will recognize and recall a professionally branded tanker. For convenience-store owners, properly placed graphics can help generate sales for specific products/promotions, etc. This can be done at the pump or via window/floor/ceiling graphics, stand-alone displays, cooler clings, shelf talkers, fountain-drink graphics, etc., which reach consumers where the interest/need is and prompt additional sales. How can the correct products enhance the customer experience and customer loyalty? Customer loyalty is built on many components. One of them is a perception that the vendor

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An example of Adcolor’s work at a Nathan’s hot dog installation

provides a value to customers’ purchasing experience. In the petroleum and conveniencestore industries, there are a lot of choices and options. Professionally printed products give a store or supplier a professional appearance, which, in turn, will yield more business and trust from their clients. Many convenience stores look similar inside and out. Using custom graphics and unique graphics and processes distinguishes a store over its competition. These advantages enhance the customer experience, as many customers notice these differences and are more likely to shop at a place that is unique over a store that has a less-professional appearance. They can also enhance the customer experience by increasing convenience, as clearly marked displays, aisles, promotions, etc., allow customers to quickly locate products. What can (or, better, what can’t) Adcolor print on? Adcolor can print on just about any substrate: papers, plastics, vinyls, board materials, metals, fabrics, foam, wood, corrugated materials, cardboard, clothing and more. We are constantly researching new products and materials to print on so we can continue offering a very broad range of substrates and solutions to our customers. What are the most innovative new products available at Adcolor right now? The printing industry is constantly changing, which is exciting for both our customers and us! Vehicle vinyl continues to evolve and allow us to put graphics on more and more types of vehicles and also apply vinyl on vehicles in areas where previously we could not. Semis, tanker trucks, box


trucks, trucks, vans, passenger vehicles, large machinery, gas pumps, ATM machines, etc. We have put graphics on just about every type of surface imaginable. Research has shown that vehicle graphics are currently the most cost-effective form of marketing (lowest cost per impression), and this trend will likely not decline in the near future. It will only continue to evolve. Advancements in vinyl have made it much easier and cost-effective to produce floor graphics for multiple types of flooring and in just about any shape. Graphics are now able to be applied to sidewalks and concrete surfaces; this was unheard of in the past. Convenience-store owners can now place messages between the pump and the interior of their store to reach their customers.

This company vehicle announces its brand wherever it goes.

Router-cut graphics are incredibly beneficial for convenience-store owners. Traditionally, if you wanted a custom-shaped piece, you would have to pay for a die and order a large quantity of the product in order to make it cost-effective. Router technology now enables us to produce custom-shaped pieces as single pieces or in large quantities without the need for creating dies. This is huge for retail settings, as we can create custom stand-alone displays, dump bins, wall lettering (dimensional), floor graphics, wall graphics, window graphics, shelf talkers, counter cards, counter mats, counter graphics, signage, etc., without having to create dies and require large quantities for custom-shaped products. A store can do custom-shaped products for monthly promotions or other promotions in a very cost-effective manner. This differentiates them from their competition.

WorldPay 1174-4

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The Spirit® Brand

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affordable branding solutions for today’s business climate. At Spirit®, we understand the challenges of doing business in tough economic times. Spirit ®’s national brand recognition, flexible business solutions and low branding costs give marketers options. Because with Spirit ®, it’s always your business, your way.

www.Spiritpetroleum.com

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Your membership with the Kentucky Petroleum Marketers Association can SAVE YOU MONEY on group medical insurance! • The Kentucky Petroleum Marketers Association has partnered with The Hartfield Company of Kentucky to help reduce and control your health care costs. • Today’s financial market can be challenging for all of our members. Reevaluating your company health care costs and coverage can save you money as well as enhance your benefits without jeopardizing coverage. • Even if your business currently has Anthem Group coverage, you can still take advantage of available discounts.

If you are interested in reducing your company’s health care premiums, please contact The Hartfield Company of Kentucky at 800-246-9728.


KENTUCKY PETROLEUM MARKETERS ASSOCIATION 2365 HARRODSBURG RD., SUITE A325 LEXINGTON, KY 40504

KPMA Marketer Spring 2013  
KPMA Marketer Spring 2013  

The quarterly publication of the Kentucky Petroleum Marketers Association

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