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Exploring the

ReligiousPolicy/Security Nexus in Responding to Critical Contemporary Regional/ Global Security Challenges

Nov. 1-2, 2016

Jones Auditorium on the St. Edward’s University Campus Austin, USA


Background and Objectives On behalf of the Kozmetsky Center at St. Edward’s University, we are honored to welcome you to this conference on the topic of “Exploring the ReligiousPolicy/Security Nexus in Responding to Critical Contemporary Regional/Global Challenges.” The conference is being held under the auspices of the Kozmetsky Center-Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University project on Religion and International Security with the support of NATO’s Public Diplomacy Division. Building on recommendations generated from our prior inaugural project session held at NATO Headquarters in January 2016, this second conference gathering organized by the Kozmetsky Center aims to focus particularly on defining and discussing the challenges that policy officials confront in attempting to engage productively with religious communities in addressing contemporary critical security challenges and threats. This Austin conference brings together leading international experts on religion-security with current and

former senior policy officials and religious clerics to exchange perspectives on a range of issues including violent extremism and terrorism, migration, religious sources of nationalism, religious drivers in contemporary geopolitical divisions, religious contributions to conflict resolution and security, human rights and democratization. Conference organizers are approaching the topic with the assumption that the international community faces challenges that can only be addressed by a comprehensive cooperative approach. We hope that by facilitating the exchanges among academic experts, policy officials, security and defense practitioners and religious leaders representing different nations and regions, we can strengthen networks of collaboration for addressing our most important security challenges. The conference organizers will prepare a summary report following the session for wide distribution among the academic and policy communities.

Our Mission The Kozmetsky Center aims to enrich the intellectual life of St. Edward’s University and to serve as a resource for informing the broader public on critical global issues. The center seeks to deepen understanding of the complex challenges of an increasingly integrated world. We facilitate interdisciplinary exchanges among experts, students, faculty and the broader public in a variety of forums. Past speakers have included American and foreign diplomats, policy makers, university scholars and leaders of the business, nonprofit and cultural communities. The center also hosts short-term visiting scholars and practitioners from the United States and around the world, who share their expertise and diverse perspectives with the St. Edward’s University community.

The Kozmetsky Center supports the university’s Global Initiative by providing students with international opportunities and experiences on multiple levels, thereby equipping students to work effectively in an interdependent and culturally dynamic world community. Our programs and activities are directed toward promoting sustained productive international partnerships throughout the world. The Kozmetsky Center contributes to advancing the mission of St. Edward’s University to educate students from all walks of life and prepare graduates with the tools needed to contribute to a more just world.

Our Story The Kozmetsky Center of Excellence was established through a $3 million gift from Ronya Kozmetsky and her late husband, George. The couple, noted for their philanthropic leadership in Central Texas, established the RGK Foundation in 1966 and since then have awarded grants totaling more than $60 million to support humanitarian concerns in the areas of education, community, medicine and health.

“My parents funded this center because they believe in St. Edward’s and the role this university can play in improving the lives of so many.” – Gregory Kozmetsky ’70, Former St. Edward’s University Trustee

Ronya and George Kozmetsky


EXPLORING THE RELIGIOUS-POLICY/SECURITY NEXUS IN RESPONDING TO CRITICAL CONTEMPORARY REGIONAL/ GLOBAL SECURITY CHALLENGES Kozmetsky Center, St. Edward’s University, Austin, Texas Robert and Pearle Ragsdale Center, Jones Auditorium

Tuesday, November 1, 2016 9:00 a.m

Session One: Overview/Reflections on Policy-Security Collaboration with Religious Communities in Addressing Contemporary Global Security Challenges

Dr. Sharyl Cross, Director, Kozmetsky Center (Introduction, Overview, & Agenda) Dr. Jeffrey Haynes, Director, Centre for the Study of Religion, Conflict, and Cooperation, London Metropolitan University Dr. Douglas M. Johnston, President, International Center for Religion & Diplomacy Dr. W. Cole Durham, Professor and Director, International Center for Law and Religion Studies, Brigham Young University 10:45 a.m.

Session Two: Religious Perspectives: Collaboration with Policy-Security Communities

Metropolitan of France Emmanuel Adamakis, Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople

Imam Mohamed Magid, Executive Director of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center; Chairman, International Interfaith Peace Corps; and The Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program, Harvard University Father Ivica Raguz, PhD, Dean of the Catholic Theological Faculty at Dakovo, Croatia Father Louis Brusatti, PhD, Professor and Director, Center for Religion and Culture, St. Edward’s University 12:30 p.m.

Break

2 p.m.

Keynote: Perspectives on Policy/Security Collaboration with Religious Actors in Managing Global Security Challenges

Dr. Andrew S. Natsios, former Director, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Director, Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs, Bush School of Government, Texas A&M University 3 p.m.

Session Three: Challenges for the Policy/Diplomatic/Security Communities in Building Networks of Collaboration with Religious Clerics & Communities in Responding to Critical Contemporary Security Challenges

Dr. Elizabeth Prodromou, Visiting Associate Professor, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University Dr. Marie Richards, Deputy Counterterrorism Coordinator for Regional and Multilateral Affairs, Bureau of Counterterrorism, U.S. Department of State Ambassador Roger Harrison, Professor Emeritus, United States Air Force Academy, and United States Ambassador (ret.) to Jordan 4:30 p.m.

Session Adjourns


EXPLORING THE RELIGIOUS-POLICY/SECURITY NEXUS IN RESPONDING TO CRITICAL CONTEMPORARY REGIONAL/ GLOBAL SECURITY CHALLENGES Kozmetsky Center, St. Edward’s University, Austin, Texas Robert and Pearle Ragsdale Center, Jones Auditorium

Wednesday, November 2, 2016 9 a.m.

Keynote: Dr. Jamie Shea, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges, NATO

9:30 a.m.

Session One: Religious Contributions to Addressing Security Challenges (David Kirkham, Chair)

Dr. Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou, Deputy Director and Academic Dean, Geneva Center for Security Policy and Adjunct Professor, The Graduate Institute, Geneva Dr. Eileen Babbitt, Director, Institute for Human Security and Professor of Practice of International Conflict Analysis and Resolution, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University Dr. David Kirkham, Associate Professor and Senior Fellow, International Center for Law and Religion Studies, Brigham Young University 10:45 a.m.

Session Two: Religion as a Source of Conflict: Terrorism and Violent Extremism (Sharyl Cross, Chair)

Dr. Frances Flannery, Director, Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Terrorism and Peace and Professor of Religion, Department of Philosophy and Religion, James Madison University Dr. Chantal de Jonge Oudraat, President, Women in International Security Dr. Maura Conway, Professor, School of Law and Government and Institute for International Conflict Resolution and Reconstruction, Dublin City University and Director of VOX-Pol Network of Excellence Project on Violent Online Political Extremism 12:00 p.m.

Break

2:30 p.m.

Session Three: Religious and Ethnic Sources of Contemporary Geopolitical Division and Conflict (Elizabeth Prodromou, Chair)

Dr. Lucian Leustean, Professor, Aston University and Fellow, Westminster Abbey Institute Parliament Square Dr. Anastasia Mitrofanova, Director, Center for Religious and Ethnic Studies and Chair of Political Science, Russian Orthodox University Dr. Volodymyr Dubovyk, Associate Professor of International Relations and Director, Center for International Studies, Odessa National University, and Visiting Senior Fulbright Scholar, St. Edward’s University (2016-2017) 4:00 p.m.

Session Four: Regional Context: Challenges in Building Religious-Policy/Security Networks (Despina Afentouli, Chair)

Ms. Sonja Licht, President, Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence, Ms. Despina Afentouli, Program Manager for Partnerships and Cooperative Security, NATO 5 p.m.

Conference Adjourns


Dr. Andrew S. Natsios, Director, Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs and Executive Professor, George H. W. Bush School of Government, Texas A&M University Andrew S. Natsios is Executive Professor and Director of the Scowcroft Institute of International Affairs at the George H.W. Bush School of Government at Texas A&M University. He was Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University from 2006-2012 and former Administrator of the US Agency for International Development (USAID) from 2001-2006. Dr. Natsios serves as Co-Chairman Emeritus of the Committee on Human Rights in North Korea, a research center in Washington DC. He also served as US Special Envoy to Sudan in 2006-2007 to deal with the Darfur crisis and the implementation of the South Sudan peace agreement. Retired from the US Army Reserves as a Lt. Colonel after twenty-three years, Natsios is a veteran of the Gulf War. From 1993 to 1998, he was vice president of World Vision US, the international non-governmental organization. Earlier in his career, Natsios served in Massachusetts State Government as a member of the House of Representatives in Boston for 12 years and later as Secretary of Administration and Finance, the chief financial and administrative officer of the Commonwealth. He is the author of three books: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (1997); The Great North Korean Famine (2001); and his latest book, Sudan, South Sudan and Darfur: What Everyone Needs to Know, published in 2012 by Oxford University Press, and has contributed to 13 other books, including two on North Korea. His research interests include food security, famines, humanitarian assistance during conflict, human rights, and foreign aid.

Dr. Jamie Shea, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges, North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Jamie Shea is NATO Deputy Assistant Secretary General for Emerging Security Challenges. He has been working with NATO since 1980. His positions have included Director of Policy Planning in the Private Office of the Secretary General, Deputy Assistant Secretary General for External Relations, Public Diplomacy Division, Director of Information and Press, Spokesman of NATO and Deputy Director of Information and Press, Deputy Head and Senior Planning Officer in the Policy Planning and Multilateral Affairs Section of the Political Directorate, as well as Assistant to the Secretary General of NATO for Special Projects. Outside NATO, Jamie Shea is involved with several prominent academic institutions. He is Professor at the Collège d’Europe, Bruges, Visiting Lecturer in the Practice of Diplomacy, University of Sussex, Associate Professor of International Relations at American University, Washington DC, where he also holds the position of Director of the Brussels Overseas Study Programme. He also lectures at the Brussels School of International Studies at the University of Kent and at the Security and Strategy institute of the University of Exeter, where he is an Honorary Fellow. He is also a Senior Transatlantic Fellow of the German Marshall Fund of the United States and a Senior Fellow at the London School of Economics, where he teaches a course on crisis management and political communication. Jamie Shea is a regular lecturer and conference speaker on NATO and European security affairs and on public diplomacy, political communication, and many other areas of contemporary international relations. He holds a D.Phil. in Modern History from Oxford University (Lincoln College), 1981. Amongst his many associations and memberships, Jamie Shea is a member of the Advisory Board, Security and Defence Programmes at Chatham House, a member of the Policy Council at the World Economic Forum in Geneva and founder and member of the Board, Security and Defence Agenda Brussels and Friends of Europe. He serves on the Board of the Danish Defence College, Copenhagen, and the Académie Diplomatique Internationale in Paris. Jamie Shea is a recipient of the Golden Eagle medal of the Republic of Albania and the Linden medal of the Czech Republic. He was European Communicator of the Year in 1999 and in 2016 was awarded the International Prize for Human Rights of the AAB University in Kosovo.

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Keynote Speakers


CONFERENCE MODERATOR AND SESSION CHAIRS

Dr. Sharyl Cross, Director, Kozmetsky Center, St. Edward’s University and Global Policy Scholar, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars Dr. Sharyl Cross is Director of the Kozmetsky Center at St. Edward’s University in Austin and Global Policy Scholar at the Kennan Institute Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington DC. Dr. Cross was Professor (2005-2013) at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen Germany where she was Director of Academics for both the Program in Advanced Security Studies and Senior Executive Seminar, and served in key leadership capacities for the Marshall Center’s strategic outreach engagement initiatives in Russia, Eurasia and South East Europe. She served as director of the Marshall Center’s project on countering violent extremism, a multi-year Department of Defense and partner initiative involving the participation of some 60 nations. Prior to the Marshall Center, Dr. Cross had been appointed Distinguished Professor of Political Science at the United States Air Force Academy. In 1999, she was a resident Senior Fulbright Visiting Research Scholar and Professor at the Institute of USA and Canada Studies in the Russian Academy of Sciences and Moscow State Institute of International Relations of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation (MGIMO). She was a Professor of Transregional Security Studies at the United States Air War College at Maxwell AFB from 1994-1996, and was a recipient of a post-doctoral fellowship at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University 1991-1992. Professor Cross earned a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of California, Los Angeles, and completed the program in Russian area and policy studies at the RAND Corporation. Dr. Cross has published extensively in leading professional peer reviewed journals, and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Strategic Security and Southeastern Europe and the executive boards for both the “Geopolitics” and “Religion and Politics” Research Committees of the International Political Science Association. Her most recent book was Shaping South East Europe’s Security Community: Trust, Partnership, and Integration, Palgrave-Macmillan, New Security Challenges Series, and Dr. Cross is currently completing her next book co-authored with Paul J. Bolt entitled China, Russia, and Twenty First Century Global Geopolitics under contract with Oxford University Press. In 2013, she received the Defense Security Cooperation Director’s Meritorious Service Award with approval of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from the U.S. Army and Department of Defense for contributions to building international security cooperation during eight years at the Marshall Center in Germany.

Dr. Elizabeth Prodromou, Visiting Associate Professor of Conflict Resolution, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University Elizabeth H. Prodromou is Visiting Associate Professor of Conflict Resolution, teaching in the Program in International Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. She is a non-resident Senior Fellow in National Security and International Policy at the Center for American Progress (Washington, DC) and a non-resident Fellow at The Hedayah International Center of Excellence for Countering Violent Extremism (Abu Dhabi). Before coming to Fletcher, Dr. Prodromou served a diplomatic appointment as Vice Chair and Commissioner on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (2004-2012), and she was a member of the US Secretary of State’s Religion & Foreign Policy Working Group (2011-2015). Her research interests focus on the intersection of religion, democracy, and security, with particular expertise on religion and geopolitics in the Near East and Southeastern Europe. Published widely in scholarly and policy journals and media, she has been involved in advisory work for international and non-governmental organizations on religion and security, interfaith cooperation, and international religious freedom. Professor Prodromou’s current research focuses on migration, religion, and security in Europe and Eurasia, as well as on response strategies of religious institutions to state repression. She holds a Ph.D. and an S. M. in political science from MIT. She holds a B.A. in History and International Relations from Tufts University, and an M.A.L.D. from The Fletcher School. Prodromou was awarded a Distinguished Service Award by the Tufts University Alumni Association in 2008. She is co-editor of and contributor to Eastern Orthodox Christianity and American Higher Education (2016) and Thinking Through Faith: New Perspectives from Orthodox Christian Scholars (2008).


David Kirkham is Academic Director of the Brigham Young University London Centre, Senior Fellow for Comparative Law and International Policy at the BYU Law School International Center for Law and Religion Studies, and a BYU associate professor of political science. Prior to joining BYU, David served as Associate Dean and Professor of International Politics and Democratic Studies at the George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies in Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Germany. David has also served as Associate Professor of History, Director of International History, and Director of International Plans and Programs at the United States Air Force Academy, and as a US Air Force Judge Advocate in England and Washington DC. He has lived nearly sixteen years of his adult life in five European countries (Germany, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, France and Belgium) and officially represented the United States and the United Nations in nearly fifty nations on six continents, including as Senior Humanitarian Affairs Officer at the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Geneva (with duties primarily in Africa). He holds a PhD from George Washington University and a Juris Doctorate from the J. Reuben Clark Law School. David’s writing and teaching address international human rights, global democratization, constitutionalism, revolution, war crimes, and the global challenges posed by ideological extremism. He is the editor of the book State Responses to Minority Religions (Ashgate, 2013) and co-editor of two recent books on Islam, law, and politics in Europe.

Ms. Despina (Ino) Afentouli, Program Officer for Partnerships, Cooperative Security and Open Door Policies, Public Diplomacy Division, NATO Despina “Ino” Afentouli currently serves as Program Officer for Partnerships, Cooperative Security and Open Door policies, regional coordinator for South Caucasus & Central Asia, and Program Officer for Moldova at NATO’s Public Diplomacy Division (Engagement Team). She is responsible for the elaboration and implementation of all Public Diplomacy activities related to NATO’s partnerships, and represents NATO’s Public Diplomacy Division in the respective NATO committees and official meetings with the nations in her areas of responsibility. Before joining NATO, from 1986 to 2001, Ms. Afentouli had extensive experience as a foreign policy and European affairs journalist and columnist. Her professional assignments included serving as European Affairs Editor at the Athens News Agency (1997-2001), editor-in-chief of the Greek edition of the Economist Intelligence Unit reports (1996-1999), diplomatic correspondent for STAR Channel (1995-1996) and Messimvrini Daily, (1995-1996), political correspondent at Kathimerini Daily (1989-1994), and Foreign Affairs editor, Athens Municipal Radio (1986-1989). Ms. Afentouli studied Law at Athens University (BA) and earned an MA degree in Political Communication at the University of Paris-I (Sorbonne). She also attended the Institut Francais de Presse (University of Paris II). She was a member of the European Association of Journalists and received the Kalligas Award (November 2000) for contributing to the dissemination of European ideas in Greece. She served as Secretary General of the European Network of Women Journalists (1994-98) and was selected as the official candidate of Greece for the prize Women of Europe in 1993. Ms. Afentouli was a member of the Greek-Turkish Forum aiming at the promotion of civil society cooperation between Greece and Turkey (19962000) and member of the Win Peace women’s organization promoting cooperation in South Eastern Europe. Ms. Afentouli is the author of four books including A Journey in Greek Foreign Policy, Athens, Potamos 2005, EMU: The Day After, Athens, Dromeas 1999, The Europe We Want, Athens, I. Sideris 1997, May ’68: Twenty years After, Athens, Odysseas 1988, and numerous articles in a range of international relations and foreign policy issues.

CONFERENCE MODERATOR AND SESSION CHAIRS

Dr. David Kirkham, Academic Director, Brigham Young University London Centre and Fellow, Comparative Law and International Policy, Brigham Young University Law School International Center for Law and Religion Studies


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Dr. Jeffrey Haynes, Director, Centre for the Study of Religion, Conflict, and Cooperation, and Professor of Politics, London Metropolitan University Jeffrey Haynes is Professor of Politics, Director of Faculty Research in the Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, and Director of the Centre for the Study of Religion, Conflict and Cooperation. Dr. Haynes teaches in the area of religion and politics/international relations. He is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of more than 40 books. The most recent are Faith-based Organizations at the United Nations (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014) and the Routledge Handbook of Religion and Politics (2nd. ed., London: Routledge, 2016). During 2015-17, Dr. Haynes is conducting a major research study on the United Nations entity ‘Alliance of Civilizations’ as part of a large project initiative funded by the USA-based John Templeton Foundation’s, ‘Enhancing Life Project.’ Both a book and several research papers will result from this research. Dr. Haynes is convenor of the European Consortium for Political Research’s Religion and Politics Standing Group, with more than 190 active members, chair of the International Political Science Association’s Research Committee on ‘Religion and Politics,’ and co-editor of the journal Democratization, published seven times a year by Taylor and Francis.

Dr. W. Cole Durham, Founding Director, International Center for Law and Religion Studies, Brigham Young University W. Cole Durham, Jr. is Founding Director of the International Center for Law and Religion Studies, Brigham Young University. Dr. Durham graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School, where he was Note Editor of the Harvard Law Review and Managing Editor of the Harvard International Law Journal. He is president of the International Consortium for Law and Religion Studies (ICLARS), based in Milan, Italy; Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Oxford Journal of Law and Religion; co-author of Law and Religion: National, International and Comparative Perspectives; co-editor of the Encyclopedia of Law and Religion (Brill 2016), and co-author of a 4-volume treatise, Religious Organizations and the Law.

Dr. Douglas M. Johnston, President and Founder, International Center for Religion and Diplomacy Douglas M. Johnston is president and founder of the International Center for Religion and Diplomacy. He is a distinguished graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy and holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from Harvard University. Dr. Johnston has served in senior positions in the public and private sector, including six years at Harvard where he taught international affairs and was founding director of the University’s Executive Program in National and International Security. His most recent assignment was as Executive Vice President and COO of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. His publications include Religion, the Missing Dimension of Statecraft (Oxford University Press, 1994), Foreign Policy into the 21st Century: the U.S. Leadership Challenge (CSIS, 1996), Faith-based Diplomacy: Trumping Realpolitik (Oxford, 2003) and Religion, Terror, Error: U.S. Foreign Policy and the Challenge of Spiritual Engagement (Praeger International, 2011 Book of the Year Award).

Fr. Ivica Raguz, Dean of the Catholic Faculty of Theology, Dakovo, Croatia Professor Ivica Raguž, PhD (Osijek, Croatia, 1973), completed his study of philosophy and theology at the Catholic Faculty of Theology in Đakovo (Croatia), Weston Jesuit School of Theology (Cambridge, USA), and the Faculty of Theology at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome. He completed his thesis on Sense for the God-human: Transcendental-theological discussion on the aesthetics of Immanuel Kant and Hans Urs von Balthasar. He is alumnus of the Pontificium Collegium Germanicum et Hungaricum in Rome. He was ordained a priest of the Archdiocese of Đakovo-Osijek, Croatia in 1998 and has served as Vice Dean of Science at the Catholic Faculty of Theology from 2008-2010. Fr. Raguz is editor in chief of the theological journal Diacovensia (2008-2016) and the editor of the International Catholic Review Communio (Croatian edition; 2009-present). In 2012, he completed a study visit to the Centre Sèvres - Facultés jésuites de Paris in Paris. He is Chairman of the Department of Dogmatic Theology, and in 2014 was selected as the Dean of the Catholic Faculty of Theology in Đakovo, Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek.


Imam Mohamed Magid is the Imam of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center in Sterling, Virginia. He is the chairman of International Interfaith Peace Corps (IIPC) and served as the President of the Islamic Society of North America (ISNA). Under Imam Magid’s direction, the ADAMS Center has grown to be one of the largest Muslim community organizations in the Washington Metropolitan Area. He also occupies the Chairmanship of the Fairfax County Faith Communities in Action and serves as a Chaplin of George Mason University Campus Ministry. He is the Vice Chairman of the Muflehun think tank, which focuses on confronting violent extremist thought through researchdriven preventative programs within a religious paradigm. Imam Magid has a long history of commitment to public service through organizations, including the Peaceful Families Project, and is leading an initiative to protect religious minorities in Muslim majority countries. He has led training and workshops for Imams and religious leaders, domestically and internationally, on the issue of violence against women. Imam Magid has co-authored three books: Before You Tie the Knot: A Guide for Couples, Reflections on the Qur’an, and Change from Within. He has written for the Washington Post and Huffington Post and has been profiled in Time magazine and Wall Street Journal. Imam Magid has served as a source of consultation and advice to the Obama Administration on issues relating to Islam. He is the recipient for the Washingtonian of the Year 2009 and the Human Rights Award 2005 from Fairfax County.

Metropolitan Emmanuel Adamakis, Metropolitan of France, Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople Metropolitan Emmanuel was born in 1958 on the island of Crete, Greece. He received his secondary education in France, attending the Sorbonne in Paris, before continuing his studies at the Catholic Institute and the St. Sergius Orthodox Theological Institute. He was ordained a priest in 1985 and continued his doctoral studies at the Holy Cross Institute of Theology in Boston, Massachusetts in the United States. Upon completion of his studies, Metropolitan Emmanuel was appointed vicar general of the Greek Diocese of Benelux. In 1995, he was appointed director of the Office of the Orthodox Church to the European Union in Brussels, Belgium. On 11 November 1996, he was consecrated the auxiliary bishop of the Benelux diocese.On 20 January 2003, he was unanimously elected by the Holy Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate to be Metropolitan of France. Fr. Emmanuel serves as the representative of His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I to the European Union. He is Vice President of the Conference of European Churches (CEC) and President of the Assembly of Orthodox Bishops of France, as well as the Co-President of the Council of Christian Churches of France. In addition, His Eminence was appointed by His All Holiness Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I to the Orthodox and Ancient Oriental Churches dialogues, as well as to diverse inter-religious and ecumenical meetings and ministries. The Metropolitan represents the Ecumenical Patriarch at the academic dialogues with Judaism and Islam. He is Co-President of the World Conference of Religions for Peace (WCRP). Fr. Emmanuel has also been honored to serve as a member of the Board of Directors of the King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz International Centre for Interreligious and Intercultural Dialogue. The Metropolitan has initiated and participated in a number of ministries, including as an advocate for peace and ecumenical dialogue. His Eminence has received multiple honors and been decorated for his service by the French Republic with Chevalier de la Légion d’Honneur, by the Republic of Greece with The Grand Commander of the Order of Honour of the Hellenic Republic, and by the country of Ukraine with The Order of Honour and of Ieroslav the Wise. He speaks Greek, French, and English.

CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Imam Mohamed Magid, Executive Director of the All Dulles Area Muslim Society (ADAMS) Center and Chairman, International Interfaith Peace Corps and The Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Islamic Studies Program at Harvard


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Fr. Louis Brusatti, Professor and Director, Center for Religion and Culture, St. Edward’s University Fr. Louis Brusatti is Associate Professor of Religious and Theological Studies and Director of the Center for Religion and Culture at St. Edward’s University. He received his Doctor of Ministry in Pastoral Theology at the Catholic University of America in Washington DC in 1983. He received an MS in Pastoral Counseling at Loyola College of Baltimore in 1978, Master of Divinity in Theology at DeAndreis Institute of Theology in 1975, and BA in Sociology at University of Missouri in 1971. Fr. Brusatti is the director of the Center for Religion and Culture at St. Edward’s University, where his work focuses on the relationship between religious faith and contemporary life. His current research is in the area of pastoral theology, and his teaching regularly focuses on the significance of the Second Vatican Council. Fr. Brusatti is a priest of the Diocese of Austin and the former Dean of the School of Humanities at St. Edward’s University. An ordained Catholic priest, Fr. Brusatti’s ministry has been primarily focused in higher education and has included teaching assignments at DePaul University in Chicago, St. Thomas Theological Seminary in Denver, Kentrick Seminary, and Aquinas Institute of Theology in St. Louis.

Dr. Marie Richards, Deputy Counterterrorism Coordinator for Regional and Multilateral Affairs, U.S. Department of State Marie Richards, a career member of the Senior Foreign Service with the rank of Counselor, began her tenure in the CT Bureau in August 2014. She is responsible for counterterrorism policy issues around the world, to include partner engagement and US participation in multilateral institutions such as the Global Counterterrorism Forum. Previously she had been Principal Deputy Director in the Office of European Political and Security Affairs. From 2011-2012 she was Consul General in Peshawar, Pakistan, preceded by a year as Pakistan-Afghanistan Border Coordinator at the U.S. Embassy in Islamabad. Dr. Richards served two years, 2007-2009, as Director for Afghanistan at the National Security Council, preceded by two years as Deputy Political-Military Counselor in Kabul, Afghanistan. She has also held the position of Asia Section Chief in the Office of Regional Security and Arms Transfers Policy, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs. Other overseas assignments include Guangzhou, New Delhi, and Karachi. Dr. Richards holds an A.B. in government from Harvard University, a Masters in Foreign Service from Georgetown University, and a PhD in history from the University of California at Berkeley. Immediately prior to joining the Foreign Service she was a Junior Research Fellow at Wolfson College, Oxford University. She is also a Distinguished Graduate of the National War College class of 2010. Dr. Richards speaks several European and South Asian languages and Mandarin Chinese, and was the recipient of the 2012 State Department Linguist of the Year award.

Ambassador Roger Harrison, PhD, Professor Emeritus, United States Air Force Academy, and United States Ambassador (Ret.) to Jordan Roger Harrison is Professor Emeritus at the United States Air Force Academy and serves as founding director of the Eisenhower Center for Space and Defense Studies of the Air Force Academy. Before returning to the Academy in 2003, Ambassador Harrison served as Dean and Academic Chairman of the Near East/ South Asia Center of the National Defense University, and concurrently, as distinguished visiting professor at George Mason University. Roger Harrison was appointed by President George H. W. Bush as Ambassador to Jordan, arriving at post eleven days after the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq in 1990, and serving until 1993. He had previously been Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Defense and Arms Control, Political Counselor of Embassy Tel Aviv and Deputy Political Counselor, Embassy London. He also served in various diplomatic capacities at Embassy Warsaw and Embassy Manila. He was special assistant to the Director, Department of Political Military Affairs at the Department of State (1974-5) and was then appointed deputy director for Planning at the National Security Council Staff under first, Henry Kissinger, and later, Brent Scowcroft. He is the author of numerous articles on international affairs and space and cyber policy.


Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou is Deputy Director and Academic Dean of the Geneva Center for Security Policy and Adjunct Professor at the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies in Geneva. He is also Visiting Professor at the doctoral school at Sciences Po Paris. Previously, Professor Mohamedou was the Associate Director of the Program on Conflict Research at Harvard University where he founded the Transnational and Non-State Armed Groups Project. He served as Minister of Foreign Affairs of Mauritania. He is the author of several books including Democratization in the 21st Century (Routledge, 2016), Understanding Al Qaeda – Changing War and Global Politics (Pluto, 2011), and Iraq and the Second Gulf War – State-Building and Regime Security (Austin & Winfeld, 2002), and contributed chapters to several edited volumes, notably Violent Non-State Actors in Contemporary World Politics (Columbia, 2010), An International History of Terrorism (Routledge, 2013), and The Role of the Arabo-Islamic World in the Rise of the West (Palgrave, 2013). Professor Mohamedou earned a PhD in Political Science from the City University of New York Graduate School (1996, Best Dissertation of the Year award), and his articles have appeared notably in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, Le Monde, and The Financial Times. He is a frequent contributor to international news media (ABC News, BBC, Al Jazeera, France 24, VOA, RT). In 2013, he was appointed Commissioner by Kofi Annan on the West African Commission on Drugs (WACD). In May 2016, the New African magazine (London) voted him amongst the 50 most influential intellectuals.

Dr. Eileen Babbitt, Professor of International Conflict Management Practice and Director, Institute for Human Security, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University Eileen F. Babbitt, PhD, is Professor of International Conflict Management Practice and Director of the Institute for Human Security at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University. Her research interests include the role of Track 2 in peace processes, reconciliation in identity-based conflicts, and the participation of civil society in governance. Her 25+ years of practice as a facilitator, trainer, and mediation specialist has included work in the Middle East, the Balkans, and with the United Nations (UNDP, UNHCR, UNAMI), U.S. government agencies (USAID, US Department of State), regional inter-governmental organizations (African Union, OSCE), and international and local NGOs. Professor Babbitt’s latest publications include: “The Pragmatics of Peace with Justice: The Challenge of Integrating Mediation and Human Rights.” (2014) in Coleman, Deutsch, and Marcus (eds) The Handbook of Conflict Resolution: Theory and Practice, Third Edition; and “Mediation and the Prevention of Mass Atrocities.” (2014) in Serrano and Weiss (eds). The International Politics of Human Rights: Rallying to the R2P Cause? Professor Babbitt holds a Master’s Degree in Public Policy from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University and a PhD in Public Policy and Planning from MIT.

Dr. Frances Flannery, Professor of Religion, James Madison University and Director, Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Terrorism and Peace Frances Flannery, PhD is Professor of Religion at James Madison University (Harrisonburg, Virginia, US), and Director of the Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Terrorism and Peace (CISTP), which aims to find systemic, long-term solutions to extremism by bridging academia with the intelligence community, NGOs, and policy makers. Flannery is a biblical scholar who works at the intersection of religion and contemporary challenges, including terrorism, environmental devastation, and identity conflicts. She researches apocalypticism from antiquity to the present day, and has also published extensively on religious experience and dreaming in antiquity. Her publications include two books, two edited books, and numerous articles and chapters. Her recent publications include Understanding Apocalyptic Terrorism: Countering the Radical Mindset (Routledge, 2016) and a co-edited volume with Rodney Werline, The Bible In Political Debate: What Does It Really Say? (Bloomsbury, 2016).

CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Dr. Mohammad-Mahmoud Ould Mohamedou, Deputy Director and Academic Dean, Geneva Center for Security Policy and Adjunct Professor, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva University


CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Dr. Chantal de Jonge Oudraat, President, Women in International Security Dr. Chantal de Jonge Oudraat is President of Women in International Security (WIIS). She was the founding and executive director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) North America (2012-2014). Previous positions include: associate vice president and director of the U.S. Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Fellowship Program; adjunct associate professor at the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University; and senior fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, Johns Hopkins University. She has also held senior positions at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC; and the United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research (UNIDIR) in Geneva. Her areas of specialization are: women, peace and security, gender, international organizations, arms control and disarmament, terrorism and countering violent extremism, peacekeeping, use of force, economic sanctions, U.S.-European relations, and women, peace and security. Recent Publications include: Women, Gender, and Terrorism: The Missing Links, WIIS Policybrief, September 2016; “Preventing and Countering Violent Extremism: The Role of Women and Women’s Organizations,” in A Man’s World (Hedayah and GCCS, 2016); “UNSCR 1325: Conundrums and Opportunities,” International Interactions, 2013; “Women and War: Power and Protection in the 21st Century” (USIP Press, 2011). De Jonge Oudraat completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Amsterdam and received her PhD in Political Science from the University of Paris II (Panthéon).

Dr. Maura Conway, Principal Investigator, VOX-Pol and Senior Lecturer/Associate Professor of International Security, School of Law and Government, Dublin City University Maura Conway, PhD, is a senior lecturer/associate professor of International Security in the School of Law and Government at Dublin City University (DCU) in Dublin, Ireland and Principal Investigator on VOX-Pol, a 5-year €5 million EUfunded project on violent online political extremism (voxpol.eu). Dr. Conway’s principal research interests are in the area of terrorism and the Internet, including academic and media discourses on cyberterrorism, the functioning and effectiveness of violent political extremist online content, and violent online radicalization. She is the author of over 40 articles and chapters in her specialist area(s). Her academic articles have appeared in, amongst others, Current History, First Monday, Media, War & Conflict, Parliamentary Affairs, and Social Science Computer Review, and she has presented her findings before the United Nations in New York, the Commission of the European Union in Brussels, the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) in London and elsewhere.

Dr. Lucian Leustean, Reader in Politics & International Relations, Aston University & Fellow, Westminster Abbey Institute Lucian Leustean is Reader in Politics and International Relations at Aston University where he has been teaching since 2007. From 2011 to 2014, he was the Associate Dean for Postgraduate Programmes in the School of Languages and Social Sciences. He studied international relations, law and theology in Bucharest, Romania, and completed his PhD in Political Science at the London School of Economics. His research has been supported by the Westminster Abbey Institute (Fellow, 2015-16), the Transatlantic Academy of the German Marshall Fund of the United States, Washington D.C. (Senior Fellow, 2014-15), the ESRC (Research Grant on ‘The Politics of Religious Lobbies in the European Union’, 2010-11) and the British Academy. His publications include, as author, The Ecumenical Movement and the Making of the European Community (OUP, 2014) and, as editor, Orthodox Christianity and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Southeastern Europe (FUP, 2014) and Eastern Christianity and Politics in the Twenty-First Century (Routledge, 2014). He is the Founding Editor of the Routledge Book Series on Religion, Society and Government in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet States.


Anastasia V. Mitrofanova is Professor at the Russian Orthodox University of St John the Divine, and Professor at the Financial University of the Government of the Russian Federation. She received her M.A. (1994) and Ph.D. (1998) from Moscow State University and her Dr. Habilitat degree from the Diplomatic Academy of the Foreign Affairs Ministry of the Russian Federation in 2005. Mitrofanova’s research interests include: religious politicization, fundamentalism, Orthodox Christianity and politics, nationalism in post-Soviet states, and religio-political movements. Her major publications include: Politizatsiia ‘pravoslavnogo mira’ (Nauka, 2004); The Politicization of Russian Orthodoxy: Actors and Ideas (Ibidem-Verlag, 2005); ‘The Russian Orthodox Church’ in Eastern Christianity and Politics in the Twenty-first Century. Ed. L. Leustean. Routledge, 2014 (with Zoe Knox); ‘Orthodox Fundamentalism: Intersection of Modernity, Postmodernity and Tradition’ in Orthodox Paradoxes: Heterogeneities and Complexities in Contemporary Russian Orthodoxy. Ed. K. Tolstaya. Brill, 2014; and ‘Russian ethnic nationalism and religion today’ in The New Russian Nationalism: Imperialism, Ethnicity and Authoritarianism 2000–2015. Ed: Pål Kolstø and Helge Blakkisrud. Edinburgh University Press, 2016.

Dr. Volodymyr Dubovyk, Director, Center for International Studies, Odessa National University and Senior Visiting Fulbright Scholar, St. Edward’s University Volodymyr Dubovyk graduated from the history department of Odessa State University in 1992. He received his PhD (Candidate of Sciences) in political science/international relations from the same university in 1996 and has remained with OSU (now ONU - Odessa National University) in various positions up to the present day. Volodymyr has been Associate Professor in the Department of International Relations since 1996 and Director of the Center for International Studies since 1999. Among his teaching and research interests are US foreign policy, US - Ukraine relations, theory of international relations, Black Sea regional security, international conflict studies, and foreign policy of Ukraine. Professor Dubovyk has held fellowships at the Kennan Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 1997 (RSEP), at the Center for International and Security Studies at Maryland (CISSM), University of Maryland in 2002 (CI program), and again at the Kennan Institute in 2006-2007 (Fulbright). He served as a visiting scholar at the University of Washington in January-June, 2013. Professor Dubovyk has been a member of the ISA, ECPR SGIR, CEE ISA, and various other professional associations. He has participated in PONARS Eurasia (Program on New Approaches to Research and Security in Eurasia, based at George Washington University) since 2003.

Ms. Sonja Licht, President, Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence Sonja Licht is the president of the Belgrade Fund for Political Excellence. She holds an MA in Socio-Cultural Anthropology from the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgrade. She was part of the Yugoslav dissident movement from the late sixties. Between 1991 and 1995, she served as the co-chair of the Helsinki Citizens’ Assembly. From 1991 to 2003, Sonja Licht was the CEO of the Fund for an Open Society (Soros Foundation) in Yugoslavia (later Serbia). From its inception in July 1999, she was the head of the Task Force of the Bratislava Process (established to support the democratic opposition of Serbia), and member of the Group of Eminent Persons of the Council of Europe in 2010 that authored the report: Living Together: Combining Freedom and Diversity in Europe of the 21st Century. She is a laureate of numerous awards including the Pro Merit Medal of the Council of Europe, the Star of Italian Solidarity and the French Legion of Honour. She is a Richard von Weizsacker Fellow of the Robert Bosch Foundation for 2015.

CONFERENCE SPEAKERS

Dr. Anastasia V. Mitrofanova, Director, Center for Religion & Ethnic Studies and Chair of Political Science, Russian Orthodox University of St John the Divine


Notes


Notes


Sponsored by the Kozmetsky Center of St. Edward’s University with the support of the NATO Public Dipomacy Division, Brussels. This conference is held under the auspices of the Kozmetsky Center-Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University Project on Religion and International Security.

Kozmetsky Center of Excellence St. Edward’s University 3001 South Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78704 kozmetskycenter@stedwards.edu 512-233-1678 Events sponsored by the Kozmetsky Center are free and open to the public. To learn more about upcoming events, visit stedwards.edu/kozmetsky.

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