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Host an Easy (and Delicious) Cookout 30+ SENSATIONAL SIDE DISHES

CookFresh THE BEST OF FINE COOKING

Flavor-Packed Summer Recipes

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Healthy

Grain Salads Light, seasonal

SOUPS & SALADS Just-Picked

Berry Desserts COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017 www.finecooking.com

Chicken Horiataki Salad with Tzatziki, p. 18


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THE BEGINNING OF EXTRAORDINARY Dijon mustard with Horseradish. Meals, Maille, Memories.

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contents

C o o k f r e s h s u m m e r 2 0 1 7, N o. 1 2 1

f e at u r e s

24 peaches, savory &

turn up the heat

60

Serve suppers with a kick when you cook with flavor-packed, spicy ingredients.

40

cook with honey the new summer side 68 

sweet

Two marinades take this summer favorite fruit to new places.

32

54

Make-ahead and endlessly versatile, grain salad just might be the perfect potluck dish.

farm to spoon

Honey lends a distinctive sweetness to suppers, snacks, desserts, and more.

 simple a 76 berry sweets Make the most of fresh, ripe berries summertime supper  in tempting seasonal desserts.

J uicy grilled steak, fresh summer salads, and a homey berry buttermilk cake star in this easy outdoor menu.

In Italy, they eat soup in summer (and so should you).

tropical bites & sips 44  Take backyard barbecue recipes to the bright and flavorful tropics.

Sweet Marinated Peach Tart with Honey-Yogurt Mousse, p. 31

www.finecooking.com


22

85

88

90 93 84

D E PA R T M E N T S 8 Welcome 10 On the Web 15 Make It Tonight

Fast and fresh meals, any night of the week.

22 3 Ways with Scallions

Versatile and affordable, these green onions add fresh flavor to recipes of all kinds.

84 Test Kitchen

Tips, techniques, ingredients.

92 Credits 93 Sources 94 Nutrition 96 Recipe Index 98 What We’re Cooking Now

Twelve ways to use four seasonal ingredients we can’t get enough of.

Pp 6

COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017

Cover photography by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day.

www.finecooking.com


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w e lc o m e

CookFresh the best of fine cooking

Issue Editor Sarah Opdahl

Issue Art Director Brittany Carlson

Issue Copy Editor Diane Sinitsky

Editorial Director Kathy Kingsley

Art Director Teresa Fernandes

Sun-Ripened Tomato and Olive Salad, p. 64

Senior Editors Joanne Smart

Food Editor Lisa Lahey

Senior Copy/ Chris Hoelck Production Editor

Staff Photographer Scott Phillips

Senior Food Ronne Day Editor/Stylist Food Editor/ Diana Andrews Test Kitchen Manager

Summer’s Gifts

Art/Production Tinsley Morrison Coordinator

welcome summer! We’re ready for all that the season has to offer: juicy peaches;

Test Kitchen Assistant Joan Velush

ripe, flavorful tomatoes; bright berries; and more. Whether you’re happily hauling home bags full of goodies from the farmers’ market or you’re knee-deep in zucchini from the garden, you’ve got the right magazine in hand. This special issue of Fine Cooking was developed to turn all of that lovely produce into fantastic dishes. Here, you’ll find it all: easy dinners (Moroccan Chicken Burgers with Feta and Carrot Slaw, p. 39); grilled favorites (Herb-Marinated Skirt Steaks, p. 62); backyard barbecue knockouts (Grilled Pork with Mojo, p. 44); standout desserts (Strawberry and Kiwi Tart with Honey Cream, p. 80); and everything in between. To make healthier eating even easier, we’ve provided icons to help you identify which recipes fit your eating and cooking style, from quick to vegetarian to make-ahead (see below). Now you have all the tools you’ll need to turn that warmweather produce into delicious dishes all season long.

—The Fine Cooking Editors

A guide to making healthy choices These icons are located throughout this issue of CookFresh to help you choose recipes that match your needs. Quick: Under 30 minutes.

Healthy: Calories are 550 or fewer; saturated fat is 5 grams or fewer; cholesterol is 300 mg or fewer. Vegetarian: May contain eggs and dairy ingredients.

8

c o o k f r e s h s umm e r 2 0 1 7

wheat-free: Contains no wheat or wheat products. Please note, icon does not indicate gluten-free. Make ahead: Can be completely prepared ahead (may need reheating and a garnish to serve).

Test Kitchen Intern William Stewart

Editors at Large Jennifer Armentrout Susie Middleton Contributing Editors Abigail Johnson Dodge Rebecca Freedman Tony Rosenfeld Molly Stevens Jill Silverman Hough (drinks) Joanne Weir

Senior Managing Editor, Carolyn Mandarano Books FineCooking.com

Senior Web Producer Sarah Breckenridge

Video Director Colin Russell

The Best of Fine Cooking: (ISSN: 1931-8227) is published by The Taunton Press, Inc., Newtown, CT 06470-5506. Telephone 203-426-8171. Canadian GST paid registration #123210981. Printed in the USA


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F I N E C O O K I N G D I G I TA L

On the Web

Make FineCooking.com your destination for seasonal summer recipes, how-tos, videos, and more.

Summer GAZPACHO Recipes The soups on pp. 40–43 are bursting with summer’s best produce, but don’t forget about the original summer soup: gazpacho. Our collection includes the ultimate classic recipe, along with regional variations (white cucumber-and-almond gazpacho) and creative riffs, like a spicy-sweet watermelon gazpacho and hors d’oeuvre-size shooters. Find the recipes at FineCooking.com/ gazpacho.

8 Summer Sauces for Quick, Easy Meals The best summer cooking is really about NOT cooking. Days are long and spent outdoors, so when dinnertime rolls around, these simple sauces and dressings are your secret weapons. Cook big batches of grains and veggies ahead of time, grill some meat, and mix and match them with this arsenal of homemade condiments. Get the recipe collection at FineCooking .com/summer-sauces.

Digital Editions Fine Cooking’s tablet editions— available for iPad, Windows, and Android devices—are the same gorgeous issues you love but full of interactive extras like videos and search. Download the app at FineCooking.comapp. Access is free with your print subscription. Connect with Fine Cooking! Follow us on: Facebook “f ” Logo

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COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017

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To contact us: Fine Cooking The Taunton Press 63 South Main Street PO Box 5506 Newtown, CT 06470-5506 Send an email to: fc@taunton.com Visit: finecooking.com To submit an article proposal: Write to Fine Cooking at the address above or Call: 800-309-0744 Fax: 203-426-3434 Email: fc@taunton.com To subscribe or place an order: Visit finecooking.com/fcorder or call: 866-288-4208 9am-9pm et Mon-Fri 9am-7pm et Sat

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To advertise in Fine Cooking: Call 800-309-8940, or email us at fcads@taunton.com Mailing list: We make a portion of our mailing list available to reputable firms. If you would prefer that we not include your name, please visit: finecooking.com/privacy or call: 866-288-4208 9am-5pm et Mon-Fri For employment information: Visit careers.taunton.com The Taunton guarantee: If at any time you’re not completely satisfied with Fine Cooking, you can cancel your subscription and receive a full and immediate refund of the entire subscription price. No questions asked. Copyright 2017 by The Taunton Press, Inc. No reproduction without permission of The Taunton Press, Inc.

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A DV E R T I S E M E N T

EASY ENTERTAINING WITH Summer’s no-fuss vibe is ideal for hosting casual get-togethers with friends and family— even if your schedule is packed and time’s at a premium. The key is to keep it simple. Opt for easy, yet delicious food and some great wine, and you can sit back and relax knowing your party is destined for success. The fresh caprese salad featured here is quick to prepare and guaranteed to please. And it pairs beautifully with the balanced, crisp acidity of Edna Valley’s Sauvignon Blanc. Here’s to easy entertaining all season long!

FIG CAPRESE SALAD Naturally sweet and syrupy, figs find an excellent match in rich cheese. Serves 4 to 6 5 6 1 2 1

ripe heirloom tomatoes, variety of sizes, sliced medium fresh figs, halved or quartered lb. fresh mozzarella, sliced Tbs. fresh basil leaves to 2 Tbs. balsamic glaze

Overlap the tomatoes, figs, mozzarella, and basil leaves on a serving plate. Drizzle with the balsamic glaze, and serve.

12

SAUVIGNON BLANC Grown in the warm and sunny Californian Central Coast, Edna Valley Vineyard is renowned for coaxing layered and complex flavors from their fruit. Edna Valley Vineyard’s Sauvignon Blanc offers elegant aromas of honeydew melon and grapefruit. On the palate, these citrus notes are echoed and complemented by tropical fruit flavors of guava, passion fruit, and a hint of lime zest. Balanced, crisp acidity with flavors that linger on the finish, this Sauvignon Blanc is a true expression of the varietal and the vintage.

COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017

Gallo-Edna Valley_v9BC.indd 12

5/16/17 1:01 PM


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m a k e i t to n i g h t Fast and fresh meals, any night of the week.

Summer Salad with Peas, Parmesan, Fried Egg, and Bacon, p. 16

f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

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summer salad with peas, parmesan, fried egg, and bacon Bacon and eggs turn a green salad into a substantial, comforting, and tasty meal, while peas and tarragon contribute bright, fresh seasonal flavors. (See the photo on p. 15.) Serves 4

4 oz. thick-cut bacon (4 slices), cut crosswise 1/4 inch thick

3/4 oz. finely grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano-Reggiano (about 1/3 cup); more for shaving

2 Tbs. red-wine vinegar

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

6 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 Tbs. vegetable oil; more as needed

4 large eggs

8 oz. mixed baby greens or similar

2 Tbs. whole fresh tarragon leaves, plus 1 Tbs. finely chopped for garnish

2/3 cup frozen peas, thawed

2 medium radishes, thinly sliced

2 Tbs. thinly sliced fresh chives

Cook the bacon in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until crisp, 4 to 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the bacon to a paper towel–lined plate, leaving any fat behind in the skillet. Meanwhile, combine the grated cheese, vinegar, and 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Gradually whisk in the olive oil. Put the skillet over medium-low heat and add the vegetable oil. When the oil is hot, crack the eggs into the skillet and cook, basting the whites occasionally with the fat, until the whites are set but the yolks are still runny, 2 to 3 minutes. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, toss the greens, tarragon leaves, peas, and radishes. Lightly dress the salad with some of the vinaigrette, season with a generous pinch each salt and pepper, and toss. Divide the salad among 4 serving plates. Top each salad with an egg. Drizzle 1/2 Tbs. vinaigrette over each egg, and season with salt and pepper. Top with the bacon, shaved cheese, chives, and chopped tarragon. Serve the remaining vinaigrette on the side.

16

cookfresh Summer 2017

zucchini, pea, and pesto lasagne This free-form, no-bake lasagne features fresh flavors and is much quicker to make than traditional vegetable lasagne. Serves 4 Kosher salt

6 dried lasagne noodles

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

3 Tbs. pine nuts

1 large zucchini, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced crosswise

11/4 cups fresh or thawed frozen peas 1/3 cup thinly sliced shallot 1/3 oz. Grana Padano or ParmigianoReggiano, finely grated (1/3 cup); more coarsely grated for serving 9 oz. ricotta cheese (about 1 cup) Freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup store-bought or homemade basil pesto

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil. Boil the noodles according to package directions until al dente. Drain and rinse under cool water. Cut each noodle in half crosswise and set aside.

Meanwhile, melt the butter in a 10-inch skillet over low heat. Add the pine nuts and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 1 minute. With a slotted spoon, transfer the nuts to a small bowl. Increase the heat to medium, add the zucchini, peas, and shallot, and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender, about 3 minutes. Add the finely grated cheese and toss gently to coat. Season the ricotta with 1/4 tsp. each salt and pepper. Place one noodle half on each of 4 plates, and spread a dollop of ricotta over each one. Divide about half of the vegetable mixture among the noodles, spreading it evenly over the cheese. Top with another noodle and repeat. Top with a third noodle, the pesto, pine nuts, and the coarsely grated cheese, and serve.


COVER RECIPE

chicken horiataki salad with tzatziki Horiataki is essentially what we outside of Greece call Greek salad but without the lettuce. The addition of garlicky grilled chicken transforms the salad into a satisfying summer meal. Tzatziki, a cool yogurt and cucumber sauce often served with gyros, is a refreshing alternative to feta. Serves 4 4 boneless, skinless chicken breast halves

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 Tbs. finely grated lemon zest

Olive oil, for grilling

FOR THE CHICKEN

2 large cloves garlic, minced

1 lemon, cut into 6 wedges

1 Tbs. chopped fresh oregano or 2 tsp. dried oregano

2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

FOR THE SALAD 2 pints cherry tomatoes, halved 1 English cucumber, peeled, sliced in half lengthwise, seeded, and sliced crosswise ½ small red onion, very thinly sliced 13 cup pitted black olives, such as Kalamatas, halved 1½ Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil 1 tsp. chopped fresh oregano or ½ tsp. dried oregano Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 cup homemade or good-quality store-bought tzatziki sauce 4 pitas, toasted (optional) GRILL THE CHICKEN

Prepare a medium-high (400°F to 475°F) gas or charcoal grill fire. Meanwhile, remove the tenderloins from the chicken breasts, if necessary, and reserve for another use. Put a chicken breast half between two large pieces of plastic wrap, and pound it to an even ¼-inch thickness with a meat mallet. Repeat with the other 3 breast halves. In a mortar, combine the lemon zest, garlic, oregano, 1 tsp. salt, ½ tsp. pepper, and ¼ tsp. water. Grind with a pestle to crush and combine. Rub the mixture all over the chicken. Drizzle olive oil on both sides of the chicken, patting it into the meat with your fingertips. Grill the chicken without moving it until grill marks form, about 4 minutes. Flip and grill until just cooked through (160°F), another 1 minute. Transfer to a plate, and squirt 2 lemon wedges over the chicken. Top with the parsley, and let rest. MAKE THE SALAD

In a large bowl, combine the tomatoes, cucumber, onion, and olives. Toss with the olive oil and oregano, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Divide the salad among 4 plates. Slice the chicken and place on top of the salad. Dollop with some of the tzatziki sauce. Serve with the remaining lemon wedges and the pitas, if using.

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COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017


“ The Everyday Baker is part culinary school,

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Early praise for Abigail Johnson Dodge and The Everyday Baker: “Everyday? Hardly! How about every minute? That’s how often we want to make the recipes from this baking pro who still makes it all too fun.” –Bruce Weinstein and Mark Scarbrough, Authors of The Great Big Pressure Cooker Book

“Abby Dodge is the best baking teacher I know, bar none. To see her amazing techniques and genius flavor pairings come to life in this soon-to-be classic resource is pure joy. The Everyday Baker is a hugely generous cookbook, the kind that invites you to drop everything you are doing and start baking this very minute.”

“I love to cook but don’t know how to bake. With Abby’s recipes, problem solved!” –Victoria Hagan, interior designer

Available at www.TauntonStore.com or wherever books are sold.

–Susie Middleton, cookbook author, farmer, and editor at large for Fine Cooking


crab and corn cakes with lime sour cream Classic crab cakes get a subtle Tex-Mex treatment with the addition of corn and a refreshing lettuce and cilantro salad on the side. Serves 4

1 lb. lump crabmeat, picked over

1 1/3 cups panko 3/4 cup corn kernels, preferably fresh Kosher salt

3 large eggs, lightly beaten

4 cups shredded iceberg lettuce

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

1 lime

1 cup sour cream

1/4 cup vegetable oil

Combine the crab, panko, corn, and 11/2 tsp. salt in a large bowl. Gently stir in the eggs. With damp hands, tightly shape the mixture into eight 3/4-inch-thick cakes and place them on a small cutting board or flat plate. Refrigerate for 10 minutes.

20

c o o k fr e sh S u mm e r 2 0 1 7

Meanwhile, toss the lettuce and cilantro together and arrange on 4 plates. Finely grate the zest and squeeze the juice from the lime into a small bowl. Stir in the sour cream, and thin with a little water to make a pourable sauce. Season to taste with salt. Heat 2 Tbs. of the oil in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Add 4 crab cakes and cook, flipping once, until golden brown, about 8 minutes. Repeat with the remaining oil and crab cakes. Divide the crab cakes among the plates and serve with the sour cream.


NOW AVAILABLE

SOUTHERN HEAT LATIN STYLE New Southern Cooking

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“Southern Heat showcases the great potential for diversity in American cooking. Its recipes are resplendent with chiles but anchored in the history of the regional foods of Kentucky.”

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“Chef Anthony Lamas balances impeccable technique and his passion for the South with Latin energy and a level of creativity that makes his cooking a genuinely one-off proposition. Southern Heat is the perfect balance of culinary location and culinary heritage.”

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A bold, bright, and fresh style of Southern cooking, combining the best ingredients of the South with the flavors and textures of Latin cuisine

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What happens when a Latino chef from California marries a girl from Kentucky? He opens Seviche, A Latin Restaurant, in Louisville that features Latin-infused Southern food—and inspires a movement that combines the best ingredients of the South with the flavors and textures of Latin cuisine, creating a bold style of Southern cooking. Taking the culinary world by storm, Anthony Lamas is spicing up the South, expressing his personality and Latino heritage through his modern interpretation of Southern food, layering flavors to achieve the perfect balance between brightness, citrus, acidity, heat, and spice.

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Fine Cooking magazine features

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It's here: The debut cookbook from Anthony Lamas, Food Network Extreme Chef winner anthony Lamas is and multiple Spicing up the South! James Beard Best Chef nominee, and Gwen Pratesi. In Southern Heat, Anthony shares his style of Southern cooking, with recipes that blend the best ingredients of the South with the bold flavors and textures of Latin cuisine. See how Anthony is spicing up the South in 125 inspired recipes. u.S. $35.00

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Get to know the best of this new style of Southern cooking in Southern Heat, where Anthony shares some of the most-loved dishes at Seviche as well as the food he grew up on in southern California. His appreciation for his heritage, mentors, and local farmers, his dedication to using sustainable ingredients, and his passion for flavor is conveyed through stories and tips as well as through stunning photography that sets the foundation for the more than 125 inspired recipes.

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Available at www.TauntonStore.com or wherever books are sold. © 2015 The Taunton Press

f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

21


3 WAYS W I T H . . .

Scallions Versatile and affordable, these green onions add fresh flavor to recipes of all kinds. scallions, or green onions, are so versatile. You can use them as a color and flavor accent in pastas, salads, and stir-fries or as a garnish on a baked potato, but their fresh, oniony flavor makes them a wonderful feature ingredient, too, as the recipes here show. So grab a bag (or two), check out the tips below, and get cooking. WHAT TO LOOK FOR: Choose scallions with firm white bulbs and fresh-looking green tops. Avoid those with slimy, wilted, or browned green parts. HOW TO STORE: Wrap whole scallions in damp paper towels and store in a zip-top bag in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator, where they should keep for about a week. HOW TO PREP: Always use a sharp knife when cutting scallions to avoid bruising them. Cut off any dried-out ends from the dark green tops (usually the top ¼ inch or so), trim the root ends, and rinse just before using.

scallion oil Don’t let its pale hue fool you—this infused oil is bursting with fresh scallion flavor. Yields 1½ cups 6 oz. scallions (10 to 12), green parts cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces, white parts chopped and lightly smashed 1½ cups grapeseed or other neutral oil

In a 2-quart saucepan, combine the scallions and oil. Slowly bring to a simmer over low heat, and then simmer for 10 minutes. Remove from the heat and let cool. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a small bowl, pushing down on the solids to extract as much oil as possible. Transfer to an airtight container and refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

12 ways to use scallion oil This versatile oil can be used as a condiment, for cooking, or even as a finishing oil. As a finishing As a dipping oil for: • french fries oil for: • bread • chicken or steak • crudités • vegetables • vinaigrettes As a cooking oil for: • soup • scrambled eggs • pasta • popcorn • fish or seafood • croutons

22

COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017


lemony scallion pilaf This simple side dish is perfect with grilled fish, chicken, or shrimp. Serves 4 1½ oz. (3 Tbs.) unsalted butter 12 oz. scallions (20 to 24), thinly sliced, whites kept separate from greens Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper ¼ cup dry white wine 1 cup basmati rice 1¾ cups lower-salt chicken broth 1 tsp. finely grated lemon zest 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice

korean-style scallion pancakes Known as pa jun in Korean (pa means scallion, and jun refers to battered, fried foods), these savory pancakes are more tender than their crispy Chinese counterparts. Paired with a spicy soy dipping sauce, they make a scrumptious snack, appetizer, or side dish. Serves 6 to 8 FOR THE DIPPING SAUCE 13 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce ¼ cup rice vinegar 1 Tbs. Asian sesame oil 1 Tbs. thinly sliced scallions 1 Tbs. packed dark brown sugar 1 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger ½ tsp. finely grated garlic ½ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes FOR THE PANCAKES 9 oz. (2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour 2 large eggs, beaten Kosher salt 6 oz. scallions (10 to 12), halved lengthwise and cut crosswise into 1-inch pieces 2 tsp. vegetable oil; more as needed MAKE THE DIPPING SAUCE

Mix all of the ingredients in a small bowl; set aside.

Melt the butter in a 3- to 4-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the scallion whites, ¼ tsp. salt, and a few grinds of pepper and cook, stirring often, until tender but not browned, about 5 minutes. Add the wine and simmer to reduce by half, about 2 minutes. Add the rice and cook, stirring often, until it begins to crackle, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the broth, lemon zest, and 1 tsp. salt; bring to a boil. Cover and turn the heat down to low. Cook until the rice is tender and the liquid is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Remove from the heat and let sit, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff the scallion greens and lemon juice into the rice with a fork and serve.

MAKE THE PANCAKES

Heat the oven to 200°F. Whisk the flour, eggs, 1 tsp. salt, and 1½ cups water in a large bowl. Using a silicone spatula, gently fold in the scallions. Let the batter sit at room temperature for 10 minutes so that the flour can fully hydrate; the batter should be thick but pourable. Heat the vegetable oil in a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour about ¾ cup of the batter into the skillet, swirling the skillet and pushing the batter to the edges with the spatula. Cook until golden brown on the bottom, 3 to 4 minutes. Flip and cook until the other side is golden brown, about 2 minutes more. Transfer to a baking sheet and keep warm in the oven. Repeat with the remaining batter, adding more oil to the skillet as needed. Cut each pancake into wedges and serve with the sauce.

F I N E C O O K I N G .C O M

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Peaches, Savory & Sweet

Two marinades take this summer favorite fruit to new places.

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COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017


peaches at the peak of the season are something to get excited about. Since they have such a short season, you may want to stock up when they are at their best. Likely that would mean more peaches than you can eat for snacks, but we have the perfect solution for how to use them: Cut them up and marinate them. Marinating peaches draws out their luscious juices and allows their peachy flavor to merge with other ingredients like fresh herbs and tangy vinegar. You can also steer the marinade down a sweet or savory road, which opens up lots of options for how to serve the peaches. Sweet mari­ nated peaches shine in breakfasts and quick desserts, while savory marinated peaches find their way into braises and salads, where the marinade pulls double duty as a vinaigrette. Another plus is that you can skip the tedious task of blanching and peeling the peaches because the marinade also softens the skins. So just make your peach marinades, kick back, and enjoy the taste of the season.

Pick your marinade Whether you go sweet or savory, cut the fruit however you like and then just stir all the ingredients together. The peaches take on great flavor in as little as 20 minutes, but they can stay in the marinade for up to 48 hours. Reserve the marinade to use in the recipes.

Savory, p. 26

Sweet, p. 30

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Savory Savory Marinated Peaches

+

pizza dough + grilled sweet onions + farmer cheese + bacon + fresh basil = a killer flatbread

shredded chicken + mayo + Dijon + shallot = a grownup chicken salad

cherry tomatoes + fresh lime juice + jalapeño = a zippy salsa

sherry vinegar and rosemary marinated peaches Vinegar and herbs tone down the peaches’ sweetness for savory dishes. Sherry vinegar brings complex tartness, fresh rosemary adds earthy pine notes, olive oil lends richness, and rum contributes a bit of spice. Yields 3 cups 3 medium ripe peaches, pitted and sliced, diced, or cut into wedges

11/2 tsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary

1/₃ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Pinch of granulated sugar

21/2 Tbs. spiced dark rum (optional) 2 Tbs. sherry vinegar

Pinch of kosher salt

gently combine all of the ingredients in a medium bowl

and let marinate at room temperature for at least 20 minutes and up to 24 hours. After marinating, you can refrigerate the peaches for up to 1 day.

heirloom tomato and peach salad Start summer dinners on the patio with this simple salad. Or, pair it with creamy burrata and crusty bread and call it lunch. Serves 4 as a first course or side 3 cups Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches (recipe above), drained, marinade reserved 1 tsp. Dijon mustard 4 large heirloom tomatoes (about 2 lb.), cored and sliced into 1/2-inch-thick rounds

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Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon, and freshly ground black pepper 8 medium fresh mint leaves, torn

in a small bowl, whisk together the reserved marinade and the Dijon; it’s ok if it doesn’t emulsify. Arrange

the tomato slices on 4 plates or a platter, top with the peaches, and drizzle some of the vinaigrette over the top. season lightly with salt and pepper and garnish with the mint. Pass any remaining vinaigrette at the table.


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braised chicken thighs with savory marinated peaches These tender chicken thighs are dripping with savorysweet herbal flavors from the marinated peaches. Salty capers and crisp prosciutto seal the deal. Serves 4 to 6

1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed

1 oz. thinly sliced prosciutto, cut crosswise into thin strips

3 lb. bone-in, skin-on chicken thighs (about 8)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 medium leek, white and light green part only, thinly sliced (1 cup)

3 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced

2 Tbs. all-purpose flour

3 cups Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches (recipe, p. 26), drained, marinade reserved

3 cups lower-salt chicken broth

2 Tbs. drained capers

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

2 Tbs. fresh tarragon leaves, coarsely chopped

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Heat the oil in an 8-quart Dutch oven or other heavy-duty pot over medium heat. Add the prosciutto and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp, about 5 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer to a bowl and set aside. If the pan is dry, add a little more oil. Season the chicken lightly on all sides with salt and pepper. Working in batches, brown the chicken on both sides, about 12 minutes total. Transfer to a plate.

Turn the heat down to medium low. Pour off all but 1 Tbs. fat from the pot and then add the leek and garlic. Cook, stirring often, until beginning to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add the reserved marinade and cook, scraping up any browned bits from the bottom of the pan, until the liquid thickens, about 2 minutes. Add the broth, season lightly with salt and pepper, and bring to a boil. Arrange the chicken in the pot skin side up, return to a boil, and transfer the pot to the oven to braise, uncovered, until the chicken cooks through, about 25 minutes. Take the pot out of the oven. Turn the broiler on high. Transfer the chicken, skin side up, to a foillined rimmed baking sheet. Simmer the sauce in the pot over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until thickened and reduced by about half, about 10 minutes. Lower the heat to medium and stir in the capers and peaches; cook until heated through. Stir in the butter until it melts, then stir in 1 Tbs. of the tarragon and season to taste with salt and pepper. Meanwhile, broil the chicken until the skin is crisp, about 3 minutes. Return the chicken to the pot or transfer it to a large platter and spoon the sauce over it. Garnish with the prosciutto and the remaining tarragon leaves, and serve.

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brown sugar and thyme marinated peaches

Sweet

Brown sugar and white balsamic vinegar lend peaches a caramelly flavor, while a semidry wine enhances their sweet tartness. Fresh thyme adds an herbal note. Yields 3 cups 3 medium ripe peaches, pitted and sliced, diced, or cut into wedges 1/₃ cup packed light brown sugar 1/₃ cup off-dry (sweet) white wine, preferably Gewürztraminer Pinch of kosher salt 3 Tbs. white balsamic vinegar 11/2 tsp. fresh thyme leaves

gently combine all of the ingredients in a medium bowl and let marinate at room temperature for at least 20 minutes and up to 24 hours. After marinating, you can refrigerate the peaches for up to 1 day.

Sweet Marinated Peaches

+

buttermilk biscuits + whipped cream + mascarpone + lemon zest = deluxe shortcakes

vanilla ice cream + cream soda = a sophisticated float

bourbon + ginger beer + peach bitters = a spicysweet cocktail

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overnight oatmeal with sweet marinated peaches This overnight method is fabulous; the flavors have a chance to develop, and the oats get a softer, creamier texture. It’s the ideal backdrop for marinated peaches and crunchy toasted walnuts. Serves 4 2 Tbs. whole milk 2 Tbs. packed light brown sugar 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract 3/4 tsp. ground cinnamon ¼ tsp. kosher salt 1 cup steel-cut oats, preferably McCann’s 3 cups Brown Sugar and Thyme Marinated Peaches (recipe above left), drained, ¼ cup marinade reserved 2 oz. (1/2 cup) toasted walnuts, coarsely chopped 1/2 tsp. chia seeds (optional) Heavy cream (optional)

combine the milk, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, salt, and 4 cups water in a 4-quart saucepan

over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Bring to a boil. stir in the oats, simmer for 1 minute, then remove from the heat. Let cool at room temperature until tepid, then cover and refrigerate overnight. Bring the oatmeal to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until thick and the oats are tender and chewy, about 10 minutes. off the heat, stir in the reserved marinade. Divide among 4 bowls, and top with the peaches, walnuts, and chia seeds, if using. Drizzle with heavy cream, if using, and serve.


sweet marinated peach tart with honey-yogurt mousse Perfect for a dinner party and easier to make than a peach pie, this tart marries sweet peaches and a creamy yogurt mousse in a press-in shortbread crust. If you’re short on time, you can skip the crust and serve the mousse topped with the peaches in little bowls or wineglasses. Serves 8 to 10 FOR THE CRUST

9 oz. (2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour

7 oz. (14 Tbs.) chilled unsalted butter, cut into 1-inch pieces

3 oz. (3/4 cup) confectioners’ sugar

1 large egg, beaten

1 Tbs. cornstarch

1 Tbs. finely grated lemon zest (from 1 large lemon)

1 tsp. kosher salt

FOR THE MOUSSE 1/8 oz. (1 tsp.) unflavored powdered gelatin 3/4 cup plus 1 Tbs. heavy cream

3 Tbs. honey

11/2 cups plain Greek yogurt Pinch of kosher salt FOR THE TOPPING

3 cups Brown Sugar and Thyme Marinated Peaches (recipe, facing page), drained, marinade reserved

MAKE THE CRUST

In a food processor, pulse the flour, butter, confectioners’ sugar, egg, cornstarch, lemon zest, and salt until the dough comes together in big clumps, about twenty 1-second pulses. The dough will be very soft and pliable. Transfer the dough to a 9-inch springform pan. Flour your fingertips and press the dough onto the bottom and sides of the pan in an even layer. Start by pressing the dough up the sides, which should be just under 1/4 inch thick, and reflour your fingers as necessary. Wrap the pan in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 1 day. Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Prick the bottom of the crust all over with a fork. Line the crust with aluminum foil and fill with pie weights or dried beans, gently pressing them against the sides. Bake until the edges begin to turn golden, about 20 minutes. Carefully remove the weights and foil.

Continue to bake the crust until golden brown and the bottom is firm and dry, 15 to 20 minutes. If the crust puffs up during baking, use the back of a spoon to gently press it down. Cool completely on a wire rack. MAKE THE MOUSSE

In a small bowl, sprinkle the gelatin over 1 Tbs. cold water; let stand until the gelatin softens, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile, stir 1 Tbs. of the cream with the honey in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat until the honey melts, about 2 minutes. Stir in the gelatin mixture and remove from the heat. Add the yogurt and salt, and whisk until smooth. In a large bowl, whisk the remaining 3/4 cup cream until soft peaks form. Gently fold the yogurt mixture into the cream.

Pour the mousse into the cooled crust and smooth to the edges with a small offset spatula. Cover and refrigerate until firm, at least 4 hours and up to 2 days. TOP THE TART

Simmer the reserved marinade in a 1-quart pot over medium heat until syrupy, about 5 minutes; refrigerate until cold, 30 minutes and up to 1 day. When ready to serve, transfer the tart to a serving plate. Spoon the peaches and a little of the syrup over the mousse. Slice and serve drizzled with the remaining peach syrup.


Harissa

Hot sauce

Chipotles in adobo

Sambal oelek

Wasabi

Sriracha

Turn Up the heat Serve suppers with a kick when you cook with flavor-packed, spicy ingredients.

want to crank up the flavor in your weeknight meals? Reach for a bottle of Sriracha or a jar of sambal oelek the next time you’re at the store. Spicy sauces like these bring a lot to

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the table. The dishes here feature pepper- and mustard-based ingredients that, when used in the right amounts, will not overwhelm with fire but give meals a flavorful bump.


spicy chipotle shrimp, avocado, and corn fajitas Arrange the fajitas and fixings on a buffet table, bar style, for casual entertaining, or serve the components on various platters at the table. Serves 4 1 lb. shrimp (26 to 30 per lb.), peeled and deveined 4 Tbs. olive oil 1 tsp. chili powder Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 large Haas avocado (about 1/2 lb.), cut into 1/2-inch dice 1 chipotle, minced, plus 1 Tbs. adobo sauce (from a can of chipotles in adobo) 1 lime, half juiced (about 1 Tbs.) and half cut into wedges 1 large yellow onion, thinly sliced (about 3 cups) 1 large clove garlic, minced 1 cup frozen corn, thawed, or the kernels from 2 ears corn 8 corn tortillas, warmed 1/4 cup coarsely chopped fresh cilantro

Toss the shrimp with 1 Tbs. of the oil, the chili powder, 1/4 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper. In a medium bowl, mash the avocado with the chipotle and adobo sauce, lime juice, and 1/4 tsp. salt. heat 11/2 Tbs. oil in a large (12-inch) skillet over mediumhigh heat until shimmering. Add the shrimp and cook, stirring, until

they turn pink and become just firm to the touch, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a large plate. reduce the heat to medium, and add the remaining 11/2 Tbs. oil to the pan. Add the onion, sprinkle with 1/2 tsp. salt, and cook,

stirring, until the onion softens and starts to brown, about 6 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the corn and shrimp, and cook, stirring, until they heat through, about 2 minutes.

Let your guests help themselves by spreading the avocado on a warm tortilla and topping the spread with some of the shrimp mixture, a squeeze of lime juice, and a sprinkling of the cilantro.

chipoTLeS in aDobo When you want to add a hit of hot, smoky flavor to your cooking, reach for a can of chipotle chiles in adobo. Chipotles are dried, smoked jalapeños. Adobo is a tangy, slightly sweet red sauce. Put them together in a can and they become a versatile pantry staple. You can use just the chipotles for intense smoky chile heat or just the sauce if you want a sour-sweet flavor and a slightly less fiery smoky heat. Or you can use them together, as in the recipe above. The chipotles are soft and ready to go straight from the can. They can be quite spicy, but you can temper the heat a bit by scraping out the seeds. The size of chipotles often varies, so if a recipe calls for two chipotles and you choose the biggest one, you might want to use just one. To store, transfer unused chiles and sauce to an airtight container— preferably glass, as the sauce tends to stain plastic—and refrigerate for about a month.

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bourbon-marinated buffalo chicken strips with maytag blue dip Instead of the traditional chicken wings, this recipe calls for juicy boneless, skinless chicken thighs. The Maytag dip can be made up to 4 days ahead, but definitely start this dish at least a day ahead of time to let the chicken marinate. Yields 2 lb.; serves 4 as a main dish or 8 to 12 as an appetizer FOR THE CHICKEN

3 cups unbleached all-purpose flour

1/4 cup bourbon

1 seedless cucumber, unpeeled, cut into spears

1 celery heart, washed and drained, cut into sticks

1/4 cup soy sauce 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice

2 lb. boneless, skinless chicken thighs

FOR THE DIP 1/4 lb. Maytag Blue, crumbled 1/2 cup mayonnaise (homemade or prepared) 1/4 cup sour cream

2 Tbs. cider vinegar

1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions

1 Tbs. finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 Tbs. finely chopped fresh dill

1/2 tsp. coarse salt 1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper Pinch of cayenne FOR THE SAUCE 1/4 cup Crystal Hot Sauce (or another brand of cayenne hot sauce such as Frank’s or Durkee but not a fiery sauce like Tabasco)

4 Tbs. melted unsalted butter

3/4 tsp. coarse salt

1 Tbs. cornstarch mixed with 1/4 cup water

FOR FINISHING THE DISH About 1 quart vegetable oil for frying 1/2 tsp. freshly ground black pepper

Marinate the chicken

In a large bowl, combine the bourbon, soy sauce, and lemon juice. Trim and discard any visible fat on the chicken thighs. Cut each thigh lengthwise into 5 to 6 strips. Toss the strips in the bourbon mixture. Cover and refrigerate for 24 hours. Make the dip

Blend half the cheese with the mayonnaise in a food processor until smooth. Add the sour cream and cider vinegar and process until the mixture has the consistency of creamy mayonnaise. Add the scallions, parsley, and dill and process again briefly. Add the remaining cheese, process very briefly (the dip should be slightly chunky), and remove from the food processor. Add the salt, p ­ epper, and cayenne. Wrap well and re­frigerate for up to 4 days.

be smooth and slightly thickened. Remove from the heat and keep warm. Finish the dish

Heat the oven to 250°F. Pour enough oil into a wok or deep, heavy pot to reach about 2 inches. Heat the oil to 365°F or until the oil shimmers and the air 2 inches above the oil feels hot. Drain the chicken well and pat dry with paper towels. Season the chicken with the 1/2 tsp. pepper. Spread the flour in a wide, shallow container and dredge one-third of the thigh strips, shaking off any excess flour. Carefully put the strips one at a time in the hot oil. Fry until the strips are golden brown, about 7 minutes. Remove from the oil and drain on paper towels. Repeat this process until all the chicken has been fried. Put the fried chicken in a large bowl. Toss with the warm sauce and spread in a ­single layer on a baking sheet. Heat in the oven for about 5 minutes so the sauce is absorbed. Serve immediately with the dip, cucumber, and celery.

Make the sauce

In a small saucepan, whisk together the hot sauce, melted b ­ utter, salt, and cornstarch mixture. Heat while whisking constantly until the mixture comes to a boil. The sauce should

Hot Sauce There’s a world of hot sauce out there, but there’s nothing quite like the piquant zing of Louisiana-style sauces. Why? Louisiana hot sauces are vinegar-based, so along with a spicy kick, their acidity lends a certain brightness to rich, earthy dishes. The vinegar in the sauce is an important finishing touch. Louisiana-style hot sauces get their heat from tabasco or cayenne chiles or both, which are mashed and aged to develop the flavors. Aside from the chiles and vinegar, salt and water are often the only other ingredients. Tabasco brand is probably the most famous (and one of the hottest) of the genre, but there are many others: Frank’s RedHot, Crystal, Texas Pete, and Louisiana Hot Sauce are just a few.

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spicy pan-fried noodles with tofu Seared tofu is the perfect vehicle to carry the sweet, sour, and savory flavors of this dish. Buying cooked noodles (look for them next to the tofu) saves a step; if you can’t find them, use 8 oz. uncooked and cook them according to package directions. Serves 4 1/4 cup soy sauce

3 Tbs. packed dark brown sugar

2 Tbs. fresh lime juice, plus lime wedges for serving

11/2 Tbs. Sriracha; more for serving

2 large cloves garlic, minced

3 Tbs. vegetable or peanut oil

12 to 14 oz. extra-firm or pressed tofu, patted dry and cut into 3/4-inch cubes Kosher salt and freshly ground white pepper

2 medium carrots, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced on the diagonal

1 lb. cooked Asian-style noodles, such as udon or yakisoba

6 medium scallions, cut into 1-inch lengths, white and dark green parts separated

2 cups thinly sliced green cabbage

Whisk the soy sauce, sugar, lime juice, Sriracha, garlic, and 2 Tbs. water in a small bowl; set aside. Heat 1 Tbs. of the oil in a 14-inch wok or 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high

heat until shimmering hot. Add the tofu, season generously with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until browned on all sides, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl. Add another 1 Tbs. oil to the pan, and then add the carrots. Season with salt and pepper and cook, stirring occasionally, until crisp-tender and well browned in spots, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to the bowl with the tofu. Add the remaining 1 Tbs. oil, the cooked noodles, and the scallion whites to the skillet. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the noodles are browned in spots and the scallions are tender, 2 to 3 minutes. Stir the sauce and then carefully pour it over the noodles; the mixture will steam. Toss well to coat and cook, stirring, until the sauce is reduced to a sticky glaze, about 2 minutes. Return the tofu and carrots to the wok. Add the cabbage and the scallion greens and toss well. Serve with lime wedges and additional Sriracha if desired.

Sriracha A Thai-style chile sauce, Sriracha is made from sun-ripened chiles, garlic, sugar, salt, and vinegar, giving it a hot-sweet-sour-salty flavor profile. Its ketchup-like, smooth, seedless consistency makes Sriracha an ideal condiment to add a jolt of heat to sandwiches, soups, and other dishes. Sriracha‘s tangy bite, though best suited to Asian foods, matches most all cuisines. The heat from Sriracha is sweeter than the vinegary tang that marks most hot sauces. Huy Fong Foods, the folks who make Sriracha, explain that this sweetness comes from sun-ripened chiles and garlic. The smooth red paste has a slightly drier consistency than ketchup. It can be squeezed out of the bottle with ease and to artful results— when you’re in a playful mood, you can decorate a dish with the sauce the way a restaurant cook might use a squeeze bottle.


crispy fish sandwiches with wasabi and ginger Wasabi, ginger, and soy sauce give this otherwise typical fried fish sandwich a bright and spicy flavor. Look for tubes of wasabi paste near other Asian ingredients in the supermarket. Serves 4 1/2 cup mayonnaise

3 cups thinly sliced iceberg lettuce (1/4 head)

4 hamburger buns, lightly toasted

1 medium lime, finely grated to yield 1/2 tsp. zest and squeezed to yield 4 tsp. juice

11/2 tsp. wasabi paste; more to taste Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 large eggs

2 Tbs. soy sauce

1 cup panko

4 4- to 5-oz. boneless, skinless hake, haddock, or cod fillets (preferably 1 to 11/2 inches thick)

1/2 cup plus 1 Tbs. vegetable oil

1 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger

In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, lime zest, 1 tsp. of the lime juice, and the wasabi paste. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and more wasabi, if you like. In a wide, shallow bowl, lightly beat the eggs and 1 Tbs. of the soy sauce until combined. Put the panko in another wide shallow bowl. Pat the fish fillets dry and lightly season with salt. Working with one fillet at a time, dip it in the egg mixture, letting any excess drip off, then coat with the panko, pressing the breadcrumbs onto the fish. Set each breaded fillet on a plate or tray as you finish it.

In a 10-inch nonstick skillet, heat 1/2 cup of the oil over medium heat until shimmering hot. Fry the fish, flipping once, until well browned and just cooked through, 5 to 8 minutes total. Transfer to paper towels to drain, and sprinkle each fillet with a pinch of salt. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, stir together the remaining 1 Tbs. lime juice, 1 Tbs. soy sauce, 1 Tbs. oil, the ginger, 1/4 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper. Add the lettuce and toss to coat. Spread the wasabi mayonnaise on both cut sides of the buns. Put one fish fillet on the bottom of each bun, then top with the lettuce and the bun top.

Wasabi If you’re a fan of sushi and sashimi, then you’re already familiar with wasabi. For the uninitiated, wasabi is the tingling-hot, sinus-clearing pasty green condiment that accompanies those popular Japanese seafood dishes. In addition to serving it with sushi, we also like to add it to mashed potatoes and to mayonnaise, as it is here. Also known as Japanese horse­radish, wasabi is a member of the mustard family. Fresh wasabi is expensive and hard to find, but you can get it in powdered or paste form at Asian markets and in the Asian section of the supermarket (or see p. 93 for an online source). Powdered wasabi is the better option: It has more of a kick than the commercial paste. Buy wasabi in the smallest quantity available because, like dried spices, its potency dissipates over time.

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spicy asian roasted broccoli and snap peas If you have trouble finding fresh Thai chiles (also called bird chiles), try using the same amount of the dried version. For more on miso, see Test Kitchen, p. 85. Serves 4 5 cups broccoli florets (from about 2 broccoli crowns) 3 cups (about 12 oz.) fresh sugar snap peas, trimmed 6 to 8 red or orange fresh Thai chiles, stems trimmed 3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil 2 plus 1 tsp. toasted sesame oil 1 tsp. kosher salt 2 Tbs. fresh cilantro leaves, chopped

SaMbaL oeLeK Although chiles are native to the New World, once they crossed the Pacific, they became wildly popular in Eastern Asian cuisines. In addition to using fresh and dried chiles, East Asian cooks also rely on a variety of prepared chile pastes and sauces to add spicy heat to their dishes. Asian chile pastes and sauces (the distinction between the two having more to do with what their manufacturers choose to call them than with their consistency), like sambal oelek, are made primarily from ground chiles, oil or vinegar, and salt. They may also include other flavors, such as garlic, ginger, sugar, sesame, black beans, or soybeans. If garlic is added, the product is often identified as “chile paste with garlic” or “chile-garlic paste,” and if soybeans predominate, it’s called “hot bean paste.” Unlike most of the thin, smooth, chile-based hot sauces of the Americas, Asian chile pastes tend to be coarse and on the thick side, full of bits of ground chiles and sometimes whole seeds. Pastes from Southeast Asian countries like Indonesia and Vietnam are typically bottled fresh, while Chinese and Korean pastes are usually fermented first. You can spice up anything with chile paste. Add it at the beginning of cooking if you want it to really permeate the dish, or at the end if you want more of a surface heat. Until you’re familiar with the heat level or the brand you’re using, start with a very small amount; you can always add more. You’ll find the broadest variety of chile pastes at an Asian grocery store. Be sure the first ingredient listed is chiles. Chile pastes aren’t usually labeled as to their heat intensity, so experiment to find a brand you like. Some pastes separate during storage, so stir them before using. Once opened, chile pastes will last indefinitely if tightly covered and refrigerated. Transfer canned paste to a jar before storing.

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11/2 Tbs. light-colored (white or yellow) miso (see p. 85 for more information) 1 Tbs. honey 2 tsp. sambal oelek (Asian chile paste) 1 tsp. finely grated orange zest 1 tsp. grated fresh ginger 1 clove garlic, minced

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°f. Put the broccoli, peas, and chiles in a large bowl; toss with 2 Tbs. of the olive oil and 2 Tbs. of the sesame oil. sprinkle with salt and toss again. Transfer the vegetables to a 10x15-inch Pyrex dish and roast, stirring once, until the peas are lightly browned and the broccoli tops are quite dark in spots, about 22 minutes. meanwhile, in a small bowl, whisk the remaining 1 Tbs. olive oil, 1 tsp. sesame oil, cilantro, miso, honey, sambal oelek, orange zest, ginger, and garlic. Pour the mixture over the roasted vegetables and toss to coat. remove the chiles (or leave them in for color but warn diners not to eat them). serve immediately.


moroccan chicken burgers with feta and carrot slaw These burgers come packed with aromatic flavor thanks to cumin, fresh ginger, mint, and harissa, a spicy North African condiment. Serves 4 1 lb. ground chicken (preferably not 100% breast meat) 1/2 medium yellow onion, grated on the large holes of a box grater 3 Tbs. chopped fresh mint 2 Tbs. harissa 11/2 tsp. ground cumin 11/2 tsp. finely grated fresh ginger Kosher salt 3 medium carrots, grated on the large holes of a box grater or cut into thin strips with a julienne peeler 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice; more to taste 2 tsp. granulated sugar 1 tsp. cumin seed Vegetable oil for grilling

Prepare a medium (350°f to 375°f) gas or charcoal grill fire. With your hands, gently mix the chicken, onion, 1 Tbs. of the mint, the harissa, ground cumin, ginger, and ¾ tsp. salt in a large bowl. With wet hands, form into four 1/2-inch-thick patties. Toss the remaining 2 Tbs. mint with the carrots, lemon juice, sugar, cumin seed, and 1/4 tsp. salt. season to taste with more lemon juice and salt. oil the grill grate and grill the burgers, flipping once, until cooked through (165°f), 8 to 10 minutes total. serve the burgers in the pitas along with the feta and slaw.

hariSSa Just about every area of the world has a favorite type of chile sauce. In North Africa, it’s harissa, a chile paste scented with cumin, coriander, and garlic, which is used to flavor couscous and kebabs, as well as various salads. Primarily Tunisian, harissa is also used in Moroccan, Algerian, and Libyan cooking. Ranging in heat from mild to scorching hot, harissa is used as both a condiment and an ingredient that’s stirred into couscous, tagines (stews), soups, and pastas. Look for harissa in tubes, cans, or jars at wellstocked grocery stores and specialty markets.

4 mini whole-wheat pitas, slit open 11/2 oz. crumbled feta (��₃ cup)

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FARM TO SPOON In Italy, they eat soup in summer (and so should you). Should grilling season signal the end of soup season? Nope. Think about it: Now is when nature’s most glorious parade of vegetables is at farmers’ markets—juicy tomatoes, sweet bell peppers, green and golden squash, purple eggplant, and crisp, fresh corn among them. These beauties are good for more than just a quick turn on the grill or a spot in your salad bowl; they are prime soup vegetables, and

as cooks across Italy know well, they make incredibly flavorful, fragrant summer soups. Some may question whether it’s too hot in the summer to eat soup. But that’s the key to a summer soup—serving temperature. Don’t serve them piping hot, but rather just warm or at room temperature, as the Italians do. That way, they fit perfectly with the weather, and soup season never has to end.

Soup Secrets Italian cooks build flavor into their soups at every step of the cooking process. Here are a few ways you can do this, too.

• Use homemade broth when­

ever possible for the most natural flavor. • For a meaty flavor boost, cook some diced pancetta along with the aromatics (carrot, onion, celery).

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• Add minced fresh, hardy herbs, like rosemary or thyme, to the aromatics for deeper herbal notes. • Freeze leftover Grana Padano or Parmi­giano-Reggiano rinds and then toss one into the

soup pot to infuse the broth. Bonus: Scraping the softened cheese from the rind before serving the soup is the ultimate cook’s treat. • Garnish your soup to add contrasting or complementary

textures and flavors. Freshly grated Grana Padano, Parmi­ giano, or pecorino, toasted croutons, fried sage leaves, and/or a drizzle of really good extra-virgin olive oil are all deli­ cious options.


BASE RECIPE

roasted vegetable broth

This broth will boost the vegetable flavor in the soups on the following pages. It’s pretty hands off, so put a pot on whenever you know you’ll be home for a couple of hours. If time is short, you can use store-bought broth, too. Yields about 2 quarts 6 sprigs fresh flat­leaf parsley 6 sprigs fresh thyme 6 medium carrots, cut into 1­inch pieces 4 medium celery ribs, cut into 1­inch pieces 1 large yellow onion, peeled and cut into 8 wedges 1 medium red onion, peeled and cut into 8 wedges 2 Tbs. extra­virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1 cup dry white wine

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°f.

In a large roasting pan, toss the herb sprigs, carrots, celery, and onions with the oil, 2 tsp. salt, and a few grinds of black pepper. spread into a snug single layer. roast, stirring twice, until the vegetables are tender and browned in spots, about 40 minutes. Transfer everything to a 6-quart heavyduty pot, add 3 quarts cold water, and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer gently, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Add the wine and simmer until the broth is reduced by about one-third and has a full vegetable flavor, 20 to 30 minutes

more. season to taste with more salt, if necessary. strain the broth through a fine-mesh sieve lined with damp cheesecloth or a coffee filter into a clean container, pressing gently on the vegetables to extract as much liquid as possible. Discard the solids. If you are not using the broth immediately, let it cool, then cover and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 3 months.

creamy roasted pepper and tomato soup Bell peppers may be available in supermarkets all year long, but nothing beats the flavor of the sweet peppers that dominate farmers’ markets in August and September; that’s the ideal time to make this rich soup with its crispy-salty fried caper garnish. Straining the soup through a fine-mesh sieve before serving yields silky results; for a more rustic version, use a medium-mesh sieve. Serves 6 3 lb. red bell peppers, cut into 1­inch­wide strips 2 lb. ripe plum tomatoes, seeded and cut into 1­inch pieces 3 medium carrots, cut into 1­inch pieces 1 large yellow onion, cut into 8 wedges 1 large red onion, cut into 8 wedges 6 large fresh basil leaves, torn 4 sprigs fresh thyme 1 tsp. sweet Hungarian paprika ¼ tsp. cayenne; more to taste Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 9 Tbs. extra­virgin olive oil 3 cups Roasted Vegetable Broth (recipe above) or store­bought lower­salt vegetable or chicken broth ¼ cup heavy cream 1½ Tbs. red­wine vinegar 2 Tbs. small (nonpareil) capers, drained and patted dry

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°f.

In a large roasting pan, toss the peppers, tomatoes, carrots, onions, basil, and thyme with the paprika, cayenne, 1 tsp. salt, a few grinds of pepper, and 6 Tbs. of the oil. roast the vegetables, turning them every 15 minutes or so, until tender and browned in spots, about 45 minutes. Discard the thyme stems and let the vegetables cool for about 15 minutes. Put one-third of the vegetables in a blender with 1 cup of the broth. Purée until very smooth, about 2 minutes. strain through a fine- or medium-mesh sieve set over a 4-quart saucepan, using a silicone spatula to press all of the liquid through; discard any solids. repeat with the remaining vegetables (including any liquid from the pan) and broth in two more batches. stir in the cream and bring to a simmer over medium-low heat. stir in the vinegar and gently simmer for 5 minutes. season to taste with salt and cayenne. remove from the heat and let cool to warm or room temperature. When ready to serve, heat the remaining 3 Tbs. oil in an 8-inch skillet over medium-

high heat until shimmering hot. Add the capers and cook, stirring, until they begin to open like little flowers and become crispy and brown, about 30 seconds. Drain the capers in a small fine-mesh sieve set over a bowl. Transfer the capers to a paper towel–lined plate; reserve the oil. serve the soup drizzled with the reserved caper oil and garnished with the fried capers.

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summer greens and rice soup

Lettuce in soup may seem a bit odd, but this Italian classic is delicate and ever-so-slightly sweet. Look for lettuce with good flavor and a sturdy texture—red oak or red leaf, or a mix of both, works well; mesclun mix will not do because it becomes stringy when cooked. If the chard at the market calls your name, feel free to substitute it for the spinach. Serves 6 3 Tbs. extra­virgin olive oil; more for serving 2 medium carrots, finely chopped 1 large celery rib, finely chopped 1 small red onion, finely chopped 1 medium clove garlic, minced 1 Tbs. minced fresh flat­leaf parsley 1 medium Yukon Gold potato, peeled and cut into ½­inch pieces Kosher salt 8 oz. mature spinach, trimmed and cut into ½­inch­thick strips (5 cups) 5 oz. red oak or red leaf lettuce, cut into ½­inch­thick strips (5 cups) 5 oz. romaine lettuce, cut into ½­inch­thick strips (3 cups) 8 cups Roasted Vegetable Broth (recipe, p. 41) or store­bought lower­salt vegetable or chicken broth

¾ cup arborio rice 1 2­inch piece Grana Padano or Parmigiano­ Reggiano rind (optional) Freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbs. chopped fresh basil

Warm the oil in a 5-quart heavy-duty pot over medium-low heat. When it’s warm— not hot—add the carrots, celery, onion, garlic, and parsley. Cook, stirring often, until the onion is translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the potato and cook, stirring often, until it has begun to soften, about 5 minutes; turn the heat down if the vegetables begin to color. Season the vegetables with 1 tsp. salt, then stir in the greens by the handful—it will seem like a lot, but they will cook down. Cover the pot and cook over low heat until the greens have started to wilt, about

3 minutes. Uncover and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the greens are completely wilted, about 3 minutes more. Turn the heat up to medium high and add the broth, rice, and cheese rind, if using. Bring the soup to a boil. Turn the heat down to maintain a simmer and cook, uncovered, until the rice is very tender and has begun to split, 20 to 25 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and stir in the basil. Let cool to warm or room temperature. Serve the soup drizzled with extra-virgin olive oil.


farmers’ market minestrone The word minestrone means “big soup” in Italian, and that’s just what this is: a richly flavored, chunky vegetable-and-pasta soup. This version is in bianco, which is to say, white, or without tomato. Feel free to add a couple of diced peeled plum tomatoes, if you like. Serves 6 ¼ cup extra­virgin olive oil 3 medium celery ribs, cut into ¼­inch pieces 2 medium carrots, cut into ¼­inch pieces 2 medium cloves garlic, minced 1 medium red onion, cut into ¼­inch pieces 2 Tbs. minced fresh flat­leaf parsley 1 small eggplant, cut into ½­inch pieces 1 large red potato, cut into ½­inch pieces 1 medium yellow squash, cut into ½­inch pieces 1 medium zucchini, cut into ½­inch pieces Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper Kernels from 1 ear fresh corn

6 to 8 cups Roasted Vegetable Broth (recipe, p. 41) or store­ bought lower­salt vegetable or chicken broth 1 cup dried tubetti or small pasta shells ½ oz. (½ cup) finely grated Grana Padano or Parmigiano­Reggiano; more for serving ¼ cup thinly sliced fresh basil

Warm the oil in a 5-quart heavy-duty pot over medium-low heat. When it’s warm—not hot—add the celery, carrots, garlic, onion, and parsley. cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is translucent and the carrots have begun to soften, about 10 minutes. stir in the eggplant, potato, yellow squash, zucchini, ½ tsp. salt, and a few grinds of pepper. cook, stirring often (the potato tends to stick to

the bottom of the pot), until the vegetables are tender but still hold their shape, 15 to 20 minutes. Add the corn and 6 cups of the broth; bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to low, partially cover, and simmer gently for 10 minutes. return to a boil and stir in the pasta. simmer, stirring once or twice, until the pasta is al dente or even a little bit more tender; cooking time will depend on the shape and brand of pasta you use. Add more broth to thin the soup, if you like. season to taste with salt and pepper. remove from the heat and stir in the cheese and basil. Let cool to warm or room temperature before serving; the soup will thicken as it cools. serve with additional grated cheese at the table.

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Tropical Bites & Sips

Take backyard barbecue recipes to the bright and flavorful tropics.

when the weather’s warm, it’s time to take dinner outside. This summer, add flair to the picnic table with recipes that range from Jamaican rice and beans and Cuban slow-cooked pork to

Hawaiian shrimp and Mexican fried plantains. Top off the menu with a batch of tasty rum-based cocktails and a refreshing fruit-filled dessert.

grilled pork with mojo (lechon asado con mojo) This is the garlicky and grand centerpiece of Cuban celebrations. The pork needs at least 8 hours to marinate in the mojo and about that long to cook, but the results—unbelievably tender meat and crisp, crackly skin—are worth the wait. Serves 10 FOR THE MOJO

MAKE THE MOJO

50 peeled cloves garlic

Combine the garlic, salt, pepper, and oregano in a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Transfer to a medium bowl and whisk in the juices. Reserve 1/2 cup of the mojo and refrigerate until ready to serve.

5/8 oz. kosher salt (11/2 Tbs. Diamond Crystal or 1 Tbs. Morton)

1 Tbs. freshly cracked black pepper

1 Tbs. dried oregano

1/4 cup plus 2 Tbs. fresh orange juice (from 1 medium) 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (from 1 large)

2 Tbs. fresh lime juice (from 1 small)

FOR THE PORK

1 6- to 8-lb. bone-in, skin-on pork shoulder

1 medium red onion, thinly sliced

2/3 cup olive oil 1/3 cup fresh lemon juice (from 11/2 lemons)

3 large lemons, cut into wedges

Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon

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MARINATE AND GRILL THE PORK

Use a paring knife to make 20 deep slits all over the pork. Using your fingers, push the remaining mojo into the slits. Wrap the pork well in plastic wrap, place skin side up on a rimmed baking sheet or platter, and refrigerate for at least 8 and up to 24 hours. Let the pork sit at room temperature for 1 hour before cooking. Meanwhile, set up a charcoal or gas grill for indirect cooking between 325°F and 350°F; if

using a charcoal grill, bank the lit, ashed-over coals to one side of the grill. Cover the grill, and adjust the vents as needed to reach the temperature range. For a gas grill, cover the grill, turn off one or more of the burners, and adjust the active burner(s) to reach the temperature range. Pat the pork skin dry with paper towels. Put the pork, skin side up, on the cooler part of the grill and cook, rotating (but not flipping) every couple of hours, until the skin is crisp and an instant-read thermometer registers 190°F to 200°F in the center of the pork, 6 to 8 hours. Toward the end of the pork’s cooking, combine the reserved 1/2 cup mojo, the onion, olive oil, and lemon juice in a 2-quart saucepan. Cook, stirring often, over medium-low heat, until the onion softens and the flavors meld, about 8 minutes. (The mojo can sit at room temperature for a few hours.)

SERVE the pork

Transfer the pork to a cutting board. Remove the skin. Tent just the pork with foil and let sit for up to an hour before serving. Scrape off and discard the soft fat underneath the skin, then cut the crispy part (the crackling) into bite-size pieces. Transfer to a small platter, add a few lemon wedges, and serve the chicharrones (cracklings) as an appetizer. Meanwhile, use your hands to break the meat into chunks and transfer to a large bowl. Pour about 1/3 cup of the mojo over it and toss to coat. Transfer to a large platter along with the remaining lemon wedges. Sprinkle with the sea salt and serve, passing the remaining mojo around the table with it.


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grilled mojo-marinated flank steak Mojos are boldly seasoned Latin American vinaigrette-type sauces. This one is good on chicken as well as on flank steak. Thick slices of grilled Bermuda onion make a tasty accompaniment. Serves 4 to 6 For the mojo 12 cloves garlic (or 4 Tbs. minced garlic)

2 fresh habaneros or other spicy chiles, cored, seeded, and minced (wear gloves to prevent irritation)

4 tsp. whole cumin seeds, toasted

Kosher salt

1 cup olive oil

1/3 cup fresh lime juice 1/3 cup fresh orange juice 11/2 Tbs. sherry vinegar Freshly ground black pepper For the steak

1 11/2-lb. flank steak

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper Make the mojo

½ oz. (1 Tbs.) fresh grapefruit juice

Mash the raw garlic, chiles, cumin, and 1 tsp. salt in a mortar and pestle until fairly smooth. (Alternatively, use a food processor, pulsing until the ingredients are finely chopped but not p ­ uréed.) Scrape the mixture into a bowl and set aside. Heat the olive oil until fairly hot but not smoking, and pour it over the garlic-chile mixture (the oil should sizzle when it hits the cool ingredients), stir, and let stand for 10 minutes. This will cook the garlic slightly. Whisk in the lime juice, orange juice, and vinegar. Season with salt and black pepper and set aside to cool completely. Put the steak in a zip-top bag or a shallow bowl and pour in 1 cup of the cooled mojo. Seal and refrigerate for at least 2 hours or overnight, turning occasionally. Refrigerate the remaining 1 cup mojo.

½ oz. (1 Tbs.) maraschino liqueur

Grill and serve

1 maraschino cherry, for garnish

1 grapefruit zest curl, for garnish

Heat a gas grill to medium high or prepare a medium-hot charcoal fire. When the grill is ready, remove the steak from the marinade (discard the marinade), pat dry, and season with salt and black pepper; grill for 5 to 7 minutes on one side and 3 to 4 minutes on the other for medium rare. Remove from the grill and let rest for 5 minutes. Meanwhile, warm the reserved mojo over low heat. Slice the flank steak very thinly on the bias and serve with the reserved mojo.

hemingway special Created for the daiquiri-loving expat Ernest Hemingway at El Floridita in Havana, this cocktail (also called a Papa Doble) was originally made without any sugar and with twice the rum. This version offers a little sweetness, by rimming the glass with turbinado sugar. Serves 1

2 Tbs. turbinado (“raw”) sugar

2 oz. white rum, preferably Havana Club Añejo 3 años

¾ oz. (11/2 Tbs.) fresh lime juice

Wet the rim of a cocktail glass in a little water and then dip the rim into a small dish containing the sugar. Place the glass in the freezer until ready to use. Fill a cocktail shaker with ice and add the rum, lime and grapefruit juices, and maraschino liqueur. Put the lid on the shaker, making sure it has a good seal. Shake vigorously until frothy, at least 30 seconds. Strain into the prepared glass. Garnish with the cherry and zest.

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island-spiced chicken salad with mango and scallions Cinnamon and allspice give the chicken a little Jamaican jerk flavor, while diced mangos add to the Caribbean vibe. This recipe makes plenty; leftovers taste great in a tortilla for an easy lunch. Serves 6 1/2 tsp. ground allspice 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon Heaping 1/4 tsp. chipotle powder Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 lb. boneless, skinless chicken thighs (about 8), trimmed of fatty patches

2 Anaheim or poblano chiles, halved, cored, and seeded

6 scallions (both white and green parts), trimmed

3 Tbs. canola or peanut oil

2 ripe mangos (about 11/2 lb.), pitted and cut into 1/2-inch dice (about 2 cups)

1 Tbs. fresh lime juice; more to taste

1 head butter lettuce, for serving (optional)

For a gas grill, light the front burner to medium high and the back burner(s) to medium. For a charcoal grill, light a medium-high fire with two-thirds of the coals banked to one side. Clean and oil the grill grates. In a small bowl, mix the allspice, cinnamon, and chi­potle powder, 11/2 tsp. salt, and 1 tsp. pepper. Rub the mix all over the chicken. Sprinkle the chiles and scallions with 1 Tbs. oil and 1/2 tsp. each salt and pepper. Set the chicken over the hot zone of the fire and the chiles and scallions over the cooler zone. Grill until the chicken, peppers, and scallions have good grill marks, 3 to 4 minutes. Continue to grill the peppers and scallions until they brown and become just tender, about another 3 minutes. Grill the chicken, flipping as needed, until it is firm to the touch and cooked through (slice into a thicker piece of the chicken with a knife to check), another 6 to 8 minutes. Transfer the chicken and vegetables to a large cutting board to cool. Coarsely chop the chicken, peppers, and scallions. In a large serving bowl, toss the mango with the chicken, peppers, and scallions. Add the lime juice and the remaining 2 Tbs. oil and toss well. Season with more lime juice, salt, and pepper if needed. Serve immediately, in bowls lined with lettuce (if using).

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chi chi pache Created by Martin Cate of Smuggler’s Cove in San Francisco, this drink is reminiscent of a creamy piña colada with a hint of spice. Serves 1

2 fl. oz. (4 Tbs.) vodka

11/2 fl. oz. (3 Tbs.) 100% pineapple juice, not from concentrate

1 fl. oz. (2 Tbs.) coconut cream, preferably Coco Lopez

1 tsp. pimento dram, preferably St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram

1 dash Angostura bitters

1 cinnamon stick

Pour the vodka, pineapple juice, coconut cream, pimento dram, and bitters into an 18- to 20-oz. cocktail shaker filled with ice. Shake lightly and strain into an 8- to 11-oz. Collins glass filled with moreice. With a nutmeg grater, grate a little of the cinnamon stick over the drink. Garnish with the cinnamon stick.

rum-glazed pork skewers with coconut rice A Caribbean-accented spice rub and glaze boost the flavor of quick-cooking pork tenderloin. Rice cooked with coconut milk adds to the tropical feel of the dish. Serves 4

3 Tbs. unsalted butter

1 Tbs. minced fresh ginger

1 cup jasmine rice

¾ cup well-shaken unsweetened coconut milk Kosher salt 1/3 cup dark rum

3 Tbs. packed dark brown sugar

2 medium limes, finely grated to yield 1 tsp. zest and squeezed to yield 1/4 cup juice

2 Tbs. vegetable oil; more as needed

1 tsp. ground allspice

1/8 tsp. ground cayenne Freshly ground black pepper

1 1- to 11/4-lb. pork tenderloin, cut into 1-inch cubes

1 medium red bell pepper, cut into 1-inch squares

1 red onion, cut into 1-inch pieces

Lime wedges for serving (optional)

Melt 1 Tbs. of the butter in a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the ginger and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the rice and stir until well coated. Add the coconut milk, 1½ cups water, and ¾ tsp. salt; bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and cook until the liquid is absorbed, about

15 minutes. Fluff with a fork, cover, and set aside. Meanwhile, combine the rum, brown sugar, 2 Tbs. of the lime juice, and the remaining 2 Tbs. butter in a 1-quart saucepan. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook until syrupy, about 5 minutes. Stir in 1/8 tsp. salt and remove from the heat. In a medium bowl, combine the remaining 2 Tbs. lime juice with the oil, allspice, cayenne, 1½ tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. black pepper. Add the pork and toss to coat. Thread the pork, bell pepper, and onions onto four 12-inch metal skewers, alternating the meat and vegetables. Prepare a medium-high (400°F) gas or charcoal grill fire or heat a large grill pan over medium-high heat. Oil the grate or pan. Grill the skewers until seared on all sides, about 4 minutes total. Brush the skewers with the glaze and grill, turning occasionally, until the pork is browned on the outside but still slightly pink in the center, 2 to 4 minutes more. Add the zest to the rice and fluff. Brush the skewers with any additional glaze and serve with the rice and lime wedges, if you like.

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jamaican rice and peas This is really a rice and beans dish, but in Jamaica, beans are called peas. Serves 8 to 10

2 cloves garlic, smashed

1 1/2-inch piece ginger, unpeeled, crushed with a mallet or the side of a knife

10 whole allspice berries

5 oz. (3/4 cup) dried red kidney beans, picked over and rinsed

1 can (about 14 oz.) coconut milk

11/2 tsp. kosher salt

1 tsp. cracked black peppercorns

2 sprigs fresh thyme

1 scallion, root trimmed

2 cups raw long-grain rice

1 fresh Scotch bonnet chile or habanero

Tie the garlic, ginger, and allspice berries in a small cheesecloth pouch. In a 3-quart oven-

proof pot, combine the pouch, beans, coconut milk, and 3 cups water. Bring to a boil, reduce to a simmer, and cook until the beans are soft, 11/4 to 2 hours. If necessary, add more water during cooking to keep the beans covered. Heat the oven to 350°F. Add the salt, pepper, thyme, and scallion to the beans. Add the rice and enough water to cover the rice by about 1 inch (about 2 cups). Bring to a boil and add the whole chile; don't break, crack, or cut the chile. Cover and bake until the liquid is absorbed and the rice is tender, about 25 minutes. Remove the chile, thyme sprigs, scallion, and ginger-garlic pouch before serving.

lift-off Made with falernum, a syrup spiced with ginger and clove, this drink has a remarkably flavorful boost. Serves 1 11/2 fl. oz. (3 Tbs.) dark Jamaican rum, preferably Appleton Estate Extra 3/4 fl oz. (11/2 Tbs.) 151-proof rum, preferably Lemon Hart Demerara 1/2 fl. oz. (1 Tbs.) fresh lime juice (save the juiced lime skin for garnish) 1/2 fl. oz. (1 Tbs.) fresh orange juice 1/2 fl. oz. (1 Tbs.) cinnamon syrup, preferably Trader Tiki’s 1/4 fl. oz. (1/2 Tbs.) falernum, preferably Fee Brothers

1 dash Angostura bitters

Combine the rums, lime and orange juices, cinnamon syrup, falernum, and bitters in a 12-oz. glass with 1 cup of crushed ice.

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spicy papaya salad This savory fruit salad is great with chicken, fish, or roast pork. The optional allspice is a nod to its Jamaican inspiration. Serves 6

1 m  edium (3- to 4-lb.) ripe papaya

½ s mall red onion, very thinly sliced (3/4 cup) ¼ c  up coarsely chopped fresh cilantro

2 Tbs. fresh lime juice

1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 tsp. freshly grated ginger

1/2 t o 1 tsp. minced fresh Thai bird or habanero chile 1/8 t sp. ground allspice (optional) 1/2 tsp. kosher salt

Cut the papaya in half lengthwise. Using a spoon, scoop out and

discard the seeds. Cut each half lengthwise into 3/4-inch strips. Using a sharp paring knife, peel the strips, removing the skin as well as all the firm, lighter-colored flesh next to it. Cut the fruit crosswise into 3/4-inch chunks and put in a large bowl. Add the remaining ingredients and toss to combine. Let sit for 10 minutes at room temperature to meld the flavors, and serve.

hawaiian garlic shrimp Inspired by the garlic shrimp served from food trucks along Oahu’s North Shore, this buttery shrimp is classically paired with “two scoops rice,” as they say there. Serves 4 3½ oz. (¾ cup) all-purpose flour 1½ tsp. sweet paprika Kosher salt

1 lb. extra-jumbo shrimp (16 to 20 per lb.), peeled, deveined, and patted dry

3 Tbs. grapeseed or canola oil

8 large cloves garlic, coarsely chopped (about 1/4 cup)

1/2 cup sake or dry white wine 11/2 oz. (3 Tbs.) cold unsalted butter, cut into 3 pieces 1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro

1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

In a shallow bowl, combine the flour, paprika, and 1½ tsp. salt. Lightly dredge the shrimp in the mixture, shaking off the excess; set aside. Heat a heavy-duty 12-inch skillet over mediumlow heat. Add the oil, garlic, and a pinch of salt. Cook, stirring, until the garlic is tender, about 2 minutes. Using a slotted spoon, remove and reserve the garlic, leaving the oil in the pan. Turn the heat up to medium high and add the shrimp in a single layer. Cook undisturbed for 2 minutes, then flip and cook until nearly opaque in the center, 1 to 2 minutes more. Add the sake and 1/2 tsp. salt and cook, flipping the shrimp once, until the liquid is reduced by half, about 3 minutes. Add the butter and the reserved garlic, and cook, swirling the pan, until the sauce is emulsified. Remove from the heat, add the cilantro and lemon juice, and toss to combine. Season to taste with salt and serve.

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cream cheese and guava swirl ice cream Guava and cream cheese is a classic Cuban combination. Guava’s pearstrawberry personality pairs so well with the tangy cheese that it’s easy to see why. Here, the cream cheese is used to make a rich ice cream that gets swirled with guava purée for a dessert few can resist. Serves 10

8 oz. cream cheese, softened

3/4 cup granulated sugar

1 cup cold sour cream

1 cup cold heavy cream

2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract Pinch of kosher salt

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6 oz. (about 1/2 cup) guava paste, cut into 1/2-inch slices, or guava jelly, preferably Goya brand (see p. 93)

Cones for serving, if you like

Beat the cream cheese with an electric mixer on medium speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. Add the sugar 1/4 cup at a time, beating well after each addition. Add the sour cream, heavy cream, lemon juice, vanilla, and salt and beat just until smooth. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until very cold, about 1 hour. Meanwhile, cook the guava paste or jelly and 1/2 cup water in an 8-inch skillet over medium-low heat, mashing with a fork or potato masher, until mostly melted with

some smaller chunks, about 6 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and chill in the refrigerator until cooled but still pourable, about 1 hour. (If it does solidify, reheat and rechill.) Whisk the cream cheese mixture to loosen it, then freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s directions until slightly thicker than soft-serve ice cream, about 15 minutes. Transfer to a freezer storage container. Using a wide spatula, gently fold in the guava to create ribbons throughout. Freeze until ready to serve.


strawberry mojito A mojito is traditionally made with white rum, muddled mint and lime juice, and seltzer. Strawberries make this cocktail both sweeter and more tart—a nice match for bold amber rum or more subtle white rum. Serves 4 11 oz. strawberries, hulled (23/4 cups) 1/3 cup fresh lime juice 1/4 cup granulated sugar 10 large fresh mint leaves

1 cup white or amber rum

1 cup seltzer

Mint sprigs, lime wedges, or fresh strawberries, to garnish

and crush with a muddler or wooden spoon until the sugar is dissolved, about 1 minute. Add the rum and stir gently. Fill 4 rocks glasses three-quarters full with ice, divide the mojito among them, and top each with about 1/4 cup seltzer. Garnish with mint sprigs, lime wedges, or strawberries.

In a medium pitcher, combine the strawberries, lime juice, sugar, and mint leaves

plátanos maduros fritos Sliced ripe plantains retain a sweet, creamy center and become caramelized around the edges when fried. This tasty side dish makes a good accompaniment to rice and beans, roasted pork, or both. Serves 6 to 8 Vegetable or canola oil 4 very ripe, dark brown plantains (2 lb.), ends removed, peeled, and sliced 1/2 inch thick on a sharp diagonal

Fill a 12-inch heavy-duty skillet with 1/4 inch of oil (about 11/2 cups) and heat over medium heat until the tip of a plantain slice dipped in the oil sizzles vigorously. Working in batches of about 12, slide the plantain slices in one at a time, making sure they’re not touching. Fry, flipping once with tongs or a fork, until golden brown on both sides, 4 to 6 minutes total. Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate. Repeat with the remaining plantains, reheating the oil as needed between batches. Serve hot.

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Spelt Salad with Cherry Tomatoes and Zucchini

Millet Salad with Avocado and Citrus

Dressing: red-wine vinegar Add-ins: cherry tomatoes, zucchini, scallions, basil, oregano

Dressing: grapefruit juice, white-wine vinegar, honey Add-ins: avocados, oranges, grapefruit, red onion, mint

The New Summer Side Make-ahead and endlessly versatile, grain salad just might be the perfect potluck dish. Basmati Rice Salad with Mango and Cucumber

Bulgur Salad with Carrots and Peppers

Dressing: rice vinegar, sesame oil, ginger Add-ins: mango, cucumbers, scallions, cilantro

Dressing: lemon juice, tahini Add-ins: carrots, red bell peppers, cucumbers, feta, parsley, dill

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Farro Salad with Artichokes and Fennel

Brown Rice Salad with Apples and Cheddar

Dressing: red-wine vinegar, lemon zest, black olives Add-ins: artichokes, fennel, radicchio, cannellini beans, pine nuts, basil

Dressing: cider vinegar Add-ins: apples, grapes, celery, lentils, Cheddar, almonds, parsley

say you’re going to a summer potluck, picnic, or barbecue. What do you bring? One sure-toplease answer is a grain salad. Not only can it be made completely ahead, but it also holds up beautifully and tastes even better the next day. Plus, it’s easy to customize because the flavor combinations are virtually endless; grains are like a blank canvas, so they go well with just about any ingredient. And best of all, the method couldn’t be simpler.

To start, cook your grain of choice (find out how on p. 56). You can choose a familiar one, like rice or barley, or try something more unusual, like farro or spelt. Next, whisk together a vinaigrette, which is easy to vary with your choice of vinegar, citrus juice, or aromatics. Finally, prep your favorite add-in ingredients. Fresh vegetables or fruits and herbs are essential, but you can also experiment with cheeses, dried fruits, beans, and nuts. Toss it all together, and you’ve got a salad that’s delicious and healthful—an ideal contribution to any summer meal.

Barley Salad with Peas and Asparagus

Quinoa Salad with Pears and Dried Cherries

Dressing: lemon juice, lemon zest Add-ins: English peas, sugar snap peas, asparagus, dill, mint

Dressing: Champagne vinegar, honey Add-ins: pears, dried cherries, goat cheese, walnuts, tarragon


cooking without recipes

summer grain salad If you can, make your salad in advance—even up to a day before serving—to give the flavors time to meld. Take the salad out of the refrigerator 30 to 45 minutes before serving so that it’s not ice cold. It’s best just slightly chilled or at room temperature. Taste and adjust the seasoning before serving to be sure the salad is flavorful and bright. Serves 8 to 10

step 1

cook the grains The cooking method will vary, depending on the grain you choose. For farro, rice, quinoa, barley, or millet, you boil the grain until tender, while wheat berries and spelt need soaking before cooking. For bulgur, just pour boiling water over the grain and let it sit until the water is absorbed. (See below for details.) Grain of choice Kosher salt

1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

If using wheat berries or spelt, soak them for 10 to 18 hours in a bowl of cold water and drain before cooking. If using bulgur, pour 31/2 cups boiling water over the bulgur in a medium bowl, stir, and let sit until the water is absorbed and the bulgur is tender, 20 to 25 minutes (do not cook further). For all other grains, rinse under cold water and drain before cooking. Bring 7 cups of water to a boil in a

4-quart pot over high heat. Add ¾ tsp. salt. Add the grain, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook uncovered, stirring occasionally and adding more boiling water as necessary to keep the grain covered, until tender (see below for cooking times). Drain and rinse the grain with cold water to stop the cooking. Transfer the grain to a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet, drizzle with the oil, and toss lightly to coat. Spread the grain on the baking sheet and cool completely at room temperature or in the refrigerator.

Grains Choose one (quantities yield 6 cups cooked)

After cooking the grains, spread them on a large baking sheet and toss them with oil to keep them from sticking together.

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Pearled barley 13/4 cups; cook 30 to 45 minutes

Wheat berries 21/4 cups; soak; cook 1 to 1½ hours

Basmati rice 21/2 cups; cook 10 to 15 minutes

Semi-pearled farro 3 cups; cook 30 to 35 minutes

Brown rice 21/2 cups; cook 20 to 25 minutes

Spelt 3 cups; soak; cook 45 to 60 minutes

Quinoa 2 cups; cook 15 to 20 minutes

Medium-grind bulgur 21/4 cups

Millet 13/4 cups; cook 15 to 20 minutes


step 2

make a vinaigrette The vinaigrette should have an assertive flavor that doesn’t get lost when mixed with the grains, so once you’ve made it, taste and adjust the seasoning with salt and more vinegar or citrus juice.

1/3 cup vinegar or citrus juice of choice 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil Aromatics and flavor boosters of choice Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Vinegars and Citrus Juice

Put the vinegar and/or citrus juice in a small bowl and gradually whisk in the oil. Whisk in the aromatics and/or flavor boosters (if using). Taste and season with salt, pepper, and additional vinegar, citrus juice, or oil as needed.

Aromatics and Flavor Boosters (optional) Choose one or two

Choose one or two (1/3 cup total)

Red-wine vinegar

Balsamic vinegar

Black or green olives, pitted and chopped, 1/2 cup

Honey 2 to 3 tsp.

Asian sesame oil 1 Tbs.

Champagne vinegar

White-wine vinegar

Roasted walnut or other roasted nut oil 1 to 2 Tbs.

Tahini 2 to 3 Tbs.

Soy sauce 1 to 2 Tbs.

Plain rice vinegar

Sherry vinegar

Capers or chopped caper berries up to 1/4 cup

Jalapeño, minced, up to 1 whole

Orange, lemon, lime, or grapefruit zest, finely grated, 1 to 2 tsp.

Cider vinegar

Lemon, lime, or grapefruit juice

Anchovies, minced, 2 to 3

Fresh ginger, finely grated, up to 2 Tbs.

Whisking in small amounts of boldly flavored add-ins, like roasted walnut oil, boosts the vinaigrette’s flavor.

Mustard up to 1 Tbs.


cooking without recipes

STEP 3

choose and prep your add-ins Vegetables or fruit (or both) and herbs are a must in these grain salads. Pair flavors that sound good to you, making sure to include a variety of textures and colors to give your salad interest. Then feel free to add optional dried fruit, cheese, nuts and seeds, or beans.

Fresh Vegetables and Fruit choose up to four (2 to 3 cups total)

Peaches, nectarines or mango, peeled, pitted, and cut into medium dice

Avocado, pitted, peeled, and cut into medium dice

Seedless grapes, halved

Oil-packed artichoke hearts, cut into 1/2-inch wedges

Apples or pears, cored and cut into medium dice or thin slices

Radicchio, shredded

Golden beets, roasted until tender, peeled, cut into medium dice or 1/4-inch-thick rounds if small

Asparagus, steamed or grilled until crisp-tender, cut into 1-inch pieces

Fennel, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch pieces

Broccoli or cauliflower, cut into 1-inch florets, steamed until crisp-tender

Carrots, cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch-thick slices, steamed until crisp-tender

Brussels sprouts, quartered, steamed until crisp-tender

Celery, cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch-thick slices

Corn kernels, blanched if fresh, thawed if frozen

Cucumbers, peeled, seeded, and cut into medium dice

Grapefruit or orange segments, cut into pieces if large

Green beans, cut into 1-inch pieces, steamed until crisp-tender

Red onion, cut into small dice

Scallions, thinly sliced diagonally

Cherry tomatoes, halved

English peas, blanched if fresh, thawed if frozen

Red, green, or yellow bell peppers, cut into medium dice

Sugar snap peas, halved on the diagonal, steamed until crisp-tender

Radishes, halved and thinly sliced

Summer squash or zucchini, cut into medium dice or 1/4-inch-thick half-rounds

Optional Add-Ins

choose one to three

Dried fruit (cranberries, raisins, chopped apricots or cherries, thinly sliced figs, etc.), up to 1/2 cup total

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Cheese (crumbled feta, blue, or goat cheese, grated Grana Padano, diced Cheddar, etc.), up to 1 cup total

Toasted nuts and seeds (pine nuts, pumpkin seeds, chopped walnuts or almonds, etc.), up to 3/4 cup total

Cooked beans (chickpeas, cannellini beans, lentils, kidney beans, black beans, etc.), up to 1 cup total


step 4

dress and season

Be sure to add enough vinaigrette when tossing your salad. An underdressed grain salad will be dry and short on flavor.

Fresh Herbs Choose one to three (up to 1/4 cup total)

Put the cooked and cooled grains in a large serving bowl and toss to break up any clumps. Add the add-ins and 1/2 cup vinaigrette and toss. Taste and season as needed with more vinaigrette, salt, and pepper. Serve or refrigerate for up to 1 day (let sit at room temperature so it’s not refrigeratorcold and season with more vinaigrette, salt, and pepper before serving).

Wheat Berry Salad with Green Beans and Corn Chives, thinly sliced

Dill, chopped

Flat-leaf parsley, chopped

Marjoram, chopped, up to 1 Tbs.

Basil, chopped

Savory, chopped

Oregano, chopped, up to 1 Tbs.

Mint, chopped

Cilantro, leaves and stems, chopped

Tarragon, chopped, up to 1 Tbs.

Dressing: sherry vinegar, roasted walnut oil Add-ins: green beans, corn, golden beets, chives, blue cheese

If you make your salad ahead, reserve some of the dressing so you can use it to fine-tune the salad’s flavor before serving.

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a simple summertime supper Juicy grilled steak, fresh summer salads, and a homey berry buttermilk cake star in this easy outdoor menu. this summer, entertaining will be a breeze when you can count on this graceful and tempting meal. The menu relies on quality and fresh ingredients and can largely be made ahead. The meal starts with a no-fuss hors d’oeuvre of richly flavored olive oil–fried almonds. They can be made days in advance and store extremely well. You’ll light the grill for the main course, a juicy, ­flavor-packed (and extremely quick-­ cooking) skirt steak. A simple marinade of fresh herbs and olive oil bring this rustic cut

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to life. Top the steaks with a zesty salsa verde. The steaks will be served alongside a fresh tomato and olive salad and a very simple green salad of romaine leaves with a bright lemon vinaigrette and cheese. The berry butter­milk cake for dessert is a dream and actually tastes best baked a day in advance. The vanilla-scented crème fraîche lends the perfect contrast to the moist, berry-sweetened cake—though the cake is great without the crème fraîche, too. It’s the perfect ending to a simply delicious summertime meal.


menu Serves 6

Olive Oil–Fried Almonds Herb-Marinated Skirt Steaks with PestoStyle Salsa Verde Sun-Ripened Tomato and Olive Salad Romaine Hearts with Lemon Vinaigrette Berry Buttermilk Cake with Vanilla-Scented Crème Fraîche

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olive oil–fried almonds The almonds and herbs are crisp, salty, and sure to whet your appetite. Canned cocktail nuts don’t hold a candle to these. Yields 2 cups

2 cups blanched almonds

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil

8 large fresh sage leaves

2 Tbs. fresh rosemary leaves

1 Tbs. fresh thyme leaves

1 tsp. sea salt

Set a metal strainer over a large heatproof bowl to quickly drain the almonds at the end of cooking. Put the almonds and olive oil in a 3- or 4-quart saucepan with a lid (the nuts and oil should fill no more than one-third of the pot). Set the pot over medium heat, stirring almost constantly until the almonds are lightly golden, 3 to 10 minutes, depending on your stove and pot. Toss in the sage, rosemary, and thyme simultaneously and cover the pot immediately with the lid to prevent the oil from spattering. Remove the pot from the heat. The herbs will make a popping sound as they cook. After the popping dies down, remove the lid and immediately pour the almonds into the strainer. Spread the drained almonds on a rimmed baking sheet and toss with the salt. When they’re thoroughly cooled, store them in an airtight plastic container at room temperature.

herb-marinated skirt steaks For the best flavor and tender­ness, cook these steaks to medium rare or just barely ­medium. Thinner skirt steaks will cook more quickly. If you can’t grill these steaks, sear-roast them; instructions are included for both methods. Serves 6 to 8

4 lb. skirt steaks (3 or 4 steaks)

12 cloves garlic

4 5-inch sprigs fresh rosemary

16 sprigs fresh thyme

1 Tbs. freshly cracked black pepper

Extra-virgin olive oil Sea salt Pesto-Style Salsa Verde (recipe, facing page)

Trim the steaks of excess fat and cut into pieces that are of relatively even thickness and of manageable size. Smash the garlic cloves with the flat part of a heavy knife and then peel the cloves. Crush and tear the rosemary sprigs with your

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hands to release their perfume. In a large bowl, combine the steaks with the herbs, garlic, pepper, and 6 Tbs. olive oil. Toss to coat well. Cover and refrigerate for 1 to 2 days. to grill the steaks

Take the steaks out of the refrigerator 30 minutes before grilling and brush off the herb sprigs and garlic. Prepare a medium-hot gas or charcoal grill fire. Season the steaks with salt. Oil the grill and then grill the steaks for 2 to 3 min­ utes on each side for medium rare (thicker steaks will be medium rare after 3 to 5 minutes per side). Let rest for 10 minutes on a clean


cutting board before slicing thinly across the grain. Serve with the salsa verde. to sear-roast the steaks

Heat the oven to 400°F. Put a rack in a rimmed baking sheet or roasting pan. Let the steaks sit at room temperature for 30 minutes. Brush off the herb sprigs and garlic and season the steaks with salt. Heat a 12-inch sauté pan over high heat until very hot. Add a small amount of olive oil and as many pieces of steak as will fit without crowding (and use a splatter screen if you have one). Sear until the first side is well browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and sear the other side until well browned, 2 to 3 minutes. (Reduce the heat to ­medium high if the pan is too hot and smoky.) Transfer the steaks to the rack on the baking sheet and continue

searing the r­ emaining steaks in batches. When all the steaks are seared, roast them in the oven until done to your liking, 5 to 10 minutes. Let the steaks rest for 10 minutes before slicing thinly across the grain. Serve with the salsa verde.

1/4 cup blanched almonds

Kosher salt

1 cup packed fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

1/2 cup packed fresh basil leaves 1/2 cup packed fresh cilantro leaves

2 medium cloves garlic, coarsely chopped

1/4 tsp. dried red chile flakes

pesto-style salsa verde This smooth herb sauce is more like a pesto than a traditional salsa verde. It’s delicious with anything grilled: fish, shellfish, chicken, pork, beef, and even vegetables. Red chile flakes are included for heat; it’s rounded out with freshly ground black pepper. Yields 1 cup

Freshly ground black pepper 3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 Tbs. white-wine vinegar

Heat the oven to 400°F. Spread the almonds in a pie pan and toast the almonds in the oven until lightly golden, about 8 min­ utes. Transfer to a plate and let cool. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and salt the water heavily (it should taste like sea water). Add the parsley and basil leaves to the pot and blanch for 1 minute.

Drain the leaves and immediately transfer them to a colander under cold running water or to an ice bath. When the leaves have cooled, squeeze them dry with your hands. Put the toasted almonds, the blanched parsley and ­basil, the cilantro, garlic, chile flakes, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a few grinds of ­pepper in a blender or food pro­cessor. With the machine on, gradually pour the olive oil into the feed tube and process until the mixture becomes a thick purée. The salsa verde may be made to this point a day ahead and refrigerated. Return the salsa verde to room temperature, if chilled, and stir in the vinegar just before serving to prevent discoloration.

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timeline

UP TO ONE WEEK AHEAD • Make the almonds. • Make the crumb topping for the cake.

UP TO TWO DAYS AHEAD • Marinate the skirt steaks. • Slice the olives for the tomato and olive salad. • Toast the nuts for the salsa verde.

ONE DAY AHEAD • Make the lemon vinaigrette. • Wash the romaine. • Bake the cake.

TWO HOURS BEFORE SERVING • Cut the tomatoes, assemble the tomato and olive salad, and keep at room temperature. • Make the salsa verde and keep at room temperature.

ONE HOUR BEFORE SERVING • Bring the lemon vinaigrette to room temperature. • Whip the crème fraîche.

25 TO 30 MINUTES BEFORE SERVING

sun-ripened tomato and olive salad Capture the flavor of ripe, just-picked tomatoes at their peak with this salad. If your tomatoes are very sweet and need more acid, adjust the flavor by adding another tablespoon of sherry vinegar. serves 6 1 cup pitted niçoise or kalamata olives 2 lb. heirloom tomatoes (about 6), assorted colors and sizes 1 medium shallot, minced sea salt and freshly ground black pepper

• Grill the steaks. • Open the wine.

1 tbs. sherry vinegar

A FEW MINUTES BEFORE SERVING

3 tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

• Toss the romaine with the vinaigrette.

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1 tbs. coarsely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

slice the olives into quarters. core the tomatoes and slice them into large bite-size wedges or large cubes. put the olives, toma-

toes, and shallot in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper to taste. add the sherry vinegar and parsley. season again with salt and pepper to taste, then add the olive oil and toss. (The salad may be prepared up to 2 hours ahead, covered, and left at room temperature. Toss again before serving.) Variation

substitute 2 Tbs. torn basil or a mix of chopped fresh herbs for the parsley.


romaine hearts with lemon vinaigrette

shopping list

The tangy lemon vinaigrette in this simple salad contrasts with the cool juiciness of the lettuce and the nutty saltiness of the shaved cheese. serves 6

MEAT, EGGS & POULTRY

1 medium shallot, minced 3 tbs. fresh lemon juice 1/4 tsp. granulated sugar sea salt 3 small hearts of romaine or 3 heads of baby romaine 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup shaved grana padano or parmigiano-reggiano

in a medium bowl, combine the shallot, lemon juice, sugar, and 1/2 tsp. salt. stir to dissolve

the sugar and salt, then let the mixture sit for 15 minutes. meanwhile, cut off the root end of the romaine so that the leaves fall loose. Wash the leaves, spin them dry, and put them in a large bowl. slowly whisk the olive oil into the lemon juice mixture (you should have about 1/2 cup vinaigrette). season with salt, if necessary, and a few grinds of pepper. (This vinaigrette can be made ahead; just whisk to

recombine it before using. if you make it more than 2 hours ahead, cover, refrigerate, and bring it to room temperature before using.) Toss the romaine with enough vinaigrette to lightly coat. season the salad with salt and pepper to taste. arrange the leaves on a large platter and sprinkle with the shaved cheese.

• 4 lb. skirt steaks • 3 large eggs

FRESH PRODUCE • 2 lb. heirloom tomatoes, assorted colors and sizes • 2 medium shallots • 1 to 2 lemons • 3 small hearts of romaine or 3 heads of baby romaine • 2 cups fresh blueberries, raspberries, or a mix • 1 large bunch fresh thyme • 2 large bunches fresh flat-leaf parsley (1 cup packed leaves and 1 Tbs. chopped) • 1 large bunch fresh basil • 1 large bunch fresh cilantro • 1 small bunch fresh rosemary • 1 small bunch fresh sage

OTHER GROCERIES • 1 package blanched almonds (enough for 2¼ cups) • 1 container sea salt • 1 bottle sherry vinegar (1 Tbs.) • 1 cup pitted Nicoise or Kalamata olives • 1 block Grana Padano or ParmigianoReggiano (need ½ cup shaved) • 1 carton buttermilk • 1 lb. (2 cups) crème fraîche

PANTRY STAPLES • • • • • • • • • • • •

Kosher salt and black pepper 2��₃ cups extra-virgin olive oil 1 Tbs. white-wine vinegar 2 heads garlic ¼ tsp. dried red chile flakes About 4 cups unbleached all-purpose flour About 1½ cups granulated sugar ��₃ cup light brown sugar 1 cup (about 16 Tbs.) unsalted butter 4 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. vanilla extract

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berry buttermilk cake with vanilla-scented crème fraîche Any leftovers make a great breakfast treat. Serves 12 to 16 For the crumb topping 21/4 oz. (1/2 cup) unbleached all-purpose flour 1/3 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1/4 tsp. kosher salt

2 oz. (1/4 cup) unsalted butter, chilled

For the cake

2 cups fresh blueberries, raspberries, or a mix

131/2 oz. (3 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more for the pan and for the berries

4 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. baking soda

3/4 tsp. kosher salt

6 oz. (3/4 cup) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature; more for the pan

11/2 cups granulated sugar

3 large eggs

2 tsp. pure vanilla extract

11/2 cups buttermilk For the vanilla crÈme fraîche

1 lb. (2 cups) crème fraîche

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

1 Tbs. granulated sugar

Make the crumb topping

Mix the flour, brown sugar, and salt in a medium bowl. Cut the butter into chunks and add to the dry mixture. Rub the flour and butter between your fingers until the mixture just comes together and has a nice crumbly texture. (This topping can be made ahead and stored, tightly ­covered, in the refrigerator for up to a week.) Make the cake

Rinse the berries well in a colander under running water and spread on paper towels. Let the berries air-dry for at least 15 minutes. Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Generously butter and flour a 12-cup bundt pan. In a medium bowl, mix the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment or with a handheld electric mixer, whip the butter

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and sugar together on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add the eggs one at a time, beating well for 15 seconds after each addi­tion. Scrape the bowl, add the vanilla, and continue whipping until the mixture is light and fluffy, 1 to 2 minutes. On low speed, add the dry ingredients one-third at a time, alternating with the buttermilk 1/2 cup at a time. After the last addition of buttermilk, scrape the bowl, increase the speed to medium, and beat for about 15 seconds to mix the batter fully. Transfer the berries to a medium bowl and toss gently with 2 tsp. flour. Gently fold the berries into the cake batter with a r­ ubber spatula to avoid crushing the b ­ erries too much. Scrape the b ­ atter into the prepared pan with the r­ ubber spatula, level the batter, and sprinkle with the crumb topping. Bake until a toothpick or wooden skewer comes out clean when i­ nserted into the middle of the cake, 45 to 55 minutes. Let the cake rest for 10 min­utes before turning it out onto a rack. Flip the cake back over so that the crumb topping is u ­ pright. Let cool completely and wrap tightly. Store at room temperature overnight before slicing. Make the vanilla crème fraîche

In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment or with a handheld electric mixer, whip the crème fraîche, vanilla extract, and sugar until soft peaks form, about 2 minutes. Cover and refrigerate until ready to use. To serve

Slice the cake and serve each slice with a dollop of the crème fraîche.

For the best flavor, make both this deliciously moist bundt cake and its crème fraîche topping one day in advance.


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COOK WITH

HONEY Honey lends a distinctive sweetness to suppers, snacks, desserts, and more.

No. 1: Drizzle on pancakes zucchini and corn pancakes with greek yogurt and honey Crispy and golden around the edges, fluffy and chock-full of veggies on the inside, these savory pancakes are summer-veggie comfort fare. Serve them with a dollop of Greek yogurt and a drizzle of honey. The batter will hold if you want to make it a bit ahead and cook to order. Yields 12 3 Tbs. unsalted butter, plus more for frying 1 Tbs. olive oil, plus more for frying 1½ cups small-diced zucchini or pattypan squash (1 mediumsmall zucchini, or about 7 oz.) Kosher salt 11/4 cups fresh corn kernels (from 2 to 3 ears) ½ cup sliced fresh scallions (white and light green parts) ½ to 1 tsp. minced fresh serrano peppers Freshly ground black pepper 2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 2 Tbs. sliced fresh chives ½ cup plus 1 Tbs. unbleached all-purpose flour ½ cup cornmeal 2 tsp. sugar ½ tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. baking soda 1 large egg, beaten

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�/₃ cup whole milk 2 Tbs. plain thick Greek yogurt or sour cream, plus more for serving Honey, preferably local, for serving

In a medium (10-inch) heavy, nonstick, ovenproof skillet, heat ½ Tbs. of the butter with the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the zucchini and ��₈ tsp. salt and cook, stirring only occasionally, until the zucchini are shrunken a bit and starting to brown lightly, about 3 minutes. Add another ½ Tbs. butter, the corn, scallions, serranos, and ½ tsp. salt. cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn kernels are glistening and some are slightly shrunken, 2 to 3 more minutes. remove the pan from the heat, season the veggies with black pepper, and transfer to a mixing bowl. Let cool to room

temperature, stirring occasionally (20 to 25 minutes). stir in the parsley and chives. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, cornmeal, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and ½ tsp. salt. melt the remaining 2 Tbs. butter (in the microwave or on the stovetop) and let cool slightly. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg, milk, yogurt, and the melted butter. make a well in the center of the dry ingredients and pour in the liquid mixture, whisking until just combined. combine the batter with the vegetable herb mixture and stir well. Let the batter sit for 5 minutes or up to 30 minutes. In a large (12-inch) nonstick skillet, heat about ½ Tbs. butter and 1 Tbs. olive oil over medium heat. When the butter has melted

and is bubbling, use a 1/4-cup measure to scoop batter into the pan, forming 3 to 4 pancakes. cook for about 2 minutes, until the pancakes are golden brown on the bottom (you will see a lot of bubbles on top), then flip. cook for 1 minute more. (The bottom will brown more quickly.) Transfer to a paper towel–lined plate and keep warm in a low (200°f) oven, if desired. repeat with the remaining batter, adding butter and oil as necessary, and turning the heat down as necessary. serve warm with dollops of greek yogurt and a generous drizzle of honey.


TEMP TIP Keep adjusting the heat during fry ing Too high it can overcook the chicken and make the coating taste bitter Too low it causes the coating to absorb oil and become greasy

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No. 2: Marinate meat honey-balsamic pulled pork with avocado relish Throw a few things in the slow cooker in the morning and come home to fork-tender pork simmering in a rich, sweet sauce. Serve the relish alongside or use it as a topping for pulled pork sandwiches. Serves 4, with leftover pork for 4 to 6 1/4 cup honey 1/4 cup Worcestershire sauce 1/4 cup aged balsamic vinegar

2 3-inch rosemary sprigs

1 medium clove garlic, minced

1 5-lb. bone-in pork shoulder

Kosher salt

2 ripe Hass avocados, diced

2 Tbs. pickled jalapeño rings, chopped

1 Tbs. apple cider vinegar

Combine the honey, Worcestershire, vinegar, rosemary, and garlic in a 5- to 6-quart slow cooker. Add the pork and turn to coat. Cover and cook until fork-tender, about 6 hours on high or 10 hours on low. Transfer the pork to a large cutting board. Discard the rosemary. Pour the liquid into a fat separator. Pull the pork into chunks, discarding the bone and any large pieces of fat or gristle. Transfer to a large bowl. Defat the liquid and bring to a boil in a 2-quart saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Cook until reduced to about 1 cup, about 6 minutes. Pour over the meat, toss well, and season to taste with salt. In a small bowl, mix the avocados, jalapeños, vinegar, and salt to taste. Serve with the pork.

4 great ideas for leftover pork • Add to a quesadilla along with charred onions, peppers, and cheese. • Stir into a frittata with roasted poblanos and corn. • Mix into your favorite hash and serve with a poached egg. • Layer with cheese, peaches, and hot sauce for a gourmet grilled cheese.

No. 3: Top fruit broiled grapefruit with honey, vanilla, and cardamom Grapefruit halves are a breakfast classic, but adding just a few intense flavorings and then broiling elevates them to a whole new level of deliciousness. Serves 4

2 large grapefruit

2 Tbs. honey

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

Seeds of 1 cardamom pod, ground in a mortar (or a pinch of ground cardamom)

Position an oven rack about 4 inches below the broiler and heat the broiler on high. With a serrated knife, cut the grapefruit in even halves. Using a small paring knife or a grapefruit knife, cut each section away from the surrounding membrane. Set the grapefruit halves in a shallow

broiler-safe pan (such as an enameled baking dish or a heavyduty rimmed baking sheet). If necessary, trim a thin slice off their bottoms so they sit level. In a small bowl, stir together the honey and the vanilla extract. Drizzle the honey mixture over the grapefruit halves. Dust each with a bit of cardamom. Broil until bubbling and lightly browned in spots, 4 to 6 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool slightly. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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No. 5: Flavor butter fried chicken with paprika and honey butter The union of crisp coating, smoky heat, and sweet slather is a beautiful one indeed. The butter is so yummy that you may want to double the recipe to have some on hand for toast and waffles. Serves 4 FOR THE BRINE

MAKE THE HONEY BUTTER

21/2 oz. kosher salt (1/2 cup Diamond Crystal or 1/4 cup plus 1 tsp. Morton) ½ cup granulated sugar

Using an electric mixer, whip the butter ingredients in a medium bowl until fluffy, about 2 minutes. Season to taste with more salt.

¼ tsp. crushed red pepper flakes

DREDGE AND FRY THE CHICKEN

1 large orange

1 large lemon

2 boneless skin-on chicken breasts, halved crosswise

2 boneless skin-on chicken thighs

2 bone-in chicken drumsticks

FOR THE HONEY BUTTER

4 oz. (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened

No. 4: Purée and freeze

1/2 cup honey

mango-honeymint sorbet

11/4 oz. (1/4 cup) rice flour

Here, honey replaces the sugar syrup that usually sweetens sorbet, lending it a deeper flavor. Be sure to purée the sorbet mixture until completely smooth for the best texture. Serves 8

1/2 tsp. kosher salt; more to taste FOR DREDGING AND FRYING

9 oz. (2 cups) all-purpose flour 1 Tbs. plus 1/2 tsp. kosher salt; more for serving

1 Tbs. garlic powder

1 Tbs. freshly ground black pepper

2 tsp. onion powder

½ tsp. baking powder

1 or 2 large oranges, finely grated to yield ½ tsp. zest, squeezed to yield ½ cup juice

¼ tsp. cayenne pepper

4 cups chopped, peeled, very ripe mango (from about 3 large)

2 cups buttermilk

1 gallon canola oil or rice bran oil

1/2 cup mild honey (such as clover)

2 tsp. chopped fresh mint

1/2 tsp. kosher salt

Combine all of the ingredients with ½ cup water in a blender and purée until completely smooth. Freeze in an ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Serve immediately or transfer to an airtight container and freeze for a firmer texture. The sorbet will keep in the freezer for up to 1 month. If the texture becomes icy, melt the sorbet and refreeze it in the ice cream maker.

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1¼ tsp. smoked paprika

BRINE THE CHICKEN

Combine the salt, sugar, pepper flakes, and 1 gallon water in a large pot. Using a vegetable peeler, zest the orange and lemon in strips, and add the zest to the pot. Stir over medium heat until the salt and sugar dissolve, about 5 minutes. Cool to room temperature in the pot or other large container. Add the chicken, cover, and refrigerate for at least 12 and up to 24 hours.

In a large bowl, whisk the flours, 1 Tbs. of the salt, garlic powder, black pepper, onion powder, baking powder, cayenne, and 1/4 tsp. of the paprika. Remove the chicken from the brine and blot dry with paper towels. Pour the buttermilk into a medium bowl and dip a piece of chicken into it, letting the excess drip back into the bowl. Dredge the chicken in the flour mixture, dragging it through to coat both sides but not too thickly. Repeat with the remaining pieces and set aside while you heat the oil. Set a wire rack on a paper towel– lined rimmed baking sheet. Fit an 8-quart Dutch oven or other heavyduty pot with a deep-fry thermometer, add the oil, and heat over medium high to 340°F. Working in batches, fry the chicken, adjusting the heat as needed to maintain 340°F, until an instant-read thermometer registers 165°F in the thickest part of each piece, about 8 minutes for the boneless pieces and 10 to 12 minutes for the drumsticks. Transfer the chicken to the rack. Combine the remaining 1 tsp. paprika and 1/2 tsp. kosher salt and sprinkle half of it over the chicken while it’s hot. Let the chicken rest 1 minute, turn the pieces over, then sprinkle a little of the paprika mixture over the other side. Serve with the honey butter on the side, or generously smear some of it on the chicken before serving.


TEMP TIP Keep adjusting the heat during frying Too high it can overcook the chicken and make the coating taste bitter Too low it causes the coating to absorb oil and become greasy


No. 6: Add to a glaze honey-chipotle glazed flank steak This steak takes just a handful of minutes under the broiler. Serves 4

2 tsp. olive oil

2 tsp. minced garlic

1/2 tsp. ground cumin Kosher salt 11/2 Tbs. minced canned chipotle in adobo sauce

1 Tbs. honey

1 Tbs. fresh lime juice

1 tsp. finely grated lime zest

1 lb. flank steak

Position an oven rack 6 inches below the broiler and heat the broiler on high. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with foil. Combine 1 tsp. of the oil, the garlic, cumin, and 1/2 tsp. salt in a 1-quart saucepan over medium-low heat; cook, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is golden, about 2 minutes. Add the chipotle and honey and stir until heated through, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat and stir in the lime juice and zest. Rub the flank steak with the remaining 1 tsp. oil and season generously with salt. Transfer to the prepared baking sheet and broil, turning once, until slightly browned and cooked to your liking, about 3 minutes per side for medium rare. Spread the glaze over the top of the steak and broil until it begins to bubble and darken in places, 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes. Slice against the grain and serve.

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No. 8: Sweeten vegetables carrot salad with walnut oil and honey You might be surprised how well the toasty flavors of the walnuts and walnut oil complement the freshly grated carrot. This salad would be a delicious accompaniment to roast pork or chicken. Serves 6 11/2 lb. carrots, peeled and grated on the medium holes of a box grater

1 cup walnuts, toasted and chopped

1/2 cup dried currants

No. 7: Dress a salad mixed herb salad with honey-lime dressing A riff on the cabbage slaw traditionally served with tonkatsu, this salad goes the extra flavor mile with lots of fresh herbs, crunchy vegetables, and a tangy Thai-inspired dressing. Serves 8 FOR THE SALAD

2 Tbs. thinly sliced fresh red or green chile or both (optional)

4 cups mixed mesclun greens

2 cups coarsely chopped bibb lettuce

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 cup very thinly sliced green cabbage

Make the salad

1 cup fresh basil leaves, preferably Thai basil, large leaves coarsely torn

1 cup fresh mint leaves

1 cup fresh cilantro leaves, coarsely chopped

4 small scallions (white and green parts), sliced into 1-inch lengths

1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, halved

½ cup very thinly sliced red onion ½ cup very thinly sliced red bell pepper FOR THE DRESSING 21/2 Tbs. fresh lime juice 21/2 Tbs. honey

2 tsp. fish sauce

1/8 tsp. minced garlic

In a large bowl, combine the mesclun, lettuce, cabbage, basil, mint, cilantro, scallions, tomatoes, onion, and bell pepper. Make the dressing

In a small bowl, whisk the lime juice, honey, fish sauce, garlic, and chile, if using. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Just before serving, toss the salad mixture with just enough of the dressing to coat the salad lightly—you may not need all of the dressing. Make ahead: You can combine, cover, and refrigerate the salad ingredients up to 6 hours ahead. The dressing can be made up to 1 day ahead.

1 orange, juiced (about 1/2 cup)

3 Tbs. apple-cider vinegar

1 Tbs. honey

3 Tbs. untoasted walnut oil (for sources, see p. 93)

Kosher or sea salt Freshly ground black pepper 21/2 Tbs. finely chopped chives

Combine the grated carrots, walnuts, and currants in a medium serving bowl. In a small bowl, whisk together the orange juice, cider vinegar, and honey. Slowly whisk in the walnut oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Toss the carrot mixture with the vinaigrette and 2 Tbs. of the chives. Adjust the seasoning to taste. You can serve the salad immediately, but it will taste even better if you let it sit at room temperature for 15 to 20 minutes. Sprinkle with the remaining 1/2 Tbs. chives right before serving.


Berry Sweets Make the most of fresh, ripe berries in tempting seasonal desserts.

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summer berry trifle Use any type of berry you like—just make sure you choose the ripest, tastiest ones available. The bread will soak up all their sweet juices. Serves 10 to 12 11/2 quarts mixed fresh berries (hull and quarter strawberries), plus extra berries for garnish 3/4 cup plus 1 Tbs. granulated sugar

4 tsp. minced fresh ginger

1 lb. day-old French bread, crusts removed, crumb cut into 1/2-inch cubes (5 to 6 cups)

1/2 cup Grand Marnier or Cointreau 11/2 cups heavy cream

Heat the berries and 3/4 cup of the sugar in a 4-quart saucepan over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they start to release juice but are still whole and intact, about 5 minutes. Stir in the ginger and pour the mixture onto a rimmed baking sheet to cool. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, toss the bread with 5 Tbs. of the liqueur. In a chilled metal bowl with chilled beaters, whip the cream with the remaining 3 Tbs. liqueur and 1 Tbs. sugar to almost-stiff peaks. In a 2- to 21/2-quart clear glass bowl, layer in the following order: 1 mounded cup of bread cubes, 1 cup of berries and juices, and 1 cup of whipped cream. Repeat 3 times—you should have 12 layers total. For the final layers, use all the remaining bread, berries (and their juices), and whipped cream. Cover and refrigerate until the juice has completely softened the bread, at least 4 hours or overnight. Garnish with fresh berries before serving.

blackberry ice cream Blackberry jam ups the intensity of this vibrant ice cream, enhancing the sweetness of fresh blackberries. Yields about 1 quart ice cream 13/4 cups heavy cream 1/4 cup whole milk 1/2 cup granulated sugar

7 oz. (11/2 cups) fresh or frozen blackberries

1/2 cup seedless blackberry jam

1 tsp. vanilla extract

1/4 tsp. table salt

Stir the cream, milk, and sugar in a 3-quart saucepan over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Continue heating, undisturbed, until steam begins rising from the surface, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a blender. Add

the blackberries, jam, vanilla, and salt and blend until smooth, about 1 minute. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium bowl. Refrigerate until thoroughly chilled, at least 6 hours or up to 1 day, covering with plastic wrap once cool. Stir the blackberry mixture and churn it in an ice cream machine according to the manufacturer’s instructions until it’s the consistency of soft-serve ice cream. Serve or pack into a container, seal, and store in the freezer for up to 1 week.

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strawberry-yogurt brûlée

blueberry crostata

Simple yogurt and fresh strawberries become a special treat with the addition of a crunchy, caramelized sugar topping. Enjoy it for breakfast or dessert. Serves 4

This simple, rustic blueberry crostata is fabulous with ice cream. Serves 8

2 cups plain whole-milk Greek yogurt

63/4 oz. (11/2 cups) plus 3 Tbs. all-purpose flour

1 cup coarsely chopped strawberries, plus several strawberry slices for garnish

5 Tbs. turbinado or granulated sugar

In a medium bowl, combine the yogurt with the chopped straw-

berries and 1 Tbs. sugar. Divide among four 6-oz. ramekins. Garnish each with a few strawberry slices. Sprinkle each with about 1 Tbs. sugar. Pass the flame of a torch over the sugar until it’s melted and browned, about 30 seconds. Serve immediately.

3 cups (15 oz.) fresh blueberries 3 Tbs. confectioners’ sugar

1/4 cup granulated sugar

2 Tbs. yellow cornmeal

41/2 oz. (9 Tbs.) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch cubes

1 large egg yolk

3 Tbs. ice water; more as needed

1 large egg white beaten with 2 Tbs. water until foamy

1 Tbs. turbinado or other “raw” sugar

Mix the blueberries, 3 Tbs. of the flour, and the confectioners’ sugar in a medium bowl. Set aside. Position racks in the top and bottom thirds of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Line two rimmed baking sheets with parchment. Combine the remaining 11/2 cups flour, granulated sugar, and cornmeal in a food processor and process until the consistency of fine sand. Add the butter and pulse until there are no visible pieces of butter. Add the egg yolk and water and pulse to form a soft dough, adding more water 1 tsp. at a time as necessary. Gather the dough into a ball and divide into 2 even pieces. On a well-floured work surface, roll each piece of dough into an 11-inch circle and transfer to the prepared baking sheets. Divide the blueberry filling between the circles, mounding the berries and leaving a 11/2-inch edge around each circle. Sprinkle any remaining sugar-flour mixture around the berry mounds. Try to get an even amount of blueberries and dry ingredients in each crostata. Fold the edges up over the filling, pleating as you go, to partially cover the filling. Brush the exposed dough with the egg white wash and sprinkle with the raw sugar. Bake for 25 minutes. Rotate the sheets top to bottom and back to front. (If there is any white flour mixture showing, carefully spoon a little of the blueberry juices over to cover.) Continue baking until the crusts have browned and the filling is bubbling, about 25 minutes more. Cool on the baking sheets on a rack for at least 15 minutes or to room temperature. To serve, slice each crostata into quarters and serve. Make ahead: The crostatas can be made up to 1 day ahead and stored on their baking sheets at room temperature, covered loosely with a clean kitchen towel. Just before serving, warm the crostatas on their baking sheets in a 200°F oven for 10 minutes.

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strawberry and kiwi tart with honey cream This gorgeous tart highlights some of summer’s most beautiful produce, underscored by a mild honey cream filling. For best results, chill the filled tart before topping it with the fruit; otherwise, the filling may be too soft to hold the fruit up well. Yields one 91/2- to 11-inch tart, plus enough dough for a second tart For the crust 10 oz. (21/4 cups) all-purpose flour; more for dusting 31/2 oz. (3/4 cup plus 2 Tbs.) confectioners’ sugar

6 oz. (12 Tbs.) cold unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1/4 tsp. kosher salt

2 large eggs, 1 separated

Cooking spray For the filling

1 cup whole milk

1/4 cup honey 1/2 vanilla bean or 1/2 tsp. pure vanilla extract or paste

1 large egg

1 large egg yolk

11/2 Tbs. cornstarch

1 Tbs. unsalted butter, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1/2 cup whipping or heavy cream For topping and finishing the tart

3 cups strawberries, halved, quartered, or sliced

2 to 3 ripe kiwis, peeled and cut lengthwise into wedges or crosswise into rounds

3 cups strawberries, halved, quartered, or sliced

1/4 cup apricot or apple jelly

2 Tbs. water or white wine

Make the dough

In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, sugar, butter, and salt. Mix on low speed until the butter begins to break up, about 1 minute. Increase the speed to just below medium and continue beating until the mixture looks sandy with butter pieces the size of tiny pebbles, about 2 minutes more. Turn the mixer off and add the whole egg and egg yolk (reserve the remaining white). Mix on low speed until incorporated. Increase the speed to medium and mix just until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl, about 30 seconds. Do not overmix. Divide the dough in half, press each half into a disk about 4 inches across, and wrap in plastic. Refrigerate one disk for at least 3 hours and up to 24 hours. (Freeze the other disk for up to a month; thaw in the refrigerator before using.) Shape and bake the crust

Lightly flour a work surface and a rolling pin. Spray a 91/2- to 11-inch fluted tart pan with a removable bottom with cooking spray. Working quickly, roll the dough disk into a 1/8-inch-thick round. Transfer the dough to the tart pan and gently coax it into the pan, allowing the excess dough to hang over the sides. Roll the rolling pin over the top of the pan to cut off the excess dough. Patch any tears or cracks with the scraps. Refrigerate the crust for at least 20 minutes or

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freeze for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 375°F. Line the crust with parchment paper and fill it to the very top with beans or pie weights. Bake until the edges are golden, 18 to 20 minutes. Carefully remove the weights and paper. Bake until the center of the crust looks dry and is just beginning to color, about 5 minutes. Beat the reserved egg white. Brush the inside of the crust with some of the egg white (you won’t need it all) and return the crust to the oven until the egg white has dried, about 2 minutes. (This prevents the crust from getting soggy once you add the filling.) Cool completely on a rack. Make the pastry cream

Combine the milk and 2 Tbs. of the honey in a 3- to 4-quart saucepan. If using a vanilla bean, split it and scrape the seeds into the milk, then add the pod. Bring to a boil, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Remove the vanilla bean pod, if using. Meanwhile, in a medium heatproof bowl, whisk the remaining 2 Tbs. honey with the egg, egg yolk, and cornstarch until smooth, about 1 minute. Whisk half of the hot milk into the egg mixture until combined. Off the heat, whisk the contents of the bowl back into the remaining milk in the saucepan. Cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture reaches a boil; it will thicken. Continue to cook for another minute past the boil, whisking constantly. Off the heat, whisk in the butter and vanilla paste or extract, if using. Strain the pastry cream through a medium-mesh sieve into a medium heatproof bowl. Cover with plastic wrap pressed onto the surface of the pastry cream to prevent a skin from forming. Refrigerate until cold, at least 2 hours and up to 3 days. Fill and top the tart

In a medium bowl, beat the cream to stiff peaks with an electric hand mixer or a whisk. Beat the pastry cream to soften and smooth it. With a large spatula, fold the whipped cream into the softened pastry cream until thoroughly combined. Fill the crust with the crème légère, evening it out with the spatula. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before topping with the fruit. Arrange the strawberries and kiwi on top of the filling. Note that because the filling is soft, you’ll need to work quickly while the filling is cold and more firm. Because it’s hard to move the fruit once it’s on the filling, you may want to practice your pattern on an empty sheet pan before placing it on the tart. Put the jelly and water or wine in a small saucepan. Simmer and whisk together to form a smooth glaze. Allow to cool slightly. Brush it on the exposed fruit, being careful not to pull up the cream filling from below. Refrigerate the tart until ready to serve. Serve the tart cold, within 6 hours of topping.


two crusts This recipe makes enough dough for two tart crusts; use one now and freeze the other for a delicious tart in your future.

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lemon-buttermilk chiffon cake with raspberry sauce Buttermilk makes a classic chiffon flavoring extra-tangy, while cornmeal enhances the cake’s beautiful yellow color and adds a bit of texture (but not grit). Serves 12 to 16 FOR THE CAKE

7 large eggs

11/2 cups granulated sugar

1 Tbs. plus 2 tsp. finely grated lemon zest (from 2 to 3 large lemons)

7 oz. (13/4 cups) cake flour

21/4 oz. (1/2 cup) stone-ground yellow cornmeal 11/2 tsp. baking powder

1 tsp. table salt

2/3 cup buttermilk 2/3 cup neutral oil, such as canola or vegetable

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

FOR THE SAUCE AND SERVING

4 cups fresh or frozen raspberries, rinsed and well dried; more for garnish

1/2 cup seedless raspberry jam

1 oz. (1/4 cup) confectioners’ sugar; more to taste

Pinch of table salt Fresh mint leaves (optional) Whipped cream (optional) make the cake

Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and heat the oven to 325°F. Have ready an ungreased, not nonstick 10x4-inch (16-cup) angel food cake pan.

Separate the eggs, putting the yolks in a small bowl and the whites in a medium bowl. In a food processor, pulse 11/4 cups of the granulated sugar and the lemon zest until the zest is finely ground, about eight 1-second pulses. Sift the flour into the bowl of a stand mixer or a large mixing bowl. Whisk in the sugar mixture, cornmeal, baking powder, and salt. Add the egg yolks, buttermilk, oil, and vanilla. Using the stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or a handheld mixer, beat on mediumlow speed until blended. Increase the speed to medium high and beat until lighter in color and thick enough to form a slowly dissolving ribbon of batter when the paddle or beaters are lifted, about 3 minutes. Using the stand mixer fitted with a clean bowl and the whisk attachment or a handheld mixer with clean beaters, beat the egg whites on medium-low speed until foamy, about 1 minute. Increase the speed to medium, and beat until the whites are opaque and form very soft peaks, about 11/2 minutes. Slowly add the remaining granulated sugar, and beat until the whites are thick and shiny and form soft peaks, about 11/2 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, scrape about onefourth of the whites into the batter and gently

fold until blended. Add the remaining whites and gently fold until just blended with no visible streaks of either the whites or batter. Immediately scrape the batter into the cake pan. Bake until deep golden brown and springy when touched, about 60 minutes. The top will have cracks that still look moist inside. Immediately invert the pan onto its feet or by sliding the center tube onto the neck of a bottle. Let cool completely, then remove from the pan. The cake can be served immediately or covered and stored at room temperature for up to 5 days. Make the sauce

In a food processor or blender, purée the raspberries, jam, confectioners’ sugar, and salt. Strain the mixture through a fine-mesh sieve over a small bowl, pressing firmly on the seeds. Season to taste with more confectioners’ sugar. The sauce can be covered and refrigerated for up to 5 days. Serve slices of the cake with the sauce, berries, mint, and whipped cream, if using.

create soft peaks

fold in stages

cool upside down

Beat the egg whites only to soft peaks; any stiffer and they won’t expand well during baking. Stop beating when the tracks from the beaters are starting to hold their shape and the peaks flop over when the beaters are lifted.

Lighten the batter with one-quarter of the egg whites so it’s easier to fold in the rest. When no streaks remain, gently pour and scrape the batter into the cake pan and bake right away so that it doesn’t deflate.

Invert the cake so it doesn’t collapse as it cools. If your pan doesn’t have feet, suspend it on the neck of a wine bottle. The cake will cool a little faster this way, so you might want to do this even if your pan does have feet.

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loosen the sides

lift from the center

saw to slice

Run a long, thin knife around the cake before removing it from the pan. Since you didn’t grease the pan, you need to separate the cake, or it could tear.

Grasp the center tube and pull straight up. The cake should slide right out of the pan. To remove the tube part of the pan, loosen the center and bottom of the cake with the knife, and pull the tube out.

Use a serrated knife and a sawing motion to slice the cake without squashing the airy texture you worked so carefully to create.

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test kitchen T I P S • T E C H N I Q U E S • I N G R E D I E N TS

a bundt pan makes the messy technique of removing kernels from the cob a little easier.

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teCHniQUe

inGredient

cutting corn off the cob

miso

For recipes like the Zucchini and Corn Pancakes on p. 68, you’ll need to remove corn kernels from the cob. This process can be messy—they like to bounce off the cutting board and end up scattered all over the counter and floor. To keep those kernels in their place, insert the tip of the ear of corn into the center hole of a Bundt pan. Cut the kernels away from the cob in long downward strokes, letting them fall into the pan. It’s also easy to preserve fresh corn kernels to keep on hand for tossing into salads, side dishes, sautés, or other weeknight dishes. Simply cut the kernels off the cobs, as described above, and then blanch them in boiling water for 1 to 2 minutes. Drain, let cool, and store in a covered container in the fridge for up to five days. Or freeze the kernels in a single layer on a baking sheet until hard, and then store in an airtight container in the freezer, where they’ll keep for up to three months.

Once enjoyed by only the emperors and shogun of Japan, miso now appears in some form at nearly every Japanese meal. The salty, savory flavors of miso—fermented soybean paste—are essential to numerous dishes like soups, dressings, glazes, and pickles. Making miso is still a revered art, and the flavors, textures, and aromas of different varieties are judged much like fine wine. After steaming and crushing soybeans, traditional miso houses add sea salt and koji, a culture made from grains like rice and barley that triggers fermentation.

tiP

shopping for corn Sometimes even the best-looking corn is bland and starchy. That’s because as soon as corn is picked, its sugar starts converting to starch. To make sure you get the best corn possible, try to buy it at a farmstand or farmers’ market, where it’s more likely to be fresh-picked. Look for corn that still has its husks, as well as soft, almost damp-feeling silk. It’s tempting to peel back the husk to peek at the kernels, but that can dry it out. Instead, give it a gentle squeeze from end to end to feel for plump kernels.

types of miso: Variables like the type of koji, the ratio of soybeans to koji, salt content, and length of fermentation lead to innumerable varieties of miso ranging in color from pale golden yellow to rich chocolate brown. For flavor-pairing purposes, think of miso in terms of two broad categories: light miso—typically called white, yellow, or sweet miso—and dark miso—red, brown, barley, and soybean miso. Generally, the lighter the miso, the sweeter and more delicate its flavor. Light miso is good in salads and dressings, and with lighter foods like fish, chicken, and vegetables (see p. 38 for a broccoli with miso recipe). Dark miso, which is fermented longer, will be saltier and “meatier.” Its rich, robust flavor is good for adding depth to soups and sauces. Try it with root vegetables, beans, or winter squash. Cooking with miso: Always add miso toward the end of cooking and never boil it, as high heat will destroy both its flavor and nutrients. For the smoothest sauces and soups, whisk miso into an equal amount of slightly warm broth until smooth, and then gradually stir the thinned miso back into the pot. Use about 1 to 1½ Tbs. of miso for every cup of liquid. Miso is a good substitute for salt or soy sauce or in place of anchovy paste for vegetarian recipes. Just remember, miso is quite concentrated in flavor, so a little goes a long way.

the lighter the miso’s color, the more delicate its flavor.

Buying and storing miso: Look for miso in plastic tubs or bags in the refrigerated section of Asian markets or health-food stores. Miso keeps for up to a year if sealed well and refrigerated.

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test kitchen

ingredient

Aged balsamic vinegar

glossary

Mojo, a magical sauce In English, the word mojo is pronounced moe-joe and means magic power. In Spanish and in cooking parlance, the word is pronounced moe-hoe and refers to a citrusy garlic sauce. But mojo the sauce is still magical: It can be used as a marinade (Grilled Mojo-Marinated Flank Steak, p. 46), dressing, dip, condiment, and, of course, sauce. Popular throughout the Caribbean and in Latin America, its specific makeup differs from place to place as each region puts its own local stamp on it. Additional flavorings include onion, butter, or cilantro. Mojos may be raw or cooked, which mellows and sweetens the garlic.

tip

Don’t throw out the cilantro stems When preparing cilantro for chopping in recipes like the Spicy Chipotle Shrimp, Avocado, and Corn Fajitas on p. 33, you don’t necessarily have to remove all of the stems. Cilantro stems are quite flavorful, so if they’re thin and tender-crisp (bite one to check), just chop them up along with the leaves.

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The Honey-Balsamic Pulled Pork recipe on p. 71 calls for an aged balsamic, but we’re not asking you to splurge on the pricey, ultra-aged stuff. Instead, we’re looking for a balsamic that’s richer, thicker, and less acidic than the one you likely use for your vinaigrette. Ideally, it’s been aged for five or more years, but not all vinegars include their age on the label. If that’s the case, tilt the bottle; if the liquid is viscous, it’s a good bet it’s aged and a bit mellower than a younger balsamic.


ingredient

3 great steaks for the grill When it comes to throwing a steak on the grill, flank steak, skirt steak, and hanger steak are three of our favorite choices. These boneless cuts from the belly area of the steer are full of rich beefy flavor and chewy texture. Because they’re relatively thin with a coarse and loose grain, they absorb marinades well. And since they’re thinly sliced across the grain before serving, portion sizes are flexible—a real advantage when you have a mixed group of steak lovers and light eaters coming to dinner. As its name implies, flank steak comes from the flank area of the steer, which is just in front of the hind legs. Marinated, grilled flank steak was the original London broil, a name now used for many other beef cuts.

Skirt steak comes from the belly area in between the flank and the brisket, which is near the front legs. Its long, thin, belt-like shape reflects the fact that it’s the preferred cut for fajitas—fajita means “belt” in Spanish. Try it: Herb-Marinated Skirt Steaks, p. 62. Popular in French bistros, hanger steak is an interior cut that hangs off the kidney and supports the diaphragm. Hanger steak is also known as butcher’s steak because butchers tend to save this prized cut for themselves. Because there’s only one per animal and it’s not well known outside France, it can be hard to find. If you do come across it and it still has its ­center membrane (as shown at right), trim it out before cooking—you’ll end up with two large pieces of hanger steak after trimming.

skirt

hanger

flank

tip

A quick way to peel a ton of garlic The Grilled Pork with Mojo on p. 44 calls for a whopping 50 cloves of garlic. You could buy peeled garlic to save yourself the peeling step, but if it’s not available, you can use a trick they teach in culinary school: To peel many cloves at once, put the cloves in a big metal bowl, and cover them with another metal bowl bottom side up. Then, while holding the bowls tightly together, shake like crazy. Not only is this kind of fun, but it also takes most of the skins right off.

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tiP

A better way to peel a kiwi Kiwis make a colorful addition to many dishes, including the Strawberry and Kiwi tart on p. 80, but they bruise easily if handled too much. To peel one without damaging it, you can use a knife or a peeler, but there’s another tool that leaves the peeled fruit smooth and rounded instead of beveled. Here’s how to peel a kiwi with a spoon: Slice off both ends with a paring knife. Slide a soup spoon under the skin, and holding the spoon steady, gently turn the kiwi to release it from the skin.

tiP inGredient

create your own pasta salad

cool cucumbers for salads

enGliSH

PerSian

JaPaneSe

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When choosing cucumbers for summer salads, such as the Basmati rice Salad with Mango and Cucumber on p. 54, skip the common ones at the supermarket, which usually are waxed for a longer shelf life and tend to be seedy. Instead, try one of the varieties at left. All are crisp, with small seeds, and have thin, unwaxed skin that doesn’t require peeling.

The method for making grain salads, pp. 54–59, also works with little pastas like fregola, orzo, ditalini, and Israeli couscous. Just keep the following tips in mind when making the swap.

• Use more vinaigrette. Pasta will

absorb more dressing than grains do. To compensate, use the entire amount of the vinaigrette recipe on p. 57 for a pasta salad. Up the salt and vinegar. The flavor of pasta is more neutral than that of grains, so you may need to add more vinegar and salt to the vinaigrette to boost your salad’s flavor. Cook your pasta until just al dente. Pasta absorbs a lot of vinaigrette and can get soggy, but if your pasta is firm, that’s less likely to happen. don’t make pasta salad ahead. Serve it within an hour or two of making, since it doesn’t hold up as well over time as salads made with hearty grains.

• • •


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Select styles at Handcrafted in the USA with imported top fabric


test kitchen INGREDIENT

Guava Although not so well known in the United States, guava is a popular fruit in many tropical countries. Native to Mexico, Central America, and northern South America, guavas (guayabas in Spanish) are small round or oval fruits with a yellow to dark green skin and white to hot pink flesh. Fresh guava isn’t in season in the summer, so you can use either guava jelly or paste in the Cream Cheese and Guava Swirl Ice Cream on p. 52. Guava paste is sliceable and similar to quince paste (membrillo). Guava jelly is looser and spreadable. Both are also delicious with cheese and crackers. Look for them at the supermarket or at Latin markets, or see Sources, p. 93.

TECHNIQUE TIP

What we mean by dice For the grain salads, pp. 54–59, we call for a variety of ingredient dice sizes. To “dice” means to cut a food into cubes, making it look like playing dice—hence the name. If the food is flat, like a bell pepper, the dice will be more of a square than a cube. Each size of dice has its own corresponding measurement, as shown below. That said, there’s no need to pull a ruler out every time. Use these dimensions as guidelines, and try to keep the dice a consistent size so the food cooks evenly.

A peeler hulls strawberries, too When you’re prepping strawberries for the Strawberry Mojitos on p. 53, reach for your peeler. Most vegetable peelers are designed with a pointed end on the top of the blade (or on the side, in the case of Y peelers). Its main purpose is to remove the eyes from potatoes, but it’s also an effective strawberry huller. Just insert the point below the stem of the strawberry and twist.

90

COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017

Large dice = ¾ inch

Small dice = ¼ inch

Medium dice = 13 to ½ inch

Fine dice = 18 inch


CREDITS Many of the recipes and photos in this issue have appeared previously in Fine Cooking. Listed here are the original authors and issue numbers. Unless otherwise noted, all photos are by Scott Phillips.

make it tonight

farm to spoon

Summer Salad with Peas, Parmesan, Fried Egg, and Bacon, Mindy Fox, #141 Zucchini, Pea, and Pesto Lasagne, Ivy Manning, #142 Chicken Horiataki Salad with Tzatziki, Elizabeth Karmel, #142 Crab and Corn Cakes with Lime Sour Cream, Jill Silverman Hough, #136

Roasted Vegetable Broth; Creamy Roasted Pepper and Tomato Soup; Summer Greens and Rice Soup; Farmers’ Market Minestrone, Domenica Marchetti, #130

3 ways Scallion Oil; Korean-Style Scallion Pancakes; Lemony Scallion Pilaf, Julissa Roberts, #129

peaches, savory & sweet Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches; Heirloom Tomato and Peach Salad; Braised Chicken Thighs with Savory Marinated Peaches; Brown Sugar and Thyme Marinated Peaches; Overnight Oatmeal with Sweet Marinated Peaches; Sweet Marinated Peach Tart with Honey-Yogurt Mousse, WIlliam Mickelsen, #136

turn up the heat Spicy Chipotle Shrimp, Avocado, and Corn Fajitas, from Big Buy Cooking by Tony Rosenfeld, photo: Maren Caruso Bourbon-Marinated Buffalo Chicken Strips with Maytag Blue Dip, Aliza Green, #49 Spicy Pan-Fried Noodles with Tofu, Matthew Card, #130 Crispy Fish Sandwiches with Wasabi and Ginger, Ian Knauer, #122 Spicy Asian Roasted Broccoli and Snap Peas, Julie Grimes Bottcher, #70 Moroccan Chicken Burgers with Feta and Carrot Slaw, Karen Tedesco, #130

92

COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017

tropical bites & sips Grilled Pork with Mojo; Hemingway Special; Cream Cheese and Guava Swirl Ice Cream, Julissa Roberts, #135, photos: Gabriella Herman Grilled Mojo-Marinated Flank Steak, Norman Van Aken, #28 Island-Spiced Chicken Salad with Mango and Scallions, from Big Buy Cooking by Tony Rosenfeld, photo: Maren Caruso Chi Chi Pache; Lift-Off, Camper English, #106 Rum-Glazed Pork Skewers with Coconut Rice, Laraine Perri, #129 Jamaican Rice and Peas, Mark Henry, #51 Spicy Papaya Salad, Julissa Roberts, #126 Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp, Dabney Gough, #130 Strawberry Mojito, Adeena Sussman, #123 Plátanos Maduros Fritos, Julissa Roberts, #124

the new summer side Spelt Salad with Cherry Tomatoes and Zucchini; Millet Salad with Avocado and Citrus; Basmati Rice Salad with Mango and Cucumber; Bulgur Salad with Carrots and Peppers; Farro Salad with Artichokes and Fennel; Brown Rice Salad with Apples and Cheddar; Barley Salad with Peas and Asparagus; Quinoa Salad with Pears and Dried Cherries; Wheat Berry Salad with Green Beans, Joanne Weir, #117

a simple summertime supper Olive Oil–Fried Almonds; Herb-Marinated Skirt Steaks with Pesto-Style Salsa Verde; Sun-Ripened Tomato and Olive Salad; Romaine Hearts with Lemon Vinaigrette; Berry Buttermilk Cake with VanillaScented Crème Fraîche, Maria Helm Sinskey, #72

cook with honey Zucchini and Corn Pancakes with Greek Yogurt and Honey, from Fresh from the Farm by Susie Middleton, photo: Alexandra Grablewski Honey-Balsamic Pulled Pork with Avocado Relish, Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough, #134 Broiled Grapefruit with Honey, Vanilla, and Cardamom, Ruth Lively, #96 Mango-Honey-Mint Sorbet, Ronne Day, #117 Fried Chicken with Paprika and Honey Butter, Christine Cikowski, Joshua Kulp, #136 Honey-Chipotle Glazed Flank Steak, Julissa Roberts, #132 Mixed Herb Salad with HoneyLime Dressing, Ed Schoenfeld, #100 Carrot Salad with Walnut Oil and Honey, Dan Barber, #85

berry sweets Summer Berry Trifle, Pam Anderson, #100 Blackberry Ice Cream, Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough, #136 Strawberry-Yogurt Brûlée, Adeena Sussman, #123 Blueberry Crostata, Bruce Weinstein, Mark Scarbrough, #136

Strawberry and Kiwi Tart with Honey Cream, Jennifer Yee, #137, photo: Andre Baranowski Lemon-Buttermilk Chiffon Cake with Raspberry Sauce, Abigail Johnson Dodge, #135

Some of the recipes and photos in this issue were excerpted from these books:

Big Buy Cooking by Fine Cooking (The Taunton Press, 2010); photos © Maren Caruso; food stylist: Katie Christ.

SuSie Middleton

Fresh from the Farm by Susie Middleton (The Taunton Press, 2014); photos © Alexandra Grablewski & Susie Middleton; food stylist: Mark Pederson.


SOURCES

carrot salad with walnut oil and honey, page 75 • International Collection Walnut Oil, $5.79 for

8.45 oz., Plummarket.com, 855-758-6627.

spicy chipotle shrimp, avocado, and corn fajitas, page 33 • La Morena Chipotles in Adobo, $5.50 per 13-oz. can, Mexgrocer.com, 877-463-9476.

blackberry ice cream, chi chi pache, page 49 • Angostura bitters, $10.99 for 4 oz., Bevmo.com, 877-772-3866.

• St. Elizabeth Allspice Dram, $29.99 for 750 ml, Shoppersvineyard.com, 973-916-0707.

page 77

• Cuisinart Pure Indulgence Ice Cream Machine, ICE-30BC, $89.95, Cuisinart.com, 800-211-9604.

• Coco Lopez coconut cream, $3.49 for 15 oz., Cocolopez.elsstore.com, 630-343-0240.

peaches, savory & sweet, pages 24–31

TO SHOOT

• McCann’s steel-cut oats,

crispy fish sandwiches with wasabi and ginger, page 37

cream cheese and guava swirl ice cream, page 52

• Wasabi powder, $4.95 per 0.88-oz.

From Mexgrocer.com, 877-463-9476:

can, Thrivemarket.com.

$7.44 for 28 oz., Vitacost.com, 800-381-0759. • Chia seeds, $11.39 for 16 oz., Bobsredmill.com, 800-349-2173.

• Guava paste, $4.95 for 21 oz. • Guava jelly, $6.95 for 17 oz.

lemon-buttermilk chiffon cake, page 82 • Nordic Ware Angel Food Cake Pan, $25, Surlatable.com, 800-243-0852.

F I N E C O O K I N G .C O M

93


nutrition Recipe

Calories (kcal)

Fat Cal (kcal)

Protein (g)

Carb (g)

Total Fat (g)

Sat Fat (g)

Mono Fat (g)

Poly Fat (g)

Chol (mg)

Sodium (mg)

Fiber (g)

MAKE IT TONIGHT, p. 15

Summer Salad w/Peas, Parmesan, Egg, and Bacon

420

330

14

9

38

7

20

8

200

470

3

Zucchini, Pea, and Pesto Lasagne

380

180

16

35

20

10

5

3

50

210

4

Chicken Horiataki Salad with Tzatziki

540

200

38

48

22

7

12

2.5

80

1100

5

Crab and Corn Cakes with Lime Sour Cream

480

260

33

25

29

8

10

7

245

990

2

Scallion Oil (per 2 Tbs.)

240

240

0

0

27

2.5

4.5

19

0

0

0

Korean-Style Scallion Pancakes

180

40

6

30

4.5

1

1.5

1.5

45

520

2

Lemony Scallion Pilaf

320

90

8

49

10

6

2.5

1

25

400

3

Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches

150

110

1

8

12

1.5

9

1.5

0

10

1

Heirloom Tomato and Peach Salad

260

170

3

20

19

2.5

13

2

0

350

4

Braised Chicken Thighs w/Savory Marinated Peaches

570

350

36

14

39

10

20

6

190

630

2

Brown Sugar and Thyme Marinated Peaches

90

0

1

21

0

0

0

0

0

20

1

Overnight Oatmeal with Sweet Marinated Peaches

350

110

9

53

12

1.5

2.5

8

0

75

7

Sweet Marinated Peach Tart with Mousse

470

250

7

48

28

18

7

1

95

160

1

Spicy Chipotle Shrimp, Avocado, and Corn Fajitas

520

230

28

48

25

3.5

16

4

170

660

8

Bourbon-Marinated Buffalo Chicken Strips w/Dip

420

290

19

12

32

8

15

2

90

830

2

Spicy Pan-Fried Noodles with Tofu

370

140

16

47

16

1.5

8

5

0

1760

4

Crispy Fish Sandwiches with Wasabi and Ginger

650

420

26

31

47

7

16

22

140

1420

2

Spicy Asian Roasted Broccoli and Snap Peas

290

180

7

24

20

3

11

5

0

800

6

Moroccan Chicken Burgers with Feta and Carrot Slaw

360

170

26

23

19

5

9

3

110

730

4

Roasted Vegetable Broth (per 1 cup)

70

30

2

2

3.5

0

2.5

0

0

280

0

Creamy Roasted Pepper and Tomato Soup

370

240

5

26

27

5

17

3

15

450

5

Summer Greens and Rice Soup

320

110

9

37

13

2

8

1.5

0

650

4

Farmers’ Market Minestrone

350

140

9

39

15

2.5

10

2

0

550

6

Grilled Pork with Mojo

430

260

32

10

29

7

17

3

110

1400

1

Hemingway Special

230

0

0

22

0

0

0

0

0

5

0

Grilled Mojo-Marinated Flank Steak

440

330

24

5

36

8

25

3

60

660

1

Island-Spiced Chicken Salad w/Mango and Scallions

340

170

28

15

19

4

9

4.5

100

470

2

Chi Chi Pache

300

60

1

26

6

6

0

0

0

15

0

Rum-Glazed Pork Skewers with Coconut Rice

550

190

25

53

22

8

7

5

80

720

3

Jamaican Rice and Peas

270

80

7

41

9

8

0

0

0

180

4

Lift-Off

250

0

0

12

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

Spicy Papaya Salad

90

25

1

16

2.5

0

1.5

0

0

105

3

3 WAYS, p. 22

PEACHES, SAVORY & SWEET, p. 24

TURN UP THE HEAT, p. 32

FARM TO SPOON, p. 40

TROPICAL BITES & SIPS, p. 44

94

cookfresh s u mmer 2 0 1 7


Recipe

Calories (kcal)

Fat Cal (kcal)

Protein (g)

Carb (g)

Total Fat (g)

Sat Fat (g)

Mono Fat (g)

Poly Fat (g)

Chol (mg)

Sodium (mg)

Fiber (g)

Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp

360

190

24

10

21

7

4

8

195

290

1

Cream Cheese and Guava Swirl Ice Cream

320

180

2

32

20

12

5

1

70

110

1

Strawberry Mojito

210

0

1

20

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

Plátanos Maduros Fritos

150

60

1

24

7

1

3

3

0

0

2

Spelt Salad with Cherry Tomatoes and Zucchini

300

120

8

39

14

2

9

2

0

290

6

Millet Salad with Avocado and Citrus

460

150

10

70

16

2.5

10

3

0

290

5

Basmati Rice Salad with Mango and Cucumber

320

130

4

45

14

2

10

2

0

290

1

Bulgur Salad with Carrots and Peppers

300

160

7

29

18

4.5

11

2.5

15

460

7

Farro Salad with Artichokes and Fennel

390

190

11

45

21

2.5

12

5

0

380

8

Brown Rice Salad with Apples and Cheddar

420

190

11

48

21

5

13

3

15

370

6

Barley Salad with Peas and Asparagus

250

110

5

31

13

2

9

1.5

0

300

7

Quinoa Salad with Pears and Dried Cherries

400

180

7

52

20

3

10

6

5

310

6

Wheat Berry Salad with Green Beans

340

180

8

37

20

4.5

11

4

10

490

5

Olive Oil–Fried Almonds

243

197

8

7

22

2

14

5

0

298

4

Herb-Marinated Skirt Steaks w/Salsa Verde

476

263

48

2

29

9

18

2

129

433

0

Pesto-Style Salsa Verde

220

210

1

2

23

3

18

2

0

94

1

Sun-Ripened Tomato and Olive Salad

166

128

2

9

14

2

11

2

0

720

2

Romaine Hearts with Vinaigrette

101

90

1

2

10

2

7

1

2

155

0

Berry Buttermilk Cake w/Vanilla Crème Fraîche

355

138

5

48

16

10

3

1

77

295

1

Zucchini and Corn Pancakes w/Yogurt and Honey

160

90

3

14

10

4

5

1

30

190

1

Honey-Balsamic Pulled Pork (per 1 cup pork & 1/4 of relish)

500

250

42

21

28

6

15

4.5

130

570

7

Broiled Grapefruit with Honey, Vanilla & Cardamom

90

0

1

22

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

Mango-Honey-Mint Sorbet

120

5

1

31

0

0

0

0

0

70

1

Fried Chicken with Paprika and Honey Butter

830

450

28

69

51

20

20

8

175

1690

2

Honey-Chipotle Glazed Flank Steak

210

90

24

6

10

3.5

5

.5

70

530

0

Mixed Herb Salad with Honey-Lime Dressing

45

5

2

10

0

0

0

0

0

270

2

290

180

5

27

20

2

3.5

14

0

210

5

Summer Berry Trifle

310

100

5

44

11

7

3

.5

40

23

2

Blackberry Ice Cream

780

460

6

80

51

33

13

2.5

160

240

3

Strawberry-Yogurt Brûlée

220

100

8

22

12

9

2

0

20

40

1

Blueberry Crostata

300

120

4

40

14

8

4

1

55

10

2

Strawberry and Kiwi Tart with Honey Cream

450

180

7

62

20

12

5

1

120

70

4

Lemon-Buttermilk Chiffon Cake w/Raspberry Sauce

300

110

5

44

12

1.5

7

3.5

80

240

3

THE NEW SUMMER SIDE, p. 54

A SIMPLE SUMMERTIME SUPPER, p. 60

COOK WITH HONEY, p. 68

Carrot Salad with Walnut Oil and Honey BERRY SWEETS, p. 76

The nutritional analyses have been calculated by a registered dietitian at Nutritional Solutions in Melville, New York. When a recipe gives a choice of ingredients, the first choice is the one used. Optional ingre­ dients with measured amounts are included; ingredients with­out specific quantities are not. Analyses are per serving; when a range of ingredient amounts or servings is given, the smaller amount or portion is used. When the quantities of salt and pepper aren’t specified, the analysis is based on 1/4 tsp. salt and 1/8 tsp. pepper per serving for entrées, and 1/8 tsp. salt and 1/16 tsp. pepper per serving for side dishes.

finecooking . com

95


RECIPE INDEX Cover Recipe

Chicken Horiataki Salad with Tzatziki ...................................................18

Zucchini and Corn Pancakes with Greek Yogurt and Honey ......................... 68

Fried Chicken with Paprika and Honey Butter ........................................72

Zucchini Boats with Basil Scrambled Eggs .......................................... 98

Beef

Island-Spiced Chicken Salad with Mango and Scallions ........................ 48

Zucchini, Pea, and Pesto Lasagne ......... 16

Grilled Mojo-Marinated Flank Steak ..... 46

Moroccan Chicken Burgers with Feta and Carrot Slaw ................................. 39

Salads

Chicken Horiataki Salad with Tzatziki ................................................... 18

Herb-Marinated Skirt Steaks with Pesto-Style Salsa Verde ..................62 Honey-Chipotle Glazed Flank Steak ......................................74

Pork & Lamb Grilled Pork With Mojo .............................. 44 Honey-Balsamic Pulled Pork with Avocado Relish ................................... 71 Rum-Glazed Pork Skewers with Coconut Rice ............................................... 49 Summer Salad with Peas, Parmesan, Fried Egg, and Bacon ........... 16

Carrot Salad with Walnut Oil and Honey ...............................................75

Fish & Shellfish Crab and Corn Cakes with Lime Sour Cream .................................................. 20 Crispy Fish Sandwiches with Wasabi and Ginger ......................................37 Hawaiian Garlic Shrimp ............................. 51 Spicy Chipotle Shrimp, Avocado, and Corn Fajitas .......................................... 33

Pasta, Grains & Nuts Olive-Oil–Fried Almonds ......................... 62

Heirloom Tomato and Peach Salad ......26 Mixed Herb Salad with Honey-Lime Dressing ................................75 Romaine Hearts with Lemon Vinaigrette .....................................................65 Spicy Papaya Salad ..................................... 51 Summer Salad with Peas, Parmesan, Fried Egg, and Bacon ........... 16 Sun-Ripened Tomato and Olive Salad .................................................... 64

Spicy Pan-Fried Noodles with Tofu ...... 36

Soups & Stews

Zucchini, Pea, and Pesto Lasagne .........16

Creamy Roasted Pepper and Tomato Soup ................................................ 41

Bourbon-Marinated Buffalo Chicken Strips with Maytag Blue Dip ..................................35

Vegetarian Mains

Farmers’ Market Minestrone ...................43

Braised Chicken Thighs with Savory Marinated Peaches ......................29

Spicy Pan-Fried Noodles with Tofu ...... 36

Poultry Basil-Tomato Stuffed Chicken Breasts .......................................... 98

Korean-Style Scallion Pancakes.............23

Roasted Vegetable Broth ......................... 41 Summer Greens and Rice Soup .............42

Breakfast Broiled Grapefruit with Honey, Vanilla, and Cardamom ............................. 71 Overnight Oatmeal with Sweet Marinated Peaches .................................... 30 p. 49

Side Dishes Barley Salad with Peas and Asparagus..............................................55 Basmati Rice Salad with Mango and Cucumber .............................................54 Brown Rice Salad with Apples and Cheddar .................................................55 Brown Sugar and Thyme Marinated Peaches .................................... 30 Bulgur Salad with Carrots and Peppers ..................................................54 Farro Salad with Artichokes and Fennel .....................................................55

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COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017


Mango-Honey-Mint Sorbet ...................... 72 Plum Meringue Fool ....................................98 Raspberry Lemonade ................................98 Strawberry and Kiwi Tart with Honey Cream............................................... 80 Strawberry Mojito ........................................53 Strawberry-Yogurt Brûlée.........................78 Summer Berry Trifle ................................... 77 Sweet Marinated Peach Tart with Honey-Yogurt Mousse.......................31

p. 42

Grilled Yellow Squash with Lime Vinaigrette ..........................................98 Jamaican Rice and Peas ...........................50 Lemony Scallion Pilaf .................................23 Millet Salad with Avocado and Citrus ....................................54 Plátanos Maduros Fritos ...........................53 Quinoa Salad with Pears and Dried Cherries ......................................55 Raspberry-Goat Cheese Pizza ...............98 Raspberry-Ricotta Crostini ......................98 Sherry Vinegar and Rosemary Marinated Peaches .....................................26 Spelt Salad with Cherry Tomatoes and Zucchini .................................................54 Spicy Asian Roasted Broccoli and Snap Peas ..............................................38 Spicy Papaya Salad ......................................51 Squash Fritters .............................................98 Summer Squash Gratin.............................98 Tomato-BasilHummus Bruschetta .................................98 Wheat Berry Salad with Green Beans and Corn ...........................................59

Sauces & Toppings Avocado Relish..............................................71 Honey Butter................................................. 72 Maytag Blue Dip ...........................................35 Pesto-Style Salsa Verde ...........................63 Roasted Plum and Shallot Chutney ...........................................98 Scallion Oil ..................................................... 22

Desserts & Beverages Berry Buttermilk Cake with Vanilla-Scented Crème Fraîche .............66 Blackberry Ice Cream ................................ 77 Blueberry Crostata .....................................78

p. 72

Chi Chi Pache ................................................49 Cream Cheese and Guava Swirl Ice Cream.............................................52 Grilled Plums with Vanilla Ice Cream .........................................98 Hemingway Special ....................................46 Lemon-Buttermilk Chiffon Cake with Raspberry Sauce .....................82 Lift-Off ............................................................50

F I N E C O O K I N G .C O M

97


W H AT W E ’ R E C O O K I N G N OW

Summer’s Best Twelve ways to use four seasonal ingredients we can’t get enough of. Summer Squash Squash Fritters Grate two medium squash and let drain for 20 minutes. In a large bowl, whisk three beaten eggs with about ¾ cup flour, then mix in some crumbled feta or chèvre, the squash, and chopped fresh mint. Season with salt and pepper and thin with a little milk to a thick batter. Cook tablespoonfuls of batter in a hot oiled pan until golden brown on both sides. Serve with thick yogurt and harissa. Summer Squash Gratin Cut small zucchini or yellow summer squash into half-moons. Toss with olive oil, fresh rosemary, panko, salt, and pepper. Arrange in a baking dish and top with Grana Padano. Bake until the cheese starts to brown. Grilled Yellow Squash with Lime Vinaigrette Slice yellow squash diagonally into ½-inch-thick planks. Brush with olive oil and sprinkle with salt. Grill on both sides over high heat until well browned and just tender. Whisk together extra-virgin olive oil, lime juice, chipotle chile powder, and salt and drizzle over the squash.

Basil

Plums Plum Meringue Fool Gently cook chopped plums with ground cardamom and sugar until they start to soften and collapse. Mash the plums roughly with a fork. Let cool, then swirl the plum compote into a blend of half whipped cream and half Greek yogurt. Layer in dessert glasses with crumbled meringue cookies. Roasted Plum and Shallot Chutney In a bowl, toss halved plums and shallots with olive oil, dark brown sugar, grated orange zest, red pepper flakes, and salt. Arrange cut side down in a single layer on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Roast at 400°F until tender, about 20 minutes. Let cool and coarsely chop. Serve with pork or duck. Grilled Plums with Vanilla Ice Cream Lightly brush halved, pitted, firmripe plums with vegetable oil and grill cut side down over mediumhigh, indirect heat until just beginning to brown. Flip the plums and continue grilling until tender. Serve over vanilla ice cream with a sprinkle of sugar and a pinch of salt.

98

COOKFRESH SUMMER 2017

Basil-Tomato Stuffed Chicken Breasts Pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts thin. Place basil leaves and thinly sliced fresh tomato on one half of each breast. Fold the other half over, and close with toothpicks. Coat in beaten egg and panko. Sauté in olive oil until golden brown, and finish cooking in the oven. Serve with lemon wedges. Zucchini Boats with Basil Scrambled Eggs Halve 2 zucchini lengthwise; scoop out and chop the flesh. Scramble 6 large eggs until barely set. Gently fold the zucchini flesh, ¼ cup mascarpone, 2 Tbs. thinly sliced basil, salt, and pepper into the eggs. Spoon the egg mixture into the zucchini halves and top with shredded mozzarella. Bake in a medium-hot oven until the zucchini is crisp-tender and the mozzarella is melted and bubbly, 5 to 10 minutes. Tomato-Basil-Hummus Bruschetta Toss diced tomatoes with minced garlic and shallot, lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper. Chop a large handful of basil, and toss gently with the tomatoes. Grill or toast a sliced baguette. Spread with some hummus and top with the tomatoes.

Raspberries Raspberry-Ricotta Crostini Lightly toast baguette slices, and top with ricotta, fresh raspberries, toasted pine nuts, and a drizzle of honey. Raspberry Lemonade Purée equal parts raspberries and water in a blender. Strain and add lemon juice and agave syrup to taste. Serve over ice with a twist of lemon. Raspberry-Goat Cheese Pizza Spread mild goat cheese on stretched pizza dough. Sprinkle with fresh, whole raspberries, chopped walnuts, and fresh rosemary leaves. Drizzle with honey, and bake until the crust is golden.


NOW ON PBS! ALL NEW SEASON 4 Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking returns for Season 4 with host Pete Evans stirring up fun. Join us for pop-up feasts across the country – new locations, new chefs and artisans, and fabulous new dishes. For showtimes, recipes, and more, go to

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NEW! Recipes from Season 1 and 2 available in our cookbook. Previous seasons available on DVD. Visit TauntonStore.com

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The best of fine cooking cookfresh summer 2017  
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