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TEAROOMS • FOOD • TEA • TABLE SETTINGS

ANNUAL

British ISSUE

®

5

Splendid Places for Tea in

Southeastern

ENGLAND Page 48 P 8

MAR/APR 2019 $5.99 US

Vol 16, Issue 2

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DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 2, 2019

Art & Tea at Londons o n’s Rosewood Rossew Rosew wood London’s Teaa ttoo W We Welcome elcom a Royal Baby


MARCH/ APRIL 2019 ................................. VOLUME 16 . ISSUE 2

shamrocks

May your thoughts be , as glad as the May your heart be as light as a song. May each day bring you bright happy hours, That stay with you all year long. —Irish Blessing

teatimemagazine.com

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table of contents

27

30 50

Embellishments

Infusions

Departments

13 Necessary Things: An Anglophile’s Delight

17 The Perfect Cup: The Agony of the Leaves

7 Come for Tea

Teatime essentials

Stewing or brewing

A note from the editor

9 Dear TeaTime 15 Our Favorites: Earl Grey Blends

48 The Tea Experience: Taking Tea in Kent

Letters from readers

Best-loved infusions

The garden of England

11 Tea Events Calendar Events in March and April

19 Treasured Teapot: A Regal Soirée Royal Douton’s Countess

53 The Romance of Tea: Valerie and James Norwood Pratt

63 Resources for Readers Essential information

Falling in love at sea

65 Advertisers’ Index

Indulgences

55 Ahmad Teas

21 Tea Amongst the Shamrocks

57 London’s Rosewood Hotel

A guide to supporting companies

One family’s mission to sell quality teas

65 Recipe Index Helpful directory of featured foods

Where art and tea collide

For Saint Patrick’s Day

29 Gluten-free Scone: Teatime Classic

60 Collector’s Corner: My English Teapot Collection Eileen Bostick’s story

Jane’s scones

30 A Union Jack Tea Party Cheery British teatime

37 Welcome the Newest Royal An elegant celebration

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TeaTime March/April 2019

76 <0+7>-: Royal Albert’s Tea Rose Yellow china sets a beautiful table for an afternoon tea to celebrate the birth of a royal baby (page 37). Cover photography by William Dickey Recipe development/food styling by Jade Sinacori Styling by Courtni Bodiford

TEAR OOMS • FOOD • TEA • TABLE SETTI NGS

ANNUAL

British ISSUE

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Places

ENGLAND



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NEW BOOK! While the custom of afternoon tea originated in Europe, the beverage itself has ties around the world. Tea Parties Around the World, a 136-page hardback book by the editors of award-winning TeaTime magazine, celebrates teaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s global roots with ten menus inspired by different countries and cultures. Expert tea pairings, along with a tea-steeping primer, make it simple to choose and prepare the perfect pot of tea to accompany any of the delicacies in this book. With 97 recipes, Tea Parties Around the World presents a collection of scones, savories, and sweets perfect for treating teatime guests to an international culinary tour without the need for a passport.

ORDER YOUR COPY TODAY!

3 EASY WAYS TO ORDER Hoffman Media Store P.O. Box 6302 â&#x20AC;˘ Harlan, IA

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March/April 2019

Volume 16, Issue 2

EDITORIAL EDITOR Lorna Reeves CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

Jane Pettigrew, James Norwood Pratt, Bruce Richardson ASSOCIATE EDITOR Britt E. Stafford RECIPE EDITOR Fran Jensen SENIOR COPY EDITOR Rhonda Lee Lother COPY EDITORS

Meg Lundberg, Barbara McCarthy EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Katherine Cloninger CREATIVE DIRECTOR/PHOTOGRAPHY SENIOR PHOTOGRAPHER

Mac Jamieson John O’Hagan

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jim Bathie, William Dickey, Nicole Du Bois, Stephanie Welbourne Steele SENIOR DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST

Delisa McDaniel Clark Densmore

D I G I TA L M E D I A MARKETING DIRECTOR Tricia Wagner Williams MARKETING COORDINATOR Vicky Lewis ONLINE EDITOR Janece Maze DIGITAL DESIGNER Stephanie Lambert

GROUP CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Deanna Rippy Gardner ART DIRECTOR

Leighann Lott Bryant ST YLIST

Courtni Bodiford

TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR

Irene Yeh

ASSISTANT TEST KITCHEN DIRECTOR

Melissa Gray FOOD ST YLISTS/RECIPE DEVELOPERS

Laura Crandall, Kathleen Kanen, Tricia Manzanero, Vanessa Rocchio, Jade Sinacori, Elizabeth Stringer ASSISTANT FOOD ST YLIST/ RECIPE DEVELOPER

Anita Simpson Spain RECIPE TESTER

Ashley Jones

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teatimemagazine.com TeaTime (ISSN #1559-212X) is published bi-monthly by Hoffman Media, LLC, 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50, Birmingham, AL 35243. The cover and contents of TeaTime are fully protected by copyright and cannot be reproduced in any manner without prior written permission. All rights reserved in all countries. SUBSCRIPTION RATES: For the United States, $22.98 per year, 6 issues; add $10 for postage in Canada; add $20 elsewhere. Single issues $5.99 available at newsstands and bookstores. Periodicals postage paid at Birmingham, Alabama, and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO TeaTime, PO Box 6201, Harlan, IA, 51593, (800) 284-0023. NOTE: TeaTime assumes no responsibility for unsolicited photographs and manuscripts; submissions cannot be returned without a self-addressed stamped envelope.

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OR DE R D TO ! AY From the cool, rainy climate of Northern Ireland to the benign sunshine of Tasmania, Camellia sinensis is now cultivated in more than 65 countries around the globe. Jane Pettigrew’s exploration of tea farming and manufacture reveals the care and dedication of all those who nurture this remarkable plant to offer us an infinite choice of wonderful teas.

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editor’s letter

ea

come for

Afternoon tea came into vogu England during the time of Queen Victoria and h en attributed to Anna, the seventh Duchess of Bedford, a lady-in-waiting to the queen. Because the evening meal was typically served late, Lady Bedford reportedly had a light snack along with a cup of tea in the afternoon and soon began inviting friends to join her. Happily for all of us who enjoy having tea, the practice caught on. Last year, the wedding of Britain’s Price Harry and American actress Meghan Markle captivated many Anglophiles. What they may have not realized is that her first meeting with Queen Elizabeth was for afternoon tea in Buckingham Palace. To prepare for that important debut, Meghan visited Rose Tree Cottage in Pasadena, California. Its owners, the ever-charming Englishman Edmund Fry and his lovely wife, Mary, tutored her in tea etiquette, and the rest, as the saying goes, is history. A few months ago, I was at their tearoom to do a book signing for Taking Tea in which we feature Rose Tree Cottage, as well as several of Mary’s recipes. The venue is adorned with Union Jack bunting and pictures of the royal couple and filled with many British-made treasures, including an array of fascinators and other headwear, and I just couldn’t resist purchasing one to wear for my next afternoon tea. This issue is brimming with articles about English tea venues and companies as well as menus inspired by British food. Our elegant yellow rose–themed tea (page 37) is perfect for welcoming the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s baby, while our “Tea Amongst the Shamrocks” (page 21) is ideal for Saint Patrick’s Day on March 17. And our Union Jack afternoon tea (page 29) pays tribute to Britannia. London-based contributing editor Jane Pettigrew takes us to five tearooms near Kent in southeastern England in her article that begins on page 48, and Food Network judge Kerry Vincent recounts her visit to The Rosewood for an art-inspired teatime (page 57) along with celebrity baker Dan Lepard. Wherever you enjoy afternoon tea, I hope the “mere chink of cups and saucers will tune your heart to ” lways.

Mark Your Calendar!

7

World Tea Expo (Trade Show) June 10–13, 2019

Midwest Tea Festival September 7–8, 2019

Northwest Tea Festival September 28–29, 2019

Chicago International Tea Festival November 1–3, 2019

Las Vegas Convention Center Las Vegas, Nevada worldteaexpo.com

Ararat Shrine Auditorium Kansas City, Missouri midwestteafest.com

Seattle Center Exhibition Hall Seattle, Washington nwteafestival.com

Holiday Inn River Plaza-River North Chicago, Illinois citfest.com

TeaTime March/April 2019


dear TeaTime

Devotees of TeaTime “I think I’ve had a subscription to TeaTime magazine almost since it began! It has always been my escape to a gentler and more refined environment. I’ve made some of the recipes and researched and purchased some of the accoutrements, and I have a collection of the published tea books. Thank you for such a lovely publication!”

SET TIN GS D • TEA • TAB LE TEA ROO MS • FOO

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North America’s

#1 TEAE MAGAZIN

cipes & Inspirations

Favorit es SIP 2018

SUZANNE BROWN via teatimemagazine.com “I save all of my issues when they come in until I declare ‘a bed day.’ I spend the day in bed with my magazines and many cups of tea. Everyone should declare a bed day once in a while.” RITA TELLIER via Facebook “I have every TeaTime magazine issue over the last 10 years. They are a treasure/heirloom in my home.” ANGELA INGRAM via Facebook

A Guide to Afternoon Tea “I frequently have afternoon tea and never plan anything before checking TeaTime magazine. You have been my inspiration and motivator. Thank you!”

teaandwhimsey.com 9

TeaTime March/April 2019

C ta

Part y eats e ee

Fe br ua ryy Ja nu ar y/ F

2019

Notes of Gratitude “I just want to say how impressed I am that you always include Jewish holidays in your issues. Many commercial teas are certified kosher nowadays, and it is lovely to have recipes, decor, and menu ideas for those of us who keep kosher. Thanks for being so inclusive, and kudos on your wonderful magazine!” AMY RONNER via teatimemagazine.com

“Love my TeaTime books. I’ve been a subscriber for a long time. I use the foods, table settings, and tea favors many, many times for family, friends, and my red hat group long ago.”

“Thank you so much for your lovely magazine. I have been a subscriber for more than 10 years and have enjoyed each and every issue. I’ve tried many of your recipes with great success and have duplicated, in part, some of your beautiful tablescapes. I’ve learned a lot, too, about tea cultivation, tearooms in the US and abroad, and other things related to the lovely pastime of afternoon tea.”

MARY GALVAN HOLMES via Facebook

CAROL KYLE via teatimemagazine.com

KAY MORRISROE via Facebook

YOUR SOURCE FOR ONE-OF-A-KIND TEAPOTS AND UNIQUE TEA ACCESSORIES. 2400--2233 0-7107 24 0 -71 0 7

Valent Sensa

Your Comments, Please We truly enjoy hearing from our readers. Connect with us on Facebook, or write to us at teatime@hoffmanmedia.com or at Dear TeaTime, TeaTime Magazine, 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50, Birmingham, AL 35243. Your comments might be printed in an upcoming issue.


Cozy CORNER

THE

L

ADVERTISING

T E A PA I R I N G Super Irish Breakfast stashtea.com 800-800-TEAS

I come from a long line of Irish storytellers. My great-grandmother emigrated from Ireland to America in 1897, and the stories have been flowing ever since. Of all the places I’ve wandered across the pond, I fell most in love with a walled town in County Limerick. That idyllic place inspired me to create the setting of my Irish Village Mystery series, where Siobhán O’Sullivan investigates crimes, wrangles her five kooky siblings, and helps run her family’s local bistro. Ireland is full of colorful phrases and slang. Like all languages, some phrases are particular to certain counties. Some are also used in the UK. Here are a few of my favorites, which I first heard in Irish pubs and uttered by Irish friends, and now appear in The Irish Village Mystery series. —Carlene O’Connor Deadly

Awesome, cool

What’s the craic?

Craic is the Irish word for fun. This translates to “what’s up,” “what’s going on.” If the phrase is “That was some craic,” it means that they had a really good time.

That’s gas

Funny

That’s class

Cool, awesome. Something admired.

Give a bell

Make a phone call

What’s for you won’t pass you

Advice given when a person is longing for something, usually a love interest. A gentle way of saying “What will be, will be.”

Doing my messages

Doing errands/shopping

Jammers

“The place was jammers!” (Full to capacity, busy.)

Knackered

Tired

Up here for thinking, down there for dancing

Accompanied by pointing to the head and then the feet or midsection. Usually said after one utters something intelligent.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Carlene O’Connor is the USA Today best-selling author of the Irish Village Mystery series, which was inspired by a walled town in County Limerick. In the series, she has renamed the town and nudged it over to County Cork, just so the folks in the real town wouldn’t get browned off. In the latest Irish Village Mystery, Murder in an Irish Pub, competing card sharks stir up Siobhán O’Sullivan’s quiet Irish village as a poker tournament turns into a game of hangman. Learn more at carleneoconnor.net.


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March 23  24 17

Alice in Wonderland

Irish Breakfast Tea

CoďŹ&#x20AC;ee & Tea Festival NYC

6:00 p.m. Erikaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tea Room Clermont, Florida

Noon to 2:00 p.m. Pinecone Cottage Tea House Downers Grove, Illinois

10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Saturday) 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Sunday) Brooklyn Expo Center Brooklyn, New York

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be late for this very important date in Wonderland with Alice, the Mad Hatter, and the White Rabbit! Enjoy a four-course dinner with four diďŹ&#x20AC;erent teas, as well as games and activities. This festive, adult-only event is $30 per person, and reservations are required. For reservations, please call 908-670-2305 or go to erikastearoom.com.

Celebrate St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day with a delicious, Irish country-style teatime meal. Guests will enjoy a number of teatime treats, such as sausage and corned beef, Dublin coddle, soda bread, breakfast scones, and smoked salmon and crab strata accompanied by the loose-leaf tea of your choice. Th is event costs $29.50 per person. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 630-963-9130. For more information, visit pineconecottageteahouse.com.

tea events calendar

April 10 13 Winnie the Pooh Afternoon Tea 11:30 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corner Shoppe & Afternoon Tea San Diego, California Tap into your inner child, or bring your own child, to Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Corner Shoppeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ rst Winnie the Pooh Afternoon Tea. Th is whimsical event will feature a variety of tea fare, a quiz to test your knowledge on the beloved characters, and a gift to take home. For pricing information and to learn more about this event, visit sandiegoafternoontea.com. To reserve your spot, call 619-638-2748.

Join fellow tea enthusiasts for a weekend tasting and learning about the beloved beverage from diďŹ&#x20AC;erent vendors and exhibitors. Th is event will also oďŹ&#x20AC;er two days of seminars from industry professionals and pioneers. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit coďŹ&#x20AC;eeandteafestival.com/nyc.

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Enchanted April Tea

Tea for Life

11:00 a.m. Miss Spenserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Special-Teas New Virginia, Iowa

Noon to 3:30 p.m. Le Salon SpĂŠcialiste/ The Plaza at Cabrillo Marina San Pedro, California

Take time out of your hectic schedule and get away for a couple hours to the serene countryside at Miss Spenserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SpecialTeas. Our lovely tea party will be inspired by Elizabeth von Arnimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s charming book The Enchanted April. The tea menu for this event will have a Mediterranean inďŹ&#x201A;uence. Enhance your experience by reading the book or watching the movie ahead of time. Perfect for those who appreciate â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wisteria and Sunshine,â&#x20AC;? this event costs $35 plus tax per person. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 641-342-1547. For more information, visit missspensersspecialteas.com.

Come join us by the seaside at the Plaza at Cabrillo Marina for a midday tea to support Tea for Life. The proceeds from this event will go to Relay for Life to support the American Cancer Society. Guests will enjoy a ďŹ lling, four-course tea with salad, tea sandwiches, scones, and assorted sweets. This event costs $60 per person. To reserve your spot or learn more about this gathering, email info@ LeSalonRPV.com, or call 310-519-7980.

If you would like to publicize a tea event in your area, please send details and information at least four months before the event date to teatime@hoďŹ&#x20AC;manmedia.com or to Tea Events Calendar, TeaTime Magazine, 1900 International Park Drive, Suite 50, Birmingham, AL 35243. Your event could be included in a future issue.

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TeaTime March/April 2019

tell us!


necessary things

An Anglophile’s Delight Enjoy a bit of British culture with this lovely array of tea necessities Text by Katherine Cloninger

Fit for a Queen

Perfectly Posh

Featuring a pattern beloved by Queen Victoria, this elegant Buckingham Palace Great Exhibition Teapot is handmade using techniques from 250 years ago, and makes every afternoon tea feel like a royal affair. (£75 plus shipping, royalcollectionshop.co.uk)

Designed by O.W. London, this exclusive and stunning bone china teacup is adorned with Fortnum’s iconic Eau de Nil and accented with hand-painted 24-carat gold detailing. (£50 plus shipping, fortnumandmason.com)

Classically British Ahmad Tea’s charming Nostalgic Caddy evokes a vintage feel with the Union Jack flag and iconic British monuments and is filled with 20 English Breakfast teabags. ($9, ahmadteausa.com or 800-637-7704)

Beguiling Beauty Bedecked with colorful birds upon a gold leafy tree, this gorgeous 3-tier cake stand by award-winning British designer Sara Miller is the perfect display for savories, scones, and sweets. ($49.99, portmeirion.com or 888-778-1471)

Calming Scents Featuring an Oriental interpretation of the Wedgwood cameo, this beautiful Wonderlust Camellia Candle fills the room with a calming green tea and aloe aroma. ($49.95, wedgwood.com or 877-720-3486) 13

TeaTime March/April 2019


The history behind the authorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite foods with recipes adapted from her family cookbooks.

$

34

Photographed at Jane Austenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s House Museum and Chawton House. 218 Full Color Pages p 45 Food History Articles p 75 Recipe Adaptations

DiningwithJaneAusten.org ashgrovepress.com

913-530-4308


our favorites

Earl Grey Lavender

Grey Line

Creamy Earl Grey

UPTON TEA IMPORTS

HUGO TEA COMPANY

LOT 35

uptontea.com • 800-234-8327

hugotea.com • 816-832-4311

fairmontstore.com • 800-866-9566

TEACUP: Wedgwood Cuckoo Green

TEACUP: Wedgwood Cuckcoo Peach

TEACUP: Wedgwood Cuckoo Blue

“I love the fragrant aroma of lavender and bergamot in this flowery brew. It’s soothing and flavorful, making it perfect for afternoon tea in the spring.”

“The malty goodness of Yunnan black tea coupled with the citrusy notes of Italian bergamot make for a marvelous variation on time-honored Earl Grey.”

“The vanilla in this Earl Grey slightly subdues the typically strong taste of this beloved favorite and gives it a wonderful creamy taste and finish.”

—Katherine Cloninger, editorial assistant

—Lorna Reeves, editor

—Britt Stafford, associate editor

Earl Grey Blends

These bergamot-scented infusions are royally delightful.

Earl Grey

Emerald Green Earl Grey

T

th thnan E Earll Grey G

AHMAD TEA

SIMPSON & VAIL

BRITS

ahmadteausa.com • 800-637-7704

svtea.com • 800-282-8372

britsusa.com • 785-843-2288

TEACUP: Wedgwood Butterfly Bloom Butterfly Posy

TEACUP: Wedgwood Cuckoo Pink

TEACUP: Wedgwood Butterfly Bloom Blue Peony

“This quintessentially British infusion has just the right amount of bite and is wonderful to sip on for a morning or afternoon pick-me-up.”

“Though I’m not an avid green tea drinker, the taste of this tea is delectable. It has a lighter flavor while still featuring the hint of bergamot traditional in Earl Grey.”

“This blend, which contains rare Cornish tea leaves harvested in the UK, holds true to the astringent and bold notes that make this black tea a classic.”

—Courtni Bodiford, stylist

—Janice Ritter, dealer program manager

—Leighann Bryant, art director

...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................

A GENTLE REMINDER: The oil of the bergamot, a thick-skinned citrus fruit native to the Mediterranean coast, is what gives Earl Grey its signature flavor. When steeping any tea, be sure to read the package for the best brewing practices, as water temperatures and steeping times will vary. All cups and saucers are available from Wedgwood, 877-720-3486, wedgwood.com.

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TeaTime March/April 2019


teatimemagazine.com

16


the perfect cup

The Agony of the Leaves Text and Photography by Bruce Richardson

he “agony of the leaves” is a centuries-old phrase sed by tea traders to describe the twisting allet tea leaves perform as they are awakened by boiling water. The leaves “may appear tormented and miserable, like autumn leaves in a storm, but they also look dancing and fanciful,” wrote Helen Gustafson in her 1996 book, Agony of the Leaves: The Ecstasy of My Life with Tea. However, as in all choreographed performances, there is a time for the first act to end and the tea drinking to begin. For the very staid British tea drinker, that vital stage direction is frequently ignored, leading to the detriment of good tea making. I often find tearooms, in both the UK and the US, guilty of allowing tea leaves to stew rather than brew. I’m reminded of the story of the 18th-century housewife in Salem, Massachusetts, who received a small portion of tea leaves from her husband one afternoon. He had purchased the expensive commodity from a merchant ship moored in the harbor. “How do you prepare it?” she asked. “I’m not sure,” he replied. “I only know you put it into hot water.” Thinking she had the recipe figured out and without benefit of a tea reference book, the wife placed the entire contents of her rare gift into a cauldron of water simmering over the hearth. The agony of the leaves quickly commenced, and, within a half hour, the leaves were fully hydrated, emerald green, and tripled in size. The proud woman poured away the hot liquid on her garden, spooned the steaming leaves onto an ironstone plate, and seasoned her exotic entrée with butter and salt. Needless to say, the tea suffered from an unfortunate preparation. How can 21st-century tea people avoid the woes of stewed tea? There are numerous books, podcasts, videos, magazines, and an array of educational programs that offer guidance in making good tea.

17

TeaTime March/April 2019

Every tea family calls for a specific time and temperature for optimum enjoyment. There is no reason to continue making tea by blindly putting spoons of leaves into a pot and dousing it with hot water. Today’s tea drinker can taste the difference in a well-made pot of tea. Maybe we teaists should lead a movement, like the wine renaissance of the late 20th century, to encourage the food service industry to make tea with appropriate water temperatures, steeped at an optimum length of time, and decanted to prevent over-steeping. That way, we prevent unfortunate preparation, and the agony of the leaves won’t result in more agony showing on the face of the tea drinker. Go forth and make good tea!

TeaTime contributing editor Bruce Richardson is co-author of The New Tea Companion (Expanded Third Edition, 2015) published by Benjamin Press and available at elmwoodinn.com.


Memories made with every cup.

Family Owned and Operated, Traditional English-style Tea Room, Homemade Scones, Sandwiches, Quiche, Desserts, and High Tea Host your special occasion here: themed event, bridal shower, baby shower, or rehearsal dinner, We offer catering and specialty cakes. Buses Welcome | Seats up to 60 | Reservations Recommended

787 West Montrose Street | Clermont, FL 34711 | 908-670-2305 Only 15 minutes from Disney in Historic Downtown Shopping District

www.erikastearoom.com

French themed Tea Salon F and Cafe serving full luncheon and tea fare, desserts d and imported teas. A little bit of Paris in Old Towne Orange, CA

www.parisinacup.com ¡ 714-538-9411 119 S Glassell Street, Orange, CA 92866 teatimemagazine.com

18


Soirée

treasured teapot

A REGAL

Royal Doulton’s original Countess pattern is a timeless treasure worth featuring on any tea table.

yal Doulton has been an illustrious name in tableware and eramics for more than two centuries. While founded in London, the company moved production in 1877 to Staffordshire, where it still has a design studio, although its production facility is now in Indonesia. With several notable patterns and products, Royal Doulton’s original Countess earthenware teapot lives up to its stately name, featuring a design of perennial painted garlands with green and yellow medallions reminiscent of Neoclassical design. First released in the early 20th century and discontinued in 1961, the pattern’s delicate details and touches of gold make it a versatile teatime accoutrement to be enjoyed in a variety of settings.

Text by Britt E. Stafford Photography by Caroline Smith


Let the Countess teapot become a part of your springtime festivities by pairing it with Royal Worcester’s Embassy Light Green dinner plates, teacups, and saucers, and Royal Doulton’s Alton salad plates and bread-and-butter plates. White linens and the subtle scrollwork on Gorham’s Rondo flatware make it a charming

Flowery Flair

table for tea.

Vibrant View

Pops ps of color from a brightbright hued tablecloth and Anna Weatherly’s Anna’s Palette Purple Orchid dinner plates help the Countess teapot shine alongside Royal Worcester’s scalloped Dunrobin salad plates, teacups, and saucers. Gorham’s Medici flatware elevates the setting for a polished, yet modern, ambiance.

teatimemagazine.com

20


TEA AMONGST THE

Shamrocks From the verdant centerpieces to the cheery china, a table adorned in green, white, and gold is an idyllic way to celebrate St. Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day on March 17, especially when the tea fare is inspired by Irish cuisine.


Corned Beef & Cabbage Canapés Makes 24

¼ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar ½ teaspoon stone-ground mustard ¼ teaspoon minced pickled ginger ¼ teaspoon finely chopped fresh parsley ⁄ teaspoon celery seeds ¼ teaspoon ground black pepper, divided 1½ cups tricolored coleslaw salad mix 1½ cups mashed potatoes, warmed 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened and divided 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream, warmed 2 teaspoons kosher salt, divided 1 large egg ¾ cup self-rising flour 3 (⁄-inch-thick) slices corned beef 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard

Pesto-Chicken Tea Sandwiches Makes 24

2¼ cups fresh arugula 1 (0.75-ounce) package fresh basil ¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil ½ cup grated Parmesan cheese ¼ cup honey ¼ cup fresh lemon juice 1 clove garlic ½ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 2 cups shredded cooked chicken 16 slices white bread

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TeaTime March/April 2019

• In the container of a blender, place arugula, basil, oil, cheese, honey, lemon juice, garlic, salt, and pepper; blend until smooth. Transfer pesto to a large bowl; stir in chicken. • Spoon ¼ cup chicken pesto onto 8 bread slices. Cover with remaining bread slices to make 8 sandwiches. Using a serrated bread knife in a gentle sawing motion, trim and discard crusts from sandwiches. Cut each sandwich into 3 (3x1-inch) rectangles. Serve immediately, or cover with damp paper towels, place in an airtight container, and refrigerate until serving time.

• In a large bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, vinegar, mustard, ginger, parsley, celery seeds, and ∕ teaspoon pepper. Stir in coleslaw. Transfer mixture to an airtight container, and refrigerate until ready to serve. • In another large bowl, beat potatoes, 2 tablespoons butter, cream, and 1 teaspoon salt with a mixer at medium speed until smooth. Press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto surface of potatoes, and let cool to room temperature. • Add egg, flour, remaining ∕ teaspoon pepper, and remaining 1 teaspoon salt to potatoes, and stir until a slightly lumpy batter forms. • In a large skillet, melt remaining 2 tablespoons butter over medium heat. Spoon 2 tablespoons batter per pancake into skillet. Cook until golden brown on both sides, turning once. Transfer to a heatproof plate. • Using a 1¼-inch shamrock-shaped cutter, cut 24 shapes from pancakes.


Using a slightly smaller shamrockshaped cutter, cut 24 shapes from corned beef. • On each shamrock-shaped pancake, layer ⅛ teaspoon mustard, a corned beef shamrock, and coleslaw. Serve immediately. MAKE-AHEAD TIP: Pancakes can be prepared and cut out a day in advance. Place shamrock cutouts in a single layer in an airtight container, and refrigerate. Let come to room temperature before using.

Watercress & Pea Soup Makes 8 servings

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 cup diced sweet onion 1 cup thinly sliced celery ½ teaspoon minced garlic ¼ teaspoon kosher salt ⁄ teaspoon ground black pepper 1 (32-ounce) carton garden vegetable broth ¼ teaspoon herbes de Provence ⁄ teaspoon paprika ⁄ teaspoon garam masala 1 (12-ounce) package English peas 4 ounces watercress Garnish: ½ cup sour cream and watercress

• In a medium Dutch oven, heat oil over medium heat. Add onion, celery, garlic, salt, and pepper; cook until fragrant, 3 to 4 minutes. Add broth, herbes de Provence, paprika, and garam masala; bring to a boil. Stir in peas and watercress. Reduce heat, and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat; using a hand blender, blend until smooth. Serve warm. • Just before serving, place sour cream in a piping bag fitted with a large open-star tip (Wilton #1M), and pipe a rosette onto each soup spoon, if desired. Garnish individual servings with watercress, if desired. teatimemagazine.com

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Irish Cheddar Scones Makes 15

2 cups all-purpose flour 1¼ cups shredded Irish Cheddar cheese, divided 1 tablespoon baking powder 2 teaspoons kosher salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper 5 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed ¾ cup whole buttermilk 1 large egg 1 tablespoon heavy whipping cream

• Preheat oven to 425°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In a large bowl, whisk together flour, 1 cup cheese, baking powder, salt, and pepper. Using a pastry blender or 2 forks, cut in cold butter until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add buttermilk, stirring just until dough comes together. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and knead until a smooth dough forms. Using a rolling pin, roll out dough to a ½-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch fluted round cutter, cut 15 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Places scones on prepared baking sheet. • In a small bowl, whisk together egg and cream. Brush tops of scones with egg wash, and sprinkle with remaining ¼ cup cheese. • Bake until a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, approximately 12 minutes. Serve warm. Recommended Condiment • Blackcurrant Jam

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TEA

sommelier .................................................................... Serve a terrific trio of teas along with the various courses of this Irish-themed menu for good luck all year. SAVOURIES COURSE: Mark T. Wendell’s Victorian Afternoon marktwendell.com • 978-635-9200 SCONE COURSE: Elmwood Inn’s Irish Blend Black Tea elmwoodinn.com • 800-765-2139 SWEETS COURSE: Trail Lodge Tea’s Connemara Morning traillodgetea.com • 314-680-3015


Matcha-Yogurt Glaze Makes approximately 1½ cups

1¼ cups confectioners’ sugar ¼ cup heavy whipping cream 2 tablespoons plain Icelandic-style yogurt ½ teaspoon fresh lemon juice ¼ teaspoon culinary matcha green tea

• In a small bowl, whisk together confectioners’ sugar, cream, yogurt, lemon juice, and matcha until smooth. Use immediately.

White Chocolate–Lime Blondies Makes approximately 40

Matcha-Almond Mini Bundt Cakes Makes 24

1 cup unsalted butter, softened 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup almond paste 3 large eggs 1 tablespoon vanilla bean paste 2½ cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon kosher salt 1 cup whole buttermilk ½ cup sliced almonds Matcha-Yogurt Glaze (recipe follows) Garnish: white nonpareils

• Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a 24-well mini Bundt cake pan with baking spray with flour. • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together butter, sugar, and almond 27

TeaTime March/April 2019

paste at medium speed until creamy, 3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. Add eggs, one at time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla bean paste. • In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. With mixer at low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with buttermilk, beginning and ending with flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. Beat in almonds. Spoon batter into prepared wells, filling three-fourths full; smooth tops with an offset spatula. • Bake until a wooden pick inserted near centers comes out clean, approximately 20 minutes. Let cool in pan for 10 minutes. Remove from pan, and let cool completely on a wire rack. • Spoon glaze over cooled cakes. Garnish with nonpareils, if desired.

1 cup unsalted butter, softened 2½ cups granulated sugar 3 large eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 cups all-purpose flour ½ teaspoon baking powder ⁄ teaspoon kosher salt 1 (4-ounce) bar white chocolate, coarsely chopped 1 teaspoon fresh lime zest Garnish: melted white chocolate and fresh lime zest

• Preheat oven to 350°. Line a 13x9-inch baking pan with foil, letting excess extend over sides of pan. Spray foil with cooking spray. • In a large bowl, beat together butter and sugar with a mixer at medium speed until fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla. • In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. With mixer at low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating until combined. Stir in white chocolate and zest just until incorporated. Spread batter in prepared pan. • Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 25 to 30


minutes. Let cool completely in pan. Using excess foil as handles, remove from pan, and cut into 1½-inch squares. • Garnish with a drizzle of melted white chocolate and a sprinkle of zest, if desired.

Mint & Chocolate Tartlets Makes 24

1 cup plus 2 tablespoons chocolate wafer crumbs ⁄ cup plus ¼ cup granulated sugar, divided ¼ cup unsalted butter, melted ⁄ teaspoon kosher salt 2 cups water 1 (0.75-ounce) package fresh mint 2⁄ cups heavy whipping cream, divided ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons whole milk 6 large egg yolks 3 tablespoons cornstarch 4 ounces mascarpone cheese Garnish: fresh mint leaves

• Preheat oven to 350°. Spray 2 (12-well) mini cheesecake pans with baking spray with flour. • In a medium bowl, stir together cookie crumbs, ¼ cup sugar, melted butter, and salt. Press mixture into bottoms of wells of prepared pans. • Bake for 10 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack. • Fill a small bowl with ice water. Set aside. • In a small saucepan, bring 2 cups water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add mint; boil for 10 seconds. Remove mint using a slotted spoon, and immediately place in ice water; let stand for 30 seconds. Remove mint from ice water, and squeeze dry with paper towels. • In a small saucepan, bring 1⅔ cups cream and milk to a simmer over medium heat. In the container of a blender, place cream mixture and mint; blend until mixture turns pale green. Return mixture to saucepan,

and bring just to a boil over medium heat. • In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks, cornstarch, and remaining ⅓ cup sugar. Add ½ cup hot cream mixture to egg mixture, whisking constantly. Return mixture to pan, and cook, whisking constantly, until thickened, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from heat, and transfer to a shallow heatproof bowl. Press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto surface, and let cool to room temperature. • In a medium bowl, beat mascarpone

cheese and remaining 1 cup cream with a mixer at medium-high speed until soft peaks form. Fold mascarpone mixture into cooled mint custard. Transfer mixture to a large piping bag with a large hole cut in tip. Pipe mixture onto prepared crusts, filling wells three-fourths full. Freeze for at least 2 hours. • Carefully remove tartlets from pans, and let stand at room temperature for 20 minutes before serving. • Garnish with mint, if desired.

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gluten-free scone

Teatime Classic In the 1980s, contributing editor Jane Pettigrew owned a tearoom in London, where scone-making was part of her daily routine. This adaptation of her favourite recipe will delight those who have a gluten sensitivity, as well as those who don’t. Photography by John O'Hagan Tea Pairing by Grace Tea Company

Jane’s Scones Makes 5 to 7

8 ounces (approximately 1⁄ cups) gluten-free all-purpose baking flour* 3½ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon kosher salt 2 ounces (¼ cup) European-style butter, softened and cut into pieces 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) caster sugar 2 medium eggs, divided, beaten 3.5 to 4.5 fluid ounces whole milk, divided

• Preheat oven to 450° F (Gas 8, 230° C). Line a baking tray with parchment paper, or grease with butter and dredge with flour. • In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. Using fingers, rub in the softened butter as lightly as possible until the mixture resembles bread crumbs. Stir in the sugar. Add 1 egg, and bind the 29

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TEA

sommelier

.................................................................... Steep a flavorful single-origin black tea, such as this marvelous, hand-rolled offering from Satemwa Tea Estates in Malawi, to accompany this classic scone. Order from Grace Tea Company online at gracetea.com or by phone at 978-635-9500. Golden Treasure Black

mixture with a fork. Gradually add 3 to 4 fluid ounces milk to form a fairly stiff dough. • Turn out dough onto a floured board, and gently knead by patting dough and folding it in half 3 or 4 times. Roll out dough to a 1-inch thickness. Using a 2½-inch fluted round cutter dipped in flour, cut as many scones as possible from dough. (Press cutter straight down, being careful not to twist it.) Place scones, almost touching, on prepared baking tray.

• In a small bowl, whisk together remaining egg with remaining .5 fluid ounces (1 tablespoon) milk. Brush mixture over tops of scones. • Bake until firm and light golden, 13 to 15 minutes. Serve immediately. *We used Bob’s Red Mill Gluten Free 1-to-1 Baking Flour. Recommended Condiments • Devon Cream • Orange Marmalade


A UNION JACK

Tea Party

Anglophiles will delight when they see a whimsically decorated table set with a platter and a three-tiered stand brimming with toothsome teatime treats.

Photography by John O'Ha Recipe Development/Fo d i g by Jade Sinacori Tea Pairings by Ah d a


Olive & English Cheddar Tea Sandwiches Makes 12

2 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 1½ teaspoons Worcestershire sauce, divided 3 ounces English Cheddar cheese, shredded ½ cup pitted Castelvetrano olives 2 anchovy fillets ⁄ cup canned artichoke hearts, drained ¾ teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon chopped fresh parsley ¼ teaspoon olive oil 8 slices white bread

• In a medium bowl, beat together butter and 1 teaspoon Worcestershire with a mixer at medium speed until smooth. Scrape sides of bowl. Add cheese, and beat until well combined. Transfer mixture to an airtight container, and refrigerate. Let come to room temperature before using. • In the work bowl of a food processor, process together olives, anchovies, artichokes, pepper, parsley, oil, and remaining ½ teaspoon Worcestershire until smooth. Transfer mixture to an airtight container, and refrigerate until ready to use, up to 2 days. • Using a 2-teaspoon levered scoop, portion 2 scoops cheese mixture onto each of 4 bread slices. Spread in an even layer. Using a 2-tablespoon levered scoop, portion olive mixture onto cheese mixture. Spread in an even layer. Cover with remaining bread slices to make 4 sandwiches.

• Using a serrated bread knife in a gentle sawing motion, trim and discard crusts from sandwiches. Cut each sandwich into 3 (3x1-inch) rectangles. Serve immediately, or cover with damp paper towels, place in an airtight container, and refrigerate until serving time.

discard crusts from sandwiches. Cut each sandwich into 4 (3x1-inch) rectangles. Serve immediately, or cover with damp paper towels, place in an airtight container, and refrigerate until serving time.

Smoked Salmon and Tomato Canapés Roast Beef, Horseradish, and Cucumber Tea Sandwiches Makes 12

1 large English cucumber, peeled ¼ cup mayonnaise 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill 1 tablespoon prepared horseradish ¾ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 6 slices marbled rye bread ½ pound thinly sliced deli London port roast beef

• Using a sharp knife, cut cucumber into 3-inch-long pieces. Using a mandoline, slice cucumber pieces horizontally into long strips. Place cucumber slices in a single layer on paper towels until ready to use. • In a small bowl, stir together mayonnaise, dill, horseradish, salt, and pepper. Spread mixture onto one side of each bread slice. Layer cucumber slices to a ⅛-inch thickness on spread side of 3 bread slices. Shingle roast beef slices on top of cucumber to a ¼-inch thickness. Cover with remaining bread slices, spread side down, to make 3 sandwiches. • Using a serrated bread knife in a gentle sawing motion, trim and

“Send her victorious, Happy and glorious, Long reign over us, God save the Queen.” —lyrics to “God Save The Queen”

Makes 12

6 slices multigrain bread, frozen 3 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons English mustard*, divided ⁄ teaspoon kosher salt ⁄ teaspoon ground black pepper 3 tablespoons sour cream ⁄ cup assorted cherry tomatoes 12 thin slices smoked salmon Garnish: watercress

• Preheat oven to 350°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • Using a 2-inch round cutter, cut 12 rounds from frozen bread slices. • In a small bowl, stir together oil and 2 teaspoons mustard. Brush mixture onto both sides of bread rounds, and sprinkle with salt and pepper. Place on prepared baking sheet. • Bake until bread rounds are golden brown and crisp, approximately 10 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack. • In a small bowl, stir together sour cream and remaining 2 tablespoons mustard until smooth. Spread an even layer of mixture onto bread rounds. • Using a serrated knife, slice tomatoes into ⅛-inch-thick rounds. Arrange four tomato slices on each bread round. • Using a paring knife, cut salmon into 48 (1¼x1x½-inch) triangular slices. Shape each salmon triangle into a cone, and arrange on top of tomato slices. Serve immediately, or cover with damp paper towels, place in an airtight container, and refrigerate until serving time. Garnish with watercress, if desired. *We used Colman’s Mustard.

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Banoffee Scones Makes 12

2 cups all-purpose flour ½ cup bread flour ½ cup caster sugar 1 tablespoon baking powder ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 5 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed ½ cup milk chocolate toffee bits 6 tablespoons mashed ripe banana 2 large eggs, divided 2 tablespoons whole buttermilk, divided

• Preheat oven to 375°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In a large bowl, whisk together flours, caster sugar, baking powder, and salt. Using a pastry blender or 2 forks, cut in cold butter until it resembles coarse crumbs. Add toffee bits, stirring well. • In a small bowl, whisk together banana, 1 egg, and 1 tablespoon buttermilk. Add banana mixture to flour mixture, and stir until a crumbly dough begins to form. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and knead until a smooth dough forms. Using a rolling pin, roll out dough to a ½-inch thickness. Using a 2¼-inch round cutter, cut 12 scones from dough, rerolling scraps as necessary. Place on prepared baking sheet. Freeze for 10 minutes. • In a small bowl, whisk together remaining 1 egg and remaining 1 tablespoon buttermilk. Brush tops of scones with egg wash. • Bake until scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, approximately 14 minutes. Serve warm. Recommended Condiment • Devonshire Cream

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TEA

sommelier .................................................................... While Ahmad Tea’s decorative tins serve as colorful vases for flowers, its flavorful teas pair beautifully with the various courses of this afternoon tea menu. To purchase, go to ahmadtea.com, or ring 800-637-7704. SAVOURIES COURSE: English Tea No. 1 SCONE COURSE: Mango Magic Black Tea SWEETS COURSE: Rooibos & Cinnamon Herbal Tisane


“In nothing is the English genius for domesticity more notably declared than in the institution of this festival—almost one may call it so—of afternoon tea.” —George Gissing, The Private Papers of Henry Ryecroft

Blueberry & Ginger Custard Loaves Makes 3 (5½x3-inch) loaves

1¾ cups heavy whipping cream, divided 1½ teaspoons grated fresh ginger, divided 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 large egg yolks 2⁄ cups plus 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour, divided 2 tablespoons plus 1½ teaspoons caster sugar, divided ½ cup plus 1 tablespoon unsalted butter, softened and divided 1 cup plus 1 tablespoon firmly packed light brown sugar 2 large eggs 1⁄ teaspoons baking powder, divided 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon kosher salt 1½ cups fresh blueberries

• Preheat oven to 425°. Spray 3 (5½x3-inch) loaf pans* with baking spray with flour. Line pans with parchment paper, letting excess extend over sides of pans. • In a small saucepan, heat ¾ cup cream, 1 teaspoon ginger, and vanilla over medium-high heat, whisking constantly, until mixture begins to boil. Remove from heat. • In a small bowl, whisk together egg yolks, 1 tablespoon flour, and 1½ teaspoons caster sugar. Add hot cream mixture to egg mixture, whisking constantly. Return mixture to pan, and cook, whisking constantly, until mixture thickens. Transfer to a shallow heatproof bowl, and press a piece of plastic wrap directly onto surface to prevent a skin from forming. Let cool completely. • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together ½ cup butter and brown sugar at medium speed until fluffy, 35

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3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. • In a medium bowl, whisk together 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, baking soda, salt, and remaining ½ teaspoon ginger. With mixer at low speed, gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture alternately with remaining 1 cup cream, beginning and ending with flour mixture, beating just until combined after each addition. • In a small bowl, toss together blueberries and 1 tablespoon flour. Fold blueberries into batter. Spoon a layer of batter into prepared pans, filling each one-fourth full. Divide custard among prepared pans. Top with remaining batter, smoothing tops with an offset spatula. • In another small bowl, stir together remaining ⅓ cup plus 1 tablespoon flour, remaining 2 tablespoons caster sugar, and remaining ⅛ teaspoon baking powder. Using a pastry blender or 2 forks, cut in remaining 1 tablespoon butter until it resembles sand. Sprinkle on top of each loaf. • Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°, and bake 15 minutes more. Loosely cover with foil, and bake until a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, 20 to 25 minutes more. Let cool completely in pans on wire racks. • Using excess parchment as handles, remove loaves from pans. Using a serrated knife, cut loaves into ¾-inch slices. Serve warm. *For the success of this recipe, it is important to use loaf pans of this size. MAKEAHEAD TIP: Wrap loaves well in plastic wrap, and freeze for up to 2 weeks. Let thaw, and rewarm in oven just before to serving.

Treacle-Oatmeal Cookies Makes 32

¼ cup unsalted butter, softened ¼ cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons canola oil 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons golden syrup* 1 large egg, room temperature ½ teaspoon vanilla extract 1½ cups plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon kosher salt ¼ teaspoon ground cinnamon ¼ teaspoon ground cloves ½ cup quick-cooking oats

• In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together butter, brown sugar, and oil at medium speed until creamy, 3 to 4 minutes, stopping to scrape sides of bowl. With mixer at low speed, add golden syrup, egg, and vanilla, beating until combined. Scrape sides of bowl. • In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking soda, salt, cinnamon, and cloves. Gradually add flour mixture to butter mixture, beating just until combined. Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface, and shape into a disk. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. • Preheat oven to 375°. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. • Place oats in a shallow bowl. Using a 1¾-teaspoon scoop, scoop dough, and roll into balls. Roll balls in oats, coating completely. Place on prepared baking sheet. • Bake for 10 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack. Store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 3 days. *We used Lyle’s Golden Syrup.


Apricot & Almond Miniature Sticky Buns Makes approximately 20

1 cup unsalted butter 1¼ cups apricot preserves, divided 1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar ½ cup all-purpose flour Sour Cream Dough (recipe follows) 1 cup sliced almonds, toasted 1 cup finely chopped dried apricots 2 tablespoons water 1¼ cups confectioners’ sugar

• Preheat oven to 350°. Spray a 24-well mini muffin pan with baking spray with flour. • In a medium microwave-safe bowl, combine butter and 1 cup preserves. Microwave on high in 30-second intervals, stirring between each until butter melts and mixture is smooth. Stir in brown sugar and flour until smooth. • Using a rolling pin, roll half of Sour Cream Dough into a 16x14-inch rectangle on a lightly floured surface. Sprinkle half of brown sugar mixture over dough, and spread in a thin layer. Sprinkle with half of almonds and half of dried apricots. Starting at one long side, roll up dough, jelly roll style; pinch seam to seal. Trim ends, and cut into 10 (¾-inch-thick) buns. Repeat with remaining dough, brown sugar mixture, almonds, and apricots. Place buns, cut side up, in wells of prepared muffin pan. • Bake until golden brown, approximately 25 minutes. • In a small microwave-safe bowl, combine 2 tablespoons water and remaining ¼ cup preserves. Microwave on high in 30-second intervals, stirring between each, until mixture is smooth. Transfer to a medium bowl, and stir in confectioners’ sugar until a smooth glaze forms. Spread glaze over buns. Serve warm.

Sour Cream Dough Makes 20 buns

1 cup warm whole milk (105° to 110°), divided 1 (0.25-ounce) package active dry yeast ⁄ cup unsalted butter, melted ¼ cup granulated sugar ¼ cup sour cream 1 large egg 4 cups all-purpose flour, divided 1¼ teaspoons kosher salt

• In a medium bowl, stir together ¾ cup warm milk and yeast. Let stand until mixture is foamy, approximately 10 minutes. • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, gently stir together by hand melted butter,

sugar, sour cream, egg, and remaining ¼ cup warm milk. • In a large bowl, whisk together 3½ cups flour and salt. Add half of flour mixture to butter mixture. With mixer at low speed, add yeast mixture, beating just until combined. Beat in remaining flour mixture. Switch to the dough hook attachment. Beat at medium speed until dough is smooth and elastic, approximately 3 minutes, adding remaining ½ cup flour if needed. (Dough should not be sticky.) Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Divide dough in half, and loosely shape each half into a ball. • Spray 2 large bowls with cooking spray. Place dough in bowls, turning to grease top. Loosely cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°) until doubled in size, approximately 1 hour. teatimemagazine.com

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W

r byy Wi l a ick e pe De e o m l ng y Te a g gss b Si Si Vail aili ai

Si a

i


Welcome

THE NEWEST ROYAL

Gather friends to commemorate the arrival of the Duke and Duchess of Sussexâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s much anticipated bundle of joy with a celebratory afternoon tea in true English style.


Smoked Trout, Cucumber, and Dill Canapés Makes 12

6 slices white bread, frozen 2 tablespoons olive oil 1½ teaspoons kosher salt, divided ¾ teaspoon ground black pepper, divided ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons crème fraîche 2 teaspoons minced fresh dill 2 (3.88-ounce) cans smoked trout in canola oil, drained 1 small English cucumber Garnish: fresh dill

• Preheat oven to 350°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • Using a 2-inch round cutter, cut 12 rounds from frozen bread. Brush both sides of bread rounds with oil, and sprinkle with ½ teaspoon salt and ¼ teaspoon pepper. Place bread rounds on prepared baking sheet. • Bake until bread rounds are golden brown and crisp to the touch, approximately 12 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack. • In a medium bowl, stir together crème fraîche, dill, remaining 1 teaspoon salt, and remaining ½ teaspoon pepper. Fold in trout. • To assemble canapés, place a 1½-inch round cutter in center of a toasted bread round. Using a 1¾-teaspoon scoop, portion trout mixture into center of cutter. Gently press trout mixture into an even layer, and remove cutter. Repeat with remaining bread rounds and trout mixture. • Using a mandoline* on the thinnest setting, slice 48 rounds from cucumber. Pat slices dry with paper towels. Fold each cucumber slice in half twice, and arrange 4 folded slices atop each canapé. • Garnish with dill, if desired. Serve immediately. 39

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*We used a Kyocera Adjustable Mandoline, available from Sur la Table, surlatable.com. MAKEAHEAD TIP: Toasted bread rounds can be stored between layers of parchment paper in an airtight container for up to 3 days. Trout mixture can be prepared up to a day in advance, placed in an airtight container, and refrigerated until needed.

Spinach-Feta Pastry Cups Makes 48

2 (9.5-ounce) boxes bite-size puff pastry cups 1 tablespoon unsalted butter 1 small sweet onion, minced 2 teaspoons thinly sliced fresh chives ¾ teaspoon kosher salt ½ teaspoon minced fresh mint ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 4 ounces feta cheese, crumbled ½ (6-ounce) package frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained 2 tablespoons cottage cheese 1 large egg, lightly beaten Garnish: fresh mint leaves

• Preheat oven to 400°. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper. • Arrange puff pastry cups on prepared baking sheets, and bake according to package directions. • In a small skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Add onion; cook until fragrant, approximately 2 minutes. Add chives, salt, mint, and pepper, stirring well; cook for 2 minutes. Transfer to a heatproof bowl, and let cool completely. • Add feta, spinach, cottage cheese, and egg to cooled onion mixture, stirring to combine. Spoon mixture into prepared pastry cups. Loosely cover filled pastries with foil. • Bake until heated through, approximately 5 minutes.

• Garnish with mint, if desired. Serve warm.

Tomato-Crab Tea Sandwiches Makes 9

3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened 2 teaspoons minced fresh basil 1⁄ teaspoons kosher salt, divided 6 slices wheat bread 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard 1 tablespoon mayonnaise ½ teaspoon ground black pepper 1 (6-ounce) can jumbo lump crabmeat, drained ½ cup grape tomatoes, sliced into ¼-inch rounds 2 tablespoons watercress Garnish: fresh basil leaves

• In a small bowl, stir together butter, basil, and ⅛ teaspoon salt. Spread butter mixture onto one side of each bread slice. • In a medium bowl, stir together mustard, mayonnaise, pepper, and remaining 1 teaspoon salt. Fold in crabmeat. Spread crab mixture onto butter side of 3 bread slices. Cover each with a remaining bread slice, butter side down, to make 3 sandwiches. • Using a serrated bread knife in a gentle sawing motion, trim and discard crusts from sandwiches. Cut each sandwich into 3 (3x1-inch) rectangles. Remove top bread rectangles from tea sandwiches, and place 3 tomato slices in a single layer over crab mixture, top with a layer of watercress, and replace top bread rectangles. Serve immediately, or cover with damp paper towels, place in an airtight container, and refrigerate until serving time. • Garnish with basil, if desired.


TEA

sommelier .................................................................... A selection of teas and tisanes inspired by British literary figures are the perfect complement to the courses of this regal afternoon tea. To order, contact Simpson & Vail at 800-282-8327 or svtea.com. SAVOURIES COURSE: Lewis Carroll’s Black Tea Blend SCONE COURSE: Charles Dickens’ Black Tea Blend SWEETS COURSE: Beatrix Potter’s Organic Herbal Tisane Blend


Chelsea Bun Scones Makes 12

2 cups cake flour ½ cup finely diced candied lemon peel ¼ cup firmly packed dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 teaspoon apple pie spice ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 5 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed ½ cup plus 3 tablespoons whole milk, divided ¾ cup black currants 1 large egg yolk, lightly beaten

• Preheat oven to 375°. Line a rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper. • In the work bowl of a food processor, pulse together flour, lemon peel, brown sugar, baking powder, apple pie spice, and salt until combined. Add cold butter, pulsing until it resembles coarse crumbs. With processor running, gradually add ½ cup plus 2 tablespoons milk, pulsing just until dough comes together. • Turn out dough onto a lightly floured surface. Using a rolling pin, roll out dough to a ¼-inch thickness, and cut into 4 pieces. Sprinkle currants onto 3 pieces, stack those pieces, and top with the fourth piece. Roll stack to a ¾-inch thickness. Using a 2-inch fluted round cutter, cut 12 scones from dough, rerolling scraps once. Place scones 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheet. • In a small bowl, whisk together egg yolk and remaining 1 tablespoon milk. Brush tops of scones with egg wash. • Bake until scones are golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, approximately 15 minutes. Serve warm. Recommended Condiments • Devonshire Cream • Lemon Curd

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Pistachio Cream Puffs Makes approximately 60

1 cup water ½ cup unsalted butter, cubed 1 teaspoon kosher salt 1¼ cups all-purpose flour 4 large eggs, room temperature 1 cup whole milk 1 cup heavy whipping cream ⁄ cup granulated sugar ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 4 large egg yolks 2 tablespoons cornstarch ½ cup finely ground roasted pistachios White Chocolate Glaze (recipe follows) Garnish: chopped pistachios

• Preheat oven to 425°. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with 43

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parchment paper. Using a pencil, draw 1½-inch circles 2 inches apart onto parchment; turn parchment over. • In a medium saucepan, bring 1 cup water, butter, and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil over medium-high heat. Remove from heat. Using a wooden spoon, quickly stir in flour. Return to heat, and cook, stirring constantly, until mixture pulls away from sides of pan and a film forms on bottom of pan, approximately 3 minutes. Transfer to a large bowl, and beat with a mixer at low speed until slightly cooled, approximately 1 minute. Increase mixer speed to medium. Add eggs, one at a time, beating until a smooth dough (pâte à choux) forms. • Transfer dough to a large piping bag fitted with a medium round tip (Wilton #12). Pipe dough onto drawn

circles on prepared baking sheets. • Bake for 10 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 350°, and bake until puffs are golden brown, 20 to 25 minutes more. Let cool completely on a wire rack. • In a medium saucepan, bring milk, cream, sugar, and remaining ¼ teaspoon salt just to a boil over medium heat. • In a medium bowl, whisk together egg yolks and cornstarch. Whisking constantly, gradually add hot milk mixture to egg mixture. Return pastry cream mixture to saucepan, and cook, stirring constantly, until mixture registers 180° on a candy thermometer. Remove from heat; whisk in pistachios. Transfer pastry cream to a rimmed baking sheet lined with plastic wrap. Press another piece of plastic wrap directly onto surface of pastry cream. Place baking sheet on a wire rack, and let cool to room temperature. Refrigerate until chilled. • Transfer pastry cream to a piping bag fitted with a small round tip. Use another small round tip to poke holes into bottom of each puff. Pipe a small amount of pastry cream into each puff through hole. • Dip top of each cream puff in White Chocolate Glaze. Sprinkle with pistachios, if desired. Serve immediately. MAKEAHEAD TIP: Puffs can be baked earlier in the day and stored in an airtight container at room temperature. Pastry cream can be made a day in advance and refrigerated until needed. Fill cream puffs and top with glaze and pistachios within an hour of serving.

White Chocolate Glaze Makes ½ cup

½ cup heavy whipping cream ⁄ cup white chocolate chips

• In a small microwave-safe bowl, combine cream and white chocolate. Microwave on high in 30-second intervals, stirring between each, until melted and smooth. Use immediately.


London Fog Tea Cakes Makes approximately 24

½ cup granulated sugar ½ cup firmly packed light brown sugar 3 tablespoons canola oil 1 large egg, room temperature 1 large egg yolk, room temperature 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1¼ cups all-purpose flour ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder 1¼ teaspoons baking powder ½ teaspoon baking soda ½ teaspoon kosher salt 1 cup whole milk Earl Grey Buttercream (recipe follows) Garnish: dark chocolate pearls*

• Preheat oven to 350°. Place 2 (12-cavity) silicone molds† on a rimmed baking sheet. • In a large bowl, stir together granulated sugar, brown sugar, and oil. Add egg, egg yolk, and vanilla, stirring to combine.

• In a medium bowl, sift together flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Gradually add flour mixture to sugar mixture alternately with milk, beginning and ending with flour mixture, stirring just until combined after each addition. Using a 2-teaspoon levered scoop, portion 2 scoops of batter into each cavity. • Bake cakes until a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, 10 to 12 minutes. Let cool in moulds for 10 minutes. Freeze for 20 minutes before removing from moulds. • Place Earl Grey Buttercream in a piping bag fitted with a rose tip (Wilton #102). Pipe frosting in a zigzag design on tops of cakes. Sprinkle with chocolate pearls, if desired. *We used Valrhona Dark Chocolate Crunchy Pearls. † We used Celebrate It 12-Cavity Nugget Silicone Treat Molds from Michaels, michaels.com.

MAKEAHEAD TIP: Store decorated cakes in a single layer in airtight containers in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Let come to room temperature before serving.

Earl Grey Buttercream Makes approximately 1½ cups

1 cup unsalted butter, softened ½ teaspoon kosher salt 3 cups confectioners’ sugar 2 tablespoons loose-leaf Earl Grey tea, crushed if leaves are large ¼ cup heavy whipping cream

• In a large bowl, beat together butter and salt with a mixer at medium speed until creamy, approximately 3 minutes. Add confectioners’ sugar, 1 cup at a time, beating well and stopping to scrape sides of bowl after each addition. Beat in looseleaf tea. Add cream, 1 tablespoon at a time, beating until fully incorporated. Use immediately.

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MAKEAHEAD TIP: Tartlets can be baked, cooled, and stored in an airtight container at room temperature up to a day in advance. Top with jam and raspberries just before serving.

Shortcrust Tartlet Shells Makes 8

1¾ cups self-rising flour 2 tablespoons granulated sugar ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cubed ¼ cup ice water 1 large egg, lightly beaten

Raspberry Bakewell Tartlets Makes 8

3.5 ounces almond paste ¼ cup unsalted butter, softened 1 large egg, room temperature 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour ⁄ cup seedless raspberry jam, divided Shortcrust Tartlet Shells (recipe follows) 1 pound fresh raspberries, halved lengthwise

• In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together almond paste and butter at medium speed until smooth. Add egg, beating well. Scrape sides of bowl. Add flour, beating until a 45

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smooth frangipane batter forms. • Using a 2-teaspoon levered scoop, portion 1 scoop jam into each prepared Shortcrust Tartlet Shell. Using same scoop, portion 2 scoops frangipane on top of jam, smoothing tops with an offset spatula. • Bake until crust is golden brown and a wooden pick inserted in centers comes out clean, approximately 15 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack before carefully removing from molds. • In a small saucepan, melt remaining ∕ cup jam over low heat. Let cool slightly before spreading a thin layer onto cooled tartlets. Top with raspberry halves, cut sides down. Brush remaining melted jam over raspberries. Serve immediately.

• In the work bowl of a food processor, pulse together flour, sugar, and salt until combined. Add cold butter, pulsing until it resembles coarse crumbs. With processor running, add ¼ cup ice water in a slow, steady stream until a soft dough forms. (Dough may be crumbly but should hold together when squeezed.) Turn out dough, and divide in half. Shape each dough half into a disk, and wrap in plastic wrap. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes. • Preheat oven to 375°. Spray 8 (3½-inch) fluted brioche molds with cooking spray. • Using a rolling pin, roll out dough to a ¼-inch thickness on a lightly floured surface. Using a 3½-inch round cutter, cut 8 rounds from dough. Transfer rounds to prepared molds. Using the wide end of a chopstick, press dough into indentations in sides of molds. Place molds on a rimmed baking sheet. Freeze for 15 minutes. • Brush dough with beaten egg. Top each crust with a small sheet of parchment paper, letting ends extend over edges of molds. Add pie weights. • Bake until golden brown, approximately 12 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack. Remove pie weights and parchment paper. Use within a day.


the tea experience

Taking Tea in Kent, THE GARDEN OF ENGLAND Text by Jane Pettigrew

Photograph of Leeds Castle by William Bray, Courtesy of visitkent.com

he county of Kent is said to take its name from the Latin cantia or cantium, meaning “coastal district” or orner land.” This region is indeed the south-eastern corner of England, whose coastline of sandy beaches nd dramatic white cliffs runs from the mouth of the Thames River to the county’s western border with Sussex on the south coast. Important seaside towns, with their rich maritime history of royal dockyards, smugglers, and Napoleonic sea defenses, are home today to ferries that travel daily between the English coast and northern Europe, and the tunnel that ploughs deep under the English Channel to carry people and goods to and from France. Known as The Garden of England, Kent is a land of ridges and valleys, ancient woodlands and sweeping pastures, where royal families and the English aristocracy of the past chose to build their castles, manor houses, and stately homes. For here, not too far from the capital and its frenetic court life, days were somewhat gentler and quieter. Today, driving away from the main highways, visitors soon find picturesque villages with perfect cottage gardens; apple, pear, and cherry orchards; fields of hops for Kentish beers; and, between the trees, glimpses of tall cathedral spires, moated castles, and ancient Tudor homes. Kent also boasts many small tearooms tucked away down narrow alleys or on seafront promenades, or set amongst half-timbered shops on the main streets of historic towns and villages. The five included here—all very different—are amongst the very best the county offers. teatimemagazine.com

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FLEUR DE THÉ 134 High Street, Rochester, Kent ME1 1JT fleurdethe.co.uk/rochester • +44 1634 402950

Photography Courtesy of Fleur de Thé

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This charismatic little tearoom sits at the heart of Rochester, a city with Roman origins, the second oldest cathedral in England, a magnificent castle that dominates the northern point of the city, and close links to Charles Dickens, who spent his childhood here and lived here in later life and whose stories were inspired by many of the town’s historic buildings. The little shop is much more than just a tearoom. As customers sit and enjoy their scones or cakes, they are surrounded by an alluring range of enticing gifts and cleverly chosen decorative artifacts and home wares— cups and saucers, teapots, candles, jam pots, trays, jugs, egg cups, cake stands, framed pictures, cards, and other small objects. It’s an enchanting treasure trove where everything is so prettily displayed that no one can resist exploring both floors. The style is shabby-chic, the atmosphere is gentle and kind, and the staff are friendly and helpful. It is no surprise that locals go back and back for cups of good tea (including Afternoon Blend, Earl Grey, and Green Tea and Peach), lunchtime snacks, or a full Afternoon Tea. The menu offers a Traditional Tea, a Luxury Tea, a Sparkling Tea with Pink Moscato or Prosecco, a Chocolate Tea (with chocolate chip scones and Belgian chocolate ganache, chocolate cupcake, and a chocolate lollipop to take home), a Children’s Tea, and for special seasonal occasions, a Festive Afternoon Tea. The tearoom also organises special celebrations for hen parties, birthdays, and anniversaries, and decorates the room with bunting, balloons, and themed cupcakes.


the tea experience

Photography by Amy Thompson

JJULIETS 5 High Street, 54 Royal Tunbridge Wells R Kent TN1 1XF K julietsandmore.com j +44 + 1892 522931

Where to start with the list of wonders here at Juliets—the welcoming, smiling girls who greet you; the eye-popping display of the most amazing cakes ever; the warm, happy chatter that fills the entire room; the coziness; the overwhelming joy and delight; and a thrilling sense—as soon as you open the door—that you’ve just discovered a little slice of magic? This is teatime heaven! Pink lysianthus and lilies in pretty jugs deck the tables, the window, and the marble counter. Generously filled sandwiches and baguettes are stacked, neatly wrapped in red-and-white chequered tissue, ready for the lunchtime rush. Large oval platters of wonderfully colourful and imaginative salads command immediate attention. And the cakes—well, how does anyone ever know what to choose? There’s Carrot & Walnut Cake more generously topped with walnuts than any such cake before it; Banana Loaf decorated all over with closely regimented, upstanding slices of banana; Lemon Feather Cake that is truly as light as its name and absolutely yummy; Chocolate & Raspberry Cake topped with the plumpest raspberries and a profusion of flaked chocolate; Orange Blossom Sunshine Cake with icing that ripples down its sides; Lemon & Poppyseed with white icing, strands of lemon zest, and a pretty scattering of seeds; Courgette & Pistachio with Elderflower, literally covered all over with pistachios; and large chunks of Rocky Road, Billionaire’s

Shortbread, brownies, flapjacks, and more, so much more. No wonder there is regularly a chattering, excited queue inside and outside the shop! This is the sort of tearoom where customers talk readily to each other and share their enjoyment. There are tables for two or four and one large shared table that inevitably encourages neighbourliness. The bare brick wall along one side of the room lends its russet warmth, and the simplicity of wooden dining tables and chairs and mix-and-match teacups, saucers, and pots is homely and comfortable. The entire room, from the window display with its eclectic collection of teapots and cake stands, coronation mugs, and well-used candlesticks to the random art and photos on the walls and the counter laden with such glamorous treats, has a style all its own. It’s clever and witty and fun, but also serious in doing everything perfectly. It has real personality—exactly as a good tearoom should.

Photograph by Jane Pettigew

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THE SECRET GARDEN

Photography by Jane Pettigrew

The Court Yard, Mersham-le-Hatch Village, Mersham, Ashford TN25 6NH secretgardenkent.co.uk • +44 1233 501586

Mersham-le-Hatch is a large country house built between 1762 and 1772 for the aristocratic Knatchbull family. Its surrounding estate extends over 2,700 acres of farmland, woodland, and deer park and includes Mersham-le-Hatch Business Village, a collection of buildings that includes a restored Victorian coach house, stables, and other outhouses. Arranged around a cobbled courtyard, it is home to restaurants, Kent Cookery School, and the Secret Garden tearoom, which occupies the coach house that once stabled the estate’s horses and carriages. The décor is simple, easy on the eye, with a wooden floor; one or two beautifully carved, oriental wooden screens; a mix of plain wood tables; and dining chairs upholstered in warm shades of crimson, silver-grey, and white. China wares are cheekily mix-and-match, and the ambiance is twinkly and welcoming. The view to one side is of the kitchen garden, the Wild Flower Garden, Butterfly Walk, and Peter Rabbit Orchard; to the other, the courtyard. Both outdoor areas are arranged with large parasols and elegant tables and chairs for al fresco teas on warm days. The menu offers a Cream Tea and a choice of three different afternoon teas, each of which is delivered to the table on a chintzy cake stand. The Traditional Tea includes finger sandwiches and cheese straws; warm fruited and plain scones with clotted cream, jam, and fresh fruit; and a selection of “seasonal fancies.” The Chocolate Tea brings sandwiches and chocolate chip scones; mini chocolate cakes, desserts, and pastries; and hot chocolate or tea. The Gentleman’s Relish Savoury Afternoon Tea adds sausage rolls, smoked mackerel pâté, quail eggs, seafood choux buns, and goat’s cheese and red onion scones to the menu. And if you happen to be in the area on Pudding Club Night, you might enjoy tucking into Sticky Toffee Pudding, Jam Roly Poly, or Bread and Butter Pudding with oodles of custard and cream in very traditional British style.

TH HE HOME FRONT TEA ROOM 13a King Street, Ramsgate Kent CT11 8NN K 40stearoom.co.uk +44 + 1843 594383

Th Home Front Tearoom, just a The sshort walk from Ramsgate’s harbour, is a heartwarmingly faithful recreation of the ’40s style of Britain’s war years. In 1940, hundreds of little ships set sail from Ramsgate to rescue B British iti h troops t stranded t d d and under attack on the French beaches at Dunkirk. One yacht, the Sundowner, brought back 130 men, and is today a floating exhibit at Ramsgate Maritime Museum on the quayside of the 51

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Royal Harbour, around the corner from the tearoom. During those days of austerity and hardship, a strong community spirit and a make-the-best-of-things attitude helped the town through heavy bombing, rationing, severe shortages, and family disruptions. Shared cups of tea brought comfort to so many, and the same sense of neighbourliness and friendship runs through this reassuring, kindly tearoom. It wraps you up in a feeling of cheery welcome and comfort and offers the simple foods and drinks that would have been available all those years ago. The room is beautifully styled with original furniture, touches of Art Deco, framed sheet music of popular ’40s songs, china ducks in flight on the wall, a Bakelite radio that plays favourite big band numbers, an original blackand-white television that plays silently in the background, a coat rack with gentlemen’s hats and coats, Union flag bunting, and an original ’40s brush and pan for sweeping up the crumbs. Even the light switches are genuine


Photography Courtesy of Lynn Coutts

the tea experience

DEBLYNS TEASHOP & GARDEN 30 High Street, New Romney, Kent TN28 8BZ deblyns.co.uk • +44 1797 369020

Deblyns Teashop is the sort of traditional tearoom that tourists and foreign visitors absolutely love. The Grade II–listed building has links back to 1287, and the building was once a hall house (a tall, one-roomed dwelling house built of plaster and wood and with a tall sloping roof). Later in its history, it was divided horizontally to create a downstairs and an upstairs, and tea is served on both floors today. The small town of New Romney also has a long history, and the local people are said to have fought off William the Conqueror’s first attempts to take England before his victory at the Battle of Hastings further along the coast in 1066. Sitting in the pretty walled garden or at a table indoors, it’s easy to imagine medieval life in this small historic town. It lies today on the main route that links Dover, where ferries from Europe dock, to the small Saxon town of Rye and the popular seaside towns of Eastbourne and Brighton. Tearoom owner Lynn Coutts has created a haven of gentility and old-fashioned calm for locals and travelers alike. The tea-

room serves comforting pots of tea, wonderful scones, “Vintage” Afternoon Teas on tiered cake stands, High h Teas with toasted buttered crumpets, and Savoury Teas with scrumptious cheese scones and caramelized onion chutney. The cakes and scones are all baked in the tearoom kitchen, and the menu of sandwiches, panini, salads, and ploughman’s lunches offers something delicious for l f everyone. The teas are all loose-leaf blends that include English Breakfast, Assam, Ceylon, Green Tea, Spicy Chai, Lapsang Souchong, and Earl Grey. Locals call in regularly to enjoy relaxing cups of tea, and Deblyns also hosts special tea parties for family gatherings, birthdays, and anniversaries and to mark seasonal occasions such as Christmas and Easter. Deblyns really is everything you could hope for from a traditional English tearoom.

Photography Courtesy of The Home Front Tea Room

originals, and the staff all wear 1940s pinafores. The lovingly crafted menu lists wartime staples such as Spam and corned beef sandwiches; pilchards on toast; jelly and tinned peaches with ice cream, evaporated milk, or custard; crumpets; and toasted tea cakes. And as well as good old builders’ tea and other loose-leaf teas (no teabags in those days, of course), there’s malty comforting Ovaltine, savoury hot Bovril, fizzy fruity Vimto cordial, Tizer (a citrus and red fruit soft drink very popular with children in the ’40s and ’50s), and ginger beer—all so very reminiscent of British childhood and life in the 1940s.

Contributing Editor Jane Pettigrew, an international tea expert who has written many books on the subject, including her newest, Jane Pettigrew’s World of Tea, is a recipient of the British Empire Medal. A former tearoom owner, she is a much-sought-after consultant to tea businesses and hotels, a conference speaker, and an awardwinning tea educator. Although her travels take her around the globe, she resides in London.

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the romance of tea

Valerie and James Norwood Pratt: FALLING IN LOVE AT SEA by Valerie Turner Pratt

as 21 and leaving my home in England to go to merica on an ocean liner. Norwood was returning home after his student year in Europe. We met on deck watching passengers from Cherbourg, France, being ferried out to our ship, which was much too huge to enter the harbor. For the duration of the voyage, we kept each other company. It was a magical six days and five nights surrounded by luxury and sophistication aboard the elegant Queen Elizabeth—yes, the first. Finally, we sailed up the Hudson past the Statue of Liberty, and the last thing we did before going ashore was order tea in my cabin. We naively expected to meet next on the pier after clearing customs and immigration, but it was to be 40 years before I ever saw him again. By the year 2001, I was a widow with two grown sons, a house in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, and a job. I had told a friend at work about falling in love with this young poet on that transatlantic voyage and how he had written a poem for me. Then one day, thanks to my friend’s Internet sleuthing, I received a book from San Francisco titled The New Tea Lover’s Treasury. Imagine how I felt when I saw the author’s photograph and knew it came from Norwood! We corresponded—by post, not email—and within months, I went to San Francisco to be swept off my feet all over again. Six months later, I had resigned from my job, put my house on the market, and joined Norwood in his tiny apartment on San Francisco’s Russian Hill. April 8, 2002, was the auspicious day he welcomed me into a world every bit as magical as any luxury liner—the world of tea—and we have journeyed through it together ever since. One of our first tea events was the New York Fancy Food Show, and I recall meeting John Harney and sons 53

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for the first time. He and Norwood were approached by a woman with the seemingly crazy idea of creating a tea convention in Las Vegas, but they encouraged her and offered help and advice. Through sheer determination, FaithAnn Bailes created Take Me to Tea, and soon afterwards, with George Jage, the World Tea Expo. The expo is now a huge annual event attracting tea growers, vendors, importers, exporters, scholars, and friends from all over the world—it feels like a joyous family reunion. Being a part of it from the beginning, watching it grow, spreading the story of tea in all its various forms, and seeing Norwood and his many friends lovingly share their tea knowledge has been a privilege and an exciting experience. We have also enjoyed presiding over a good many spectacular dinners pairing teas and wine with successive courses. After one such event in Seattle, Julee Rosanoff invited the local tea people to meet Norwood in a room overlooking the legendary Pike Place Market and talk. There he imparted his vision of tea festivals for the public at large and inspired Julee, Ken Rudee, and others to create the Northwest Tea Festival the following year. This past year, on the 11th anniversary of that first festival, more 3,000 people showed up for the two-day event to enjoy teas from 54 separate vendors and almost as many classes and workshops. This seed, once planted and nurtured with love and dedication, has brought festivals sprouting forth all over the country. Norwood and I attend every one of them, and my supporting role has grown into a major responsibility. We work together on everything we do. The spirit of tea must surely inhabit us. Norwood is respected for writing the first serious book on tea in English since before World War II, and by now he has communicated his love of tea to thousands. We bask in the love of friends from all around the world. We spent part of our honeymoon in India as guests of Rajah Banerjee on his Darjeeling estate and in the Nilgiris where Norwood and his spiritual brother Devan Shah were judges at India’s first-ever tea competition. Norwood is a writer, so ours is a quiet life punctuated by joyous festivals and reunions with friends and sustained by tea from morning ’til night. Leaving England for “the colonies,” I never expected to enjoy tea like this again— and what tea it is! My former countrymen are only beginning to discover the excellence and variety available to American tea lovers today. And now I am partnered with Norwood in spreading awareness of this most spiritual beverage and practice. We were married in 2011 in my ancestral parish church, Saint Edmund’s, Fritton, which was established around 700 AD. At the ceremony, our priest, the Reverend Leslie Hobbs, said “Well, Valerie and Norwood, it’s taken you 50 years to walk down this aisle and receive a blessing on your marriage. The message you bring is that there’s hope for all of us.”


Ahmad Tea One family’s mission to sell quality teas Text by Britt E. Stafford

or more than three decades, UK-based Ahmad ea has striven to make the highest quality teas ailable to consumers at affordable prices. And while tea is the company’s product, the business was built on the founding family’s values. Rahim Afshar grew up learning about tea from the tea plantations his family once owned in the Middle East. Using his and his father’s knowledge and expertise of the plant, Rahim decided to enter the industry by opening a tea shop in Southampton on England’s southern coast in 1986. After earning a contract with El Corte Inglés, a major department store chain in Spain, Ahmad Tea launched into exportation. Ahmad Tea—named after Rahim’s father, Ahmad—maintains strong roots in the three generations of the Afshar family that have transformed the company from a tea shop to the international enterprise it is today. Ali Afshar, Rahim’s nephew and Ahmad Tea’s general manager, is just one of the many family members working to keep the legacy. “The quality of tea 30 years ago was much poorer than what it is today,” Ali comments. 55

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(Opposite page, bottom) Rahim Afshar and his son Amin tasting teas at Ahmad Tea’s London headquarters. (Above) Ali Afshar visiting a tea plantation in Sri Lanka in 2006. (Top right) Sri Lankan women plucking tea leaves. (Right) Ali in Sri Lanka in 2006 inspecting freshly plucked leaves prior to processing.

“And we believe that better quality teas can be sourced and that people will appreciate them. You don’t need to charge a fortune for great tea.” While the London-based company has maintained an impressive global presence by distributing to approximately 80 countries, Ahmad Tea has targeted the burgeoning tea-drinking community in the United States. “We’ve seen in the last few years a greater appreciation for good tea in the United States,” Ali says. “And that’s our forté—everyday great-quality teas.” He says that each batch sold goes through an extensive selection process. Quality control is one of the most important aspects to procure the best product for patrons, he reports, and every step of the teas’ journey is monitored with great care. To ensure clients receive the best fl avors in each blend, Ahmad Tea relies on the palates and experience of 25 certified tea tasters. Prior to reaching customers, each tea is tasted at least seven times, from when it’s initially bought to when it ships. “Tea is our business,” Ali notes. “It’s the only business we’re in, so we’re making sure that it’s done well.” Among the many different products sold, about 70 to 80 are different teas and blends in bags or loose-leaf form. According to Ali, one of the most popular products the company sells is English Tea No. 1, which is a combination of black tea leaves from different countries blended with a touch of bergamot. There are also a variety of herbal and decaffeinated options from which to choose.

Philanthropy is another key component to Ahmad Tea’s mission. Ten percent of the company’s profits are donated to a number of charities, benefiting causes such as healthcare, child welfare, water supply, and education in foreign countries. “It’s different charities and different causes,” Ali says. “This goes back to my grandfather’s influence. He got into commerce to help people. By and large, we actually run the [philanthropic] projects ourselves. It will be tied to countries we are connected with and want to give back and see that we can actually do something for others.” Ahmad Tea founder Ra him Afshar.

Ahmad Tea’s blends and products are available for purchase in various locations throughout the United States and online. For more information, call 800-637-7704 or visit ahmadtea.com. teatimemagazine.com

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LONDON’S Rosewood Hotel Where art and tea collide Text by Kerry Vincent Photography Courtesy of The Rosewood Hotel

(Top) The Mirror Room is a sumptuous collection of clever low tea table settings, quiet corners, and grand upholstered furniture. (Above) The magnificent façade of the majestic Rosewood Hotel is designed in flamboyant Edwardian style.

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boarded a rumbling train on London’s Underground Piccadilly Line and sped my way to a much-anticipated afternoon tea in the Mirror Room at The Rosewood Hotel. This special contemporary afternoon tea was voted London’s best for 2017, and as an added bonus, an old friend, distinguished master baker, author, and television presenter Dan Lepard would join me. Together, we would evaluate this tea with a twist. Afternoon-tea doyenne, the late Caroline Rose Hunt, daughter of oil billionaire H. L. Hunt, owned and founded The Rosewood luxury hotel line until she sold her interest in 2011. She also created Lady Primrose’s thatched cottage tearoom and glittering silver-fi lled antiques shop once located within The Crescent Hotel complex in Dallas, Texas. Being oh-so-familiar with The Rosewood’s Dallas fl agship hotel, The Mansion on Turtle Creek, there was not a doubt in my mind that this tea would be spectacular.


ork Australia

Dan’s overall impression was the same as mine— perfectly clean artistic presentations with delicious flavor profiles. At the very top of his list of best on the day was the extraordinary cake inspired by the British graffiti artist Banksy. “What a work of art! Utterly flavor-packed,” Dan declared. “It’s such a tricky feat to construct thin wafers of Belgian white chocolate to form a decorated box on the plate. The chef shows astonishing skill and boldness filling those boxes with layers of vanilla choux pastry, a hazelnut caramel, cherry gelée, and chocolate mousse. Definitely a dessert to die for and worth a return visit!” Longtime besties, UK-based I couldn’t agree more. From master baker Dan Lepard, left, start to finish, The Rosewood and Kerry Vincent, right. Hotel is a class act! Photograph Cour tesy of Nine Netw

Formerly the Chancery Court Hotel, The Rosewood’s powerful façade exuded a sense of royal residence. It was easy to feel just a tiny bit aristocratic as I made my grand entrance through the black wrought-iron gates that led the way through an arch, revealing an enormous Edwardian courtyard. Dan appeared promptly, and we made our way to the Mirror Room. Soon he introduced me to Rosewood partner and Holborn Dining Room Executive Chef Calum Franklin, who launched into an intimate explanation of each pastry as it was presented. Calum is a firm believer in knowing the provenance of ingredients, so as to ensure the freshest and most unique additions in the overall menu lineup. Rosewood’s Art Afternoon Tea was the brainchild of talented Executive Pastry Chef Mark Perkins. Not your standard offering, this avant-garde interpretation touted a few unusual surprises inspired by an international cross section of five talented, recognized modern artists who have all contributed to London’s extraordinarily vivid art scene—American artist Jeff Koons, who loves to transpose commonplace disposable pop culture objects into enduring mirror-finished stainless steel; French fantasist Hubert le Gall; Russian theorist Wassily Kandinsky, a master of vibrant artworks; American abstract expressionist Jackson Pollock, known for drip painting, a technique that coincidentally lends itself well to chocolate applications; and finally, anonymous British-based graffiti artist Banksy. First to appear were piping-hot glass teapots filled with robust Darjeeling tea by the French house Mariage Frères, which sat center table with sides of sugar and steamy full-cream milk. The tea captain then arrived with flat trays of mixed crustless sandwiches—an eclectic mix of free-range chicken and tarragon mayonnaise, smoked salmon and lemon butter, brown egg mayonnaise and mustard cress, and the layered fl avors of celeriac rémoulade, horseradish, and crisp Bramley apple. Scones with crumb as soft as silk followed, accompanied by strawberry-elderflower jam and clotted cream. Next, came the artsy pastries. This was one time when I really felt it a shame to eat them, beautiful works of contemporary pastry art created to emulate the works of each of the “fab five” designers.

Photography by Patricia Niven

Photography by Patricia Niven

Delicious artistic pastries with themes are the benchmark of Rosewood's tea service, such as the Art Lover’s Tea (left) and Rodin’s Tea (below), inspired by the sculptural exhibit at the British Museum.

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The Rosewood Hotel is located at 252 High Holborn, London, WC1V 7EN, a short walk from the Underground’s Holborn Station. For more information or to book a table for one of Rosewood’s art-inspired afternoon teas that change seasonally, go to rosewoodhotels.com/en/London, or ring +44 203747 8620. Award-winning cake designer Kerry Vincent is a television host and a global traveler who seeks out interesting places for tea wherever she goes. teatimemagazine.com

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collector’s corner

(Left) Three commemorative teapots from the late 1990s, left to right: Sadler Elizabeth I Pattern 4442, James Sadler Landmarks Royal Albert Hall, and James Sadler Horseguards. (Below left) Two Gaudy Welsh–style teapots, left to right: Lingard Webster (Tunstall) 255, c. 1940; Sudlow's (Burslem) 0164, c. 1930. (Below) Royal Fenton Swan, c. 1940.

My English Teapot Collection An array of vintage and contemporary treasures Text by Eileen Bostick / Photography by Jim Bathie

(Above) The teapot that started Eileen Bostick’s collection— Crown Dorset Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee, 2002.

ea has been a pleasant part of my life ever ce I was a small child enjoying Cambric tea with y mother. Our family history made tea a natural ur lives. Mother’s parents, originally from Scotland, moved to London when she was very young. From there, they moved to Canada. My father’s family, of English heritage, lived in Canada. My grandmothers and aunts always served afternoon tea when I visited them. I really admired their fine English teapots. Often, they prepared special treats to serve with tea, and at other times digestive biscuits accompanied the tea. I was introduced to tearooms during my visits to Canada and in my hometown of Richmond, Virginia. At that time, the department stores had tearooms where mothers and daughters enjoyed tea dressed in their Sunday best. I have been fortunate to enjoy afternoon tea in elegant settings such as London, Toronto, Hong Kong, Cairo, Sydney, and Istanbul. I have also enjoyed tea at cozy little shops in quaint villages. What a variety of tea spots I have observed! teatimemagazine.com

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(Clockwise from top left) Arthur Wood 5103 white teapot with gold decoration, c. 1950. Sudlow’s (Burslem) 01313 black and cream teapot with gold decoration, c. 1940; Sadler 1699 gold and cream teapot, c. 1950; Sadler 1493 black teapot with gold trim, c. 1940. Price Kensington 3766 white teapot with red dragons, c. 1960. Sadler 2273 handpainted floral teapot with gold trim, c. 1937; Elijah Cotton Limited Lord Nelson Ware Marina chintz tea-for-one set, c. 1950.

I remember a very special tea when mother and I visited London in 1985. We were invited for high tea by the young couple residing in the house where mother had lived as a child. Their gracious hospitality included a full menu of meats, breads, pies, and tea served from a Brown Betty teapot. Such a delightful afternoon! Teapots have always fascinated me. I like pretty teacups, but teapots are my first love. My teapot collection really began after I retired in 2004. At last I had time to browse antiques stores to my heart’s content. While visiting in North Carolina, my husband and I spotted a Queen Elizabeth Golden Jubilee commemorative teapot in the window of a British specialty shop. Unfortunately, the store was closed, and we had to leave town before it opened the next day. Secretly, my husband called the store and surprised me by having the teapot delivered to our house a few days later. I proudly placed the teapot on the sideboard in my breakfast room. I soon realized that it looked lonesome. We headed to a local antiques store and found several Sadler teapots commemorating historical events and literary themes. I was hooked! As my teapot collection came into being, I knew that I wouldn’t have space for too many teapots, so I decided to specialize. Because of my heritage, selecting English teapots was a natural choice. I have stayed with that decision, except for a few teapots I couldn’t resist and some charming ones from friends and family. My husband has joined me in my quest for English teapots. As we have traveled around the United States, we have visited numerous antique malls and stores, flea markets, and estate sales. Friends have called to tell us where teapots may be found. My collection has benefitted from the help from many. 61

TeaTime March/April 2019

Shopping around, I have been impressed by the good quality and variety of English teapots. I have bought elegant bone china pots and some with humble origins. I have purchased teapots with roses of many colors. Fruit is also a favorite theme. I have found many more commemorative ones and even two with dragons. I like the pots with historical themes, such as the Blue Willow legend. I was delighted to learn when visiting Pacific Grove, California, that their Festival of Lanterns is based on the Blue Willow story. Doing research on teapots reveals so many interesting facts! The problem of display space presented itself as my collection grew. We bought a display cabinet, another, another, and then another. When there were no more places for display cases, we found two tea carts that looked attractive in our dining room. They are now loaded with teapots. I have slowed down on buying teapots and tend to choose smaller ones, but I will always find space for just the right pot. The collecting bug has bitten my family, too. My husband collects vintage cameras. Our daughters both like tea and teapots, and one of them now collects Moorcroft pottery. I have more than 150 teapots. When asked which is my favorite, I can’t really say. Usually, it’s the one I’m holding in my hands.


Tearoom Directory

North Carolina

resources for readers

Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour & Gift Shoppe Celebrating 10 Years!

Relax with friends at breakfast, lunch or afternoon tea! Open Tuesday - Saturday Breakfast 8am - 10:30am Lunch & Afternoon Tea 11am - 4pm Reservations Recommended

21 Chinquapin Road Village of Pinehurst 910-255-0100 www.ladybedfords.com

TITLE PAGE Page 2: Haviland Clover Leaf teapot ($549.95), teacup/saucer set (price not available), and salad plate ($21.99); Royal Worcester Regency Green & Gray dinner plate ($49.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. MASTHEAD Page 5: Royal Worcester Embassy Light Green teacup/saucer set ($31.99); Royal Doulton Alton salad plate ($11.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Napkin, tablecloth, and vase from private collection.

South Carolina

Planning a trip in the near future? Visit these lovely tea locales.

COME FOR TEA Page 7: Fascinator (styles and prices vary) available from Rose Tree Cottage, 626-7933337, rosetreecottage.com. Royal Worcester Dunrobin teacup/saucer set ($35.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. THE COZY CORNER Page 10: Pierced creamware teapot with twisted handles ($188) from Colonial Williamsburg, 800-446-9240, shop.colonialwilliamsburg.com. Teacup/ saucer set, glass creamer, and needlepoint pillow from private collection.

A Garden Comes To Life! Paintings • Prints • Notecards

Save 15% use code: teatimegifts New 8”x 8” paintings on wood panels $95 Notecards 6/$20 Shipping Extra

Joyful, Elegant Art For Your Home Or Inspired Gift Giving

Shop online: www.lauraleeder.com Shop by phone: 250-254-0083

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COVER Royal Albert Tea Rose Yellow teapot ($259.95), dessert plate ($9.99), teacup/ saucer set ($23.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Tiered stand from private collection.

TeaTime March/April 2019

TREASURED TEAPOT: A REGAL SOIRÉE Pages 19–20: Royal Doulton Countess teapot from private collection. Royal Doulton Alton teacup/saucer set ($15.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. [Flowery Flair] Royal Worcester Embassy Light Green dinner plate ($89.95) and teacup/saucer set ($31.99); Royal Doulton Alton salad plate ($11.99); Gorham Rondo knife ($21.99), salad fork ($49.99), and teaspoon ($29.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Tablecloth and napkins from private collection. [Vibrant View] Anna Weatherley Anna’s Palette Purple Orchid dinner plate ($98) from FX Dougherty, 800-834-3797, fxdougherty.com. Royal Worcester Dunrobin salad plate ($9.99) and teacup/saucer set ($35.99); Gorham Medici knife ($45.99), salad fork ($79.95), and teaspoon ($43.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Glass creamer, sugar bowl, silver vase, tablecloth, and napkins from private collection. TEA AMONGST THE SHAMROCKS Pages 21–28: Haviland Clover Leaf teapot ($549.95), creamer ($49.99), sugar ($49.98), teacup/saucer set (price not available), salad plate ($21.99), bread and butter plate ($11.99), handled cake plate

($99.95), 13-inch oval platter ($43.99), 9-inch serving bowl ($109.95); Royal Worcester Regency Green & Gray dinner plate ($49.99), soup bowl/saucer set ($47.99), 15-inch oval platter ($149.95); Reed & Barton Marlborough knife ($18.52), salad fork ($40.47), teaspoon ($25.19), soup spoon ($64.95), and demi spoon ($17.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800737-5223, replacements.com. April Cornell tablecloth (price not available), 888-3327745, aprilcornell.com. Napkins (price not available) from Boutross Fine Linens, 718965-0070, boutross.com. Runners, vases, and condiment dish from private collection. GLUTEN-FREE SCONE: TEATIME CLASSIC Page 29: Dessert plate, teacup/saucer set, vase, and green bowl from private collection. A UNION JACK TEA PARTY Pages 30–36: UK Gourmet Square Union Jack teapot ($38.75), 203-628-7462, ukgourmet.us. Royal Crown Derby Carlton Red creamer ($34.01), sugar ($44.77), salad plate ($35.59), teacup/saucer set ($37.79); Royal Doulton Pacific dinner plate ($13.99) and rectangular dots platter ($13.99); Wedgwood Knightsbridge knife ($8), salad fork ($8.99), and teaspoon ($15.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Red ruffle place mat ($5.95) from Pier 1 Imports, 817-2526300, pier1.com. Aspen and Pine napkins set of 6 ($9.99) from HomeGoods, 800-8880776, homegoods.com. Union Jack heart ornament ($7.99) from World Market, 877-967-5362, worldmarket.com. Tiered stand ($10) from TJ Maxx, 800-926-6299, tjmaxx.com. Blue condiment bowl ($3) from Anthropologie, 800-309-2500, anthropologie.com. Policeman Telephone Box ($9) from Ahmad Tea, 800-637-7704, ahmadtea.com. WELCOME THE NEWEST ROYAL Pages 37–45: Royal Albert Tea Rose Yellow teapot ($259.95), creamer ($59.99), sugar ($9.99), creamer/sugar tray ($13.99), dessert plate ($9.99), and teacup/saucer set ($23.99); Royal Albert Val D’Or dinner plate ($29.99); Royal Albert Old Country Roses knife ($7.99), salad fork ($7.99), and teaspoon ($9.99) from Replacements, Ltd., 800-737-5223, replacements.com. Nicole Miller tablecloth (price not available) and Pure napkins set of 6 ($9.99) from HomeGoods, 800-888-0776, homegoods .com. Classic Table Runner in Cactus ($59) from Pottery Barn, 888-779-5176, potterybarn.com. Condiment bowls (discontinued) from Anthropologie, 800309-2500, anthropologie.com. Tiered stand and spoons for condiment bowls from private collection. Heritage Lace Victorian Rose runner ($16) from Heritage Lace, 641-628-4949, heritagelace.com. Flower arrangement from FlowerBuds, 205-9703223, flowerbudsfloristbirmingham.com.


recipe index

Frostings & Glazes Earl Grey Buttercream 44 Matcha Yogurt Glaze 27 White Chocolate Glaze 43

Savouries

23

Corned Beef & Cabbage Canapés 23 Olive & English Cheddar Tea Sandwiches 31 Pesto-Chicken Tea Sandwiches 23 Roast Beef, Horseradish, and Cucumber Tea Sandwiches 31 Smoked Salmon and Tomato Canapés 31 Smoked Trout, Cucumber, and Dill Canapés 39 Spinach-Feta Pastry Cups 39 Tomato-Crab Tea Sandwiches 39 Watercress & Pea Soup 24

31

Scones Banoffee Scones 33 Chelsea Bun Scones 42 Irish Cheddar Scones 25 Jane’s Scones 29

35

44

Sweets Apricot & Almond Miniature Sticky Buns 36 Blueberry & Ginger Custard Loaves 35 London Fog Tea Cakes 44 Matcha-Almond Mini Bundt Cakes 27 Mint & Chocolate Tartlets 28 Pistachio Cream Puffs 43 Raspberry Bakewell Tartlets 45 Shortcrust Tartlet Shells 45 Sour Cream Dough 36 Treacle-Oatmeal Cookies 35 White Chocolate–Lime Blondies 27

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EDITOR’S NOTE: Recipe titles shown in gold are gluten-free, provided gluten-free versions of processed ingredients (such as flours, prepared meats, sauces, extracts, and stocks) are used.

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advertisers’ index

65

Ahmad Tea ............................................1

Hamilton Collection .......................... 64

Ross Simons ..........................................8

Artisan Sugars.................................... 66

Jane Pettigrew’s World of Tea .................6

Simpson & Vail, Inc. .......................... 67

Ashgrove Press ................................... 14

Kensington Books.............................. 10

Stauer ........................................... 47, 62

Bradford Exchange, The ..................... 54

Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour ................ 63

Tea & Whimsy .......................................9

Consumer Cellular ............................. 46

Laura Leeder ...................................... 63

Tea Parties Around the World .................4

Elmwood Inn Fine Teas ..................... 16

Laura’s Tea Room ............................... 63

TeaTime Back Issues........................... 59

Erika’s Tearoom ................................. 18

Mark T. Wendell Tea Company ......... 18

Trail Lodge Tea......................................9

Grace Tea Company ........................... 16

Paris In A Cup ................................... 18

World Tea Expo .................................. 12

Grandma Rae ..................................... 18

Penguin Books ................................... 16

TeaTime March/April 2019


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