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TA R T I N E BY E L I S A B E T H M . P R U E I T T A N D C H A D R O B E R T S O N

F O R E W O R D BY A L I C E W AT E R S

Photographs by France Ruffenach

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TO OUR PARENTS . AND SPECIAL THANKS TO CAROL FOR ALL YOUR GREAT WORK ON THIS BOOK .

Text copyright © 2006 by Elisabeth M. Prueitt and Chad Robertson. Photographs copyright © 2006 by France Ruffenach. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any form without written permission from the publisher. ISBN-13: 978-1-4521-3610-3 The Library of Congress has previously cataloged this title under ISBN-13: 978-0-8118-5150-3 Designed by Vanessa Dina Typesetting by Janis Reed Chronicle Books LLC 680 Second Street San Francisco, California 94107 www.chroniclebooks.com


yudhacookbook.com CONTENTS F O R E W O R D BY A L I C E W AT E R S INTRODUCTION B R E A K FA S T

16

TA R T S A N D P I E S

CA K E S

76

13

FRUIT DESSERTS

CREAM DESSERTS

166

B A S I C B A K E RY R E C I P E S

190

PA S T R I E S A N D C O N F E C T I O N S

142

44

SOURCES

217

AC K N OW L E D G M E N T S INDEX

220

9

218

112

COOKIES

124

WITH A GLASS OF WINE

178


FOREWORD

The word authentic has been overused by food writers, who have turned it into a catchall term of praise for just about anything that tastes good, especially if a grandmother is hovering somewhere in the recipe’s back story. But whenever I see this word, another similar word springs to mind—author—and the food I recognize as authentic is real food that is unmistakably its creator’s own, as genuine as a manuscript in its author’s own handwriting. Such food is rare, so when I first saw the handmade fruit tarts and loaves of bread from the wood-fired brick oven of Elisabeth Prueitt and Chad Robertson, I did an excited double take. That was nearly ten years ago, when Liz and Chad had already started their tiny Bay Village Bakery in Point Reyes Station in Marin County. Twice a week, they hauled their bread to the Berkeley farmers’ market in big, eye-catching vintage wooden boxes, and before long Berkeley shoppers were queuing up for bread before the market had even opened. The bread was that good. It had that remarkable village-bakery quality that comes from stone-ground organically grown flour, native yeasts, coarse gray sea salt, a wood fire, and loving hands. Call it authenticity. I went to see the bakery soon after. It was in a little Victorian cottage, and the brick oven was in a fifteen-foot-square kitchen in the back of the house, where Chad baked as much as he could in the limited space.

The Japanese designer Eiko visited me in Bolinas that same summer, and because I wanted to surprise her with something unexpected and beautiful—no easy task, Eiko having one of the more exacting and exquisite aesthetic sensibilities I have ever encountered—I took her to the bakery one afternoon. Liz was stacking boxes of apricot tarts to take to market; I remember the sun was streaming down and the apricots were glistening, their edges just slightly caramelized, and Eiko was ravished. The whole magic tableau said everything that needs to be said about food and the joy of living.

9 / foreword

At the time I was summering in the fog of Bolinas, a seaside village not far from Point Reyes Station, where I was reading a wonderful memoir, Life à la Henri, by the French chef Henri Charpentier. I was so caught up in Charpentier’s vivid descriptions of his apprenticeship in the kitchens and markets of France almost a hundred years ago that I couldn’t help drawing negative comparisons between the food of then and now. But I made an immediate exception for Liz and Chad’s bakery. I remember thinking that their little tarts and rustic loaves would have been right at home in Henri’s world, a world where freshness was measured in hours rather than days or weeks and where honest food was grown and prepared by human hands—a world that, even in France, has largely disappeared.


I’ve never been much of a baker or pastry cook, and so whenever family birthdays rolled around, I came to entrust Liz and Chad with baking the cake, one of which in particular floats into my mind’s eye (and onto my mind’s palate) as a kind of Platonic ideal of a birthday cake: layers of airy cake separated by thinner layers of strawberry jam; a rose geranium–flavored red wine syrup; just enough perfectly whipped cream; and little sprigs of just-picked fraises des bois, the fragile, intensely aromatic European woodland strawberries that are rarely grown in California gardens, arranged around the glazed top. It is a cake so classically restrained in appearance and so impetuously romantic in flavor that it is the finest birthday present I can imagine receiving. More birthdays have raced by, and today Liz and Chad are the proud proprietors of the bustling San Francisco establishment that gives this book its name. On the surface, Tartine may appear to be the urban antithesis of the bucolic Bay Village Bakery. It’s not just that the bakery is several times larger than their old one; Tartine is also a corner café in a cosmopolitan neighborhood densely populated with the young, the restless, and the ambitiously hip. Yet Liz and Chad have preserved their quiet artisanal authority without making any aesthetic compromises. The desserts at Tartine are full of light and air at the same time. The bakery is lavish in the use of seasonal fruit, judicious in its deployment of sugar and decoration, and, best of all, nearly all the ingredients used are grown nearby and produced sustainably, so that everything that comes out of the kitchen is fresh, unfussy, simple, and alive. In short, Tartine is about as authentic—and as indispensable—as a bakery and café can get. No wonder people are still lining up. Alice Waters

tartine /

10


INTRODUCTION

Tartine is a neighborhood bakery and café at the

fruit desserts to change with the seasons, and our

intersection of Mission and Guerrero streets, near

cookies to look like they’re made with loving

the geographical center of San Francisco, just a

hands. But most of all, we want everything we

few blocks away from the Spanish mission church

make to taste of what was used to make it.

of Saint Francis, completed in 1791. The bakery dates back to only 2002, the year my husband, Chad Robertson, and I moved into the neighborhood. We had been married and baking together for nearly ten years, most of them spent in the country, and it was time to move our life and our business back to the city, to a neighborhood that was full of diversions and diversity, with a busy hum and a quirky look, where live new music was never far away. We named our bakery Tartine because the bread Chad bakes is central to our enterprise, and the French tartine is a piece of bread—any size, sliced or torn, grilled or not—on which something is spread: usually a little jam and butter for an everyday breakfast, but also such things as tomatoes, goat cheese, and olive oil for a

In order to achieve that kind of simplicity, everyone at Tartine approaches his or her work more like a savory cook than a traditional pastry chef. We consider components of flavor and the seasonality of ingredients, and we strive to contrast textures and to season to taste—all practices more common to a restaurant kitchen than to a typical bakery. We start from scratch every day and produce a supply of baked goods that will be sold out that same day. In other words, we work as à la minute as anyone can in a bakery. Of course, some bakery staples, such as certain pastry doughs and custard bases, are made a day or so ahead, but what you see in our shop was prepared that day to sell out quickly.

Provençal picnic or some smoked eel for a fisher-

In other words, there is no nightshift at Tartine,

man’s lunch.

no bakers baking pastries that will be held for

We both knew exactly the kind of establishment we wanted: a bread bakery, pastry shop, and café as our clientele, where we could lead the life we want and make the things we like the best. We have tried to make Tartine look like it belongs exactly where it is: we hang pictures by local artists and change them every few weeks, we didn’t overdesign or overdecorate, and we let the sun shine in. The café customers can get a little crowded

don’t start coming out of the oven until soon after we open the front door for business. Throughout the morning, the scene is of breakfast pastries in constant motion: some are being formed, some are proofing, and some are baking; and at the same time, we are mixing doughs for the next day’s bake. One day while watching this steady parade, a friend who is also a baker observed, “My lord, you’re baking in real time!”

around their tables, but we give the food some

In this book, you will find recipes for many of

room to speak for itself.

Tartine’s best-loved breakfast pastries and more.

We’re both purists when it comes to ingredients and presentation: we believe in keeping it simple. We want our cakes to look as natural as the flowers we use to decorate them, our pies and tarts and

Some are simple constructions, perfect for a quick bite with coffee, and others are more elaborate creations meant to be savored over a long breakfast or brunch. Still others are the way to end a

13 / introduction

that would vibrate with the same youthful energy

hours before they’re sold. Our morning pastries


meal on a decadent note, and a few are good for

favorites. You can have the best brownie recipe in

gift giving. The bakery always stocks a variety

the world, but if a brownie is slightly overbaked,

from each of these categories, with seasonal

it will not have the proper texture. In other words,

changes to keep the baker and eater interested,

while it will still be a decent brownie, it won’t be a

challenged, and anticipating what is coming next

Tartine brownie. This is true of all the recipes. In

throughout the year.

general, we are not doing things radically differ-

These recipes are more than simply ingredients lists and general directions for assembling and baking. It is important to know how and why a recipe works, too, so each one includes both an introductory note, usually on how the recipe came to be or how it looks and tastes when it is on the table, and a section called Kitchen Notes, a bit of practical advice or insider’s know-how. This latter text is typically something about the recipe that I or others have learned in the kitchen as we worked. It has been said that the skill of a cook can be measured in how he or she makes an omelet, a seemingly simple exercise. Putting together an omelet assesses the cook’s understanding of eggs and how they react not only to heat, but also to whisking, seasoning, the addition of ingredients, timing, and to various pieces of equipment. The same is true in pastry making. When cooks try out for a position in the Tartine kitchen, the first tartine /

14

thing they do is make a batch of pastry cream and a génoise, two relatively easy tasks but with enough variables to make them challenging tests of the baker’s skill and focus. All of the senses are involved in these two recipes, and adjustments must be made quickly and precisely throughout the process. This is true for every recipe we make in the Tartine kitchen and every recipe you will make at home. Many of the recipes are our versions of such classics as brownies or shortbread that are found in countless other bakery counters. But what sets our brownies apart from what you will find in most other display cases is our bakers’ understanding of the correct technique for making these ubiquitous

ently than what many other bakeries and restaurants do, but we strive to be conscious of every detail as we work. And we are extremely resolute on two aspects of everything we make: we use only the best-quality ingredients and we adhere to exacting standards of production. Attention to both is what makes the difference between something good and something exceptional emerging from the oven. The formal, gilded pastries seen in many pastry shops look and feel rigid—labored over by too many hands for too much time. In contrast, the Tartine philosophy is that our pastries should look natural, rather than contrived, that everything we make should be an honest expression of the marriage of first-rate ingredients and experienced hands and minds. We see the nuances of flavor as another essential component of good pastry making, one that elsewhere is often ignored or buried under layers of sugar. We regularly experiment with flavors to gain a better understanding of the way they work together. For example, at the bakery we might add a squeeze of lemon juice to strawberries or a pinch of black pepper to the batter for a ginger tea cake to heighten the “true” flavor of the berries or the batter. Or, there are times when I will add a dash of orange-flower water to a Bavarian batter if I know that I am going to be serving it with a citrus compote after a Middle Eastern main course. The flavor combinations and rules of preparation for most traditional recipes are grindingly pedantic. I remember being a young, tentative baker who slavishly followed each and every pinch and cupful, whether or not it seemed right. Even


though I may have thought the recipe needed

the contrast of texture and temperature is wonder-

something more, I was afraid to stray from the

fully satisfying.

formula on the page. Now I know that almost anything folded into croissant dough, from smoked ham, cheese, or chocolate to fresh fruit, results in a batch of delicious pastries. And I know that the same is true for scones, quiches, and countless other items.

Newborn ideas come from things freshly looked at and learned, and of course, from memories of desserts past. Some of the recipes in this book are classic, like fruit cobbler or shortbread, and should always be that way. They were perfected long ago and don’t need to be changed. Some

I have also learned never to discriminate against

others, like Steamed Gingerbread Pudding or

any part of a fruit. A friend who runs a fresh juice

Lemon Cream Tart, are the product of new ways

stand at one of the local farmers’ markets was hav-

to make old favorites. As a baker, I am always

ing a hard time getting her watermelon juice to

intrigued by the use of different techniques to

taste right. Using only the ripe, sweet pink flesh

make something familiar, and as an eater, I am

of the melon didn’t do the trick; the result was a

equally intrigued by the different texture and

slushy, sugary drink without good melon flavor.

flavor that result from such changes.

She kept experimenting until she discovered that simply adding some puréed watermelon seeds to the drink produced a mouthful of true watermelon flavor—the taste of the seeds completed the picture. If we make a peach dessert at the bakery, for example, we often leave the skins on the fruits. The same is true for apples for a tart, if they are nice and fresh and the skins haven’t toughened from storage. Apple skins have a lot of flavor, and by leaving a little bit of skin on, you can end up

In these pages, I have tried to pass along the enthusiasm we all have at Tartine for what we do and the knowledge we have gained baking over the years. I hope that what you find here will inspire you, whether a novice or a seasoned baker, not only to bake more but to learn more, too. A Note on the Measurements

I have included three measuring systems for recipe ingredients: standard American volume

if you used soft-cooked peeled apples alone.

measures, imperial fluid ounces and ounces, and

Because fruits play a big role in our kitchen, we are always thinking about ways to enhance their texture in what we make. We rarely strain berry purées, for example, for two reasons: an unstrained purée creates contrast on the palate and for the

metric milliliters and grams. American cooks traditionally use volume measures for both wet and dry ingredients, and you will achieve perfect results with the recipes if you use these measures consistently. Since these recipes are considerably

eye, and it clues the eater in to what the purée is

scaled down for home use, small units of measure

made from, rather than it simply being a generic

become difficult to weigh accurately. Because

“red berry” sauce. Or, roasting strawberries whole

of this, we use teaspoons and tablespoons and the

for topping a bread pudding or as a garnish for ice

metric equivalent in millileters. Note that the

cream is an unusual and a delicious alternative

imperial and metric measurements have been

to using them fresh. The juices that come from

rounded off, usually to the nearest ounce or gram.

roasting run clear, making a beautiful sauce; the fruit turns soft and luscious but stays intact; and

15 / introduction

with a more interesting texture and flavor than


B R E A K FA S T CROISSANTS

21

BRIOCHE

28

BOSTOCK

31

BRIOCHE BREAD PUDDING

33

A L M O N D B R E A K FA S T CA K E W I T H F R E S H F R U I T A N D C R U M B L E TO P P I N G BUTTERMILK SCONES

37

QUICHE

40

S AVO RY B R E A D P U D D I N G

42

35


When I think about how Chad and I started our bakery, some of my fondest memories are of making morning pastries together, just as some of my fondest childhood memories are of breakfast time, especially on weekends and holidays when we would start early and make all our family specialties for the relatives and friends who would gather around the table. My father’s side of the family is from the South, which meant biscuits, grits, fried meats and tartine /

18

gravy, waffles, and eggs. My mother’s ancestors are Swedish, so on the mornings when our Scandinavian roots were being honored, we would make plattar, small, thin crêpelike pancakes, and serve them with lingonberry jam.


Of course, things have changed since Chad and I worked alone on the morning pastries. As Tartine has grown, we have added staff to cope with our steadily expanding early bake. Yet much about the place remains the same today: quiet morning hours, little talking, and just the sound of the mixer, of the oven doors, and of sheets of pastries sliding in and out of ovens and onto cooling racks. As the early morning bakers warm up the espresso machine, there is the grind of coffee beans— a sweet sound that anticipates the heavy production to come. The kitchen activity is calm and methodical, with hundreds of croissants pinned out, cut, and rolled; proofed; brushed with egg wash; and then baked. The work is part concentration, as we keep our minds on the dough on the workbench, in the proofer, and in the oven, and part instinctual, from the daily repetition of working with the same doughs over time. The measure of success for all breakfast pastries, whether time-consuming croissants or quick-to-assemble scones, is freshness at the table. While cakes, cookies, and many other baked goods are typically designed to last for at least a short period of time, people usually want their breakfast pastries fresh and warm—as close to hot from the oven as possible. At Tartine, this means baking in small batches throughout the day, with the result that the staff is hard at work nearly all the time and that sometimes customers must wait a bit for the next batch to be pulled from the oven.

19 / breakfast


yudhacookbook.com CROISSANTS

/

yield 16 to 18 croissants

/

Until the early 1970s, the opportunity to enjoy croissants in the United States was limited to French enclaves in a handful of cities and towns. Only then did these flaky, crescent-shaped pastries begin to appear in bakeries elsewhere in urban areas on the East and West coasts. Initially, their production adhered to traditional French techniques that had been introduced by bakers who had learned them from working in France. The process, which calls for laminating the leavened dough, was labor-intensive and demanded nothing less than the best ingredients. Over time, however, things changed in Preferment

both the United States and France, and in general the qual-

Nonfat milk

3⁄4

6 oz/150 ml

ity of croissants fell dramatically due to mechanization, a

Active dry yeast

1 tbsp

15 ml

widespread disregard for standards, and the use of cheaper

All-purpose flour

1 1⁄3 cups

6 1⁄4 oz / 175 g

ingredients, like margarine to replace butter. In the end,

cup

freshness and good taste were sacrificed in the interest of efficient distribution and profit. Today, some croissants are

Dough

made in small batches in the honest, artisanal manner, but

Active dry yeast

1 tbsp + 1 tsp

20 ml

Whole milk

1 3⁄4 cups

14 oz/425 ml

All-purpose flour

6 cups

28 oz/800 g

Sugar

1⁄3

2 1⁄2 oz/70 g

lamination process with a day’s forethought to yield what

Salt

1 tbsp + 1 tsp

20 ml

many consider the ideal breakfast pastry. Plain croissants

Unsalted butter, melted

1 tbsp

15 ml

cup

most are mass-produced with little regard to tradition. At Tartine, we make them the traditional way, marrying a well-fermented, slightly sweet dough and the

latte. The same dough can be used to make many other breakfast pastries. At Tartine, we stick with simple tradi-

Roll-in Butter

tional variations, such as pain au chocolat and pain au jambon

Unsalted butter, cool but pliable

(see page 27), the first filled with chocolate and the second 2 3⁄4 cups

22 oz/625 g

with ham and Gruyère cheese. We also use croissants as components of a number of our other offerings. Leftover

Egg Wash

croissants have typically been used in clever ways to minimize waste; at Tartine, we bake fresh croissants to make the

Large egg yolks

4

Heavy cream

1⁄4

Salt

pinch

cup

2 oz/60 ml

usual by-products associated with unsold pastries. The most popular of these are frangipane croissants (croissants aux amandes) and bread pudding (see page 27). continued

21 / breakfast

are often eaten spread with jam and dunked into bowls of


KITCHEN NOTES:

To maintain the correct consistency

of the dough and butter components, work in a cool kitchen up until the final rising of the shaped pastries. The preferment, a mixture of milk, yeast, and flour with the consistency of a batter, is left to rise so that it will ferment slightly, developing flavor and aroma, before the dough is mixed. It can be made in the morning and allowed to rise at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours to make the croissant dough the same day, or it can be made at night, put in the refrigerator to rise overnight, and used to make the croissant dough straightaway the next morning. tartine /

22

••••••

To make the preferment, in a small saucepan, warm the milk only enough to take the chill off. The milk should not be warm or cold to the touch but in between the two (80° to 90°F). Pour the milk into a mixing bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the milk, stir to dissolve the yeast with a wooden spoon, and then add the flour, mixing with the spoon until a smooth batter forms. Cover the bowl with cheesecloth and let the mixture rise until almost doubled in volume, 2 to 3 hours at moderate room temperature or overnight in the refrigerator.

To make the dough, first measure out all the ingredients and place them near at hand. Transfer the preferment and then the yeast to the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Mix on low speed until the yeast is incorporated into the preferment batter, which will take a minute or two. Stop the mixer as needed and use a spatula to clean the bottom and sides of the bowl, folding the loosened portion into the mixture to incorporate all the elements fully. When the mixture has come together into an even, well-mixed mass, increase the speed to medium, and mix for a couple of minutes. Slowly add half of the milk and continue to mix until the milk is fully incorporated. Reduce the speed to low, add the flour, sugar, salt, melted butter, and the rest of the milk, and mix until the mass comes together in a loose dough, about 3 minutes. Turn off the mixer and let the dough rest for 15 to 20 minutes. This resting period helps to shorten the final mixing phase, which comes next.


Engage the mixer again on low speed and mix until the dough is smooth and elastic, a maximum of 4 minutes. If the dough is very firm, add a little milk, 1 tablespoon at a time, to loosen it. Take care not to overmix the dough, which will result in a tough croissant that also turns stale more quickly. Remember, too, you will be rolling out the dough several times, which will further develop the gluten structure, so though you want a smooth dough, the less mixing you do to achieve that goal the better. Cover the bowl with cheesecloth and let the dough rise in a cool place until the volume increases by half, about 1 1⁄2 hours.

About 1 hour before you are ready to start laminating the dough, put the butter that you will be rolling into the dough in the bowl of the mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Mix on medium speed until malleable but not warm or soft, about 3 minutes. Remove the butter from the bowl, wrap in plastic wrap, and place in the refrigerator to chill but not resolidify.

Give the plaque a quarter turn so that the seams are to your right and left, rather than at the top and bottom. Again roll out the dough into a rectangle 28 by 12 inches, and fold again in the same manner. Wrap in plastic wrap or slip into a plastic bag and place in the refrigerator for 1 1⁄2 to 2 hours to relax the gluten in the dough before you make the third fold, or “turn.” continued

23 / breakfast

Lightly flour a work surface. Transfer the dough to the floured surface and press into a rectangle 2 inches thick. Wrap the rectangle in plastic wrap, or slip it into a plastic bag and seal closed. Place the dough in the refrigerator to chill for 4 to 6 hours.

Now you are ready to begin laminating the dough. First, lightly dust a cool work surface, and then remove the chilled dough and the butter from the refrigerator. Unwrap the dough and place it on the floured surface. Roll out the dough into a rectangle 28 by 12 inches. With a long side of the rectangle facing you, and starting from the left side, spread and spot the butter over two-thirds of the length of the rectangle. Fold the uncovered third over the butter and then fold the left-hand third over the center, as if folding a business letter. The resulting rectangle is known as a plaque. With your fingers, push down along the seams on the top and the bottom to seal the butter in the plaque.


Clean the work surface, dust again with flour, and remove the dough from the refrigerator. Unwrap, place on the floured surface, and again roll out into a rectangle 28 by 12 inches. Fold into thirds in the same manner. You should have a plaque of dough measuring about 9 by 12 inches, about the size of a quarter sheet pan, and 1 1⁄2 to 2 inches thick. Wrap in plastic wrap or slip into the plastic bag, place on a quarter sheet pan, and immediately place in the freezer to chill for at least 1 hour. If you intend to make the croissants the next morning, leave the dough in the freezer until the evening and then transfer it to the refrigerator before retiring. The next morning, the dough will be ready to roll out and form into croissants, proof, and bake. Or, you can leave the dough in the freezer for up to 1 week; just remember to transfer it to the refrigerator to thaw overnight before using.

Line a half sheet pan (about 13 by 18 inches) with parchment paper. To shape each croissant, position a triangle with the base facing you. Positioning your palms on the two outer points of the base, carefully roll the base toward the point. To finish, grab the point with one hand, stretching it slightly, and continue to roll, tucking the point underneath the rolled dough so that the croissant will stand tall when you place it on the sheet pan. If you have properly shaped the croissant, it will have 6 or 7 ridges.

During this final rising, the croissants should at least double in size and look noticeably puffy. If when you press a croissant lightly with a fingertip, the indentation fills in slowly, the croissants are almost ready to bake. At this point, the croissants should still be slightly “firm” and holding their shape and neither spongy nor starting to slouch. If you have put the croissants into the oven to proof, remove them now and set the oven to 425°F to preheat for 20 to 30 minutes. About 10 minutes before you are ready to bake the croissants, make the egg wash. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, cream, and salt until you have a pale yellow mixture. Using a pastry brush, lightly and carefully brush the yolk mixture on the pastries, being careful not to allow the egg wash to drip onto the pan. Let the wash dry slightly, about 10 minutes, before baking. continued

25 / breakfast

When you are ready to roll out the dough, dust the work surface again. Roll out the dough into a rectangle 32 by 12 inches and 3⁄8 inch thick. Using a pizza wheel or chef’s knife, cut the dough into long triangles that measure 10 to 12 inches on each side and about 4 inches along the base.

As you form the croissants, place them, well spaced, on the prepared half sheet pan. When all the croissants are on the pan, set the pan in a draft-free area with relatively high humidity and let the pastries rise for 2 to 3 hours. The ideal temperature is 75°F. A bit cooler or warmer is all right, as long as the temperature is not warm enough to melt the layers of butter in the dough, which would yield greasy pastries. Cooler is preferable, and will increase the rising time and with it the flavor development. For example, the home oven (turned off) with a pan of steaming water placed in the bottom is a good place for proofing leavened baked items. To make sure that no skin forms on the pastries during this final rising, refresh the pan of water halfway through the rising.


Place the croissants into the oven, immediately turn down the oven temperature to 400°F, and leave the door shut for the first 10 minutes. Then, working quickly, open the oven door, rotate the pan 180 degrees, and close the door. This rotation will help the pastries to bake evenly. Bake for 6 to 10 minutes longer, rotating the pan again during this time if the croissants do not appear to be baking evenly. The croissants should be done in 15 to 20 minutes total. They are ready when they are deep golden brown on the top and bottom, crisp on the outside, and feel light when they are picked up, indicating that the interior is baked through.

If properly made, each croissant will have a light, distinctly layered, tender interior. The outside will be crisp and deeply caramelized and make a mess of crumbs when you bite into it. The flavors and aroma should be a combination of excellent butter and the complex organic acids achieved by long fermentation, much like the aroma of warm fresh bread. Pain au Jambon Variation: After you cut the rolled-

out dough into triangles, lay 1 ounce (30 g) thinly sliced smoked ham over two-thirds of each triangle, leaving the pointed tip (the remaining one-third)

Pain au Chocolat Variation: Roll out the dough as directed, but cut it into 6-by-4-inch rectangles, rather than triangles. Place 1 ounce (30 g) bittersweet chocolate batons (or 2 ounces/55 g for double chocolate) in the center of each rectangle. Starting from a long side, roll up each rectangle carefully, encasing the batons in the center, and proceed as directed for plain croissants. Croissants aux Amandes Variation: Bake the plain croissants as directed. When cool, split each croissant in half (like a bagel). Make a brandy syrup by combining 1⁄2 cup (3 1⁄2 ounces/100 g) sugar and 1⁄3 cup (2 1⁄2 fluid ounces/75 ml) water in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add 2 tablespoons (30 ml) brandy and remove from the heat. Moisten both cuts sides of each croissant with the brandy syrup. Spread the bottom half of each croissant with Frangipane Cream (page 210), replace the top half, and spread more cream on top. Top each croissant with sliced almonds, and arrange the croissants on a baking sheet. Bake in a 350°F oven until hot throughout, crispy, and golden, 20 to 35 minutes. Serve warm from the oven dusted with confectioners’ sugar. Bread Pudding Variation: Use plain croissants,

split in half lengthwise or sliced crosswise into 1-inch-thick slices, in place of the brioche slices in Brioche Bread Pudding (page 33).

27 / breakfast

Remove the croissants from the oven and place them on a wire rack to cool. As they cool, their moist interiors will set up. They are best if eaten while they are still slightly warm. If they have just cooled to room temperature, they are fine as well, or you can rewarm them in a 375°F oven for 6 to 8 minutes to recrisp them before serving. You can also store leftover croissants in an airtight container at room temperature for 1 day, and then afterward in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. If you have stored them, recrisp them in the oven before serving.

uncovered. Place some matchstick-sized batons of Gruyère or similar cheese on top of the ham. Roll up carefully, encasing the ham and cheese, and then proceed as directed for plain croissants.


yudhacookbook.com BRIOCHE

/

yield 3 3⁄4 pounds (1.7 kg) dough, enough for three 1 1⁄4 -pound (570-g) loaves

/

This light-textured, rich-tasting French bread or cake, made from eggs, butter, flour, yeast, sugar, and salt, likely originated in Normandy, which has long been known for its highquality butter. Different types of brioche dough are made depending on how they will be used, with the formulas varying primarily in the percentage of butter. For example, dough for brioche mousseline, which is 50 percent butter, is used for making coffee cakes or for plain loaves with a particularly soft, meltingly tender crumb. At Tartine, we bake this less-rich loaf for making our bread pudding (page 33) and our bostock (page 31) because Preferment

we add rich ingredients to both of them and we need the

Nonfat milk

3⁄4

Active dry yeast

2 tsp

10 ml

Bread flour

1 3⁄4 cups

8 3⁄4 oz/250 g

cup

6 oz/175 ml

crumb structure to hold up. You can also slice this brioche to make French toast, or you can spread two slices with Nutella or with almond, hazelnut, or pistachio butter, or sprinkle them with chocolate shavings, put them together, and grill them in a sand-

Dough

tartine /

28

Active dry yeast

2 tbsp + 1 tsp

35 ml

Large eggs

5

Whole milk

1 1⁄4 cups

10 oz/310 ml

Bread flour

3 1⁄2 cups

17 1⁄2 oz/495 g

Sugar

1⁄4

2 oz/55 g

Salt

1 tbsp

15 ml

Unsalted butter, chilled but pliable

1 cup + 2 tbsp

81⁄3 oz/235 g

wich press or on the stove top. The brioche slices are great for making tea sandwiches or BLTs, too, or grill them plain and top them with slices of foie gras terrine or pâté for

cup

tartines (open-faced sandwiches). KITCHEN NOTES:

Because the dough has a high ratio of

butter, it is well chilled when you form it into loaves. Its consistency should be slightly softer than modeling clay. If the dough becomes too warm, the butter will begin to melt out of it and the dough will have a greasy feel. Also, it will become soft and sticky, making it difficult to shape

Egg Wash

into uniform loaves.

Large egg yolks

4

Heavy cream

1⁄4

Salt

cup

2 oz/60 ml

••••••

To make the preferment, in a small saucepan, warm the milk only enough to take the chill off. The milk should not be warm or cold to the touch but in between the two (80° to 90°F). Pour the milk into a mixing bowl, sprinkle the yeast over the milk, stir to dissolve the yeast with a wooden spoon, and then add the flour, mixing with the spoon until a smooth batter forms. Cover the bowl with cheesecloth and place in a cool, draftfree area for 1 hour and then in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour or for up to 3 hours to cool down. pinch


The mixture will rise until doubled in volume and not yet collapsing. During this time, measure all the ingredients for the dough. Once you measure the butter, cut it into cubes, and then return the eggs, milk, and butter to the refrigerator to chill. To make the dough, transfer the preferment and then the yeast to the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook. Mix on low speed until the yeast is incorporated into the preferment batter, which will take a minute or two. Stop the mixer as needed and use a spatula to clean the bottom and sides of the bowl, folding the loosened portion into the mixture to incorporate all the elements fully. When the mixture has come together into an even, well-mixed mass, begin to add the eggs one by one, increasing the mixer speed to medium or mediumhigh to incorporate the eggs and stopping the mixer and scraping down the sides of the bowl as needed.

Remove the bowl holding the butter from the mixer, and replace it with the bowl holding the now-rested first-stage dough. Refit the mixer with the dough hook and begin mixing on medium speed. When the dough again starts to come away cleanly from the sides of the bowl, increase the speed to mediumhigh. At this stage the dough will appear very silky and elastic. With the mixing speed still on mediumhigh, add small amounts of the butter, squeezing the cubes through your fingers so that they become ribbons as they drop into the bowl. Stop the mixer to clean the bottom and sides of the bowl as needed with the spatula. Make sure that you don’t add too much butter too quickly, and also make sure that you don’t mix the butter too long after each addition, or you will heat the dough up. When all the butter has been added, allow the mixer to run for another 2 minutes to make sure the butter is fully incor porated. The dough should still be coming away cleanly from the sides of the bowl at this point. Now, slowly add the remaining 1⠄4 cup milk (2 fluid ounces/60 ml) in increments of 1 tablespoon (15 ml) and increase the mixer speed to high. Mix until the dough is very smooth and silky and continues to pull cleanly away from the sides of the bowl. This should take another 2 minutes. continued

29 / breakfast

Once all the eggs are incorporated, reduce the mixer speed to low and begin slowly to add 1 cup (8 fluid ounces/250 ml) of the milk. When the milk is fully incorporated, stop the mixer and add the flour, sugar, and salt. Engage the mixer again on low speed and mix until the dry ingredients are incorporated, about 3 minutes. Increase the speed to medium-high and mix until you see a dough forming and it starts to come away cleanly from the sides the bowl, 2 to 3 minutes.

Turn off the mixer and let dough rest for 15 to 20 minutes. While the dough is resting, place the chilled butter cubes into a separate mixer bowl. Fit the mixer with the paddle attachment and mix the butter on medium speed until the cubes are pliable but not soft and are still chilled.


Lightly oil a large baking sheet. Spread the dough evenly on the prepared pan. Dust the top lightly with flour and cover with cheesecloth. Put the pan in the freezer for at least 3 hours and then transfer to the refrigerator overnight if you want to use the dough the next morning. If you want to bake the same day, put the pan in the freezer for 2 hours and then transfer to the refrigerator for 3 to 5 hours before shaping the dough. Alternatively, you can freeze the dough for a few days before baking: transfer it to a wide, shallow airtight container, slip it into the freezer, and then thaw it overnight in the refrigerator before using.

tartine /

30

Brush three 9-by-5-inch loaf pans with melted butter. Remove the chilled dough from the refrigerator and place on a lightly floured work surface in a cool kitchen. Divide the dough into 3 equal portions. Press each portion into a rectangle the length of a loaf pan and slightly wider than the pan. Starting from a narrow end, roll up the rectangle tightly, pinch the ends and seam to seal, and place seam side down in a prepared pan. The pan should be no more than about one-third full. The dough increases substantially in volume during rising, and if you fill the pan any fuller, the brioche will bake up too large for the pan. When the pans are filled, place them in a draft-free area with relatively high humidity and an ideal temperature of 75째 to 80째F. Let rise for 2 to 3 hours. During this final rising, the brioche dough should at least double in size and look noticeably puffy but still be resilient to the touch.

Preheat the oven to 425째F for at least 20 minutes before you want to begin baking. Then about 10 minutes before you are ready to begin baking, make the egg wash. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, cream, and salt until you have a pale yellow mixture. Using a pastry brush, brush the yolk mixture on the tops of the loaves. Let the wash dry slightly, about 10 minutes, before baking. Place the loaves in the oven and bake for 15 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 350째F and bake until the loaves are a uniformly dark golden brown on the bottom, sides, and top, about 45 minutes longer. Remove the pans from the oven, immediately rap the bottoms on a tabletop or countertop to release the loaves, and then turn the loaves out onto wire racks to cool. The loaves can be eaten warm from the oven or allowed to cool and eaten within the day at room temperature or toasted. If you keep them longer than a day, wrap them in plastic wrap or parchment paper and store them for up to 3 days in the refrigerator, then toast or warm to serve.


B O S TO C K

/

yield 6 servings

/

Bostock can be served for dessert, but I think of it more as a decadent breakfast or brunch pastry, which is the time of day it is traditionally served in France. Typically made with brioche slices, it would be equally good made with other rich egg breads, such as challah or panettone. The flavors are orange and almond, and the texture is soft in the center like French toast and crunchy on the outside because of the caramelized frangipane cream and the toasted almonds. KITCHEN NOTES:

Make sure that your jam and frangipane

cream are at room temperature so that they are easy to

Syrup

spread on the bread. This recipe makes very good use of

Water

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

Granulated sugar

1⁄4

cup

1 3⁄4 oz/50 g

the skins on), they make a more attractive presentation

Orange liqueur

2 tbsp

30 ml

than sliced blanched almonds.

Orange juice

1⁄4

Orange zest, grated

1 tbsp

cup

2 oz/60 ml

day-old bread. If you can find sliced natural almonds (with

••••••

30 ml

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Brioche slices (page 28), each 1⁄2 inch thick

6

Apricot jam, at room temperature

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/170 g

To make the syrup, in a small saucepan, combine the water, granulated sugar, orange liqueur, orange juice, and orange zest, place over medium heat, and heat, stirring, just until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature. 31

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/175 ml

Sliced almonds

3⁄4

cup

2 3⁄4 oz/80 g

Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

While the syrup is cooling, line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Arrange the bread slices on the prepared pan, and brush evenly with the syrup. Using an offset spatula or knife, spread 2 tablespoons (30 ml) of the jam over the syrup, and then spread 2 tablespoons of the cream over the jam. Finally, scatter 2 tablespoons of the almonds evenly over each slice.

Bake the brioche slices until the almonds are golden brown and the edges of the bread slices are toasted, 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and, using a fine-mesh sieve, dust with the confectioners’ sugar. Serve immediately.

/ breakfast

Frangipane Cream (page 210), at room temperature


yudhacookbook.com BRIOCHE BREAD PUDDING

/

yield one 9-by-5-inch pudding; 6 to 8 servings

/

We make countless, huge pans of this bread pudding every day. It is one thing that doesn’t suffer from being made in a very large batch, and if you have some left over, you can chill it, slice it, and fry it as you would French toast. We serve it topped with seasonal fresh fruits, such as cherries, peaches, or thinly sliced apples or pears that we lightly sauté in butter and then heat in caramel (page 212) until they are soft. For blueberries, we heat them briefly with a little maple syrup and a nugget of butter and then immediately spoon them over each serving. You can also serve the pudding topped with just the caramel sauce or with a simple berry purée (purée fresh berries with sugar to taste in a blender).When Brioche slices (page 28), each 1 inch thick

made correctly, the bread pudding will have little pockets of soft custard among the bread slices and the top will be

6

slightly crusty. This recipe works equally well with croissants (see

Custard

bread pudding variation, page 27). If you have chocolate-

Large eggs

8

Sugar

3⁄4

Whole milk

4 cups

32 oz/1 l

Vanilla extract

1 1⁄2 tsp

7 ml

caramel (page 212). You can also use panettone or challah

Salt

1⁄2

2 ml

slices in place of the brioche slices.

cup + 2 tbsp

tsp

6 1⁄2 oz/185 g

filled croissants (pain au chocolat variation, page 27) left over, cut them into the same size as the brioche slices, add a little extra chocolate between the layers, and top with

KITCHEN NOTES:

You must never crowd the bread slices in

custard is added. When a bread pudding turns out dry, crowding is usually the cause. Also, the deeper your mold is, the higher the ratio of custardy bread you will have in the pudding, so here I have used a loaf mold. If you use a shallower mold, make sure to reduce the baking time. Finally, if you end up with more custard than you need, transform it into a simple dessert: pour it into ramekins, place them in a hot-water bath, and bake in a 350°F oven until set, about 40 minutes. •••••• continued

33 / breakfast

the mold. They are like sponges, and will expand once the


Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a 9-by-5-inch glass loaf dish. Arrange the brioche slices on a baking sheet. Place in the oven until lightly toasted, 4 to 10 minutes, depending on the freshness of the bread. Remove from the oven and set aside to cool. To make the custard, crack the eggs into a mixing bowl and whisk until blended. Add the sugar and whisk until smooth. Add the milk, vanilla, and salt and whisk until fully incorporated. Pour the custard through a fine-mesh sieve held over a pitcher or a measuring cup with a spout (to make pouring it into the dish easier).

tartine /

34

Place the toasted bread slices in the prepared loaf dish, cutting the slices to fit as needed. If the bread extends over the top of the loaf pan, trim the slices to fit. Pour the custard evenly over the bread, filling the dish to the top. You may not be able to add all of the custard at this point. Let sit for about 10 minutes, so that the bread can absorb the custard. (Or, you can make the pudding up to this point, cover, and refrigerate overnight and then bake the next day. Cover and refrigerate any extra custard for adding just before baking if the mixture does not reach the rim of the dish.)

Just before baking, top off the dish with more of the custard if the previous addition has been completely absorbed. (See Kitchen Notes for a suggestion on how to use any leftover custard.) Cover the dish with aluminum foil, place in the oven, and bake the pudding for about 1 hour. (If you have refrigerated the pudding overnight before baking it, it will take 20 to 30 minutes longer to bake.) To test for doneness, uncover the dish, slip a knife into the center, and push the bread aside. If the custard is still very liquid, re-cover the dish and return the pudding to the oven to bake for about 10 more minutes. If only a little liquid remains, the pudding is ready to come out of the oven. The custard will continue to cook after it is removed from the oven and it will set up as it cools. Let the pudding cool for about 10 minutes before serving. You can serve the bread pudding by slicing it and removing each slice with an offset spatula, or by scooping it out with a serving spoon.


A L M O N D B R E A K FA S T CA K E WITH FRESH FRUIT AND CRUMBLE TOPPING

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 servings

/

This is a quick and delicious cake that can be topped with nearly any seasonal fruit: berries, apricots, peaches, and plums in the summer; sautéed apples, simmered quince, or pineapple in the fall and winter. It is what I think of as the perfect cake with coffee or tea. The batter is made with almond paste, which goes well with all of the fruits and keeps the cake moist and flavorful. One of the most appealing things about this recipe is that it can be fully assembled the night before serving and baked the next morning for breakfast or brunch. KITCHEN NOTES:

Make sure to purchase almond paste,

rather than marzipan. Marzipan contains a lower percentCrumble Topping

age of almond, so it will yield different results. Almond

Unsalted butter

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/115 g

meal is made by milling the almonds with their brown

All-purpose flour

3⁄4

cup + 2 tbsp

4 1⁄2 oz/130 g

skins intact. This cake is best served the day it is baked.

Natural almond meal

2⁄3

cup

3 oz/85 g

Sugar

1⁄2

cup + 1 tbsp

4 oz/115 g

Salt

pinch

Cake 1⁄2

Sugar

1 cup + 2 tbsp

8 oz/225 g

Unsalted butter

3⁄4

6 oz/170 g

All-purpose flour

1 1⁄2 cups + 2 tbsp

7 1⁄2 oz/215 g

Baking powder

1 1⁄2 tsp

7 ml

Salt

1⁄2

2 ml

Large eggs

3

continued

cup + 1 tbsp

cup

tsp

6 oz/170 g

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter or oil an 8-inch round glass cake dish. To make the crumble topping, place the butter in the small bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix on medium-high speed until creamy. Add the flour, almond meal, sugar, and salt and mix only until all the ingredients are evenly incorporated. You do not want a smooth mixture; it should still have a crumbly appearance. If you overmix it, cover it and chill it for about 1 hour, and then break it into crumble-sized pieces. Place the topping aside. continued

35 / breakfast

Almond paste

••••••


Fruit Topping (choose one)

tartine /

36

Berries

1⁄2

Medium plums, pitted and sliced

4

Large peach, pitted and sliced

1

Apples or pears, cored, sliced, sautéed in unsalted butter, and cooled

2

Quince, peeled, cored, thinly sliced, simmered in 1 1⁄2 cups (12 oz/375 ml) water and 1 3⁄4 cups (12 1⁄4 oz/350 g) sugar until tender

1

Pineapple slices, 1⁄2 inch thick, cut into 1⁄2 -inch cubes

2

pint

5 oz/140 g

To make the cake, place the almond paste in the large bowl of the mixer fitted with the paddle attachment and mix on low speed until the paste is broken up. Add the sugar and gradually increase the speed to medium. Continue to mix until the sugar breaks up the almond paste fully and there are no lumps. Add the butter and mix until creamy, about 1 minute. Stop the mixer as needed to scrape down

the bottom and sides of the bowl with a spatula. On low speed, add the flour, baking powder, salt, and eggs all at once, then increase the speed to medium and mix just until everything is combined. Do not overmix. Pour the cake batter into the prepared pan. Top with your choice of fruit, distributing it evenly over the surface, and then with the crumble topping, again scattering it evenly. (At this point, you can cover the assembled cake loosely with plastic wrap and refrigerate it overnight. The next morning, remove the cake from the refrigerator and leave it out at room temperature for about 45 minutes before baking.) Bake the cake until the crumble topping is golden brown, about 40 minutes. It is difficult to gauge doneness with a cake tester, as some of the fruit is so moist that the tester won’t come out clean. If you are not sure if the cake is done, insert a small knife into the center and gently push some of the cake aside to see if it is cooked. Let the cake cool on a wire rack for at least 10 minutes before serving.


BUTTERMILK SCONES

/

yield 12 scones

/

Scones are made like biscuits, their delicate and flaky texture the result of carefully cutting in the butter and of using a light hand to mix in the other ingredients. Usually we make these with the traditional Zante currants, although we vary the recipe sometimes in spring and summer with blueberries, raspberries, strawberries, or even peaches. This same dough makes a great cobbler topping or biscuit for berry shortcakes. KITCHEN NOTES:

Zante currants, also sometimes labeled

“black currants” or “dried currants,” are dried tiny Black

Zante currants

3⁄4

cup

3 1⁄2 oz/100 g

All-purpose flour

4 3⁄4 cups

24 oz/680 g

Baking powder

1 tbsp

15 ml

Baking soda

3⁄4

tsp

3 3⁄4 ml

Granulated sugar

1⁄2

cup

31⁄2 oz/100 g

(5 ounces/140 g) berries. Hull and coarsely chop the straw-

Salt

1 1⁄4 tsp

6 1⁄4 ml

berries but leave the raspberries or blueberries whole.

Unsalted butter, very cold

1 cup + 1 tbsp

9 oz/255 g

Buttermilk

11⁄2 cups

12 oz/375 ml

you add the buttermilk. You must be careful not to mash the

Lemon zest, grated

1 tsp

5 ml

berries into the dough, or you will color it with their juice.

Corinth grapes that were first cultivated on the Greek island of Zante, thus their name. If you decide to make the scones with fresh berries, such as raspberries, blueberries, or strawberries, instead of the currants, start with about 1⁄2 pint

Freeze the whole berries or berry pieces in a single layer on a small baking sheet, and then add them to the dough after

•••••• Topping

37

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Butter a baking sheet. about 3 tbsp

Large crystal sugar or granulated sugar for sprinkling

45 ml

To make the dough, first combine the currants with warm water to cover in a small bowl and set aside for about 10 minutes until the currants are plumped. Drain well.

While the currants are plumping, sift the flour, baking powder, and baking soda into a large mixing bowl if making by hand, or into the large bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the sugar and salt and stir to mix with a wooden spoon. Cut the butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes and scatter the cubes over the dry ingredients. If you are mixing by hand, use a pastry blender or 2 table knives to cut the butter into the dry ingredients. If you are using the mixer, pulse on and off so that you don’t break down the butter too much. You want to end up with a coarse mixture with pea-sized lumps of butter visible. continued

/ breakfast

Unsalted butter, melted


Add the buttermilk all at once along with the lemon zest and currants and mix gently with the wooden spoon by hand or on low speed if using the mixer. Continue to mix just until you have a dough that holds together. If the mixture seems dry, add a little more buttermilk. You still want to see some of the butter pieces at this point, which will add to the flakiness of the scones once they are baked.

Dust your work surface with flour, and turn the dough out onto it. Using your hands, pat the dough into a rectangle about 18 inches long, 5 inches wide, and 1 1⠄2 inches thick. Brush the top with the melted butter and then sprinkle with the sugar. Using a chef’s knife, cut the dough into 12 triangles. Transfer the triangles to the prepared baking sheet. Bake the scones until the tops are lightly browned, 25 to 35 minutes. Remove from the oven and serve immediately.

39 / breakfast


QUICHE

/

yield one 10-inch quiche; 6 to 8 servings

/

There are two small but important differences between this quiche filling and most others. The first is that part of the liquid is crème fraîche, which makes the filling smoother and slightly tart. The other is the presence of a small amount of flour. This idea comes from Boulangerie Artisanal des Maures, a bakery that Chad and I apprenticed at in the Var region of France. This recipe is just one of many that we learned there, each of which has some small, unique, and usually simple little trick to it. KITCHEN NOTES:

tartine /

40

If you have difficulty pouring all of the

Fully baked and cooled 10-inch Flaky Tart Dough shell baked in a deep 10-inch tart pan or a 10-inch pie pan (page 194) 1

batter into the pastry shell and then transferring the dish

Large eggs

5

top is ever so slightly set, and then, with the tip of a paring

All-purpose flour

3 tbsp

45 ml

knife, make a hole in the center, pour in the rest of the

Crème fraîche

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

filling, and continue baking until the quiche is done.

Whole milk

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Salt

1 tsp

5 ml

Black pepper, freshly ground

1⁄2

2 ml

tsp

to the oven without spills, here’s what we do for a nice high quiche with no filling loss. Fill the pastry shell as high as you can without worry of mishap, bake the quiche until the

••••••

Have the pie shell ready for filling. Preheat the oven to 375°F.

Place 1 egg and the flour in the bowl of a stand mixer or in a large mixing bowl and mix at high speed or by hand with a whisk until smooth. Mix or whisk in the remaining 4 eggs until blended. In a medium bowl, whisk the crème fraîche until it is perfectly smooth and then whisk in the milk. Pour the egg mixture through a fine-mesh sieve held over the milk mixture. Whisk in the salt, pepper, and thyme. (You can prepare the custard up to 4 days in advance before baking; cover and refrigerate. The flour, thyme, and pepper will settle to the bottom of the storage container and can stick to it, so whisk well before using.)

Fresh thyme, finely chopped

1 tbsp

15 ml

Pour the egg mixture into the pastry shell. Place in the oven and bake for 10 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F and bake until the filling is just set, about 30 minutes longer. The center of the quiche should feel slightly firm, rather than liquidy, when touched. Let cool on a wire rack for at least 20 minutes to allow the custard to set up, so that it will slice neatly. It can be served warm or at room temperature. To serve a fully cooled quiche warm, cover it with aluminum foil and reheat it in a 325°F for about 15 minutes.


S AVO RY B R E A D P U D D I N G

/

yield one 9-by-13-inch pudding; 8 to 12 servings

/

Whenever we slice our country bread for sandwiches, we end up with lots of ends and unusable holey pieces. We combine them with a custard and any of the savory ingredients we have at the bakery on that day—fresh porcini or shiitake mushrooms, smoked ham or bacon, asparagus, rainbow chard, onion or leek, various kinds of cheese—to make this breakfast dish. You can put nearly anything in it, including such flavorings as pimentón (smoked Spanish paprika) and saffron. KITCHEN NOTES:

You can bake the bread pudding in a heavy

10-inch skillet, preferably cast iron. If you decide to use the

Country bread or any type of good crusty bread, preferably day old

12 oz/340 g

skillet, you can sauté the onion or leek in it and then use

Olive oil

2 tbsp

30 ml

it for baking the pudding without washing it first. The bits

Yellow onion, chopped

3⁄4

3 1⁄2 oz/100 g

pudding. You can also substitute 4 ounces (115 g) sliced

OR

bacon, cut into strips, for the ham, and sauté it in the skillet

Leek, chopped

2 oz/55 g

after you sauté the onion or leek, making the olive oil for

left behind in the bottom of the pan add more flavor to the

3⁄4

cup

cup

cooking the onion or leek unnecessary. Custard

••••••

Large eggs

5

Salt

3⁄4

Whole milk

4 cups

32 oz/1 l

Heavy cream

4 cups

32 oz/1 l

Black pepper, freshly ground

1⁄2

2 ml

Nutmeg, freshly grated

1⁄4

Sliced smoked ham, cut into strips

4 oz

115 g

Fresh thyme, chopped

2 tbsp

30 ml

Swiss chard or other braising green, chopped (optional)

1 cup

3 oz/85 g

Gruyère, Cheddar, or other good melting cheese, grated

3⁄4

3 oz/85 g

tsp

4 ml

tartine /

42

tsp tsp

cup

1 ml

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Oil a 9-by-13-inch baking dish with olive oil. Cut the bread into 1 1⁄2-inch cubes. If the bread is fresh, spread the pieces on a baking sheet, place in the oven, and toast for a few minutes to dry them out. Set aside. In a skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion or leek and sauté, stirring with a wooden spoon, until lightly browned, if using onion, or soft, if using leek, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside. To make the custard, in a mixing bowl, whisk together the eggs and salt until the eggs are well blended. Add the milk and cream, whisk to combine, and then whisk in the pepper and nutmeg.


Topping

Cheese, as above, grated Black pepper, freshly ground

1â „2

cup

2 oz/55 g

In a large mixing bowl, combine the bread, custard, ham, thyme, chard (if using), sautĂŠed onion or leek, and cheese and mix well. Carefully pour the mixture into the prepared baking dish. The custard should come right up to the top but not cover the highest pieces of bread. Top the pudding evenly with cheese and then grind a light dusting of pepper over the surface. Place in the oven and bake until the custard is no longer runny in the center, about 1 hour. If the top starts to get too dark before the pudding is done, cover the dish with aluminum foil. Serve the bread pudding hot or at room temperature. Store any leftovers in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

43 / breakfast


TA R T S & P I E S L E M O N C R E A M TA R T

49

B L U E B E R R Y- L E M O N C H I F F O N TA R T

C H O C O L AT E H A Z E L N U T TA R T

51

F R A N G I PA N E TA R T

B A N A N A C R E A M P I E W I T H C A R A M E L A N D C H O C O L AT E F R E S H F R U I T TA R T

60

54

50

53

A P P L E N O U G AT I N E TA R T

F R E S H F R U I T TA R T W I T H B A V A R I A N F I L L I N G

B L A C K B E R R Y TA R T W I T H R O S E G E R A N I U M C R E A M P E C A N M A P L E P I E W I T H K U M Q U AT S A N D B O U R B O N SHAKER LEMON PIE

69

66

F R U I T GA L E T T E S

62

63

PUMPKIN PIE

71

67

57


As spring approaches, we bakers are hungry to begin making tarts with fresh fruit. Intensely flavored

cherries,

plentiful

in

northern

California, are, along with the local apricots and strawberries from southern California, among the first fruits we get to work with at this time of year. Come summer and fall, we usually have lots of peaches, nectarines, and plums to use. In the winter, fruit tarts become more challenging, and we turn to apples, tartine /

46

pears, and quince, which we sautĂŠ lightly. Or, we use tropical fruits such as mangoes (our favorite), which we shave into long ribbons and arrange in waves and curls atop tarts. If you have good frozen fruit, such as raspberries,


strawberries, or peaches, you can use it for making a Frangipane Tart (page 53) any time of year. Almost every fruit I can think of, from blueberries to rhubarb to peaches, goes with the slightly sweet, mild flavor of almonds in the frangipane cream. Most of our tarts bring together a fully baked pastry shell, a cooked filling, and fresh fruit. But our favorite baked tarts are our wonderfully simple galettes. We use a recipe for flaky tart dough that we roll out like a rough puff pastry, to produce what may be the flakiest pastry you will ever make. The fruit is lightly dusted with sugar and then we bake the galettes until the fruit caramelizes and blackens slightly on the tips. This technique yields an especially intense fruit flavor and thickens the juices to a bubbly syrup with just the right touch of sweetness. It is best not to decide what kind of fresh fruit tart you want to make before you head out to the market. In other words, always go with an open mind and see what you can find that is the ripest and the most beautiful. Often we have farmers just show up at the bakery with what they have, which is what we end up making that day. When we take advance orders from customers for our fruit tarts, we often have to leave the decision on the kind of tart to the day that it will be picked up, explaining to the customer that he or she will get a tart made with the most luscious and ripe fruit available.

47 / tarts & pies


L E M O N C R E A M TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

Most lemon tarts are a baked lemon custard or curd in a sweet or flaky tart shell. This one calls for our basic lemon cream recipe, which you make with a generous amount of butter on the stove top, pour into a prebaked shell, and then chill until the filling sets up. The resulting filling is less acidic and translucent and is softer, creamier, and more unctuous than the filling in more traditional tarts, and it sets just enough to slice without being at all stiff. We use the same lemon cream in a number of ways, including mixing it with whipped cream to make a light-textured filling for a blueberry tart (page 50) and using it as a filling for Lemon Meringue Cake (page 81). KITCHEN NOTES:

If you are softening chilled already

made lemon cream, you will need to stir it constantly over

Fully baked and cooled 9-inch Sweet Tart Dough tart shell (page 196)

1

Lemon Cream (page 209)

2 1⁄4 cups

18 oz/560 ml

Heavy cream, very cold

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Sugar

2 tsp

10 ml

simmering water. This will keep the butter in emulsion, which is what makes this filling so smooth and creamy. If the butter “breaks,” that is, comes out of emulsion, it won’t have as light a texture, although it will still be delicious. ••••••

Candied lemon zest (page 214) or fresh flowers for decorating

If you are using already made lemon cream, you need to soften it so that you can pour it into the tart shell and create a smooth finish on top. Spoon it into a stainless-steel bowl and set up a double boiler as you did when you made the cream. Place the bowl over, not touching, the simmering water and stir constantly until the cream is pourable but is not completely liquid, about 6 minutes. Pour the cream directly into the cooled tart shell and shake the tart pan gently to smooth the top of the filling. Chill the tart until the filling is firm, about 2 hours, before serving. To serve the tart, in a mixing bowl, whip the cream with a whisk until thickened. Add the sugar and whip until the cream holds soft peaks. Top the tart with the whipped cream and decorate with the candied zest or flowers. Serve the tart cool.

49 / tarts & pies

Have the tart shell ready for filling. If you are making the lemon cream for this recipe, prepare as directed, measure out 2 1⁄4 cups, and pour them directly into the cooled tart shell. Shake the tart pan gently to smooth out the top of the filling. Chill the tart until firm, about 2 hours, before serving. It will keep for up to 3 days in the refrigerator.


B L U E B E R RY- L E M O N C H I F F O N TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

This variation on the Lemon Cream Tart (page 49) is lighter and a little more mousselike than the original and goes especially well with blueberries. Figs work well with this filling also, but you must make sure that the cut surfaces of the figs never touch the cream. Figs contain an enzyme that liquefies protein (the same enzyme found in kiwifruits), and it will turn the cream fluid. KITCHEN NOTES:

The filling for this tart does not need

gelatin to set up properly. It firms up because of the reacFully baked and cooled 9-inch Sweet Tart Dough tart shell (page 196)

1

Lemon Cream (page 209)

1 cup

Heavy cream, very cold

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/175 ml

Blueberries

1 1⁄2 pints

16 oz/455 g

tion of the lemon juice with the cream, creating a perfect medium-firm set. We use the same filling for one of our cakes. The filling for the cake must be higher, however, so 8 oz/250 ml

we use the smallest amount of gelatin to stabilize the filling and make it sliceable. ••••••

Have the tart shell ready for filling. If the lemon cream is cold, spoon it into a stainless-steel bowl and set up a 3 tbsp 45 ml double boiler as you did when you made the cream. Place the bowl over, not touching, the simmering water and gently warm the cream, stirring constantly, until it softens. Remove from over the water. The cream must be cool when it is folded into the whipped cream, or the cream will “break.” Also, the lemon cream and the whipped cream should have the same consistency, a basic rule of folding together any two components in pastry making.

Apricot jam or apple jelly (optional)

tartine /

50

In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with a whisk until it holds medium peaks. Spoon the whipped cream onto the lemon cream and fold together with a rubber spatula. Scoop the filling into the tart shell and smooth the surface with the spatula. Top with the blueberries. If the tart needs to travel, or if you prefer the top glazed, warm the jam or jelly in a small saucepan over low heat just until it is liquid (if using jam, strain it through a medium-mesh sieve), and then toss the berries with it before piling them on top of the tart. Chill the tart until the filling is firm, about 2 hours, before serving. Serve the tart cool.


C H O C O L AT E H A Z E L N U T TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

Although the filling for this tart calls for a substantial amount of chocolate, it is light textured because the eggs are whipped to a ribbon with the sugar before they are folded into the chocolate. I usually like my chocolate without additional flavors, but the tiny amount of orange zest and the brandy work well with the hazelnuts. Whenever I devise a filling like this, I can never stop at one flavor combination or way of baking it. Following this hazelnut-brandy pairing, which is how we almost always make the tart, are two equally delicious combinations, one with coffee and walnuts and a second Fully baked and cooled Sweet Tart Dough tart shell (page 196)

1

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

6 oz

170 g

Unsalted butter

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/115 g

Brandy (optional)

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

Sugar

2⁄3

cup

4 3⁄4 oz/135 g

Large eggs

3

Salt

1⁄8

tsp

1⁄2

Orange zest, grated

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

with Armagnac-soaked prunes, plus I have included a simple way to serve the filling without a pastry shell, creating a dessert that is like a hot chocolate mousse. KITCHEN NOTES:

The thinner you have rolled your dough

for the tart shell, the more striking the contrast will be between the smooth filling, the crunchy topping, and the thin crust. This filling can also be made a few days ahead of time and stored, making it possible to prepare the filling

ml

one day and bake the tart a few days later. Keep the filling tightly covered in the refrigerator, and then scoop it into the tart shell or ramekins, smooth the top, and proceed with the recipe. The cold filling will need to bake slightly

Topping

longer. If you prefer to make tartlets, the recipe yields enough filling for six 4-inch tartlet shells. Reduce the 1 cup

5 oz/140 g

baking time to 6 minutes. ••••••

Have the tart shell ready for filling. Preheat the oven to 325°F. Put the chocolate in a heatproof mixing bowl. In a saucepan, combine the butter, brandy (if using), and 1⁄3 cup (2 1⁄2 ounces/70 g) of the sugar. Place over medium-low heat and stir until the butter melts and the sugar dissolves. Pour the butter mixture over the chocolate and stir with a rubber spatula until the chocolate melts. continued

51 / tarts & pies

Hazelnuts, lightly toasted and skins rubbed off


In a large mixing bowl, combine the remaining 1⁄3 cup sugar, the eggs, the salt, and the zest. Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment on medium speed or a whisk, beat the mixture until it is a very pale yellow, light, and flows off the whisk in a thick ribbon when whisk is lifted out of the bowl. This will take about 3 minutes. Pour one-third of the egg mixture into the melted chocolate, whisk to lighten the mixture, and then fold in the remaining egg mixture with a rubber spatula. Pour the filling into the pastry shell and smooth the surface with an offset spatula. Arrange the hazelnuts evenly on top. Bake the tart until the surface of the filling loses some of its shine but hasn’t souffléed (puffed up), 7 to 9 minutes. Remove from the oven and let cool completely on a wire rack. Serve at room temperature. The tart will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. tartine /

52

Coffee Walnut Tart Variation: When making the filling, substitute an equal amount of strong brewed coffee for the brandy and omit the lemon zest. Top the tart with lightly toasted walnuts, using the same quantity as the hazelnuts. Bake as directed. Chocolate Tart with Armagnac Prunes Variation:

Place 8 whole pitted prunes if making a single tart or 6 whole pitted prunes if making the tartlets in a bowl. Add 1⁄4 cup (2 fluid ounces/60 ml) Armagnac and enough water to cover. Let stand until the prunes are very soft, about 1 hour or up to overnight, and then drain well. When making the filling, omit the brandy and lemon zest. Fill the tart or tartlet shells with the filling as directed. Omit the hazelnuts. Arrange 8 prunes in a circle on top of the tart, or put 1 prune in the center of each tartlet. Bake as directed. Ramekins Variation: Omit the pastry shell. Divide the filling evenly among 4 ramekins; you will have about 2⁄3 cup (5 1⁄2 fluid ounces/150 ml) for each ramekin. Top with the hazelnuts, dividing them evenly. Bake for about 6 minutes. You can hold the ramekins in a warm oven (250°F) for up to 3 hours. Serve with unsweetened lightly whipped cream.


F R A N G I PA N E TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart, 8 to 12 servings

/

Here is a simple, traditional tart for people who don’t like very sweet desserts. I find most almond tarts without character and too dry. That isn’t true of this one. I’ve left the almonds in slices here, and have mixed them into a filling made with pastry cream and just enough egg to hold it all together. The filling is classic, but recipes that call for small amounts of another recipe drive me crazy, so I’ve made another version of frangipane cream that does not require making pastry cream in advance. It yields a slightly different yet still delicious result. If you do end up making the pastry cream, follow Unbaked 9-inch Flaky Tart Dough tart shell (page 194) Frangipane Cream (page 210) or Frangipane Cream Variation (page 211)

this tart up by making a trifle or éclairs with what is left over, or just eat the pastry cream with fruit as a pudding.

1

The fruits that work best with frangipane filling are the juicier ones that have a bit of acidity to balance the nuts 3 cups

24 oz/750 ml

and richness in the cream. These include very ripe stone fruits like peaches, cherries, or apricots, or berries such as

Fruit such as sliced apricots, plums, or peaches or whole raspberries or blackberries

2 cups

10 1⁄2

Apricot jam

3 tbsp

45 ml

raspberries. Poached pear halves, sliced and fanned over the filling, are the classic winter partner. Apples and oz/300 g

quince are delicious as well. KITCHEN NOTES:

For the best results, remove the bottom

from a tart pan and use the ring only (or use a flan ring). Line a baking sheet with a nonstick liner or parchment bottom of the shell better. Since the filling is so moist, the contact of the dough with the baking sheet will conduct the heat better. ••••••

Have the tart shell ready, forming it in a 9-inch tart-pan ring placed on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Fill the tart shell with the frangipane cream, smoothing the top with a rubber spatula. Arrange the fruit on top. Bake the tart until the crust is golden brown and the filling is set, about 1 hour and 20 minutes. The filling should feel firm and slightly springy to the touch and the fruit should be tender. Transfer the tart to a wire rack and let cool until warm. To unmold, use a wide metal spatula to lift the tart onto a surface slightly smaller in diameter than the tart ring. The ring will fall away. While the tart is baking, in a small saucepan, warm the jam over low heat just until it is liquid, then strain through a medium-mesh sieve to make a glaze. Brush the glaze over the fruit when the tart comes out of the oven. The tart tastes best served warm or at room temperature. It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

53 / tarts & pies

paper, place the ring on top, and then form the pastry shell in the ring. This allows you to brown the


BANANA CREAM PIE W I T H C A R A M E L A N D C H O C O L AT E

/

yield one 10-inch pie; 8 to 12 servings

/

This is a very American pie and, like lots of modern American pastries, it uses traditional European elements: a flaky crust and a perfect pastry cream. I like a cream pie with a filling that is not so stiffened with cornstarch that the cut edges stand straight when the pie is sliced. This one oozes a bit, but you get a much lighter cream filling in return. Because the pastry is lined with chocolate, the pie will, unlike most cream pies, keep for a few days and still have a perfectly crisp crust. KITCHEN NOTES:

tartine /

54

If you want a pastry cream filling that is a

little thicker, use the larger amount of cornstarch indicated

Fully baked and cooled 10-inch Flaky Tart Dough pie shell (page 194)

1

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

3 oz

85 g

Heavy cream, very cold

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Sugar

2 tbsp

30 ml

Caramel (page 212)

1⁄3

cup

21⁄2 oz/75 ml

Pastry Cream (page 207), cold

2 1⁄2 cups

20 oz/625 ml

Ripe bananas, sliced into 1⁄4-inch-thick rounds

2

Bittersweet chocolate bar for making curls

3 oz

in the pastry cream recipe. When making the chocolate curls, it is easiest to work with a large bar. Also, the bar should be

85 g

at slightly warm room temperature. If it is too cool, you can warm it quickly by rubbing your palm over it. ••••••

Have the pie shell ready for filling. Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Put the chocolate into a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the pan and place it over, not touching, the water. Heat, stirring occasionally with a heatproof rubber spatula, just until the chocolate melts and is smooth. Remove from over the heat.

Using an offset spatula, pastry brush, or the back of the spoon, spread the melted chocolate evenly over the bottom of the pie shell. If using a pastry brush, make sure it is completely dry. Any moisture will make the chocolate seize, or become grainy and hard. Refrigerate for 10 minutes to set the chocolate. While the chocolate is setting, pour the heavy cream into a mixing bowl and whip with a whisk or a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment until thickened. Add the sugar and continue to whip until it holds medium-firm peaks. Remove the pie shell from the refrigerator and drizzle the caramel evenly over the chocolate. Transfer the pastry cream to the shell. It’s not necessary to whisk the pastry cream to smooth it for this tart. Arrange the banana slices evenly over the pastry cream, and then lightly press them into the cream. continued


Using an offset or rubber spatula, spread the whipped cream on top. To make the chocolate curls, place the chocolate, with the smooth side facing you, on the countertop. If the chocolate is cool, warm it slightly by lightly rubbing it with your palm. Position the bar on the edge of the counter to stabilize it, and use your body to block the bar from falling off the counter (I wear an apron while doing this). Now, using long strokes, scrape the warm surface with a chef’s knife to form curls. Scatter the curls over the top of the pie. Chill the pie until the pastry cream is set, at least 3 hours. Serve the pie cool. It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

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56

Banana Coconut Cream Pie Variation: Fold

1 1⁄4 cups (3 1⁄2 ounces/100 g) unsweetened smallflake dried coconut into the pastry cream before filling the pie shell. Chill the tart for several hours before serving to allow time for the coconut to absorb moisture from the pastry cream, which will thicken the cream and hydrate and soften the coconut.


A P P L E N O U GAT I N E TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

This tart smartly combines the best elements of an American apple pie and a perfect French tart: a filling made from a variety of apples that you precook with a small amount of sugar and butter until fork-tender and slightly caramelized, a prebaked flaky pastry shell, and an almond crust quickly browned and crisped in the oven. A variety of apples gives you the best contrast of sweet and tart, with meltingly soft pieces mixed with some that keep their shape. The almond crust marries well with other fruits too, especially stone fruits such as peaches and cherries. KITCHEN NOTES:

Fully baked and cooled 10-inch Flaky Tart Dough tart shell (page 194)

I like to leave about 25 percent of the peel

on some of the apples for more character. You should only do this if it is near apple season, when the peels have not become thick and tough from storage. Use Granny Smith

1

or pippin mixed with Fuji, Gala, Pink Lady, or McIntosh. ••••••

Filling

Apples

31⁄2 pounds

1.6 kg

Unsalted butter

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/55 g

Sugar

1⁄3

cup

21⁄2 oz/70 g

Salt

pinch

Topping

To make the filling, halve, core, peel, and slice the apples, mixing them together in a large bowl. Have an empty bowl ready for the sautéed apples. You should be able to sauté the apples in 3 or 4 batches, depending on how large your sauté pan is. Divide the butter and sugar into the number of batches you think you will need for sautéing.

In the heavy sauté pan, melt the butter over high heat. Add the sugar and allow it to caramelize; the mixture will 1⁄2 cup Sugar 31⁄2 oz/100 g darken as the sugar caramelizes. If the sugar is caramelizing Large egg whites 2 unevenly, stir with a wooden spoon; otherwise just let it Salt pinch cook. Carefully add the apples to the pan in a single layer and sauté until soft, turning a few times with the spoon. You want about half of the apples to become very soft and the other half to hold their shape. The timing will depend on the types of apples used and the thickness of the slices. As the apples are ready, transfer them to the waiting empty bowl. Don’t clean the pan between batches; the sugar and bits of apple in the bottom of the pan—the fond —will caramelize Sliced almonds

1 cup

31⁄2 oz/100 g

continued

57 / tarts & pies

Lemon juice and grated zest from 1⁄2 medium lemon

Have the tart shell ready for filling. Preheat the oven to 350°F.


and add more flavor and color to the next batch. Melt more butter in the pan, add the sugar, and caramelize again. This won’t take as long as the first time, so watch the pan closely. Add the second batch of apple slices and sauté in the same manner. Repeat until all the apples are sautéed. If you need to sauté another batch and have used all the butter and sugar, just add a couple of additional tablespoons of each. When all of the apples are cooked, deglaze the pan by increasing the heat to high and letting it become very hot. Add a few large spoonfuls of water and scrape up the caramel and bits from the bottom of the pan. Let the juices reduce and then pour them over the apples.

tartine /

58

When all the apples have been cooked, mix them well with lemon juice, zest, and salt and pile them into the prebaked pastry shell. It is all right if the apples are still hot from the sauté pan when they go into the shell. Smooth the top of the apples with the back of the spoon. To make the topping, combine the almonds, sugar, egg whites, and salt in a small mixing bowl and stir well. Using a spoon, spread the topping evenly over the apples, extending it to the edges of the tart with your fingertips, if necessary. Bake the tart until the topping is browned, about 30 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely before serving. The tart will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.


F R E S H F R U I T TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

The fresh fruit tart, the most basic of bakery tarts—a sweet pastry shell filled with pastry cream and topped with seasonal fruit—depends entirely on the quality of its three components. This tart is so simple and straightforward that I hesitated even to include it as a recipe. But so many people ask about the pastry cream, want to know how to make the tart shell, and comment on how good the marriage is that I decided to include it. Really, though, it’s equally about the fruit. In the San Francisco area, we have extraordinary fruit farmers who grow all types, and I have a wonderful kitchen manager who goes to the farmers’ market when I can’t and picks out the best. Also, we make these tarts fresh every day, never hold any Fully baked and cooled 9-inch Sweet Tart Dough tart shell (page 196)

1

Pastry Cream (page 207), cold

21⁄2 cups

20 oz/625 ml

Fruit, sliced or whole, depending on type

2 to 4 cups

10 to 20 oz/ 285 to 570 g

Apple jelly or apricot jam

3 tbsp

45 ml

over to the next day, and only barely glaze them. Just pick the ripest and most gorgeous fruit that you can find, even if it makes a one-fruit tart, and serve it the day you make it. It is best to use soft fruits that will easily give to the bite, such as peaches, certain tropical fruits, and berries, rather than crisp plums or apples. KITCHEN NOTES:

The fruits that make the most compelling-

looking tarts deliver variety in their shape, color, and texture: apricot half-moons mixed with whole, dark red raspberries, pale white peach crescents with crimson, round cherries. I

tartine /

60

only lightly glaze the cut sides of fruit and leave whole fruits such as berries in their natural state. If you are using stone fruits, try turning some of the pieces so that the fuzzy side is facing up and others so that the inside is facing up. Some fruits such as peaches turn a lovely crimson red around where the pit sat. Look for plums and grapes with the most amount of gray bloom on them, which shows off how untouched they are. Finally, one way to finish a berry tart beautifully when you don’t want to glaze it is to drizzle honey lightly from a small spoon. The honey will pool into tiny beads and sit on the fruit like morning dewdrops. ••••••

Have tart shell ready for filling. Spoon the pastry cream into the tart shell and smooth the surface with a rubber spatula. You may not need all of the pastry cream. The amount you need will depend on the depth of the shell and how much fruit you are using. You don’t want to fill the shell to the top, as the weight of the fruit can cause the pastry cream to overflow the rim, making slicing difficult. The shell should be about three-fourths full. Top with the fruit. Glaze the fruit if using cut fruit. In a small saucepan, warm the jelly or jam over low heat just until it is liquid to make a glaze, and then strain through a medium-mesh sieve if using jam. Brush the glaze over the fruit. The tart can be eaten right away, or you can store it in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. If it is kept longer than that, the filling will eventually make the pastry shell soft. Serve it cool.


F R E S H F R U I T TA R T W I T H B AVA R I A N F I L L I N G

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

This is a slightly lighter filling than the one used for the Fresh Fruit Tart on page 60 due to the addition of whipped cream. Although I am not certain why, I usually prefer this filling with cherries or with slightly more acidic fruits such as peaches. Apricots are divine with the cream, too—one of those magic combinations that is greater than its parts. KITCHEN NOTES:

In warm weather, we stabilize this filling

with gelatin, although it is not absolutely necessary. If you

tartine /

62

Fully baked and cooled 9-inch Sweet Tart Dough tart shell (page 196)

1

Gelatin

1⁄2

Water

1 tbsp

15 ml

Heavy cream, very cold

3⁄4

6 oz/175 ml

Pastry Cream (page 207), cold

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Fruit, sliced or whole depending on type

2 to 4 cups

10 to 20 oz/ 285 to 570 g

Apple jelly or apricot jam

3 tbsp

45 ml

don’t use the gelatin, make sure the cream is whipped to firm peaks and that you refrigerate the tart for a few hours tsp

cup

2 ml

before serving. ••••••

Have the tart shell ready for filling. In a small dish, sprinkle the gelatin over the water and let stand for a few minutes without stirring to soften. In a small saucepan, heat 1⁄4 cup (2 fluid ounces/60 ml) of the heavy cream over medium heat. Add the gelatin to the cream and stir to dissolve. Remove from the heat.

In a mixing bowl, whisk the pastry cream to smooth it out. In another bowl, with a clean whisk, whip the remaining 1⁄2 cup (4 fluid ounces/125 ml) heavy cream until it holds firm peaks. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold the whipped cream into the pastry cream. Whisk about 1⁄2 cup (4 fluid ounces/125 ml) of the whipped cream–pastry cream mixture into the gelatin mixture. Add the gelatin mixture to the rest of the cream combination and whisk to combine. Immediately spoon the cream into the tart shell and smooth the surface with the spatula. You may not need all of the pastry cream. The amount you need will depend on the depth of the shell and how much fruit you are using. You don’t want to fill the shell to the top, as the weight of the fruit can cause the pastry cream to overflow the rim, making slicing difficult. The shell should be about three-fourths full. Top with the fruit. Glaze the fruit if using cut fruit. In a small saucepan, warm the jelly or jam over low heat just until it is liquid to make a glaze, and then strain through a medium-mesh sieve if using jam. Brush the glaze over the fruit. The tart can be eaten right away, or you can store it in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. If it is kept longer than that, the filling will eventually make the pastry shell soft. Serve it cool.


B L AC K B E R RY TA R T WITH ROSE GERANIUM CREAM

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

For the best-tasting tart, the cream must be freshly made and the fruit must be at its peak of color, sugar, and juiciness. Varying the flavor of the filling to contrast with the fruit makes all the difference in tarts like this. Combine the flavor of rose with blackberries, raspberries, or strawberries; of orange liqueur with apricots; or of almonds with peaches. For this tart, the filling is simply pastry cream infused with a handful of rose geranium leaves. Lemon verbena is a good choice as well (blueberries and lemon verbena are wonderful together), or you can use a split vanilla bean for a simple vanilla pastry Rose Geranium Cream

cream that will go with almost any fruit. If you have pastry

Whole milk

2 cups

16 oz/500 ml

Large fresh rose geranium leaves

4

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Sugar

1⁄2

cup + 1 tbsp

4 oz/115 g

Cornstarch

1⁄4

cup

1 oz/30 g

Large eggs, lightly beaten

2

Unsalted butter

4 tbsp

cream on hand, you can use it in place of the cream for a great last-minute tart. You need only flavor the cream with rosewater or vanilla extract, scoop it into the pastry shell, and top it with fresh fruit. If you are serving your tart right away, there is no need to glaze the fruit. We keep the use of glazes to an absolute minimum at the bakery. Usually we lightly brush

2 oz/55 g

the cut edges of the fruit with melted good-quality apricot or raspberry jam or apple jelly, making our choice according to what fits with the flavor and color of the fruit.

1

Heavy cream, very cold

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/175 ml

Blackberries or any mixture of berries

2 pints

20 oz/570 g

KITCHEN NOTES:

Make sure that the saucepan you use

for making the cream is not unlined aluminum, as it will turn the cream gray. You can use rosewater in place of the rose geranium leaves, but wait to flavor the cream until after it has cooled and use the rosewater sparingly. Add it a teaspoon at a time until you have the flavor you like, as different brands vary in strength of flavor. ••••••

In a saucepan, combine the milk, geranium leaves, and salt. Place over medium heat and bring to just under a boil. You should see tiny bubbles forming around the sides of the pan. Remove from the heat and let the leaves steep in the milk for 15 minutes. continued

63 / tarts & pies

Fully baked and cooled 9-inch Sweet Tart Dough tart shell (page 196)


Have a heatproof bowl ready for cooling the pastry cream, with a fine-mesh sieve resting in the rim. In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar and cornstarch (the sugar prevents the cornstarch from lumping). Add the eggs and whisk until all the ingredients are evenly blended. Remove the leaves from the milk, return the pan to medium heat, and heat the milk just to under a boil again, whisking periodically to prevent milk solids from burning on the bottom. Take the pan off the heat. Using a ladle, add about one-third of the hot milk to the egg mixture while whisking constantly. (Slip a slightly damp, folded towel under your mixing bowl, and it won’t slide around while you are whisking.) Add another ladleful of the hot milk to the eggs and whisk again.

Let the pastry cream cool for 10 minutes. Meanwhile, cut the butter into 1-tablespoon (15-ml) pieces. When the pastry cream is ready (it should be about 140°F), add the butter bit by bit, whisking in each addition before adding the next one. When all the

Have the tart shell ready for filling. In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with a whisk or with a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment until it holds medium-stiff peaks. Using a rubber spatula, gently fold the whipped cream into the chilled pastry cream. (If you are using rosewater, this is the point at which you should add it.) Be careful when whisking cold pastry cream. Overmixing will break down the starch and thin the cream. 65

Scoop the pastry cream into the tart shell and smooth the surface with the spatula. The pastry cream should fill the shell. Cover the top evenly with the berries. Refrigerate until serving. This tart should be eaten the day it is made. Serve it cool.

/ tarts & pies

All at once, pour the egg mixture into the pan with the hot milk, put it back over medium heat, and whisk until it is as thick as lightly whipped cream. Take care not to overcook it or the eggs will curdle. You should see just a few bubbles. The entire process should take only a few minutes. Remove from the heat and pour through the sieve into the waiting bowl.

butter has been added, let the pastry cream cool for a few minutes. To prevent a skin from forming on top, cover the bowl with plastic wrap, pressing the wrap directly onto the top of the cream. Let cool for about 30 minutes and then refrigerate until chilled, about 2 hours. (Or, you can run a pat of butter over the warm surface of the pastry cream to prevent a skin, let the cream cool for about 30 minutes, and then cover and refrigerate.) To cool the cream very quickly, place in a shallow dish and press plastic wrap directly on top.


P E CA N M A P L E P I E W I T H K U M Q U AT S A N D B O U R B O N

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

To say that pecan pies are typically too sweet is an understatement, but tempering the sweetness is difficult. What you are making is essentially a sugar custard, and in baking science, you need a given amount of sugar, eggs, and liquid to get it to set properly. Most recipes rely on corn syrup to offset the extreme sweetness, but it doesn’t add much in the way of flavor or character. We do use some corn syrup, but to give the filling more flavor, we also use maple syrup, bourbon, and kumquats or orange zest to take off the edge in a better way. If you can find kumquats, they are incredible. Because their flesh is so thin, they “candy” themselves during the cooking. The acidity from the citrus works well to balance the richness of the sugar custard. KITCHEN NOTES:

If kumquats are unavailable, use the

grated zest of 1 orange, adding it at the same point in the

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66

Fully baked and cooled 10-inch Flaky Tart Dough pie shell (page 194)

1

Sugar

3⁄4

cup

51⁄4 oz/150 g

Maple syrup

1⁄2

cup

51⁄2 oz/155 g

Light corn syrup

1⁄2

cup

53⁄4 oz/165 g

Bourbon

2 tbsp

30 ml

Salt

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Unsalted butter

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/55 g

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

Large eggs, lightly beaten

3

Pecan halves

2 cups

10 oz/285 g

Kumquats, thinly sliced

1⁄2

3 oz/85 g

Unsweetened softly whipped cream for serving

recipe.

cup

5 ml

••••••

Have the pie shell ready for filling. In a saucepan, combine the sugar, maple syrup, corn syrup, bourbon, and salt. Place over medium heat, bring to a rolling boil, and boil for 1 minute. Take the pan off of the heat, add the butter, and whisk as it melts. Let the mixture cool to room temperature. While the mixture is cooling, preheat the oven to 350°F. Add the vanilla and eggs to the cooled mixture and stir to mix well. Stir in the pecans and kumquats. Pour into the pie shell. Bake the pie until the filling is just set, 40 to 60 minutes. If the top is browning too quickly, cover with a piece of aluminum foil. Let cool on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature with the whipped cream. The pie will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


PUMPKIN PIE

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

Customers often ask if we process our own pumpkin for our holiday pies. We tried one year, and it was a fiasco of round-the-clock roasting and blending, and the results were never completely satisfying. Preparing the purée from scratch doesn’t work that well at home either, as it is difficult to achieve as smooth a purée as you would like, although some bakers may not be bothered by that. Because this is a custard and custards rely on the action of eggs and liquid to set up (as opposed to cakes, which require a certain proportion of sugar and fat to acquire the proper crumb), you can scale the sugar up or down as you like. You can use maple as a sweetener, too; I like brown sugar for the slight caramelized flavor it gives the pumpkin. KITCHEN NOTES:

If you do opt to use fresh pumpkin, after

you have roasted and puréed the flesh, you need to cook the

Partially baked and cooled 10-inch Flaky Tart Dough pie shell (page 194)

1

Pumpkin purée

2 cups

Large whole eggs

3

Large egg yolk

1

Heavy cream

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

mass down a bit or hang it overnight in a cheesecloth bag. This will rid it of excess moisture, and give you a much 18 oz/510 g

more pronounced pumpkin flavor and a richer texture. ••••••

2 tbsp

30 ml

1⁄2

31⁄2

Ground cinnamon

1 tsp

5 ml

Ground ginger

1 tsp

5 ml

Ground cloves

1⁄8

tsp

1⁄2

Nutmeg, freshly grated

1⁄8

tsp

1⁄2

ml

Black pepper, freshly ground

1⁄8

tsp

1⁄2

ml

Salt

1 tsp

cup

Lightly sweetened softly whipped heavy cream for serving

oz/100 g

In a mixing bowl, combine the pumpkin purée, whole eggs, egg yolk, cream, and brandy and whisk to mix well. In a second mixing bowl, combine the sugar with all the spices and stir to mix. Whisk the sugar mixture into the pumpkin mixture.

ml

5 ml

Pour the filling into the pie shell and smooth the top with a rubber spatula if necessary. Bake the pie until just set but still slightly wobbly in the center, about 1 hour. The filling will continue to set as it cools. Let the pie cool on a wire rack. Serve slightly warm, at room temperature, or cold, with whipped cream. The pie will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

67 / tarts & pies

Brandy Light or dark brown sugar, lightly packed

Have the pie shell ready for filling. Preheat the oven to 325°F.


SHAKER LEMON PIE

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 8 to 12 servings

/

This recipe perfectly demonstrates the simplicity, wholesomeness, and ingenuity of the Shakers, who were renowned bakers and responsible for many culinary inventions, including the mechanical apple peeler, the hand-crank egg beater, and the revolving oven, still used in many bakeries today. Making the pie could not be easier. You are essentially putting all the raw ingredients for lemon curd into an unbaked pie shell and letting the heat of the oven do the work. The key to success is using a very sharp knife for slicing the whole lemons paper-thin. The result is a sweet-tart filling that Lemons

2 medium

about 1⁄2 pound/ about 225 g

is quite toothsome because of the use of the whole lemon,

Sugar

2 cups

14 oz/395 g

malade. Don’t cut back on the sugar. It may look like a lot,

Flaky Tart Dough rounds, each 12 inches in diameter (page 194)

2

Large eggs

4

but I compensate by using a tart pan, rather than a pie pan or dish, for making this pie, which balances the quantity

1⁄4

Salt

rind and all, which lends the filling the texture of mar-

and intensity of the filling with more crust. KITCHEN NOTES:

tsp

1 ml

Chill the lemons well before slicing. They

firm up when cold, making them easier to slice paper-thin. Also, if you start by making one lengthwise horizontal cut, you will have a flat surface that allows you to slice the

Egg Wash

lemon more safely and evenly. Make sure you don’t use an 1

Heavy cream

1 tbsp

Sugar for decorating

aluminum bowl for the lemons. The lemons will react with 30 ml

the metal, giving the filling a metallic flavor. ••••••

Slice the lemons paper-thin, discarding the thicker stem end and any seeds. Put them in a nonreactive bowl (stainless steel or glass) and, using a spoon or your hands, toss with the sugar. Cover and let sit at room temperature for at least 3 hours or for up to overnight. If any seeds are still left, they will usually float to the top, where they are easily fished out. If you are using the more tender-skinned Meyer lemons, you can proceed to the next step without letting them sit, as the skins don’t need the sugar to tenderize them.

Unsweetened softly whipped cream for serving

Use 1 pastry round to line a 10-inch tart pan with a removable bottom, easing it into the bottom and sides and leaving a 1-inch overhang. Set aside. continued

69 / tarts & pies

Large egg yolk


In a small bowl, whisk the eggs and salt together until blended. Add the eggs to the lemon mixture, mixing thoroughly. Pour the mixture into the pastrylined tart pan. The mixture will be very liquid, so you must evenly distribute the lemon pieces in the pan.

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70

To make the egg wash, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolk and cream. Brush the rim of the pastry with the egg wash to help the top pastry round adhere. Lay the second pastry round over the filling and trim the overhang for both rounds to 1⠄4 inch. Crimp the edge as you would for a pie, making sure you have a good seal. Brush the top of the pie with the egg wash and then sprinkle the sugar evenly over the top. Chill for about 30 minutes. (I chill this assembled pie, as I do nearly all pies and tarts, to firm up the pockets of butter in the dough, so that when the pie is put into the oven, the butter pockets will melt, creating the flaky texture you want in your finished dough.) While the pie is chilling, position a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F.

Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper. Cut a few decorative slits in the top of the pie for air vents, and place the tart pan on the lined baking sheet. Bake the pie until it is deep gold on top and the filling is bubbling (visible through the vents), about 40 minutes. If the top is coloring too quickly, place a piece of foil or parchment loosely over the top. Let the pie cool completely before slicing to allow the filling to set properly. Serve at room temperature or slightly warmed with lightly whipped unsweetened cream (though the pie needs to cool completely for the filling to set up, it can be warmed up a little in the oven before serving). The pie will keep in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.


F R U I T GA L E T T E S

/

yield 2 large or 12 small galettes

/

The ingredients and their amounts for this galette dough are the same as the recipe for Flaky Tart Dough (page 194), although the method for making the dough is completely different. These quintessentially beautiful rustic tarts, with their darkened tips of fruit and sugar-glazed, free-form crusts, are very satisfying to make. Apricots make an appealing tart, with their tips blackening in the oven, but they also taste incredible because they contain less water than many fruits and thus develop a very concentrated flavor as they bake. I highly recommend yellow peaches or nectarines (the subtle flavor of white peaches and nectarines is best enjoyed fresh). If you have cherries, combine them with other fruits like apricots or nectarines for color and contrast. Berries are good, too, just make sure to mound Dough

them higher than the other fruits since they cook down so

Unsalted butter, very cold

2 cups

1 pound/455 g

Water

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Salt

1 1⁄2 tsp

7 ml

All-purpose flour

2 1⁄3 cups

12 oz/340 g

Pastry flour

2 2⁄3 cups

12 oz/340 g

much. In winter, I like to sauté sliced apples or pears and add a dash of brandy or Armagnac. KITCHEN NOTES:

If you have pastry flour, use half pastry

and half all-purpose flour. The blend makes the best crust. If you don’t have pastry flour, the recipe is still excellent using only all-purpose flour. Unlike the measurements for fruit tarts in this chapter, I use a volume measure, rather than weight, for the cut-up fruits here. I think it is better

Fruit, cut up or whole (see method), depending on type

suited to arriving at the correct amount of filling for each about 6 cups

48 oz/1.5 l

galette. You’ll also notice that the recipe doesn’t call for mixing all the fruit with the sugar en masse and then filling

Granulated or brown sugar

the galettes. Instead, each galette is sweetened individually. Even if we are making scores of galettes at a time at the

Lemon juice, if needed

bakery, we sweeten them one at a time. If you add sugar to the whole batch, you end up with lots of sweetened fruit

Egg Wash

Large egg yolks

2

Heavy cream

2 tbsp

Granulated sugar for sprinkling

juice in the bottom of the bowl. If you taste the fruit and are careful about how much sugar you put into each galette, 30ml

you end up with a juicier pastry in the end. •••••• continued

71 / tarts & pies

Filling


To make the dough, cut the butter into 1-inch cubes and put them in the freezer. Measure the water, dissolve the salt into it, and put it in the freezer as well. Chill the butter and water for about 10 minutes.

While the dough is chilling, prepare your fruit. Hull the berries if necessary, pit the peaches and cut into eighths, pit the apricots and leave in halves or quarter them, pit the cherries, and so on. continued

73 / tarts & pies

Measure all of the flour onto your work surface. It is not necessary to mix the flours at this point, as they will become well mixed as the dough is being made. Spread the flour out into a rectangle about 1⠄3 inch deep. Scatter the butter cubes over the flour. Toss a little of the flour over the butter so that your rolling pin won’t stick and then begin rolling. When the butter starts flattening out into long, thin pieces, use a bench scraper to scoop up the sides of the rectangle so that it is again the size you started with. Repeat the rolling and scraping 3 or 4 times. Make a well in the center and pour all of the water into the well. Using the bench scraper, scoop the sides of the dough onto the center, cutting (mixing in with the bench scraper) the water into the dough.

Keep scraping and cutting until the dough is a shaggy mass, and then shape the dough into a rectangle about 10 by 14 inches. Lightly dust the top with flour. Roll out the rectangle until it is half again as large and then scrape the top, bottom, and sides together again to the original size and reroll. Repeat 3 or 4 times until you have a smooth and cohesive dough. You should have a neat rectangle measuring about 10 by 14 inches. Transfer the dough to a large baking sheet, cover with plastic wrap, and chill well, about 1 hour.


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74

When you are ready to roll out the dough, divide it into 2 equal portions if making large galettes or into 12 equal portions if making individual galettes. To roll a circle from what is roughly a square for either small or large galettes, start out with the dough positioned as a diamond in front of you, with the handles of the pin at 2 points of the square. Roll from the center toward each end, only flattening the center, not the 2 points that are nearest to and farthest from you (at top and bottom); leave those 2 points thick. Now turn the dough so that the flattened-out corners are at the top and bottom. Again roll from the center toward the points nearest to and farthest from you, again stopping short of both the top and bottom. Now you should have a square that has little humps in between the pointy corners. Roll out the thicker areas and you will begin to see a circle forming. Keep rolling until the dough is a little more than 1â „8 inch thick for large galettes (each circle should be about 14 inches in diameter) and a little thinner for small galettes (each small circle should be 6 to 7 inches in diameter). Fold the large circles into quarters, transfer each one to a baking sheet, and unfold. Transfer the small circles to baking sheets. Chill the circles until firm, about 10 minutes.

Fill the center of each dough circle with fruit, leaving uncovered a border of 2 inches on the large circles and 1 inch on the small circles. Taste the fruit for sweetness to determine how much sugar you want to use to sweeten it. Then sprinkle with granulated or brown sugar, typically using 2 to 4 tablespoons (20 to 60 ml) for each large galette or 1 to 2 teaspoons (5 to 10 ml) for each small galette. You may also want to add a squeeze of lemon juice to some fruits, such as blueberries or blackberries or if you are using sautÊed apples or pears. Fold in the sides of the circles to cover the fruit partially, being sure not to leave any valleys where the fruit juice can leak out. Chill until firm, about 10 minutes. While the galettes are chilling, preheat the oven to 375°F.


To make the egg wash, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and cream. Brush the egg wash over the pastry edges, and then sprinkle with granulated sugar. You can bake the galettes immediately or hold them, unwrapped, for a couple of hours in the refrigerator. (Or, you can skip the egg wash and sprinkle of sugar at this point, wrap the galettes airtight, and freeze them for up to 2 weeks. When ready to bake, remove from the freezer, brush with egg wash and sprinkle with sugar, and bake straightaway.)

Bake the galettes until the crust has visibly puffed and baked to dark brown and the juice from the fruit is bubbling inside, 45 to 60 minutes for large galettes and 40 to 50 minutes for small galettes. Rotate the baking sheets 180 degrees and switch the baking sheets between the racks at the midway point to ensure even browning. (If you are baking them straight from the freezer, add 10 minutes to the baking time.) If the pastry is browning too quickly, reduce the oven temperature to 350°F, or place aluminum foil over the tops of the galettes. Remove from the oven and serve hot, or let cool on a wire rack and serve warm or at room temperature. 75 / tarts & pies


CA K E S L E M O N M E R I N G U E CA K E S U M M E R F R U I T B AVA R I A N

86

81

PA S S I O N F R U I T A N D L I M E B A V A R I A N

F R O M AG E B L A N C B AVA R I A N

C H O C O L AT E S O U F F L É C A K E

93

89

D E V I L’ S F O O D L AY E R C A K E

104

PA S T E L D E T R E S L E C H E S

96

BÛCHE DE NOËL

P U M P K I N T E A CA K E

105

ZU C C H I N I A N D O R A N G E M A R M A L A D E T E A CA K E

106

B A N A N A - D AT E T E A C A K E

S T E A M E D G I N G E R B R E A D P U D D I N G W I T H B O U R B O N H A R D S AU C E A L M O N D - L E M O N T E A CA K E

109

84

107

101

91


I am often asked what our specialty cake is. I used to bristle at the question, believing that any well-trained pastry chef ought to be able to cover the full spectrum of cakes with equal ease and without bias. What I’ve come to realize, however, is that what makes a house specialty isn’t just what the pastry chef makes especially well. It is instead defined by a combination of factors. First, it is what customers keep coming back for, including items that tartine /

78

they insist be returned to the menu even though we bakers have decided to give them a rest. Equally important is what we think of the particular dessert. We occasionally change the menu just because we want a new challenge,


but some items are always satisfying to make. Our lemon meringue cake, with its génoise layers spread with lemon syrup and caramel, filled with lemon cream, and topped with Italian meringue, fits these criteria—our customers like it and we like to make it—giving it specialty status. At the bakery, I keep all these components on hand, making assembly of this cake relatively simple. It is equally easy to create new cakes with the addition of a different type of cake layer or another filling. But if I bake a cake at home, it can sometimes turn into a day-long project because I have to make all the parts from scratch. The cakes in this chapter are designed to go together easily, with the exception of the once-a-year Bûche de Noël (page 101), which has many components. You will find everything from summer Bavarians, perfect for when all you want is fresh fruit, a good creamy filling, and a light cake base, to a rich, dark devil’s food cake. There are also some tea cakes for when you have only a little time to devote to baking. If you bake a génoise or chiffon cake and end up with extra cake, from trimming or otherwise, layer it with some whipped cream, jam, and fresh fruit macerated in brandy or another spirit, and you will have a wonderful triflelike dessert. I’ve also crushed cookies that didn’t bake up right and used them as a base for the Fromage Blanc Bavarian (page 89). The idea is to make use of what you have on hand or what you can easily find, and not be afraid to make substitutions when you lack an ingredient or when you prefer the taste of a different ingredient, such as trading lemon juice for lime juice in a cream filling recipe. In other words, always strive to understand how a recipe works, and then change it to make it your own. 79 / cakes


L E M O N M E R I N G U E CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

This is an extremely popular cake at our shop, though it’s not for anyone without a sweet tooth. Layered with lemon cream and caramel and topped with meringue, it is on the sweet side. However, the caramel and the lemon do their part to give the cake more flavor than just sweetness and the cake layers are moistened with lemon syrup. The cake is also quite pretty, with the meringue topping shaped into swoops and peaks with torched tips. We also often make the cake in large sizes for wedding cakes. I thought that I was being original when I came up with this adaptation of lemon meringue pie, but similar cakes have popped up everywhere. Flavor combinations,

10-inch Chiffon Cake, Basic (page 201), Lemon (page 203), or Orange (page 204), split into 4 layers 1

like fashion, come into being and bakers quickly find ways of incorporating them into their way of doing things.

Caramel (page 212)

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Lemon Cream (page 209)

21⁄2 cups

20 oz/625 ml

KITCHEN NOTES:

As is the case with most cream-filled cakes,

you must give the cream filling time to set up, at least a few hours but preferably overnight, before serving. Make sure that the lemon cream does not come into contact with any aluminum (many springform pans are aluminum). The acid

Lemon Syrup

Water

1⁄3

cup

21⁄2 oz/75 ml

Sugar

1⁄3

cup

21⁄2 oz/70 g

Lemon juice

1⁄3

cup

21⁄2 oz/75 ml

in the lemon will react with the metal, giving the cake an off flavor. ••••••

Italian Meringue

Egg whites

scant 1 cup (about 7 large whites)

8 oz/250 ml

Sugar

1 3⁄4

12 1⁄4 oz/350 g

Salt

pinch

cups

To make the lemon syrup, combine the sugar and water in a small, heavy saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon. When the sugar has dissolved, remove the pan from the heat, let cool for a few minutes, and then chill until cool to the touch, about 30 minutes. Whisk the lemon juice into the syrup. continued

81 / cakes

Have ready the chiffon cake, caramel, and lemon cream.


Line the sides of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with plastic wrap, allowing enough overhang to cover the top of the cake completely when it is assembled. Leave the bottom of the pan unlined. Fit 1 cake layer into the bottom of the pan. Using a pastry brush, moisten the layer evenly with one-fourth of the lemon syrup. Using an offset spatula, spread one-third of the caramel over the cake, and then spread with one-third of the lemon cream. Repeat with 2 more layers, using up the remaining caramel and lemon cream. Top with the fourth cake layer and moisten with the remaining lemon syrup. Fold the overhanging plastic wrap over the top of the cake, covering completely, and refrigerate for at least 4 hours or for up to overnight. When you are ready to finish the cake, make the meringue. Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the egg whites, sugar, and salt in the stainless-steel bowl of a stand mixer tartine /

82

that will rest securely in the rim of the sauce pan over, not touching, the water. Whisk together and then place over the saucepan and continue to whisk until the whites are hot to the touch (120°F), about 5 minutes or so. Remove the bowl from over the water and place on the mixer stand. Fit the mixer with the whisk attachment and mix on high speed until the mixture is very thick and holds glossy, stiff peaks when you lift the beater. Release and lift off the pan sides and peel away the plastic wrap. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate, if using, or leave it on the pan base. Using the offset spatula, immediately frost the top of the cake with the meringue, creating swoops and peaks. Using a kitchen torch, lightly brown the meringue, and then lightly blacken some of the tips of the peaks. The cake can be served immediately or kept cold in the refrigerator until ready to serve. It will keep for up to 1 week.


B AVA R I A N CA K E S

83 / cakes

A Bavarian (bavarois) is a cooked base of fruit juice or cream combined with egg yolks (this mixture is called a bombe, the first stage of the Bavarian), folded together with whipped cream and meringue, and stabilized with a small amount of gelatin. It is an easy filling to make once you get the feel for it, although the technique and name can initially sound forbidding. Occasionally I find that the addition of the meringue makes the filling too sweet, especially if the fruit I’m using doesn’t have good acidity to stand up to the added sugar. In those cases, I dispense with the meringue, as you will see in the recipe for Summer Fruit Bavarian (page 86). You can change the recipes, making additions and subtractions, modifying sizes and shapes, if you understand the simple science at work. Basically, what you are doing is stabilizing a light mixture— whipped cream, pastry cream—so that it can be sliced, a quality made possible with the addition of gelatin. This means that you can alter the filling as you like (a little more pastry cream, a little less meringue) as long as you always keep the volume of the base and the amount of gelatin in the correct ratio. At Tartine, we make Bavarians during every season. In the fall and winter, we use tropical fruits. Passion fruit is our favorite, and we usually moisten the cake layers with lime syrup. But that formula changes when we get fresh California blood oranges to use for the moistening syrup, which turns the cake a beautiful sunset shade of orange. Sometimes we switch to pineapple or lime for the filling. Our only nod to the world of cheesecakes has a Bavarian base, too, but it calls for fromage blanc in place of the traditional cooked fruit juice and yolks or pastry cream. Also, unlike traditional cheesecakes, our cheesecake, like all Bavarians, is not baked.


PA S S I O N F R U I T A N D L I M E B AVA R I A N

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

We almost always make this cake with passion fruit. It started out as a fall and winter cake, when passion fruits are easy to get, but it became so popular that we now sell it almost year-round. We usually make some small changes along the way, such as altering the flavor of the moistening syrup, or adding tangelo zest to the filling. Whatever flavors we use, the outside is always covered with wide 10-inch Chiffon Cake, Basic (page 201), Lemon (page 203), or Orange (page 204), split into 4 layers

shavings of dried coconut that turn soft from the barely whipped cream, which makes them taste as if they were freshly shaved from young, soft coconuts. 1 KITCHEN NOTES:

The thickening power of gelatin continues

after the first day the cake has set up. You will notice that

Lime Syrup

Sugar

1⁄2

cup

31⁄2 oz/115 g

Water

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml

Lime zest, grated

from 2 limes

Lime juice

1⁄3

cup

on the second and even third days you serve the cake that the filling will be a bit stiffer. If you have difficulty finding passion fruits, some high-quality companies sell the pulp frozen. If you do add zest to the filling as suggested in the

21⁄2 oz/75 ml

headnote, add it after the fruit-yolk mixture has cooled, or the zest will toughen.

Bavarian Cream

••••••

Passion fruit pulp, from about 12 fruits

2⁄3

cup

5 1⁄2 oz/150 ml

Wrap 1 cake layer in plastic wrap and reserve for another use. Have the remaining 3 layers ready.

cup

21⁄2 oz/70 g

To make the lime syrup, combine the sugar and water in a small, heavy saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon. When the sugar has dissolved, remove the pan from the heat and chill until cool to the touch, about 30 minutes. Whisk the lime zest and juice into the syrup.

tartine /

84

Large egg yolks

2

Sugar

1⁄3

Salt

pinch

Unflavored gelatin

11⁄2 tsp (1⁄2 envelope)

7 ml

Water

2 tbsp

30 ml

Heavy cream, very cold

11⁄2 cups

12 oz/375 ml

Heavy cream, very cold

11⁄2 cups

12 oz/375 ml

Sugar

3 tbsp

45 ml

Unsweetened largeflake dried coconut

1 cup

2 oz/60 g

Topping

Line the sides of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with plastic wrap, allowing enough overhang to cover the top of the cake completely when it is assembled. Leave the bottom of the pan unlined. Fit 1 cake layer into the bottom of the pan. Using a pastry brush, moisten the layer evenly with one-third of the lemon syrup.


To make the Bavarian cream, pass the passion fruit pulp through a fine-mesh sieve placed over a small bowl and discard the seeds. Prepare an ice bath, using both ice and water, in a large bowl. Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the egg yolks, sugar, passion fruit juice, and salt in a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Whisk together and then place over the saucepan and continue to whisk until the whites are hot to the touch (120°F), about 7 minutes. This is the bombe . Meanwhile, in a small dish, sprinkle the gelatin over the water and let stand for a few minutes to soften. When the bombe is ready, add the gelatin and whisk well to dissolve. Remove the bowl from over the hot water and nest the bowl in the ice bath just until slightly cool to the touch, whisking to cool the mixture evenly.

When you are ready to finish the cake, release and lift off the pan sides and peel away the plastic wrap. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate, if using, or leave it on the cake pan base. To make the topping, using the mixer or a whisk, whip the cream until thickened. Add the sugar and whip until the cream holds soft peaks. Using an offset spatula, frost the top and sides of the cake with the whipped cream, and then sprinkle the top and sides with the coconut. Return the cake to the refrigerator for about 2 hours before serving to allow the coconut flakes to absorb the moisture from the cream and soften. Serve the cake cold. It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

85 / cakes

In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with a whisk or a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment until it holds medium-stiff peaks. Scoop about one-third of the cream into the bombe and whisk together to lighten the bombe . Gently fold in the rest of the whipped cream with a rubber spatula.

Working quickly, pour half of the mixture onto the first layer of cake. Top with the second layer, being careful as the filling is very liquid. Brush this layer with half of the remaining lime syrup and then immediately pour the remaining Bavarian cream over it. Carefully top with the last layer and moisten it with the remaining lime syrup. Fold the overhanging plastic wrap over the top of the cake, covering completely, and refrigerate overnight.


S U M M E R F R U I T B AVA R I A N

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

This recipe makes a light, soft, mousselike filling that goes well with most summer fruits. If I am making a Bavarian with strawberries, which have good acidity, I’ll use the traditional method described on page 83, which calls for folding both a meringue and whipped cream into the base. Otherwise, especially for making a cake with lower-acid fruits such as apricots, white peaches, or nec10-inch Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201) or Génoise (page 198), split into 2 layers each about 1⁄2 inch 1

tarines, I’ll almost always use this method, which skips the meringue. Generally when we make this type of filling at the bakery, we use cake layers on the top and bottom only, and wrap a clear cake band around the sides so that the

Fresh fruit (one type or a mixture)

beautiful layers of fruit, cake, and filling are all visible.

Berries or cherries

2 pints

20 oz/570 g

Peaches, apricots, or nectarines

about 11⁄2 pounds

680 g

KITCHEN NOTES:

The thing to remember when combining

the pastry cream, whipped cream, and gelatin (or anything that contains gelatin) is that when you add gelatin to any cold mixture, its setting action begins immediately. Because of this you have to (1) make sure that the mixture the gelatin

Fruit Purée (see Note)

Berries

tartine /

86

is going into isn’t stone cold, and (2) add the gelatin first

very full pint

6 oz/170 g

to a small amount of the base and then whisk that smaller

Sugar

1⁄4

1 3⁄4 oz/50 g

amount into the remainder.

Salt

pinch

1⁄2

cup

••••••

Filling

Line the sides of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with plastic wrap, allowing enough overhang to cover the top of the cake completely when it is assembled. Leave the bottom of the pan unlined. Have the cake ready.

Gelatin

11⁄2 tsp (1⁄2 envelope)

7 ml

Water

1 tbsp

15 ml

Pastry Cream (page 207), cold

21⁄2 cups (1 batch)

20 oz/625 ml

Heavy cream, very cold

2 cups

16 oz/500 ml

Select 1 fruit or a mixture. If using blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, or other berries, leave them whole (you will need to hull the strawberries). If using cherries, remove the stems and pits. If using peaches and nectarines, pit and slice lengthwise into eighths; if using apricots, pit and cut into quarters. You want a total of about 4 cups (22 ounces/625 g) prepared fruit.

Heavy cream, very cold

11⁄4 cups

10 oz/300 ml

continued

Sugar

4 tsp

20 ml

Topping


To make the fruit purée, combine the berries, sugar, and salt in a blender and process on high speed until smooth. To make the filling, in a small dish, sprinkle the gelatin over the water and let stand for a few minutes to soften. Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Place 1⁄2 cup (4 fluid ounces/ 125 ml) of the pastry cream in a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Heat the pastry cream, whisking constantly, until hot to the touch (120°F), about 5 minutes. Add the gelatin and whisk until smooth. Remove from the water bath. Whisk half of the remaining cold pastry cream into the hot mixture, then whisk in the rest.

tartine /

88

In a mixing bowl, using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or a whisk, whip the cream until it holds medium-stiff peaks. Immediately and gently fold the whipped cream into the pastry cream with a rubber spatula. Fit 1 cake layer into the bottom of the prepared springform pan. Using a pastry brush, moisten the layer evenly with half of the fruit purée. Spoon half of the filling onto the layer, add the fruit (if using strawberries, directions follow), and spoon the rest of the filling over the fruit. Smooth the surface with an offset spatula. If using strawberries, spoon only enough of the filling onto the cake to create a layer 1⁄4 inch thick and stand the strawberries upright, pointed end up, pushing them into the cream. Quickly turn the remaining filling onto the fruit, lightly pressing down with the back of a large spoon to fill in any air pockets. Place the second cake layer on

top and moisten it with the rest of the fruit purée. Fold the overhanging plastic wrap over the top of the cake, covering completely, and then gently press down on the plastic to distribute the cream evenly (don’t use too much pressure). Refrigerate for at least 4 hours or preferably overnight. When you are ready to finish the cake, release and lift off the pan sides and peel away the plastic wrap. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate, if using, or leave it on the cake pan base. To make the topping, using the mixer or a whisk, whip the cream until thickened. Add the sugar and whip until the cream holds soft peaks. Using the offset spatula, frost the top of the cake. The cake can be served immediately or kept cold in the refrigerator until ready to serve. It will keep for up to 3 days. Note: You can make a liqueur-flavored sugar syrup in place of the fruit purée for moistening the cake layers. In a small, heavy saucepan, combine 1 cup minus 2 tablespoons (6 ounces/170 g) sugar and 1⁄2 cup (4 fluid ounces/125 ml) water and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. When the sugar has dissolved, remove the pan from the heat and refrigerate until cold. Select a liqueur or other spirit, such as Cointreau, Grand Marnier, Chambord, brandy, or Armagnac, that complements the fruit you are using, and whisk 2 to 4 tablespoons (30 to 60 ml)—the amount depends on how strong you want your syrup to taste—into the sugar syrup.


F R O M AG E B L A N C B AVA R I A N

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

Fromage blanc is a fresh cow’s milk cheese made from skim milk (there is plenty of cream added to the Bavarian, so it actually ends up being a rich cake in spite of the low-fat cheese). The flavor of the cheese is slightly tart and the texture is smooth yet crumbly, similar to fresh goat cheese. If you are a fan of goat cheese, you can substitute it for the fromage blanc. The texture of the Bavarian is light and just Cake Base

barely set. I’m from Brooklyn and love a good New York–style

10-inch cake layer, 1⁄2 inch thick, from Génoise (page 198), Basic (page 201), Lemon (page 203), or Orange (page 204) Chiffon Cake 1

cheesecake from time to time, but I find this much lighter,

Water

1⁄4

Lemon juice Sugar

velvety version, with its slight acidity, to be more in tune with what I want after a meal, and the apricot glaze goes 2 oz/60 ml

beautifully with the flavor of the fromage blanc (or with the

1 tbsp

15 ml

other cheeses suggested in the Kitchen Notes). For fruit

3 tbsp

45 ml

accompaniments, apricots and plums are on the top of my

cup

list in the summertime, followed by any other stone fruit. In

OR

the winter, candied quince (page 213) or sautéed apples are

Nut Base

Pistachio nuts, finely chopped

good choices, as is any type of candied citrus peel (page 214) 3⁄4

cup

3 oz/85g

or tropical fruit such as sautéed banana or pineapple. KITCHEN NOTES:

You can use any soft fresh cheese in this

Bavarian. Soft goat cheese and ricotta cheese work well, as

Filling

cup

6 oz/175 ml

does quark, a low-fat cheese similar to fromage blanc. Make

Sugar

1⁄2

cup

31⁄2 oz/100 g

sure that if you are using a cake base, it is ready and waiting,

Large egg yolks

8

Unflavored gelatin

41⁄2 tsp

22 ml

Fromage blanc

3 cups

21 oz/600 g

Heavy cream

3 cups

24 oz/750 ml

Lemon juice

4 tsp

20 ml

Lemon zest, grated

from 1 small lemon

Orange zest, grated

from 1⁄2 small orange

as the filling will begin to set up once the gelatin is added.

3⁄4

cup

heat; if they sit, the sugar will coagulate the yolks, turning them irretrievably grainy. ••••••

Line the sides of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with plastic wrap, allowing a little overhang. Leave the bottom of the pan unlined.

Glaze (optional)

Apricot jam

Also, don’t let the egg yolks come into contact with the sugar syrup before you are ready to whisk them together over the

6 oz/175 g

To prepare the Bavarian using the cake base: Have the cake ready. In a small saucepan, stir together the water, lemon juice, and sugar over low heat just until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and let cool to room continued

89 / cakes

Water

3⁄4


temperature. Place the cake layer in the bottom of the prepared springform pan. Using a pastry brush, moisten the layer evenly with the syrup. To prepare the Bavarian using the nut base: Evenly distribute the chopped nuts over the bottom of the springform pan. Gently shake the pan back and forth to fill in any gaps. It is not necessary to grease or otherwise prepare the bottom of the pan. To make the filling, combine 1⁄2 cup (4 fluid ounces/ 125 ml) of the water and the sugar in a small saucepan over medium heat and bring to a boil, stirring to dis solve the sugar. When the sugar has dissolved, remove from the heat and let cool until warm to the touch.

tartine /

90

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the sugar syrup and egg yolks in a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Heat the mixture, whisking often, until it thickens and registers 180°F on a thermometer, 5 to 10 minutes. Meanwhile, in a small dish, sprinkle the gelatin over the remaining 1⁄4 cup (2 fluid ounces/60 ml) water and let stand for a few minutes to soften. When the egg yolk mixture is ready, remove from the water bath, add the softened gelatin, and whisk until smooth. The mixture must now be cool to the touch. You can cool it by nesting it in a larger bowl filled with ice and water or by putting it in the refrigerator. In either case, you must stir it with a rubber spatula or whisk so that the gelatin does not begin to set up unevenly. In a large bowl, combine the fromage blanc and cup (4 fluid ounces/125 ml) of the cream and stir to break up and soften the cheese. Using the mixer or a whisk, whip the remaining 2 1⁄2 cups (20 fluid ounces/ 625 ml) cream until it holds soft peaks. Using a rubber

1⁄2

spatula, fold the egg yolk mixture into the cheese, and then fold in the lemon juice and the lemon and orange zests. Finally, fold in one-third of the whipped cream to lighten the mixture, and then gently fold in the remaining whipped cream until it is fully incorporated and the mixture is smooth. Transfer the filling to the springform pan, smoothing the top with the spatula. Cover the Bavarian with a sheet of plastic wrap, being careful that it does not touch the surface. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours or preferably overnight. You can serve the cake with or without a glaze. To serve without a glaze, release and lift off the pan sides and peel away the plastic wrap. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate, if using, or leave it on the cake pan base. To glaze the cake, keep the cake in the refrigerator until the moment you are going to glaze the top. Put the jam in a small saucepan over medium heat. Depending on how thick it is, you may need to thin it with a little water. I suggest starting with 1 tablespoon (30 ml) water and stirring with a spoon or small whisk to break up any lumps. Be careful not to add too much water, as you want the jam to set back up again once it is poured onto the cake and allowed to cool. Remove the jam from the heat, pour it through a medium-mesh sieve, and let cool until it is still liquid and warm. It must not be too hot to the touch, or it will melt the surface of the cake when you pour it on it. Take the cake out of the refrigerator and lift away the plastic wrap. Working quickly, pour the warm jam on top of the cake and turn and slightly tip the cake so that the glaze spreads evenly to the sides. Return the cake to the refrigerator until the top has set, about 30 minutes, then remove from the pan and serve as directed above.


PA S T E L D E T R E S L E C H E S

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

The Mission District of San Francisco, where Tartine is located, is home to a large, long-established Latin community, evident in the neighborhood’s many Salvadoran, Mexican, and Guatemalan restaurants. A slice of pastel de tres leches (three milks cake) makes complete sense after eating an especially spicy meal: it’s the horchata of desserts—or the flan of cakes—the perfect way to put out the fire in your mouth. The cake is soft, moist, and delicately flavored, here with coconut milk, pastry cream lightened with whipped cream, and a lightly sweetened whipped cream frosting. It’s a little like Boston cream pie, Coconut Chiffon Cake (page 205), split into 3 layers

but without the strong flavor of chocolate. I would definitely serve this with tropical fruits, such as freshly scooped pas-

1

sion fruit pulp; a compote of orange, lime, and grapefruit; or pineapple. You often see this cake with caramel (page 212)

Coconut Syrup

spread on the cake layers, which is delicious as well.

Unsweetened coconut milk

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Sugar

6 tbsp

2 3⁄4 oz/80 g

and coconut cream on the market, many of them sweetened.

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

5 ml

You will need unsweetened coconut milk for this recipe.

Salt

pinch

KITCHEN NOTES:

There are different types of coconut milk

When whisking anything in a stainless-steel bowl, especially one that has been used to heat ingredients over a hot-water bath and is hot to handle and wet on the bottom, have a

Filling

11⁄2 tsp

7 ml

Water

2 tbsp

30 ml

Pastry Cream (page 207)

21⁄2 cups

20 oz/625 ml

folded, lightly dampened kitchen towel ready to put the bowl on. The towel will keep the bowl steady as you whisk. ••••••

Heavy cream, very cold

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Caramel (page 212) (optional)

1⁄2

4 oz/125 ml

cup

Topping

Heavy cream, very cold

11⁄4 cups

10 oz/300 ml

Sugar

4 tsp

20 ml

Line the sides of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with plastic wrap, allowing enough overhang to cover the top of the cake completely when it is assembled. Leave the bottom of the pan unlined. Have the cake layers ready. To make the coconut syrup, in a small bowl, stir together the coconut milk, sugar, vanilla, and salt and stir until the sugar dissolves. Set aside. continued

91 / cakes

Unflavored gelatin


To make the filling, sprinkle the gelatin over the water in a small dish and let stand for a few minutes to soften. If using freshly made pastry cream and it is still hot, whisk the gelatin into the entire amount, then place the bowl in an ice bath (a large bowl filled with ice cubes and water) and let the pastry cream cool before continuing. If using pastry cream that is cold, pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Place 1â „2 cup (4 fluid ounces/ 125 ml) of the pastry cream in a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Heat the pastry cream, whisking often, until it is very hot to the touch, 4 to 5 minutes. Whisk in the gelatin until smooth. Remove from the water bath. Whisk half of the remaining cold pastry cream into the hot mixture, then whisk in the rest.

tartine /

92

Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or a whisk, whip the cream until it holds medium-soft peaks. Working quickly, gently fold the whipped cream into the pastry cream mixture with a rubber spatula. The cold cream will make the gelatin begin to set up at this point, so be sure you have all of your cake components—moistening syrup, caramel (if using), and cake layers—and tools ready.

Place 1 cake layer in the bottom of the prepared springform pan. Using a pastry brush, moisten the layer evenly with one-third of the coconut syrup. If using caramel, drizzle half of it over the cake layer. Pour half of the filling over the layer and spread it evenly (the back of a large spoon works well). Place the second layer over the filling, pressing down gently with even pressure. Moisten this layer with half of the remaining coconut syrup, and then drizzle over the remaining caramel (if using). Pour the remaining filling over the second layer. Place the third cake layer on top and moisten it with the rest of the coconut syrup. The top layer should come right up to the rim of the cake pan. Fold the overhanging plastic wrap over the top of the cake, covering completely. Place something flat, such as a flat plate or a baking sheet, over the cake, and press down gently to level the cake layers. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours or preferably overnight. When you are ready to finish the cake, release and lift off the pan sides and peel away the plastic wrap. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate, if using, or leave it on the cake pan base. To make the topping, using the mixer or a whisk, whip the cream until thickened. Add the sugar and whip until the cream holds soft peaks. Using an offset spatula, frost the top of the cake. The cake can be served immediately or kept cold in the refrigerator until ready to serve. It will keep for up to 5 days.


C H O C O L AT E S O U F F L É CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

This rich cake, made without flour but with a good amount of butter and chocolate, is not dense the way most flourless cakes are because the yolks and whites are beaten separately and then combined with the chocolate and butter. Its character changes depending on whether you serve it at room temperature or cold. At room temperature, the chocolate and butter soften and the cake becomes mousselike, more easily gently scooped than sliced. When cold, it’s a sliceable light but firm mousse. This cake is 10-inch Chocolate Chiffon Cake layer (page 206), 1⁄2 inch thick 1

perfect for Passover if you make it with the nuts, rather than with the chocolate cake base. Or, you can omit both of them for a wheat-free, nut-free cake (you’ll still need to line the

OR

pan with parchment).

Walnuts or pecans, lightly toasted and finely chopped

3⁄4

cup

3 oz/85 g

Unsalted butter

3⁄4

cup + 1 tbsp

61⁄2 oz/185 g

KITCHEN NOTES:

The success of this cake depends on two

things. First, you must incorporate air into the egg yolk and sugar mixture, whipping them to a thick ribbon, or the

Bittersweet chocolate, chopped

14 oz

Large eggs

7

Sugar

3⁄4

cup + 2 tbsp

6 oz/170 g

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

395 g

cake will not have the correct light texture when it is baked. Second, you must be careful not to overbake the cake, or it will turn out dry. Many cooks are inclined to turn the mixer to high speed for beating egg whites to stiff peaks. But you will find that if you whip whites on medium speed and take a little longer, the whites will have a tighter, more stable structure and have fewer large, irregular air pockets.

Bittersweet chocolate, chopped

4 oz

115 g

Heavy cream

1⁄2

4 oz/125 ml

cup

••••••

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly.

If using the chocolate layer, fit it into the bottom of the prepared pan. If using nuts, evenly distribute them over the bottom of the pan, then gently shake the pan back and forth to fill in any gaps. In a small saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat and then add the chocolate. Stir as the chocolate melts, blending it with the butter. Remove from the heat and set aside. continued

93 / cakes

Ganache Topping (optional)


Separate the eggs, placing the yolks and whites in separate mixing bowls. Add half of the sugar to the egg yolks. Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the yolk mixture on high speed until light, fluffy, and the mixture triples in volume and falls from the beater in a wide ribbon that folds back on itself and slowly dissolves on the surface, 4 to 5 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, fold the chocolate mixture into the egg yolks. Don’t worry about the mixture being perfectly blended in at this point because you will be folding in the whites next. Using the mixer, beat the egg whites on medium speed until soft peaks form. Add the rest of the sugar and the salt and beat until the whites hold medium-stiff, glossy peaks. Stir one-third of the whites into the chocolate-yolk mixture to lighten it, and then gently fold in the remaining whites just until no white streaks are visible. Immediately turn the batter into the prepared pan.

Serve the cake cold or at room temperature. If served cold, slice the cake with a warm knife (have a tall container filled with very hot water for dipping the knife before each cut and a towel to wipe the knife clean after each cut). If you prefer to serve the cake a little warmer, it will have a lighter, more mousselike consistency, which is more difficult to cut but delicious nonetheless. It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Wrap it well for storage; chocolate absorbs refrigerator odors more readily than most other ingredients do.

95 / cakes

Bake until the top of the cake is no longer shiny, being careful not to let it “soufflé” (puff up and expand beyond its original volume), 30 to 40 minutes. Let cool completely in the pan on a wire rack. As the cake cools, it will become firmer. Cover and refrigerate until well chilled, at least 3 hours or for up to overnight.

If you want to make the ganache topping, remove the cake from the refrigerator, uncover it, and let it sit on the countertop for about 15 minutes to warm up just a bit before you top it. To make the ganache, place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl. Heat the cream in a small saucepan and bring to just under a boil. Pour the cream over the chocolate. Let the mixture sit for about 2 minutes without stirring until the chocolate melts, and then stir gently with a rubber spatula (so as to incorporate as little air as possible) until smooth. Pour the ganache over the cake, and tilt and turn the cake pan to cover the top evenly. The cold temperature of the cake will help the ganache set up. When the chocolate is set, after about 20 minutes, run a thin knife blade around the inside edge of the pan to loosen the cake sides. (Or, you can instead wrap a damp, warm towel around the pan sides, or use a kitchen torch to warm the metal; both will loosen the cake sides.) Release and lift off the pan sides. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate, if using, or leave it on the pan base.


D E V I L’ S F O O D L AY E R CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake; 12 to 16 servings

/

Although most professionally made cakes are made from a handful of bases, usually génoise, biscuit (similar to génoise, usually rolled), pound cake, and chiffon, this devil’s food cake has a special toothsome quality all its own. Always serve it at room temperature. The butter that goes into the batter makes the texture a bit too firm if the cake is served cold, but the layers soften up beautifully at room temperature and the flavors become more pronounced. The ganache between the layers is better at room temperature, too, since it is made from equal parts

Cake Layers

Cornstarch

4 1⁄2 tbsp

60 ml

warmer. One of the bakery managers used this recipe for

Baking powder

1 tsp

5 ml

her wedding cake, and she put the top tier in the freezer on

Baking soda

1⁄2

2 ml

Cocoa powder

11⁄4 cups

4 oz/115 g

Salt

1 tsp

5 ml

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Sugar

2 3⁄4 cups

20 oz/570 g

cups

tsp

8 3⁄4

oz/250 g

her wedding day and ate it a year later. She said it was as delicious as the day it was made, a notable feat for any cake. You can finish the cake with just the ganache (use the larger amount of ganache ingredients), or you can finish it as we do at the bakery, with a dusting of finely ground cake crumbs (use the trimmings from the cake to make the crumbs). The crumbs give the cake a dark, velvety look—a

Large eggs

5

Full-fat buttermilk

11⁄4 cups

10 oz/310 ml

look borrowed from the blackout cake that was my favorite when I was growing up in Brooklyn.

96 tartine /

chocolate and cream and becomes silky smooth when it is

All-purpose flour

1 3⁄4

KITCHEN NOTES:

Chocolate Ganache

If you like, after assembling the cake

Bittersweet chocolate

24 oz OR 32 oz

680 g 900 g

layers, apply a smooth, very thin layer of ganache over

Heavy cream

3 cups OR 4 cups

24 oz/750 ml 32 oz/1 l

overnight in the refrigerator or for 1 hour in the freezer.

Caramel (page 212)

1⁄2

41⁄2 oz/140 ml

stick to the cake so that they do not mar the final icing.

cup + 1 tbsp

the top and sides of the cake and allow it to set up either This base layer, called a crumb coat, helps any crumbs

•••••• continued


Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter and lightly flour the sides of two 9-inch cake pans, knocking out the excess flour. Line the bottom of each pan with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. To make the cake layers, sift together the flour, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, cocoa powder, and salt into a bowl and set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium-high speed until light and creamy. Slowly add the sugar and continue to beat on the same speed until light in color and fluffy. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition until incorporated before adding the next egg. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with the rubber spatula. With the mixer on low speed, add the flour mixture in 3 equal batches alternately with the buttermilk in 2 batches, beginning and ending with the flour mixture. Stop the mixer, scrape down the sides of the bowl, and then mix again for another few seconds. tartine /

98

Divide the cake batter evenly between the prepared cake pans. Bake until the top springs back when

lightly touched or a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 45 minutes. Let the cakes cool completely in the pans on a wire rack. When the cakes are cool, turn them out by inverting the pans, and then turn the cakes upright. Using a serrated knife, slice off the domed portion from the top of each cake to make the tops flat. If you want to decorate the cake with crumbs as described in the headnote, reserve the slices for making the crumbs. To make the crumbs, preheat the oven to 250°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Break up the cake slices and spread on the lined baking sheet. Place in the oven and toast until completely dry, about 1 hour. Let cool completely, then transfer to a food processor or blender and process until finely ground. Sift the crumbs through a medium-mesh sieve. (Don’t use a sieve with fine mesh or the crumbs won’t pass through.) Set aside. To make the ganache, place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl, using the smaller amount of each


ingredient if you will be decorating the cake with crumbs and the larger amount if you will not. Bring the cream to just under a boil in a small saucepan. Pour the cream over the chocolate. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes without stirring until the chocolate is partially melted, and then stir with a rubber spatula until smooth and shiny.

Serve the cake at room temperature. To store, cover tightly and keep in a cool place for up to 4 days. It is not necessary to keep this cake in the refrigerator.

99 / cakes

To assemble the cake, split each cake into 2 layers to make 4 layers in all. Transfer 1 layer to a serving plate. Using an offset spatula, spread 3 tablespoons (45 ml) of the caramel evenly over the cake layer. Spread a thin layer of ganache (about 1â „4 inch thick) over the caramel. Top with a second cake layer, and again spread with 3 tablespoons caramel and then a thin layer of ganache. Repeat with the third cake layer, the remaining 3 tablespoons caramel, and a thin layer of ganache. Top with the fourth cake layer. Refrigerate the cake until the center seems firm, 1 to 2 hours. Cover the remaining ganache with plastic wrap and leave at room temperature for finishing the cake.

Remove the cake from the refrigerator. Using the rest of the ganache, frost the top and sides of the cake with the offset spatula. If you are going to coat the cake with the toasted cake crumbs, the cake must be evenly frosted and the ganache must be soft enough for the crumbs to adhere. If the ganache has hardened, use a kitchen torch to soften it slightly, or put the whole cake into a 400°F oven for 10 seconds or so, just until the chocolate looks shiny. Sprinkle the crumbs evenly over the top of the cake, then tilt and turn the cake so that they spill over the sides, adhering to them as they fall. If you are using only the ganache and not the crumbs, the ganache will be thicker on both the top and sides.


BÛCHE DE NOËL

/

yield one 12-inch cake; 8 to 12 servings

/

A few days before Christmas, Tartine turns into a bûche de Noël factory. Bakers lined up and down both sides of the workbenches—stacks of thin cakes at one end and icing and decorations at the opposite end—labor on every stage of production. This is when work is fun, when everyone is in on it, and when there is Champagne to share in the near future, as we celebrate the passing of another hectic Buttercream

Christmas.

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

11⁄4 cups

10 oz/285 g

Granulated sugar

1 cup + 2 tbsp

8 oz/225 g

Egg whites

1⁄2

4 oz (about 31⁄2 large whites)/ 125 ml

chocolate. We sprinkle on silver dragées of different sizes caramel-sugar leaves and flowers. You can mold marzipan

cup

A bûche de Noël is all about looks, and ours are more fanciful than traditional, with green pistachio “moss” covering “bark” made from toasted sliced almonds and dark to represent dew, and we have special brass tools to make

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Coffee, brewed double strength, or espresso

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

Confectioners’ sugar

1⁄2

cup + 2 tbsp

21⁄2 oz/70 g

buttercream, and finish the cake with toasted sliced-

All-purpose flour

11⁄2 tsp

7 ml

almond chocolate ganache.

Large egg whites

2

Cream of tartar

pinch

Granulated sugar

1⁄3

into acorns, dipping the caps in chocolate, or make bugs or

Meringue Mushrooms

twigs. In our version of this traditional French dessert, we moisten the cake with espresso syrup, fill it with espresso

KITCHEN NOTES:

advance. However, you should frost and decorate it the day 21⁄2 oz/70 g

you plan to serve it, or at most the night before, keeping it in the refrigerator. You can also make the buttercream in

Coffee Syrup

advance and refrigerate it for up to 5 days or freeze it for up

Coffee, brewed double strength, or espresso

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml

to 1 month. In both cases, bring it to room temperature and

Granulated sugar

1⁄3

cup

21⁄2 oz/70 g

then beat it with a mixer on high speed until it is the cor-

continued

rect consistency. It will look broken at first because the liquid separates from the fat, but it will come together as you continue to beat it. •••••• continued

101 / cakes

cup

You can make the log several days in


Almond Ganache “Bark”

Sliced almonds

1 cup

31⁄2 oz/100g

Bittersweet chocolate, chopped

6 oz

170 g

Heavy cream

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/175 ml

1⁄4

cup

11⁄4 oz/35 g

Pistachio “Moss”

Pistachio nuts

11-by-17-inch Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201) 1 Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

To make the buttercream, cut the butter into 1-tablespoon (15-ml) pieces and set aside.

tartine /

102

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the granulated sugar, egg whites, and salt in the stainless-steel bowl of a stand mixer that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Whisk together and then place over the saucepan and continue to whisk until the whites are hot to the touch (120°F), about 5 minutes or so. Remove the bowl from over the water and place on the mixer stand. Fit the mixer with the whisk attachment and mix on high speed until the mixture is very thick and stiff, holds glossy, stiff peaks when you lift the beater, and is cooler. This will take 5 to 7 minutes. Add the butter 1 tablespoon at a time, beating on medium-high speed after each addition until incorporated before adding the next piece. The buttercream should look satiny and smooth. Add

the coffee and mix on low speed first, and then medium speed until incorporated. Set aside until needed (or store as directed in Kitchen Notes). To make the meringue mushrooms, preheat the oven to 175°F. Sift together the confectioners’ sugar and flour into a small bowl. Combine the egg whites and cream of tartar in medium-sized bowl. Using the mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the egg whites on medium speed until they hold soft peaks. Slowly add the granulated sugar and continue beating until smooth, shiny, and very stiff. Using the rubber spatula, gently fold the flour–confectioners’ sugar mixture into the egg whites all at once, working quickly and thoroughly so as not to deflate the meringue. Pipe the meringue immediately. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper and use a pastry bag fitted with a 1⁄2-inch (no. 6 or 7) plain tip or a cone made from parchment paper with a 1⁄2 -inch opening. Holding the opening of the tip horizontal to the sheet pan, pipe mushroom caps of different sizes, squeezing the bag or cone until you’ve reached the size you want, and then immediately stopping the pressure on the bag and pulling away quickly. If you leave a “tail,” smooth it over with a wet finger. To pipe stems for the mushrooms, again hold the tip horizontal to the paper and make a “kiss” shape with the meringue, stopping the pressure on the bag and pulling directly up to leave a tail. If you don’t like the shapes, scoop up the meringue and pipe again. Place the baking sheet in the oven and keep the oven door ajar with the handle of a wooden spoon to allow moisture to escape. Bake for at least 4 hours or for up to overnight. (If you have a gas oven with a continuous pilot light, leave them over night with


just the pilot light.) The meringues should be very dry but should not color. If you see that they are coloring, reduce the oven temperature by 25°F. When the mushrooms are ready, remove from the oven and let cool completely. They may feel a little soft when they come right out of the oven, but they will firm up as they cool. They will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to a few weeks. To make the coffee syrup, in the small saucepan, combine the coffee and sugar and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Remove from the heat and let cool. (If you are using freshly brewed coffee or espresso, simply dissolve the sugar in the hot coffee.) To make the almond ganache “bark,” preheat the oven to 350°F. Spread the almonds on a baking sheet and toast in the oven until golden brown, stirring a couple of times with a wooden spoon to ensure even browning, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a small plate and let cool.

To assemble the bûche , place the cake on a piece of parchment paper or plastic wrap. Using a pastry brush, moisten the cake with the coffee syrup. Transfer the buttercream to the cake and spread it evenly over the cake with an offset spatula. Leave a 1-inch strip of cake without buttercream on the 2 long sides. Starting from the long side nearest you, begin rolling up the cake, using the parchment or plastic wrap to help you lift and roll evenly and tightly. Don’t worry about how the ends look. They will be cut off. Refrigerate the rolled cake until the buttercream is firm, about 2 hours. Using a sharp knife, cut a thick slice on the diagonal off each end of the log and set aside. To frost the log, place it seam side down. Use a small offset spatula to place dollops of the ganache along the top, smoothing them over the top and sides down as you go along the length. Choose the prettiest cut end and place it, with the slanted side up, on the log to create a cut “bough.” Frost the sides of the bough with ganache. Using a wide metal spatula, transfer the cake to a serving plate. To assemble each mushroom, use the tip of a small paring knife to whittle a hole on the underside of the cap where the stem will fit. Using some of the ganache as glue, attach the stem to the cap. Finish decorating the bûche with the mushrooms, moss, and other decorations you have made. Finish the cake with a dusting of confectioners’ sugar to simulate snow.

103 / cakes

Place the chocolate in a small heatproof bowl. Pour the cream into a small saucepan and heat to just under a boil. Pour the cream over the chocolate. Let the mixture sit for a few minutes and then stir with a rubber spatula until melted, smooth, and shiny. Add the cooled almonds and mix gently. Set aside in a cool place. You may put the ganache in the refrigerator for 15 minutes to cool and thicken slightly. It should be spreading consistency when you use it, like buttercream. If the mixture should become too thick, place the heatproof bowl over a pot of simmering water and mix with a wooden spoon until it is the correct consistency.

To make the pistachio “moss,” put the pistachios in a small blender or coffee grinder and process to a powder.


B A N A N A - DAT E T E A CA K E

/

yield 1 large loaf; 6 to 8 servings

/

Most tea cakes are made with oil, but this one has butter in it, which makes it more flavorful, although you’ll want to serve it at room temperature for the best soft texture. The texture and flavor of dates go wonderfully with banana, and the walnuts add an even more toothsome quality to the combination. KITCHEN NOTES:

Use very ripe bananas in this recipe. I keep a zip-lock plastic bag in my freezer to which I

add bruised and too-soft-for-eating bananas, so there is never a wasted piece of fruit. ••••••

tartine /

104

All-purpose flour

1 cup + 2 tbsp

5 1⁄2 oz/155 g

Cornstarch

2 tbsp

30 ml

Ground cinnamon

1 tsp

5 ml

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Baking soda

1 tsp

5 ml

Bananas, very ripe

3 medium

9 oz/255 g

Large eggs

2

Vanilla extract

1 1⁄2 tsp

7 ml

Salt

1⁄2

2 ml

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

6 tbsp

3 oz/85 g

Sugar

3⁄4

6 oz/170 g

tsp

cup + 2 tbsp

Walnuts, lightly toasted and coarsely chopped 1 cup

4 oz/115 g

Dates, pitted and coarsely chopped

8 oz/225 g

13⁄4 cups

Topping

Banana

1 medium

Sugar

2 tbsp

30 ml

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Lightly butter the bottom and sides of a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan. This recipe is easily mixed by stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium speed or by hand with a wooden spoon. In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, cornstarch, cinnamon, baking powder, and baking soda and stir to mix. Set aside. Peel the bananas and place in a second bowl. Mash with a fork until you have a chunky purée. Add the eggs, vanilla, and salt to the bananas and stir to mix well. Set aside. In a third mixing bowl, beat the butter until light and creamy, about 2 minutes. Slowly add the sugar and beat until light in color and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Slowly add the banana mixture and beat until incorporated. Again scrape down the sides of the bowl, and then mix for another 30 seconds to make sure all the ingredients are incorporated. Using the rubber spatula, fold the dry ingredients into the banana mixture. Then fold in the nuts and dates. Scrape down the sides of the bowl and mix again, making sure all the ingredients are fully incorporated.

Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan and smooth the surface with an offset spatula. To top the cake, peel the banana and cut in half lengthwise. Then place each half cut side down and cut in half lengthwise, to yield 4 long slices. Lay the slices on the top of the batter. Sprinkle with the sugar. Bake until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for about 20 minutes, and then invert onto the rack, turn right side up, and let cool completely. Serve the cake at room temperature. It will keep, well wrapped, at room temperature for 2 days or in the refrigerator for about 1 week.


P U M P K I N T E A CA K E

/

yield 1 large loaf; 6 to 8 servings

/

This tea cake has a soft, even, moist crumb and a slight spiciness. The cake will differ depending on the brand of pumpkin purée you use. Some brands result in a lighter-colored cake, and some deliver a more pronounced pumpkin flavor. If you have a favorite brand of unseasoned purée for pie making, it would be good here. At Tartine, customers often request a dollop of bourbon hard sauce (page 107) on a slice of this cake, and because it is not too sweet, it benefits from a topping. If you can find raw pepitas (hulled pumpkin seeds), they make a beautiful crunchy topping along with the sugar. Look for them in the international-foods section of well-stocked supermarkets or in Latin American grocery stores. KITCHEN NOTES:

1 2⁄3 cups

8 oz/225 g

Baking powder

1 1⁄2

7 ml

Baking soda

1⁄2

Ground cinnamon

1 tbsp + 2 tsp

25 ml

Nutmeg, freshly grated

2 tsp

10 ml

Ground cloves

1⁄4

1 ml

Pumpkin purée

1 cup + 2 tbsp

9 oz/255 g

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Sugar

1 1⁄3

91⁄2

Salt

3⁄4

Large eggs

3

Sugar for topping

2 tbsp

tsp

tsp

tsp

cups

tsp

2 ml

oz/270 g

4 ml

30 ml

tough crumb. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Lightly butter the bottom and sides of a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan. This recipe is easily mixed by stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or by hand with a whisk. Sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves into a mixing bowl and set side. In another mixing bowl, beat together the pumpkin purée, oil, sugar, and salt on medium speed or by hand until well mixed. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition until incorporated before adding the next egg. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. On low speed, add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Scrape down the sides of the bowl, then beat on medium speed for 5 to 10 seconds to make a smooth batter. The batter should have consistency of a thick purée.

Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan and smooth the surface with an offset spatula. Sprinkle evenly with the sugar. Bake until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for about 20 minutes, and then invert onto the rack, turn right side up, and let cool completely. Serve the cake at room temperature. It will keep, well wrapped, at room temperature for 4 days or in the refrigerator for about 1 week.

105 / cakes

All-purpose flour

As with all quick breads, make sure

not to overmix the batter, or you will end up with a coarse,


ZUCCHINI A N D OR ANGE M A R M A L A D E T E A CA K E

/

yield 1 large loaf; 6 to 8 servings

/

My view of zucchini used to be that there were far too many of them in the world, that they were overtaking the home garden of everyone I knew, and that no one knew how to cook with them well. This comes from early childhood exposure to zucchini in extreme amounts that no one should have to endure. At the same time, I have to say that my parents are both creative cooks and they gave me this recipe. My only change to it is the addition of the orange marmalade, which, though subtle, goes well with the barely discernable flavor of the zucchini. Both the zucchini and the marmalade contribute to a very moist cake. KITCHEN NOTES:

13⁄4 cups + 2 tbsp

91⁄2 oz/270 g

marmalade). You can ready the ingredients ahead of time,

Baking soda

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

but you must bake off the batter as soon as it is mixed.

Baking powder

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Cinnamon, ground

1 tsp

Large eggs

2

All-purpose flour

tartine /

106

Apricot jam works equally well if you

don’t have orange marmalade (no need to strain it or the

5 ml

Otherwise, the sugar macerates with the zucchini, which pulls out all the moisture, giving you a very watery batter. ••••••

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄2

cup + 2 tbsp

5 oz/155 ml

Sugar

3⁄4

cup

5 1⁄4 oz/150 g

Orange marmalade

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/115 g

Zucchini, grated

21⁄2 cups

10 oz/285 g

Sea salt

1⁄2

2 ml

tsp

Walnuts, lightly toasted and coarsely chopped 1 cup

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly oil and flour the bottom and sides of a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan, knocking out the excess flour. This recipe is easily mixed by stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium speed or by hand with a wooden spoon. Sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, and cinnamon into a mixing bowl and set aside.

4 oz/115 g

In another mixing bowl, beat together the eggs, oil, sugar, and marmalade until combined. Add the zucchini and salt and again beat until combined. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the flour mixture and beat just until combined. Add the nuts and mix just until incorporated.

Sugar for topping

2 tbsp

30 ml

Transfer the batter to the prepared loaf pan and smooth the surface with an offset spatula. Sprinkle evenly with the sugar. Bake until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, 60 to 70 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for about 20 minutes, and then invert onto the rack, turn right side up, and let cool completely. Serve the cake at room temperature. It will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.


STEAMED GINGERBREAD PUDDING W I T H B O U R B O N H A R D S AU C E

/

yield 2 large or 6 to 8 small loaves

/

This is not a true steamed pudding, something that I don’t always have the patience for making. It is instead a batter that starts out very thin, like a crêpe batter, and then bakes up into a moist, eggy cake that is almost black from spices and molasses and carries a sharp, fresh ginger flavor. It is not what I would call a light cake, but its unique firm, moist texture vindicates all cakes that don’t fall into Gingerbread

the category of “light and airy.” The batter is so wet that it

All-purpose flour

1 1⁄2 cups

7 1⁄2 oz/215 g

essentially “steams” itself, baking up so that it is almost

Baking soda

1 tsp

5 ml

identical to a traditional steamed pudding, a dessert that

Ground cinnamon

1 tsp

5 ml

would be logistically impossible for a bakery to make in

Ground cloves

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

any quantity. If you let the cake sit for a day, the ginger and

Black pepper, freshly ground

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Fresh ginger, peeled and coarsely chopped

2⁄3

cup

3 1⁄2 oz/100 g

Hot water

3⁄4

cup + 2 tbsp

7 oz/200 ml

Sugar

3⁄4

cup

5 1⁄4 oz/150 g

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

2⁄3

cup

5 1⁄2

decide against the hard sauce, unsweetened softly whipped cream is good with the cake, too. KITCHEN NOTES:

You can peel ginger by scraping the edge

of a spoon along the length of it. You can also use a vegetable peeler, but you end up taking away more of the ginger. When slicing ginger, always slice against the grain into

oz/150 ml

1⁄8-inch-thick

“coins” before chopping. If you cut with the

grain, you will end up with tough, hairlike fibers. 3⁄4

Salt

1⁄2

Large eggs

2

cup tsp

107

8 1⁄4 oz/235 g 2 ml

••••••

To make the gingerbread, preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter the bottom and sides of two 9-by-5-inch loaf pans or six to eight 4 1⁄2-by-2 3⁄4-by-2 1⁄2-inch loaf pans.

Bourbon Hard Sauce

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1⁄2

Confectioners’ sugar

1 cup

4 oz/115 g

Bourbon, Cognac, or Armagnac

1⁄2

41⁄2 oz/135 ml

Salt

pinch

cup

cup + 1 tbsp

4 oz/115 g

This recipe is easily mixed by stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or by hand with a whisk. Sift together the flour, baking soda, cinnamon, and cloves into a mixing bowl. continued

/ cakes

Blackstrap molasses

other spices become even more pronounced. And if you


Place the ginger in a blender, add enough of the hot water to cover, and process until smooth. Pour into a large mixing bowl. Pour the rest of the hot water into the blender to dislodge any remaining ginger and add to the mixing bowl. Add the sugar, oil, molasses, and salt to the ginger and beat on medium speed until well mixed. (If you add the ingredients in that order, the oil will keep the molasses from sticking to the measuring cup.) Add the flour mixture and beat on low speed until moistened. Then switch to high speed until the batter is perfectly smooth, about 1 minute. Add the eggs and beat on medium speed until incorporated. The batter will be very thin. Pour the batter into the prepared pans, dividing it evenly. Bake the cakes until a cake tester inserted

tartine /

108

in the center comes out clean, about 1 hour and 10 minutes for the large pans and 45 minutes for the small pans. To make the hard sauce, combine the butter, confectioners’ sugar, bourbon or other spirit, and salt in a small mixing bowl and mix with a whisk or wooden spoon until smooth. Serve at room temperature. The sauce will keep in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. When the cakes are ready, let cool in the pans on wire racks for about 20 minutes, and then invert onto the racks, turn right side up, and let cool. Serve the cakes warm or at room temperature with the hard sauce. The cakes will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


A L M O N D - L E M O N T E A CA K E

/

yield 1 large loaf; 8 to 10 servings

/

This tea cake is from Flo Braker, author of The Simple Art of Perfect Baking, among other books, and it is one of the most perfectly textured, moist, and flavorful cakes that I have come across. It is rich with almond paste, which is what keeps it so moist, and it is glazed with a mixture of lemon juice, orange juice, and sugar, which crystallizes to create a perfect citrusy-tart contrast to the rich almond cake and helps to seal in the moisture. KITCHEN NOTES:

The key to making this cake batter smooth

is incorporating the almond paste completely before the

Pastry or cake flour, sifted

3⁄4

cup

3 1⁄4 oz/95 g

eggs are added. The success of the glaze—a pretty crystallized

Baking powder

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

look and a proper set—is dependent on two things: the glaze

Salt

1⁄8

tsp

1⁄2

ml

must be made just before it is brushed on the cake, and the cake must be warm from the oven so that the sugar and juices

Large eggs

5

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

5 ml

Almond paste, at room temperature

3⁄4

7 oz/200 g

Sugar

1 cup

7 oz/200 g

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Lemon zest, grated

1 tsp

5 ml

Orange zest, grated

1 tsp

5 ml

Lemon juice

3 tbsp

1 1⁄2 oz/45 ml

Orange juice

3 tbsp

11⁄2 oz/45 ml

Sugar

3⁄4

5 1⁄4 oz/150 g

can penetrate it properly and form crystals. ••••••

cup

cup

To make the cake, sift together the flour, baking powder, and salt twice. In a small bowl, combine the eggs and vanilla and whisk together just to combine. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the almond paste on low speed until it breaks up. This can take up to a minute, depending on how soft and warm it is. Slowly add the sugar in a steady stream, beating until incorporated. If you add the sugar too quickly, the paste won’t break up as well. continued

109 / cakes

Citrus Glaze

Position a rack in the lower third of the oven and preheat the oven to 350°F. Lightly butter and flour an 8 1⁄2-inch tube pan or a 9-by-5-inch loaf pan, knocking out the excess flour.


Cut the butter into 1-tablespoon pieces. Continue on low speed while adding the butter, a tablespoon at a time, for about 1 minute. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Then turn on the mixer to medium speed and beat until the mixture is light in color and fluffy, 3 to 4 minutes. With the mixer still on medium speed, add the eggs in a very slow, steady stream and mix until incorporated. Stop the mixer and again scrape down the sides of the bowl. Turn on the mixer again to medium speed and mix for another 30 seconds. Add the citrus zests and mix in with a wooden spoon. Finally, add the flour mixture in 2 batches, stirring after each addition until incorporated. Scrape down the sides of the bowl one last time, and then spoon the batter into the prepared pan and smooth the surface with an offset spatula.

Bake until the top springs back when lightly touched and a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, 45 to 50 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 5 to 7 minutes while you make the glaze. To make the glaze, stir together the lemon and orange juices and the sugar in a small bowl. Place the wire rack holding the cake over a sheet of waxed paper or aluminum foil to catch any drips of glaze, and invert the cake onto the rack. If the cake does not want to release from the pan, run the tip of a small knife around the edge to loosen it. Brush the entire warm cake with the glaze, then let the cake cool completely on the rack. The cake breaks apart easily when warm, so don’t attempt to move it. When the cake is cool, transfer it to a serving plate, using 2 crisscrossed icing spatulas or the base of a two-part tart pan to lift it. Serve at room temperature. The cake will keep, well wrapped, for 1 week in the refrigerator. 111 / cakes


FRUIT DESSERTS M I X E D - B E R R Y S H O R T C A K E S W I T H B E R R Y- C A R A M E L S A U C E TRIFLE OF SUMMER FRUIT

119

APPLE CRISP

C H E R RY A N D A P R I C OT D U M P L I N G

121

120

CLAFOUTIS

123

116


My favorites. If we weren’t expected to have so many “baked” desserts in the traditional bakery sense, I would have more of these fruit desserts on the menu. To me, a perfect dessert is fruit enhanced by a little sugar or lemon juice, baked just until the flesh is soft and hot and the skin is ready to burst, and served with some crunchy accompaniment like a cookie or with a cold, creamy spoonful of pastry cream or barely whipped heavy cream. When pretartine /

114

pared this way, fruit desserts are as close as they can be to the taste of a freshly picked fruit still warm from the sun—hot, ripe, and juicy, and enclosed in a flavor-packed skin that splits when you bite into it.


The skins of fruits are important in these desserts, and too many people make the mistake of peeling them off. Just like the layer of fat on a beef roast, the skin contributes flavor and keeps the fruit moist during baking. If you don’t like to eat the skins, they usually easily slip off after cooking. Another wonderful thing happens when some fruits are baked. The kernel inside the pit of such fruits as cherries and apricots flavors the fruit with a slight almond essence. For example, amaretto liqueur is made from apricot kernels, and jam makers know that adding a few cooked kernels to each jar will give their preserves a faintly almond flavor. You can also leave the pits in the cherries for a clafoutis (always being careful to tell diners to chew with caution) as they do in French bakeries to give the custard a light almond accent, or you can flavor pastry cream or pots de crème with the kernels. Just remember to toast them first for about 7 minutes in a 350°F oven to eliminate their toxicity. Finally, adhere to the advice in the old saying, “If it grows together, it goes together.” If fruits are grown in the same season, they nearly always work in combination. Rhubarb and strawberries are good partners in the spring, all of summertime’s berries marry well, quince and grapes (especially Concords) are natural together in the fall, and in wintertime every tropical fruit I can think of goes well with every other tropical fruit.

115 / fruit desserts


M I X E D - B E R RY S H O R TCA K E S W I T H B E R R Y- C A R A M E L S A U C E

/

yield 6 shortcakes

/

These shortcakes are flaky and light, if made right, and when I think about them, I always wonder why we don’t make them more often. They are biscuits, basically, and benefit from the same care and light touch in mixing and rolling that other biscuits do. The result is a classic cream biscuit, slightly sweetened and with buttery layers. What I love about a “plated” dessert, rather than a fully composed dessert like a cake or tart, is that you can Biscuits

have a variety of temperatures and textures on one plate: 2 1⁄2 cups + 2 tbsp

12 1⁄2 oz/355 g

here, we have the cool cream, the warm berry sauce, the

Baking powder

1 tbsp

15 ml

soft, cool berries, and a soft biscuit with a crunchy sugar

Sugar

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/55 g

top to soak up all the juices. Extend the shortcake season

Salt

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

and make them with peaches or nectarines, with a sauce

All-purpose flour

of raspberries or blackberries.

Unsalted butter, very cold

7 tbsp

3 1⁄2

Heavy cream, very cold

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

oz /100 g

KITCHEN NOTES:

This dough comes together so quickly by

hand, and is superior if made by hand, that I don’t recommend using an electric mixer. The biscuits should be eaten

Heavy cream for brushing tops

about 1⁄4 cup

2 oz/60 ml

the day they are baked. If you are eating them the following

Sugar for topping

about 2 tbsp

30 ml

day, cover them with aluminum foil and warm in a preheated 325°F oven for 10 minutes before serving.

tartine /

116

Caramel (page 212)

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Assorted berries

2 1⁄2

pints

25 oz/710 g

Heavy cream

1 1⁄2

cups

12 oz/375 ml

Sugar

••••••

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Butter a baking sheet.

To make the biscuits, sift the flour and baking powder together into a mixing bowl. Add the sugar and salt. Cut the butter into 1⁄2-inch cubes and scatter the cubes over the dry ingredients. Using a pastry blender or 2 knives, cut the butter into the dry ingredients. You want to end up with a coarse mixture with peasized lumps of butter visible. 2 tbsp

30 ml

Make a well in the center of the flour mixture and pour in the cream. Gently mix the dough together with a wooden spoon or your hands, but don’t overmix. It should look a bit shaggy at this point. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface and pat into a smooth ball. Dust the top with flour and roll out gently about 1 inch thick. Using a 4-inch round cookie cutter, cut out as many circles as possible. Gather up the scraps, reroll them, and cut out additional circles. If any scraps remain, pat them together into a 4-inch circle. You should have 6 circles in all.


Place the circles on the prepared sheet pan. Brush the tops with the cream and sprinkle with the sugar. Bake the biscuits until the tops are golden, 10 to 12 minutes. To test for doneness, gently split a biscuit on the side to see if the dough has cooked all the way through. Let cool for 15 minutes on a wire rack if you want to serve them warm; otherwise, let them cool completely. While the biscuits are baking and cooling, make the berry-caramel sauce and whip the cream. Pour the caramel into a small, heavy saucepan and add 1â „2 cup (2 1â „2 ounces/70 g) of the berries. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the berries have exuded their juices and the caramel has reduced a bit, about 10 minutes. Remove the sauce from the heat and let stand until warm. (The sauce can be made up to a week in advance and stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Reheat until warm before serving.)

In a mixing bowl, whip the cream with a whisk until thickened. Add the sugar and whip until the cream holds soft peaks. To assemble the shortcakes, split the biscuits horizontally and put the bases, cut side up, on individual plates. Divide the remaining berries evenly among the bases, spooning them on top. Top the berries evenly with the warm sauce and about 2 tablespoons of the whipped cream. Put the tops on, cut side down, and serve the remaining cream alongside. Serve immediately.

117 / fruit desserts


TRIFLE OF SUMMER FRUIT

/

yield 8 to 10 servings

/

I don’t know why this dessert isn’t more popular on restaurant menus and in homes. Every time we make it at the bakery it sells out instantly. When made in a clear glass trifle bowl, it is a beautiful dessert showpiece of layers of sliced fruit, whipped cream, pastry cream, and cake moistened with a garnet red fruit purée. Traditionally, trifle is no more than leftover cake and jam with whipped cream and custard. Here, you can use whatever summer fruit you like, from berries to peaches to nectarines. Choose a spirit for the purée that complements the fruit you are using. This dessert is sumptuous and refreshing. KITCHEN NOTES:

Use fruits that are so ripe that they couldn’t

wait another day before they are eaten. If you don’t have a

Fruit Purée

Berries or sliced fruit

2 2⁄3 cups

13 1⁄2 oz/380 g

Sugar

1⁄2

3 1⁄2 oz/100 g

cup

Chambord, Grand Marnier, sweet sherry, white wine, or kirsch (optional)

trifle bowl (a straight-sided round bowl, usually on a pedestal), substitute any clear glass bowl. Or, if you are not concerned about presentation, use any type of bowl. ••••••

1 2⁄3 cups

13 1⁄2 oz/400 ml

Sugar

3 tbsp

45 ml

Génoise (page 198) or any type of chiffon cake (pages 201–206)

1

Berries or sliced fruit

4 cups

20 oz/570 g

Pastry Cream (page 207), cold

2 1⁄2 cups

20 oz/625 ml

Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or a whisk, whip the cream until thickened. Add the sugar and whip until the cream holds soft peaks. Set aside.

Split the cake horizontally into 3 layers each 1⁄4 inch to 1⁄3 inch thick. Cut a cake layer to fit into the bottom of a trifle bowl about 8 inches in diameter and 8 inches deep (or 10 inches in diameter and 5 inches deep). Fill in any gaps with trimmings. Pour 2⁄3 cup (51⁄2 fluid ounces/150 ml) of the fruit purée over the cake. This will appear at first to be an excessive amount, but it will soak into the cake. Top the purée with one-third of the fruit. If using more than one type of fruit, you can mix them or you can use a different fruit for each layer. If you are using sliced fruit, place some of the slices with their cut sides facing outward against the sides of the bowl, so that the slices are visible in cross section. Spoon half of the pastry cream over the fruit. Spoon half of the whipped cream on top, filling in any gaps in the pastry cream. Top with a second cake layer, again trimming as needed. Pour on 1 cup (8 fluid ounces/250 ml) of the fruit purée, top with half of the remaining fruit, all of the remaining pastry cream, and all of the remaining whipped cream. Place your last cake layer on top and gently press down on it. Finish with the rest of the fruit purée and top with the last of the fruit. Chill the trifle well before serving. It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 day.

119 / fruit desserts

Heavy cream, very cold

To make the fruit purée, combine the fruit and sugar in a blender and mix on high speed until very smooth. It is not necessary to strain the purée unless you have used berries with seeds and prefer a purée without seeds. Transfer to a bowl, stir in the spirit to taste (if using), and set aside. You should have about 3 cups (24 fluid ounces/750 ml).


APPLE CRISP

/

yield one 9-by-13-inch crisp; 8 to 10 servings

/

When making anything with apples, I like to use a variety to ensure a balance in texture and flavor, sweetness and tartness. Ideally, I choose three or four varieties and leave some of the skin on each of them if it hasn’t gotten tough from the apples being in storage. Taste them and decide. You want some of the apples to turn to applesauce and some to keep their shape for this crisp. Among the common firmer apples are Granny Smith, Greening, Gravenstein, and Winesap. Sweeter apples are Golden Delicious, Empire, Gala, and Fuji. The McIntosh on the East Coast and the Pink Lady on the West Coast have a good sweet-tart balance and bake up softer. KITCHEN NOTES:

Assorted apples

3 pounds

1.3 kg

Sugar

1⁄4

1 3⁄4 oz/50 g

Lemon juice

3 tbsp

Lemon zest, grated

from 1 lemon

Salt

1⁄8

cup

tsp

45 ml

In the fall, we process so many apples at

the bakery that we have discovered the fastest way to core and cut a peeled apple: Cut the apple through the stem end, cutting slightly off center so that you just miss the core. Place it on its flat side and cut along either side of the core. Then flip and cut the rest of the apple from the

1⁄2

ml

core. Once you’ve cut all your apples this way, line them up, flat side down, and slice. There are also combination corers-cutters available that work well.

Topping

tartine /

120

Unsalted butter, cold

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Sugar

1 cup

7 oz/200 g

All-purpose flour

11⁄4 cups

6 oz/170 g

Ground cinnamon

1 tbsp

15 ml

Salt

1⁄8

1⁄2

tsp

ml

••••••

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter the bottom and sides of a 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Peel (some or all, as you prefer), core, and slice the apples, and place in a large mixing bowl. In a small bowl, stir together the sugar, lemon juice and zest, and salt. Add to the apples and toss together well with your hands. Transfer the apples to the prepared baking dish, and shake the dish to settle the apples into any crevices.

To make the topping, place the butter and sugar in a mixing bowl. Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment on medium speed or a wooden spoon, beat together until smooth. Add the flour, cinnamon, and salt and mix just until the mixture comes together in a smooth dough. To top the crisp, scoop up palm-sized balls of the dough, flatten each scoop as if you are making a tortilla, and lay it on top of the apples. Cover the entire surface of the apples with the dough rounds. Gaps in the topping are okay; they will allow steam to escape during baking.

1⁄4 -inch-thick

Bake the crisp until the apples are tender and the topping is golden brown, about 1 1⁄2 hours. If the top is getting too dark before the crisp is done, cover it with aluminum foil. Let cool on a wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature. The crisp will keep well in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


C H E R RY A N D A P R I C OT D U M P L I N G

/

yield one 9-by-13-inch dumpling; 8 to 10 servings

/

This recipe would be more accurately titled a dumpling-cobbler because it came about from making a topping that was just thin enough to slip between the pieces of fruit and cook in the juices, steaming to a perfect soft dumpling finish. Some of the batter stays on top of the fruit, too, where it is dusted with sugar and bakes up into a wonderful crunchy foil to the tender filling. KITCHEN NOTES:

It can be difficult to tell when the filling has finished cooking since dumplings by

nature are moist when baked. Push a bit of batter away from the very center with a knife to see if there is any unbaked batter. •••••• Filling

Cherries, pitted

61⁄2

cups

42 oz/1.2 kg

Apricots, pitted and sliced

91⁄2 cups

56 oz/1.6 kg

Sugar

1⁄2

41⁄2 oz/130 g

cup + 2 tbsp

Dumpling Topping

Large eggs

3

Unsalted butter, melted

3 tbsp

45 ml

Crème fraîche or sour cream

5 tbsp

21⁄2 oz/75 ml

Vanilla extract

3⁄4

4 ml

All-purpose flour

1 3⁄4 cups

8 3⁄4 oz/250 g

Sugar

6 tbsp

2 2⁄3 oz/75 g

Baking powder

1 1⁄2 tsp

7 ml

Salt

1⁄4

1 ml

Sugar for topping

3 tbsp

Vanilla ice cream or lightly sweetened softly whipped cream for serving

cup

tsp

tsp

4 oz/125 ml

45 ml

To make the filling, in a large mixing bowl, combine the cherries, apricots, and sugar and mix well with your hands or a wooden spoon. Transfer the fruit to the prepared baking dish, evening out the top. To make the dumpling topping, in a mixing bowl, combine the eggs, milk, butter, crème fraîche or sour cream, and vanilla and whisk until well blended. In a second mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt and whisk together to mix well. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture and whisk just until combined. Spoon the batter over the fruit in an even layer. Some will sink in between the fruit and some will remain on top. Sprinkle the top with the sugar. Place the cobbler on a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil to catch any of the fruit, which may bubble over. Bake for about 1 hour. To test for doneness, push some of the topping aside so that you can see if the crumb structure under the top crust has baked through. Serve hot, warm, or at room temperature with ice cream or whipped cream.

121 / fruit desserts

Whole milk

1⁄2

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking dish.


CLAFOUTIS

/

yield one 10-inch custard; 8 to 10 servings

/

A clafoutis is a French baked custard, traditionally made with unpitted cherries. The pits give the custard a faintly almond flavor, which is called noyau. A satisfying and homey dessert, it appears in nearly every kind of bakery in France, although not usually as light in texture or cherry filled as you would like. It has just a little bit of flour in it to make it sliceable, and sometimes a little kirsch, and it’s a great way to use spring cherries if you don’t feel like Whole milk

2 cups

16 oz/500 ml

Sugar

3⁄4

5 1⁄4 oz/150 g

Vanilla bean

1⁄2

Salt

pinch

cup

pitting as many as you would need for a whole pie. At Tartine we also make it with apricots, which come on the heels of cherry season, and then later in the season we use sliced peaches and nectarines. In the winter, prunes are traditional and it is called far breton (see variation). Occasionally you will see clafoutis in a tart shell, but here it is just the custard.

Large whole eggs

3

All-purpose flour

1⁄3

Cherries, pitted

2 cups

12 oz/340 g

balanced with acidity and sweetness, such as raspberries,

Sugar for topping

1⁄4

1 3⁄4 oz/50 g

apricots, or peaches. Sautéed apples or pears are delicious

cup + 1 tbsp

cup

1 2⁄3

oz/50 g

KITCHEN NOTES:

You may use any fruit that is well

fall variations. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Butter a 10-inch ceramic quiche mold or pie dish.

Remove the saucepan from the heat. Slowly ladle the hot milk mixture into the egg mixture while whisking constantly. Pour the mixture into the prepared mold and add the fruit, making sure that the fruit is evenly distributed. Bake until just set in the center and slightly puffed and browned around the outside, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove the custard from the oven and turn up the oven temperature to 500°F. Evenly sprinkle the sugar over the top of the clafoutis. Return the custard to the oven for 5 to 10 minutes to caramelize the sugar. Watch carefully, as it will darken quickly. Let the custard cool on a wire rack for at least 15 minutes before slicing. Serve warm or at room temperature. Far Breton Variation: Omit the cherries. Soak 2 cups (11 ounces/300 g) pitted prunes in equal parts

water and brandy for about 1 hour; the timing will depend on how dry the prunes are. Drain off any remaining liquid before adding the prunes to the custard.

123 / fruit desserts

In a small saucepan, combine the milk, sugar, vanilla bean, and salt. Place over medium heat and heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar, to just under a boil. While the milk mixture is heating, break 1 egg into a heatproof mixing bowl, add the flour, and whisk until the mixture is free of any lumps. Add the remaining 2 eggs and whisk until smooth.


COOKIES SHORTBREAD

129

C H O C O L AT E - O AT M E A L - W A L N U T C O O K I E S

O R A N G E - O AT M E A L - C U R R A N T C O O K I E S ALMOND ROCHERS

135

132

130

WA L N U T C I N N A M O N S L I C E S

SOFT GLAZED GINGERBREAD

136

133

HAZELNUT BISCOT TI

D E L U X E D O U B L E - C H O C O L AT E C O O K I E S

141

139


Cookies are nearly always place specific, whether it is the country where they originated or the family home where they were a tradition, with the cookies of childhood memories perhaps the most difficult to re-create. We have probably spent more time at the bakery testing and retesting cookies than any other type of dessert. And if all the bakers were polled, each would have a favorite cookie different than the favorite cookie of every other tartine /

126

baker. The cookies that I have included here represent all our top choices. I personally like a small cookie, and one that has a lot of character. Our chocolate chip cookies are tiny (although we do make a large version, our only


big cookie), crisp, and so thin that they verge on being tuiles. They are full of chocolate chunks, cut off a block, along with walnuts and oats, and each is a child-sized sophisticated bite, a description that applies to all our cookies. We also make oatmeal cookies with orange zest and currants that are slightly soft and are fantastic sandwiched with some ice cream, the slight give in the cookies making them the perfect foil for a frozen dessert. Our meringue-based almond rochers are our most versatile cookies. They can be fully baked for a crisp cookie or they can be baked a little less, so that the exterior is crisp and the interior is slightly soft. Additions to the batter are simple, as long as you remember that it is based on whipped egg whites and cannot hold anything too oily or wet, such as melted chocolate or a fruit or nut purÊe. If you can find cocoa nibs, bits of unsweetened chocolate in its purest form, they are a nice crunchy addition. If you can’t find nibs, try some unsweetened chocolate in small chunks. The little nuggets are a striking contrast with the very sweet meringue. The biscotti on page 139 are from Chez Panisse. I consider it a perfect biscotti recipe, yielding cookies that are buttery and crunchy without being too hard. They are lightly flavored with aniseeds and orange zest (our addition), a combination that complements the toasted hazelnuts.

127 / cookies


SHORTBREAD

/

yield one 6-by-10-inch pan, about sixty 2-by- 1⁄2 -inch bars

/

Finely textured and very tender, this is the perfect version of the Scottish cookie. Many recipes include some kind of starch that contributes, along with butter, to the “shortness” of the dough, which is where these cookies get their melt-in-the-mouth texture. Potato starch, cornstarch, and rice flour are among the possibilities. Rice flour gives a bit more crunch, while cornstarch is the softest of all, making a particularly short and flaky cookie. KITCHEN NOTES:

If my butter hasn’t softened in time, I put

the cold butter into a saucepan and melt a portion of it.

Unsalted butter, very soft

1 cup + 2 tbsp

9 oz/255 g

Then I mix the rest of the butter into the melted butter

Salt

1⁄2

2 ml

to get the very soft consistency I need. Just make sure that

All-purpose flour

1 3⁄4 cups + 2 tbsp

9 oz/255 g

Cornstarch

1⁄2

cup + 2 tbsp

2 2⁄3 oz/75 g

Granulated sugar

1⁄3

cup

2 1⁄2

Superfine or granulated sugar for topping

1⁄4

tsp

oz/70 g

you don’t let too much of the butter melt. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter a 6-by-10-inch glass baking dish.

Place the butter in a mixing bowl. The butter must be very soft—the consistency of mayonnaise or whipped cream. Add the salt to the butter and mix well with a wooden spoon or whisk so that it dissolves completely before you add the rest of the ingredients. Sift the flour and cornstarch together into a bowl. Add the granulated sugar to the butter and mix just until combined. Add the flour mixture and mix just until a smooth dough forms. cup

2 oz/55 g

Sprinkle the shortbread with the superfine or granulated sugar. Tilt the dish so that the sugar fully and evenly coats the surface and then tip out the excess sugar. With a very thin, sharp knife, cut the shortbread into rectangular fingers about 1⁄2 inch wide and 2 inches long. If the cookies have become cold they will not slice well, so they must still be warm to the touch at this point. Chill thoroughly before removing from the baking dish. The first cookie is difficult to remove, but the rest should come out easily with the aid of a small, thin offset spatula. The cookies will keep in an airtight container in a cool place for up to 2 weeks.

/ cookies

Pat the dough evenly into the prepared baking dish. The dough should be no more than 2⁄3 inch deep. Bake until the top and bottom are lightly browned, about 30 minutes. The middle of the shortbread should remain light. Let cool on a wire rack until warm to the touch.

129


C H O C O L AT E - OAT M E A L -WA L N U T C O O K I E S

/

yield twenty-four 3-inch cookies

/

This version of chocolate chip cookies is like most of the cookies we make at the bakery: familiar flavors, but in a slightly different size or shape than you usually find, or with an additional ingredient that sets them apart from the average. I like delicate, petit four–sized cookies best (see variation; we also make this cookie in a five-inch version, but it is still very thin and delicate). These are to my mind a perfect little cookie, with chunks of chocolate and nuts and some oats for texture. KITCHEN NOTES:

Bittersweet chocolate

12 oz

340 g

cookies. The moisture keeps the dough from sticking to

All-purpose flour

2 cups

10 oz/285 g

your fingers as you flatten the cookies.

Baking powder

1 tsp

5 ml

Baking soda

1 tsp

5 ml

Old-fashioned rolled oats

2 cups

6 oz/170 g

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Sugar

1 3⁄4 cups

12 1⁄4 oz/350 g

tartine /

••••••

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Coarsely chop the chocolate into 1⁄4- to 1⁄2 -inch pieces. A serrated knife works well for this task. Chill in the freezer until needed.

In a mixing bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder, baking soda, and oats. Set aside. Using a stand mixer Large eggs 2 fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium-high speed until light and creamy. Slowly add the Whole milk 2 tbsp 30 ml sugar and mix on medium speed until light in color and Vanilla extract 1 tbsp 15 ml fluffy. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the Salt 1 tsp 5 ml bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Add the molasses Walnuts, coarsely and beat until well combined. Add the eggs one at a time, chopped 1 cup 4 oz/115 g beating well after each addition before adding the next egg. Beat in the milk, vanilla, and salt and then stop the mixer again and scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the flour mixture and beat on low speed until well incorporated. Stop the mixer, scrape down the sides of the bowl, and fold in the chocolate chunks and the walnuts with the spatula. Blackstrap or other dark molasses

130

You need to have a small bowl of water

nearby for dipping your fingers when you are shaping the

4 tsp

20 ml


Have ready a small bowl of water. Scoop the dough onto the prepared baking sheet. An ice-cream scoop works well (about 3 1⁄2 ounces/100 g for each scoop). Dip your fingers into the water and press out each scoop into a thin, flat 3-inch circle. Bake until the edges of the cookies are lightly browned but the centers remain pale, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack and let cool. They will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks.

Variation: To make smaller cookies, shape the dough

into a log about 1 1⁄2 inches in diameter. Wrap the log in parchment paper, waxed paper, or plastic wrap and place in the freezer for at least 4 hours or up to overnight. Remove from the freezer, unwrap, slice into 1⁄4-inch-thick rounds, and arrange on the lined baking sheet. Bake as directed, reducing the baking time to 6 to 10 minutes. You can also make the 3-inch cookies this same way, shaping the log 3 inches in diameter, slicing it into rounds 1⁄4 inch thick, and then baking as directed for 10 to 12 minutes.

131 / cookies


O R A N G E - OAT M E A L - C U R R A N T C O O K I E S

/

yield eighty 2-inch cookies

/

Some of the simplest recipes are the ones we’ve wrestled with the longest, like these oatmeal cookies. I love a soft oatmeal cookie, with a small amount of spice and a little brown sugar flavor. I also love the flavor of orange, which goes so well with the other flavors in this cookie. You can bake these thin, delicate cookies a little bit longer if you prefer a crisp cookie. And as mentioned in the chapter introduction, these cookies are great for making ice-cream sandwiches. KITCHEN NOTES:

tartine /

132

Zante currants

11⁄2 cups

7 oz/200 g

All-purpose flour

2 cups

10 oz/285 g

Baking soda

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Nutmeg, freshly grated

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Sugar

11⁄4

8 3⁄4 oz/250 g

Large whole egg

1

Large egg yolk

1

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

5 ml

Light corn syrup

2 tbsp

30 ml

Blackstrap or other dark molasses

1 tbsp

15 ml

Salt

1⁄2

21⁄2 ml

Orange zest, grated

4 tsp

20 ml

Old-fashioned rolled oats

11⁄2 cups

51⁄2 oz/155 g

Because of the use of corn syrup and

molasses in the dough, the dough logs need to chill well before slicing (the liquid sweetener makes the dough softer than granulated sugar would). ••••••

cups

tsp

In a small bowl, combine the currants and warm water to cover and set aside for about 10 minutes until the currants are plumped. Drain well and set aside. Sift together the flour, baking soda, and nutmeg into a mixing bowl and set aside. Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium-high speed until light and creamy. Slowly add the sugar and mix on medium speed until light in color and fluffy. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Add the whole egg, egg yolk, vanilla, corn syrup, molasses, salt, and orange zest and beat until well mixed. Stir in the flour mixture, currants, and oats until incorporated.

Divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Working on a large sheet of parchment paper, shape each portion into a log about 14 inches long and 2 inches in diameter. Gently press each log to give it an oval shape. Wrap tightly in parchment paper or plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator or freezer overnight. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Unwrap the logs. Using a sharp knife, slice the logs into ovals about 1⁄4 inch thick. Arrange the ovals on the prepared baking sheets. Bake until the edges of the cookies are lightly browned but the centers remain pale, 7 to 10 minutes. You may bake both pans at the same time, but rotate them 180 degrees at the midway point if they are not baking evenly. Transfer the cookies to wire racks to cool. The cookies will be soft when they cool. They will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks.


WA L N U T C I N N A M O N S L I C E S

/

yield 36 cookies

/

The cinnamon is faint in these delicate, light, crisp butter wafers. They have a perfect texture, with a crunchy border of sugar around the edge. You can vary the shape from the traditional round. We make them as thin rectangles; ovals would be good, too. These cookies also would be delicious sandwiched with ganache (page 93). KITCHEN NOTES:

All-purpose flour

1 3⁄4 cups + 2 tbsp

9 oz/255 g

works well with this dough. Pine nuts and sliced almonds are especially good (whole almonds are difficult to stir through).

Ground cinnamon

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Baking soda

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Unsalted butter, at cool room temperature Sugar

I have used walnuts here, but almost any nut

11 tbsp

5 1⁄2

oz/150 g

2⁄3

cup

4 1⁄2

oz/130 g

Large egg

1

Salt

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Walnuts, coarsely chopped

3⁄4

cup

3 oz/85 g

Sugar Coating

2

Heavy cream

2 tbsp

30 ml

Sugar

1 cup

7 oz/200 g

Sift together the flour, cinnamon, and baking soda into a mixing bowl. Set aside. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat together the butter and sugar on medium speed just until blended and creamy without adding a lot of air. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and salt until blended. Slowly pour the egg mixture into the butter mixture, still beating on medium speed until well mixed. Add the flour mixture and beat on low speed just until a dough forms. Mix in the walnuts. Turn the dough out onto a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, waxed paper, or plastic wrap. Form into a rectangle about 1 inch thick. Wrap tightly and refrigerate until firm, about 4 hours. If you want to make round cookies, shape the dough into a log of the desired diameter, wrap in parchment paper or plastic wrap, and chill until firm.

Preheat oven to 325°F. Butter a baking sheet or line with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Unwrap the rectangle and, using a sharp knife, slice lengthwise into 2-inch-wide rectangular logs. To make the sugar coating, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks and cream to make an egg wash. Spread the sugar on a baking sheet. Brush the rectangular logs well but sparingly with the egg wash. One at a time, dredge the logs in the sugar, coating evenly on all sides. Cut crosswise 1⁄8 to 1⁄4 inch thick, creating rectangles measuring 2 inches by 1 inch, and arrange the rectangles on the prepared baking sheet. If you have made a round log, brush it with the egg wash, coat it evenly with the sugar, cut crosswise 1⁄8 to 1⁄4 inch thick, and arrange the rounds on the baking sheet. Bake the cookies until the edges are golden but the centers remain pale, about 7 minutes. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack and let cool. The cookies will keep in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks in the refrigerator or 1 week at room temperature.

133 / cookies

Large egg yolks

••••••


ALMOND ROCHERS

/

yield 30 small cookies

/

These cookies (rochers is French for “boulders”), in the shape of a chocolate kiss, are simply meringue that has been mixed with toasted sliced almonds, piped, and then baked. They are easy and quick to make, and are slightly soft in the center and crisp outside when fresh from the oven. After a couple of days, they are dry throughout and still delicious. You can use these cookies to make a very quick filling Sliced almonds

1 cup + 2 tbsp

Large egg whites, at room temperature

2

Confectioners’ sugar

1 cup

Salt

pinch

Vanilla extract

1⁄2

4 oz/115 g

for a fruit-topped tart: Crush 4 cookies and mix them with 2 cups (16 fluid ounces/500 ml) Pastry Cream (page 207) or with 1 1⁄2 cups (12 fluid ounces/375 ml) heavy cream whipped to

tsp

4 oz/115 g

2 ml

medium peaks. Fill a fully baked and cooled Sweet Tart Dough (page 196) shell, top with fresh fruit, and chill before serving. KITCHEN NOTES:

Egg whites will break down in the presence

of egg yolk or anything oily, so you must make sure that you clean the bowl and beater thoroughly before starting. Rinsing with hot water with a little lemon juice or vinegar works well. If you prefer completely dry, crisp meringues, bake at 200°F for about 45 minutes with the door ajar. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner.

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the egg whites, confectioners’ sugar, and salt in the stainless-steel bowl of a stand mixer that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Whisk together and then place over the saucepan and continue to whisk until the whites are hot to the touch (120°F), about 5 minutes or so. Remove the bowl from over the water and place on the mixer stand. Fit the mixer with the whisk attachment and mix on high speed until the mixture is very thick and holds glossy, stiff peaks when you lift the beater. Fold in the almonds and vanilla with a rubber spatula. Immediately scoop the meringue into a pastry bag fitted with a 1⁄2-inch (no. 6 or 7) plain tip and pipe onto the prepared baking sheet, forming “kisses” about 1 inch in diameter and spacing them about 1 1⁄2 inches apart. Or, you can drop the meringue by tablespoonfuls onto the baking sheet. Place the baking sheet in the oven and keep the oven door ajar with the handle of a wooden spoon to allow moisture to escape. Bake the cookies until they puff slightly, crack along the sides, and feel dry on the outside but soft to the touch, 15 to 20 minutes. They will harden as they cool. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack and let cool. They will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 2 weeks.

135 / cookies

Spread the almonds on an unlined baking sheet. Place in the oven and toast until golden brown, 7 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely. Break up the almonds with your hands into 1⁄4-inch pieces (or use a rolling pin). If piping, keep in mind that any large bits of almond will clog the pastry tip.


SOFT GLAZED GINGERBREAD

/

yield 12 to 20 cookies, depending on size of cutters

/

Several years ago during the holidays, I experimented with different thicknesses of gingerbread dough and patterned rolling pins and cookie molds. I found that the dough I was using made a perfect soft cookie with some adjustments to the butter and sugar, and the addition of a little extra molasses and corn syrup. The dough also kept the impression from an antique pin I had, and when it was glazed and cut into rectangles, the resulting cookies looked like tiles, with the glaze settling into the grooves and turning white from the crystallization of the sugar. Originally, I used what is called a thread glaze, meaning that sugar and water are cooked together to the Dough

tartine /

136

thread stage, cooled slightly, and then brushed on. The

All-purpose flour

3 3⁄4 cups

18 1⁄2 oz/525 g

brushing action made the sugar crystallize and set. A

Cocoa powder

1 tbsp

15 ml

simple water icing, confectioners’ sugar and water mixed

Ground ginger

4 tsp

20 ml

together to a thin brushing consistency, is easier and works

Ground cloves

11⁄2 tsp

7 ml

just as well. The glaze seals in the moisture in the cookie

Ground cinnamon

2 tsp

10 ml

Baking soda

1⁄2

2 ml

KITCHEN NOTES:

Salt

1 tsp

5 ml

bining it with the water to ensure a smooth glaze. If you

Black pepper, freshly ground

1 1⁄4 tsp

6 ml

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

evenly distributed, it will disappear from the surface dur-

Granulated sugar

3⁄4

6 oz/170 g

ing baking. The patterned pin and cookie plaques are often

Large egg

1

Blackstrap or other dark molasses

1⁄2

Light corn syrup

2 tbsp

tsp

and gives it a perfect amount of extra sweetness. Sift the confectioners’ sugar before com-

are using a pin or cookie forms with a carved design, make sure to flour the top of the dough so that it doesn’t stick in the crevices of the design. As long as the flour is lightly and cup + 2 tbsp

sold as springerle molds or pins, after the Scandinavian cookie traditionally made with them. cup

5 1⁄2 oz/155 g 30 ml

Glaze

Confectioners’ sugar

1 cup

4 oz/115 g

Water

2 tbsp

30 ml

••••••

To make the dough, stir together the flour, cocoa powder, ginger, cloves, cinnamon, baking soda, salt, and pepper in a mixing bowl. Set aside. Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on mediumhigh speed until creamy. Slowly add the granulated sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is completely smooth and soft. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Add the egg and mix well. continued


Add the molasses and corn syrup and beat until incorporated. Stop the mixer again and scrape down the sides of the bowl. Add the flour mixture and beat on low speed until a dough forms that pulls away from the sides of the bowl and all the ingredients are well incorporated. Remove the dough from the bowl, flatten it on a large piece of plastic wrap into a rectangle about 1 inch thick, cover the dough with the plastic wrap, and refrigerate overnight. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner.

tartine /

138

Unwrap the dough and place on a floured work surface. If using a plaque with a design, roll out the dough 1⁄3 inch thick, lightly dust the top with flour, press your cookie molds over the dough, and then cut out the shapes with a small knife and place on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Alternatively, using the mold as a guide, cut around it with a small knife, flip the mold over so the design is facing you, and place the dough over it, pressing it into the design. Unmold the shapes onto the prepared baking sheet, leaving about 1 inch between them. If using a patterned rolling pin, lightly dust the lined baking sheet with flour and transfer the dough to the pan. Lightly dust the top of the dough with flour and roll it into a rectangle about 1⁄3 inch thick with a plain pin. Then, using the patterned pin, roll over the dough with enough pressure to ensure a clear impression of the design. Trim the sides with a small knife. It is not necessary to cut into smaller sizes before baking.

Bake the cookies until lightly golden along the sides but still soft to the touch in the centers, 7 to 15 minutes. The timing will depend on the size of the individual cookies, or if you have made a single large patterned piece that will be cut after baking. While the cookies are baking, prepare the glaze. In a small bowl, whisk together the confectioners’ sugar and water until smooth. When the cookies are ready, remove from the oven and let cool on the pan on a wire rack for about 10 minutes. Then, while the cookies are still warm, using even strokes, brush a light coat of glaze on the top of each cookie, evenly covering it. Let the cookies cool completely. When the glaze dries, it should leave a shiny, opaque finish. If you have used a patterned pin to make a single large plaque, cut into the desired sizes with a small, very sharp knife. At the bakery, we cut them into 3-by-4-inch rectangles, but 1 1⁄2 by 4 inches makes a nice smaller size. The cookies will keep in an airtight container in a cool place for about 2 weeks. They do not freeze well, however, as glaze becomes watery when they are thawed. Icing Variation: If you want to make the traditional thread glaze for finishing the cookies, heat 1 1⁄2 cups (10 1⁄2 ounces/300 g) sugar and 1 cup (8 fluid ounces/ 230 ml) water over low heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Then increase the heat to medium and cook without stirring until the mixture registers 225° to 230°F on a candy thermometer. Remove from the heat and let the syrup cool to 180°F. Brush the syrup over the cooled cookies with a clean, dry natural-bristle pastry brush, brushing quickly back and forth to encourage sugar crystals to form. Once the crystallization begins, the glaze will continue to turn opaque over the next hour or so. Store as directed above.


H A Z E L N U T B I S C OT T I

/

yield 4 1⁄2 dozen cookies, 2 1⁄2 inches long

/

This recipe generously comes from Chez Panisse, where it was originally made with almonds and grappa (the original version follows). It is one of the few recipes that I have not been compelled to change or make our own except for a slight flavor variation. The basic dough works well with many types of nuts, though my favorite choice is the incredible hazelnuts we get from Oregon. If you dip one of these biscotti into a glass of red wine, the cookie tastes exactly like zabaglione. Of course, the more traditional drink would be grappa or vin santo. KITCHEN NOTES:

Hazelnuts

1⁄2

cup

21⁄2 oz/70 g

Unsalted butter, very soft

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/115 g

Sugar

3⁄4

cup

51⁄4 oz/150 g

Large eggs

2

Aniseeds

1 tsp (5 ml)

You can increase the amount of nuts up

to double what is called for in the recipe. Tangerine zest can be substituted for the orange zest (though only a small amount is used, it tastes surprisingly of tangerine). Since the cookies bake twice, the nuts need to be only very lightly toasted before they go into the dough. ••••••

4 tsp

20 ml

Orange zest, grated

2 tsp

10 ml

All-purpose flour

2 cups + 2 tbsp

11 oz/310 g

Baking powder

11⁄2

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

tsp

7 ml 1 ml

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spread the hazelnuts on a baking sheet. Place in the oven and toast lightly just until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Remove from the oven, place in the center of a kitchen towel, and rub off the skins while the nuts are still warm. Coarsely chop the nuts and set aside. Reduce the oven temperature to 325°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner.

This recipe is easily mixed by stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment on medium speed or by hand with a spoon. In a mixing bowl, cream the butter until light and creamy, about 2 minutes. Slowly add the sugar and beat until light in color and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the eggs and beat until the mixture is smooth. Beat in the aniseeds, liqueur, and orange zest. Add the flour, baking powder, and salt and mix until just combined. Stir in the chopped nuts.

Large egg for egg wash (optional)

1

continued

139 / cookies

Grand Marnier or other orangeflavored liqueur


On a lightly floured work surface, divide the dough into 2 equal portions. Shape each portion into a log about the length of your prepared baking sheet and about 2 inches in diameter. Set the logs on the baking sheet, spacing them about 2 inches apart. If you want to glaze the biscotti, whisk the egg and brush it evenly over the logs. Bake the logs until they are set to the touch and lightly browned on top, about 25 minutes. Let the rolls cool on a wire rack for 5 minutes, then transfer to a cutting board and cut on the diagonal into slices about 2 1â „2 inches wide and 1â „2 inch thick. Return the slices cut side down to the baking sheet.

tartine /

140

Bake the cookies until the edges are lightly toasted, 5 to 7 minutes longer. Let the cookies cool completely on a wire rack. They will keep in a tightly covered container at room temperature for several weeks. Original Almond Biscotti from Chez Panisse: Omit the orange zest. Substitute almonds for the hazelnuts (there is no need to rub off their skins) and grappa for the liqueur and add 1 teaspoon (5 ml) anise extract with the grappa. Proceed as directed.


D E L U X E D O U B L E - C H O C O L AT E C O O K I E S

/

yield about 36 cookies

/

Made with cocoa powder and bittersweet chocolate, these cookies are both balanced and decadent. The large amount of chocolate may look like a mistake, but the cookies bake up beautifully: pulled from the oven when they are still very soft to the touch, they cool to a perfect soft-firm consistency. For a great holiday cookie, sandwich the cookies with chocolate ganache (page 93). KITCHEN NOTES:

Because these cookies are so rich in choco-

late, it’s important to use your favorite high-quality brand.

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

8 oz

225 g

Scharffen Berger, Valrhona, Guittard, and Callebaut are all

All-purpose flour

1 cup + 1 tbsp

51⁄2 oz/155 g

good choices for this recipe. Some chocolates are labeled

Cocoa powder

1⁄2

1 3⁄4 oz/50 g

with their percentage of cacao mass. Look for packages that

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1⁄2

4 oz/115 g

Sugar

1 cup + 2 tbsp

Large eggs

2

cup + 2 tbsp

indicate at least 60 percent. ••••••

cup

8 oz/225 g

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a baking sheet or line with parchment paper.

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Put the Vanilla extract 1 tsp 5 ml chocolate into a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely 1 Whole milk ⁄3 cup 21⁄2 oz/75 ml in the rim of the pan and place it over, not touching, the water. Make sure that the bowl is completely dry before you add the chocolate and that no moisture gets into the chocolate. Moisture will cause the chocolate to seize, or develop lumps. Heat, stirring occasionally, just until the chocolate melts and is smooth. Remove from the heat and let cool. Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Drop the dough by heaping tablespoonfuls onto the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Bake the cookies until they are just barely firm on top when lightly touched but are still very soft underneath, about 7 minutes. They will get firmer as they cool. Transfer the cookies to a wire rack and let cool. They will keep in an airtight container at room temperature for several days.

/ cookies

Stir together the flour, cocoa powder, and baking powder in a bowl. Set aside. Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium-high speed until creamy. Slowly add the sugar and mix until the mixture is completely smooth and soft. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. Add the eggs one at a time, mixing well after each addition until incorporated before adding the next egg. Beat in the salt and vanilla, and then add the melted chocolate and beat until incorporated. Add the milk and beat until combined. Finally, add the flour mixture and beat on low speed until incorporated.

141


PA S T R I E S & C O N F E C T I O N S ÉCLAIRS C H O C O L AT E F R I A N D S

146 151

LEMON BARS ON BROWN BUT TER SHORTBREAD P E CA N - B O U R B O N P R A L I N E S

C H O C O L AT E T R U F F L E S BROWNIES

160

157

154

C H O C O L AT E A L M O N D T O F F E E

M A P L E - G L A Z E D P E CA N S

PA N F O R T E W I T H C A N D I E D Q U I N C E

149

158 162

PEANUT BRITTLE

159

CA R A M E L A P P L E S

165

155


When I was child, this was the section I turned to in a cookbook whenever I wanted to make something sweet, and it is how my grandmother indulged me whenever I visited her. Like my grandmother’s many special tins of little nut caramel tarts and spritz cookies, pastries and confections are extra special. They are usually the most sophisticated of all the sweet offerings, and they are also usually the most fun to eat, look at, and make. At Tartine, we started tartine /

144

out making many of the items in this chapter, such as the toffee and the glazed pecans, just for the holidays, but now we have a year-round confection-making schedule.


The Panforte (page 162) is the most unusual recipe in the chapter. It is part confection and part small cake, and is really its own thing. Though nowadays it is most often eaten as a sophisticated dessert in thin slices with a glass of Champagne, grappa, or vin santo, it was originally created to nourish travelers on long, arduous journeys. It originated in Siena, where it is still made with the fruits, nuts, and honey native to the region, and its production has spilled into other Italian locales, where bakers have incorporated their own local ingredients. Feel free to use what is found in your area, and the result will be the more delicious and special for it. Not all the recipes in this chapter are so flexible, however. In general, making pastries and confections demands more precision than, say, cookie making does. You must watch the thermometer for the right temperature, and you must wield your pastry bag with skill. If you follow the precise temperatures and directions, you will always have wonderful results.

145 / pastries & confections


ÉCLAIRS

/

yield 12 éclairs

/

For some people, an éclair must have a chocolate filling. I think that there is enough chocolate on top, and the contrast of the light pastry cream filling makes a more compelling and tasty pastry. Finishing éclairs with fondant is also traditional, but I find fondant far too sweet and without flavor, even if it has chocolate in it. At Tartine, we simply dip the éclairs into some chocolate ganache that includes a tiny bit of corn syrup for shine. KITCHEN NOTES: Choux Paste

tartine /

baked. The better your piping, the better your end product.

Nonfat milk

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml

Water

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml

scoop up your mistake, scrape it back into your piping bag,

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

and try again. You can also smooth out any tiny bumps with

Sugar

1 tsp

5 ml

a wet fingertip.

Unsalted butter

1⁄2

4 oz/115 g

All-purpose flour

1 cup

Large eggs

5

cup

5 oz/140 g

Glaze

146

When piping choux paste, every little

bump and mistake is exaggerated when the pastries are

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

4 oz/115 g

Light corn syrup

1 tbsp

15 ml

Heavy cream

1⁄2

4 oz/125 ml

Filling

cup

This is a forgiving dough to work with, however. You can

••••••

Preheat the oven to 425°F. Butter a baking sheet or line with parchment paper. In a heavy saucepan, combine the milk, water, salt, sugar, and butter and place over medium heat until the butter melts and the mixture comes to a full boil. Add the flour all at once, stirring vigorously with a wooden spoon. Keep stirring until the mixture has formed a smooth mass and pulls away from the sides of the pan and some of the moisture has evaporated. This will take about 3 minutes.

Transfer to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or to a heatproof mixing bowl. If using a mixer, 1 1⁄4 cups 10 oz/310 ml add the eggs one at a time and mix on medium-high speed, incorporating each egg before adding the next. When all the eggs have been added, the mixture will be thick, smooth, and shiny. If making by hand, add the eggs one at a time and mix with a wooden spoon, incorporating each egg before adding the next.

Pastry Cream (page 207), cold

Transfer the contents of the bowl to a pastry bag fitted with a 1⁄2-inch (no. 6 or 7) plain tip, adding only as much to the bag as is comfortable to work with. Pipe out fingers about 5 inches long and 1 inch wide, spacing them about 2 inches apart. If you end up with a bulge or a “tail” at the end of the piping, you can smooth it over with a damp fingertip.


Bake until puffed and starting to show some color, about 10 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 375°F and continue to bake until the shells feel light for their size and are hollow inside, about 12 minutes longer. They should be nicely browned all over. Remove from the oven and, using a metal skewer, poke a small hole in the end of each shell to allow steam to escape. This keeps the shells from collapsing. Let cool on wire racks. They should be used as soon as they are cool enough to fill. You can also wrap them airtight and freeze them for up to 3 weeks. When you are ready to fill them, recrisp them directly from the freezer in a 450°F oven for about 10 minutes and then let cool before filling.

You can alternatively fill the shells by splitting them in half with a serrated knife. Dip the top half in the glaze, allowing the excess to drip off, and then place upright on a wire rack and allow the glaze to set. Spoon the pastry cream into the bottoms of the shells and replace the glazed tops. Serve the pastries at once, or refrigerate for up to 6 hours before serving. They should be eaten the same day they are filled.

147 / pastries & confections

To make the glaze, combine the chocolate and corn syrup in a heatproof bowl. Bring the cream to just under a boil in a small saucepan. Pour the cream over the chocolate. Let the mixture sit for about 2 minutes without stirring until the chocolate melts, and then stir gently with a rubber spatula (so as to incorporate as little air as possible) until smooth and shiny. Let cool until just warm.

To fill and glaze the éclairs, stir the pastry cream (it must be very cold) until smooth and then spoon the cream into a pastry bag fitted with a plain tip with a very small opening. It is easiest to start with a hole in each end of the shell and to fill from both ends if necessary. Sometimes pockets inside the shell prevent the pastry cream from filling the entire shell from a single hole. Fill the shells until they feel heavy. To glaze the éclairs, dip the top of each filled éclair into the glaze, shaking gently to allow the excess to drip off, and then place upright on a wire rack and allow the glaze to set.


L E M O N B A R S O N B R OW N B U T T E R S H O R T B R E A D

/

yield one 9-by-13-inch baking pan; twelve 3-by-3 1⁄4 -inch bars

/

Although we love having these bars fill our pastry cases in the fall and winter—they are one of the few bright colors in the sea of chocolate and caramel—a really cold lemon bar in the heat of the summer is very refreshing. I find the bases of most lemon bars to be undercooked and doughy, and the filling usually too scant. Just as we like to bake a lot of our pastries a little darker than many bakeries, we do the same with these bars: we bake the shortbread base until it turns golden brown, producing a deeper butter flavor and crispier crust. We also fill the crust with a little more custard than is typical. You will find that the bases of these bars not only have a nice toothsome bite, but will also stay crisp beyond the day they are made. If you can find a bergamot orange (a sour, aromatic variety), use the zest (the juice doesn’t have the characterisCrust

tic flavor) in place of the lemon zest. You may also want

Confectioners’ sugar

1⁄2

All-purpose flour

cup

2 oz/55g

to try adding pine nuts to the crust. Their earthy flavor is

11⁄2 cups

7 1⁄2 oz/215 g

delicious with lemon, and their light, fatty crunch is a good

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/170 g

Pine nuts (optional)

1⁄2

cup

2 oz/55 g

contrast to the crust. Pine nuts are also one of the few nuts not overwhelmed by the strong flavor of lemon. KITCHEN NOTES:

Whisking eggs with salt helps to denature

(relax) the protein in the eggs and breaks them up more

Filling

Sugar

2 1⁄4 cups

1 pound/455 g

You can also do this if you are making an egg wash, adding

Lemon juice

1 cup + 2 tbsp

9 oz/280 ml

a small pinch of salt for each egg you use.

Lemon zest, grated

from 1 small lemon

Large whole eggs

6

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a 9-by-13-inch baking pan.

Large egg yolk

1

Salt

pinch

To make the crust, sift the confectioners’ sugar into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the flour and stir to mix. Add the butter and pine nuts (if using) and beat on low speed just until a smooth dough forms.

Confectioners’ sugar for topping (optional)

whisk eggs thoroughly and there is also salt in the recipe.

•••••

continued

149 / pastries & confections

1⁄2

cup

2 1⁄2 oz/70 g

quickly and thoroughly. We do this whenever we need to

All-purpose flour


Transfer the dough to the prepared pan and press evenly into the bottom and 1⁄2 inch up the sides of the pan. It should be about 1⁄4 inch thick. To help even out the crust, use the flat bottom of any type of cup, pressing down firmly. Line the crust with parchment paper and fill with pie weights. Bake the crust until it colors evenly to a deep golden brown, 25 to 35 minutes. Rotate the pan 180 degrees if the crust appears to be baking unevenly. While the crust is baking, make the filling: Sift the flour into a mixing bowl. Add the sugar and whisk until blended. Add the lemon juice and zest and stir to dissolve the sugar. In a separate mixing bowl, whisk the whole eggs and egg yolk with the salt. Add the eggs to the lemon juice mixture and whisk until well mixed.

tartine /

150

When the crust is ready, pull out the oven rack holding the crust and pour the filling directly into the hot pan. (It is easiest to pour the custard into the pan if the pan is in the oven.) If the crust has come out of the oven and cooled before you have finished making the filling, put it back in for a few minutes so that it is hot when the custard is poured into it. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F and bake just until the center of the custard is no longer wobbly, 30 to 40 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack, then cover and chill well before cutting. Using a sharp knife, cut into 12 squares, or as desired. If you like, dust the tops of the squares with confectioners’ sugar. They will keep in an airtight container or well covered in the baking dish in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.


yudhacookbook.com C H O C O L AT E F R I A N D S

/

yield 24 mini cakes

/

Friand is French for “small mouthful,” and these friands, like cupcakes, can be made from any cake batter. However, I think that if you are going to eat a bit of cake that is only two mouthfuls at most, it should be satisfyingly extra rich and moist and topped with a shiny chocolate glaze. These little cakes also make a perfect little party cake, as they can be baked in the cups they are served in. KITCHEN NOTES:

You can use a pastry bag or a tiny ice-

cream scoop for filling the paper cups or wells, in place of Batter

the measuring cup. If you can find 1 1⁄2-by- 1⁄2-inch glassine

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped 6 oz

170 g

Unsalted butter

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Sugar

1 1⁄2 cups + 1 tbsp

11 oz/310 g

All-purpose flour

3⁄4

3 3⁄4 oz/105 g

Cornstarch

2 tbsp

30 ml

Salt

1⁄4

1 ml

Large eggs

4

cup

tsp

Ganache

Bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped 4 oz cup

115 g 51⁄2 oz/150 ml

ing candies), you can use them for baking the friands, and they can be served in them as well. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line up 24 mini-muffin-cup paper liners on a baking sheet, or butter and flour 24 mini-muffin-tin wells, knocking out the excess flour. To make the batter, place the chocolate in a large mixing bowl. In a small saucepan, melt the butter over medium heat until very hot. Pour the butter over the chocolate and whisk or stir until smooth. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the sugar, flour, cornstarch, and salt and mix well. Add the flour mixture to the chocolate mixture in 3 batches, whisking well after each addition. Add 2 of the eggs and whisk until combined, and then add the remaining 2 eggs and whisk just until incorporated. Be careful not to overmix the batter.

Transfer the batter to a liquid measuring cup for pouring, and fill the cups three-fourths full. Bake until the cakes just start to crack on top, 12 to 15 minutes. Let cool for 10 minutes on a wire rack, and then unmold them if you have baked them in the muffin tins and let cool completely. If you have baked them in the paper cups, just let them cool in the cups. continued

151 / pastries & confections

Heavy cream

2⁄3

cups (or any similarly sized cups like those used for hold-


To make the ganache, place the chocolate in a small heatproof bowl. Bring the cream to just under a boil in a small saucepan. Pour the cream over the chocolate and let sit for a minute or two. Stir gently with a rubber spatula until the chocolate is melted and smooth. Make sure the friands are cool before dipping them into the ganache. Holding each friand by its sides, dip the top into the ganache and then shake gently to let the excess run off the side. Return the friand to the rack and let the ganache set up in a cool place for about 1 hour. I don’t recommend putting

tartine /

152

the friands in the refrigerator to set up if your kitchen is hot because condensation will form on the tops when you take them out, ruining the smooth look of the ganache. The only way to avoid the condensation is to place them in an airtight container before putting them in the refrigerator and then to leave them in the container when you remove them from the refrigerator until they come to room temperature, or to serve them right away. Serve the friands within a day of making, or store them in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.


P E CA N - B O U R B O N P R A L I N E S

/

yield about 26 pralines

/

These are the classic southern pralines of New Orleans. They are very soft and look just like maple-sugar candies: pale, tan, and a little grainy but creamy. The taste of the bourbon is very pronounced on the first bite, then you discover butter, sugar, salt, and nut. At Tartine, we pour out the entire mass of candy mixture, let it set, break it apart, and sell it in large chunks. But if you work quickly, you can make these in traditional rounds. KITCHEN NOTES:

tartine /

154

Usually you need to be careful not to

stir a pot when you are cooking sugar, or it will crystallize.

Pecan halves

2 cups

10 oz/285 g

Sugar

3 cups

21 oz/600 g

Heavy cream

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

out. When making any candy that involves cooking sugar

Unsalted butter

4 tbsp

2 oz/55 g

at high temperatures, make sure that you have ice water

Salt

1⁄4

1 ml

close by in case you burn yourself.

Blackstrap or other dark molasses

1 tbsp

15 ml

••••••

Bourbon

2 tbsp

30 ml

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Spread the pecans on a baking sheet and toast lightly just until fragrant, about 3 minutes. Let cool completely.

tsp

However, in this case, we want the mixture to do exactly that, so that it will harden into a praline when it is poured

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. In a deep, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, cream, butter, salt, molasses, and bourbon. Place over medium-high heat and cook, stirring with a wooden spoon to break up any lumps or to dislodge any sugar stuck to the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture registers 240°F on a thermometer, 7 to 10 minutes, depending on how vigorously the mixture is boiling. Remove from the heat and let cool to 210°F. Add the pecans to the sugar mixture and stir vigorously. The mixture will begin to thicken, so you must work quickly at this point. Drop the sugar mixture from a spoon onto the prepared baking sheet, forming circles about 3 inches in diameter, and let cool. Or, pour the contents of the saucepan pan onto the prepared baking sheet, let cool, and break into pieces with your hands. The pralines will keep in an airtight container in a cool place for up to 2 weeks.


C H O C O L AT E A L M O N D TO F F E E

/

yield about 1 1⁄2 pounds (680 g)

/

Toffee is no more than caramelized sugar with a little baking soda and butter to give it the flavor and crunch characteristic of the candy. This is an easy, incredibly delicious, and addictive confection to make. As always with recipes that have just a few ingredients, use the best chocolate you can find. The toffee itself is so sweet, I like to use a chocolate that has less sugar in it, such as the Scharffen Berger (70 percent) we use at the bakery. Or, you can substitute 20 percent of your bittersweet chocolate with unsweetened chocolate. KITCHEN NOTES:

Sliced almonds

2 cups

7 oz/200 grams

Sugar

1 3⁄4 cups

121⁄4 oz/350 g

Water

3 tbsp

45 ml

Unsalted butter

1⁄2

4 oz/115 g

Blackstrap or other dark molasses

1 tsp

5 ml

Sea salt

1⁄4

1 ml

cup

tsp

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

5 ml

Baking soda

1⁄4

1 ml

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

5 oz

tsp

Whenever you make candy, it is important

to read through the whole recipe and to have all of your ingredients premeasured and ready to go before you start. Once the sugar starts cooking, you don’t have a lot of time to stop and read or measure. Also, when cooking sugar to high temperatures, keep a bowl of ice water close by in case you burn yourself. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Spread the almonds evenly on a baking sheet and toast until golden brown, 7 to 10 minutes. Let cool completely.

140 g

In a medium, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, water, butter, molasses, and salt. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mixture registers 295°F on a thermometer, 5 to 7 minutes. Immediately remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla and baking soda. Be careful at this point: the mixture will bubble up when you add the baking soda. Make sure that you incorporate the baking soda evenly throughout the mixture. continued

155 / pastries & confections

Line a 13-by-18-inch baking pan or a baking sheet of about the same size with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Evenly spread half of the almonds over the bottom of the prepared pan. The parchment or liner should not be visible at all. Reserve the remaining almonds for topping.


Pour the hot mixture evenly over the almonds. Work quickly, as it will begin setting up immediately. If you need to spread it out at all, use a lightly oiled rubber or metal spatula. When the toffee has cooled enough to touch, spread the chocolate over the warm toffee and let the heat of the toffee melt the chocolate. Smooth

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156

it out evenly with an offset spatula when it is completely melted. Sprinkle the rest of the almonds over the top, covering evenly. Let cool completely. Break the cooled sheet into pieces. They will keep in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to several weeks. Do not freeze.


C H O C O L AT E T R U F F L E S

/

yield about sixty 1-inch truffles

/

The combination of butter and cream gives a lovely melting texture to the truffle. If you don’t have butter, you can always make a ganache of cream and chocolate in a one-to-one ratio, which is how many truffles are made. The butter gives the confections a slightly creamier, smoother texture, however. You’ll notice if you add the quantity of butter and cream together by weight, you have the same quantity as the chocolate, which is the ratio we use at the bakery for almost all ganache. KITCHEN NOTES:

A lot of baking does not rely on recipes,

but rather on remembering simple ratios, such as the one

Bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped

1 pound

455 g

Heavy cream

2⁄3

5 1⁄2 oz/150 ml

Light corn syrup

1 tbsp

15 ml

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

5 tbsp

2 1⁄2 oz/70 g

Cocoa powder

about 1 cup

3 oz/85 g

cup

described in the headnote. You can use this same recipe as a quick, easy chocolate filling for a tart shell. While it is still liquid, pour it right into a fully baked Sweet Tart Dough pastry shell (page 196). ••••••

Place the chocolate in a heatproof mixing bowl. In a small saucepan, combine the cream and corn syrup and heat to just under a boil. Pour the hot cream over the chocolate and let it sit for a minute or two. Stir with a rubber spatula in a circular motion until the chocolate has melted. Add the butter and stir until it is incorporated. Let the mixture firm up in a cool place until it can be piped from a pastry bag. The amount of time for the mixture to become firm depends on how cool the room is. Or, place in the refrigerator to speed the process.

Remove the baking sheet from the refrigerator and cut the logs crosswise into pieces about 1 inch long. Roll each piece between your palms into an irregularly shaped truffle. If you have left the mixture in the bowl, use a small scoop or spoon to scoop out each truffle and then roll between your palms. Once the truffles are shaped, place the cocoa powder in a shallow bowl and roll each truffle in the cocoa, coating evenly. The truffles will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for about 2 weeks.

/ pastries & confections

Line a baking sheet with parchment or waxed paper. Transfer the contents of the bowl to a pastry bag fitted with a 1⁄2-inch (no. 6 or 7) plain tip. Pipe out long logs about 1 inch wide. Place in the refrigerator and chill well, about 1 hour. If you don’t have a pastry bag and tip, you can leave the mixture in the bowl in the refrigerator until well chilled.

157


M A P L E - G L A Z E D P E CA N S

/

yield 2 cups (10 ounces/285 g)

/

Although the maple makes these pecans seem like holiday nuts, they make delicious cocktail bites (try them with sherry) before a meal or sweets after a meal, too. You can also chop them for topping ice cream or a sundae, or use them on top of a chocolate tart. This is a good example of how important salt is to a dessert recipe. The nuts taste sweetly bland without it—good but not very compelling or interesting. The salt heightens the toasted flavor of the pecans and brings out the buttery flavor of the nuts. KITCHEN NOTES:

Corn syrup is used in the glaze because

it prevents the sugar and maple syrup from crystallizing,

tartine /

158

Maple syrup

2 tbsp

30 ml

Light or dark corn syrup

2 tbsp

30 ml

Sugar

2 tbsp

30 ml

Salt

1⁄8

1⁄2

Pecan halves

2 cups

tsp

ml

10 oz/285 g

which ensures a clear, shiny coating on the nuts. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. In a mixing bowl, combine the maple syrup, corn syrup, sugar, and salt and mix well. Add the pecans and toss to coat evenly with the syrup mixture. Turn the contents of the bowl onto the prepared baking sheet and spread evenly.

Toast the nuts, stirring every few minutes with a heatproof rubber spatula or a wooden spoon once the mixture begins to bubble, 4 to 6 minutes. The nuts are done when they are golden brown and the syrup is thicker and bubbling slowly. Remove from the oven and let cool completely on the pan. The coating on the nuts should be crisp when the nuts are cool. If it isn’t, you can put the nuts back in the oven for another couple of minutes. Separate the cooled nuts. They will keep in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks or for a month in the refrigerator.


PEANUT BRITTLE

/

yield 1 1⁄4 pounds (570 g)

/

It is easy to add other flavors and textures to this brittle. If you can find cocoa nibs (small, crunchy, unsweetened bits of unprocessed chocolate; see Sources, page 217), they make a great addition. Because they are unsweetened, they balance the rest of the candy. Unhulled pumpkin seeds, known as pepitas, are delicious additions, too. Sesame seeds alone give the candy a Middle Eastern flavor reminiscent of halvah, while unsweetened small-flake dried coconut and macadamias are a delicious tropical variation. KITCHEN NOTES:

Sugar

3⁄4

cup + 2 tbsp

6 oz/170 g

Water

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

Light or dark corn syrup

1⁄3

cup

4 oz/115 g

Salt

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Raw peanuts

11⁄2 cups

8 1⁄4 oz/235 g

Unsalted butter

1 tbsp

15 ml

Vanilla extract

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Baking soda

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

If you decide to include one of the

additions suggested in the headnote, add 1⁄2 cup of each (the weight will vary depending on the addition). ••••••

Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and oil lightly, or line with a nonstick liner.

Remove from the heat and stir in the butter and vanilla until incorporated. Then add the baking soda and stir quickly, making sure you incorporate the baking soda evenly throughout the mixture. Pour the mixture onto the prepared baking sheet, spreading it with the back of an oiled spoon or offset spatula. Let cool just until you can handle it (it helps if you wear rubber gloves), and then pull from the sides until the brittle has a shiny, “lacy” appearance. This incorporates air bubbles into the candy, making it more crisp. Let the candy cool completely. Break the brittle into pieces. They will keep in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks.

159 / pastries & confections

In a heavy, deep saucepan, combine the sugar, water, corn syrup, and salt over low heat. Stir with a wooden spoon until the sugar dissolves. Raise the heat to high, bring to a boil, and cook without stirring until the mixture registers 264°F on a thermometer. This will take 5 to 8 minutes. Immediately add the peanuts to the syrup and stir constantly until the mixture registers 310°F on the thermometer.


B R OW N I E S

/

yield one 9-by-13-inch baking dish; 12 brownies

/

This recipe has been adjusted and developed at Tartine over the years to reflect our preference for “fudgy” brownies. As is traditional for a brownie recipe, the only leavener is beaten egg, and the batter contains very little flour. The same recipe, with minor variations, can be baked in thin layers for an exceptional base for an ice-cream sandwich (see variation). KITCHEN NOTES:

Unsalted butter

3⁄4

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

1 pound

455 g

All-purpose flour

3⁄4

4 1⁄2 oz/130 g

Large eggs

5

cup

cup + 2 tbsp

6 oz/170 g

2 cups

14 oz/395 g

Salt

1⁄2

2 ml

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

tsp

5 ml

Topping (optional)

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160

doneness for these brownies. Because the batter has a high percentage of chocolate, the tester comes out wet even if the brownies are done. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a 9-by-13-inch glass baking dish.

Light brown sugar, lightly packed

Nuts such as walnut or pecan halves

You can’t use a cake tester to judge

In a small saucepan, melt the butter over low heat. Remove from the heat and add the chocolate. If the heat from the butter does not fully melt the chocolate, put the pan back over the heat for 10 seconds and stir until melted. Set aside to cool.

Sift the flour into a small mixing bowl. Set aside. In a medium mixing bowl, combine the eggs, sugar, salt, and vanilla. Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat on high speed until the mixture thickens and becomes pale in color and falls from the beater in a wide ribbon that folds back on itself and slowly dissolves on the surface, 4 to 5 minutes. Alternatively, use a mixing bowl and a whisk to beat the ingredients until the mixture falls from the whisk in a wide ribbon. Using a rubber spatula, fold the cooled chocolate into the egg mixture. Add the flour and fold it in quickly but gently with the rubber spatula so that you don’t deflate the air that’s been incorporated into the eggs. 2 cups

10 oz/285 g

Pour the batter into the prepared dish and smooth the top with the spatula. If you are using nuts, evenly distribute them across the batter. Bake until the top looks slightly cracked and feels soft to the touch, about 25 minutes. Let cool completely on a wire rack. Using a sharp knife, cut into 12 squares, or size desired. The brownies will keep in an airtight container in a cool place for up to 1 week.


Ice-Cream Sandwich Brownies Variation: Preheat

161 / pastries & confections

the oven to 350°F. Butter and lightly flour two 9-by13-inch glass baking dishes, knocking out the excess flour. (If you have only 1 baking dish, bake the first batch, let cool, turn out of the dish, wash the dish, and then bake the second batch.) Follow the directions for making the above batter, substituting 6 tablespoons (3 ounces/85 g) unsalted butter; 8 ounces (225 g) bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped; 1⁄2 cup minus 1 tablespoon (2 1⁄4 ounces/ 65 g) all-purpose flour; 3 large eggs; 1 cup (7 ounces/ 200 g) lightly packed light brown sugar; 1⁄4 teaspoon (1 ml) salt; and 1⁄2 teaspoon (2 ml) vanilla extract for the amounts given. Divide the batter in half, and spread each half in a prepared baking dish, smoothing the surface with an offset spatula or the back of a large spoon. Bake until the top feels set and the batter has just baked through, 7 to 10 minutes. For ice-cream sandwiches, you want a very moist and fudgy brownie, one that is slightly underbaked (the layers will set up and become quite firm when frozen). Let cool to room temperature in the baking dishes on wire racks, then turn out onto the wire racks to continue cooling completely. (You may need to ease out the edges with a flexible spatula.)

To make the sandwiches, let 1 1⁄2 to 2 pints (750 ml to 1 l) ice cream sit at room temperature just long enough to become spreadable. Line a 9-by-13-inch baking dish or pan with plastic wrap, allowing enough overhang to cover the top of the sandwich completely when it is assembled. Place 1 brownie layer, top side down, in the lined dish. Scoop the ice cream out onto the brownie and spread evenly and quickly with a rubber spatula or an offset metal spatula. Top with the second brownie layer, top side up, and gently and evenly press down on the second layer. Fold the plastic wrap over the top, covering completely. Using a square plate or a book, press down with firm, even pressure to distribute the ice cream evenly. Freeze for at least 3 hours or over night. Uncover the top, turn the sandwich out onto a cutting board, peel away the plastic wrap, and cut into desired sizes with a large, very sharp knife. Wrap together or individually until ready to serve. The sandwiches will keep, well wrapped, in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.


PA N F O R T E W I T H CA N D I E D Q U I N C E

/

yield one 10-inch round cake; 16 to 20 servings

/

This quintessential thin, round confection-like cake is rich, dense, and spiced. It is sweet and moist from honey and from the preserved fruit that makes up most of the batter, with just a little flour to hold the ingredients together. It originated in the Tuscan town of Siena in the Middle Ages, and reflects the spice trade of the times. Spice merchants, who were also the town’s pharmacists, made and sold the confection, liberally flavoring it with cinnamon, cloves, coriander, and nutmeg; thus, its name panforte, or “strong bread.” In keeping with Tartine’s dedication to using local ingredients, we used what we had at the time we developed our recipe one fall: quince, which we candied, dates from southern

tartine /

162

Fruits and Nuts

California, candied citrus peel, and cocoa. The cocoa does

Candied quince, cut into 1⁄4-inch-wide strips (page 213)

not give the panforte a chocolate taste, but instead adds a 2 cups

8 oz/225 g

Dates, pitted and coarsely chopped

1 3⁄4 cups

8 oz/225 g

Zante currants

3⁄4

4 oz/115 g

cup + 2 tbsp

1 cup

5 oz/140 g

Orange zest, grated

2 tbsp

30 ml

Lemon zest, grated

1 tbsp

15 ml

Pistachio nuts, lightly toasted

1 cup

5 oz/140 g

Almonds, well toasted continued

wine and panforte are an incredible combination that makes you want to keep drinking the wine and eating the confection to see how each one tastes after a bit of the other one. Because this is so rich, small portions are

Candied orange zest, coarsely chopped (page 214)

Hazelnuts, well toasted

mellow spiciness and a beautiful deep color. Sparkling

recommended. TIPS:

Use a cocoa that has not been “dutched.” Cocoa that

is “dutched” is processed with baking soda, which gives it its dark color, but it also flavors the cocoa. If all you have is Dutch-processed cocoa, the results will still be excellent. You can use any type of dried or candied fruit, in any com-

2 cups

10 oz/285 g

bination, as a substitute for the fruits in the recipe as long as the total amount is 25 ounces (700 g).

2 cups

10 oz/285 g

••••••

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter a 10-inch springform pan with 2- or 3-inch sides. In a large mixing bowl, combine the fruits, citrus zests, and nuts. Sift together the flour, cocoa powder, and all the spices over the fruits and nuts. Mix well with your hands or a wooden spoon. Set aside.


In a deep, heavy saucepan, combine the honey and granulated sugar and place over medium-high heat. Stir gently with a wooden spoon from time to time to make sure that no sugar is sticking to the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil and cook until the mixture registers 250°F on a thermometer, about 3 minutes. Flour and Spices 2⁄3

cup

3 oz/85 g

Cocoa powder

1⁄2

cup

11⁄2 oz/40 g

Ground cinnamon

1 tbsp

Nutmeg, freshly grated

from 11⁄2 nutmegs

Ground coriander

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Black pepper, freshly ground

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Ground cloves

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Honey

3⁄4

cup

9 oz/255 g

Granulated sugar

1 1⁄3 cups

91⁄2 oz/270 g

Confectioners’ sugar

1 cup

4 oz/115 ml

15 ml

Transfer the mixture to the prepared pan and smooth the top with a rubber spatula dipped in water. Bake until the top no longer looks moist and the cake has puffed up a bit, about 40 minutes. Let cool in the pan on a wire rack for 15 minutes, and then turn out of pan and let cool completely. Using a fine-mesh sieve, sift the confectioners’ sugar over the top, bottom, and sides of the cake. It will keep, well wrapped, in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks, or indefinitely in the refrigerator.

163 / pastries & confections

All-purpose flour

Remove from the heat and immediately pour over fruit-and-flour mixture in the bowl. Stir with the wooden spoon to incorporate the syrup thoroughly with the other ingredients. The mixture may seem dry at first, but it will come together once it is well mixed. (If you have rubber gloves, it is easier to mix with your hands than with the spoon.) You want to work quickly at this point; the longer the mixture sits, the firmer it becomes.


CA R A M E L A P P L E S

/

yield 10 to 12 candied apples

/

This recipe makes a nice, thick caramel coating that hardens to just the right toothsome consistency—firm but yielding. These apples are irresistible in the fall, especially when made with a tart variety like Granny Smith or a tart-sweet variety like Pink Lady or McIntosh. If you’ve candied too many apples, you can cut them up, sauté them very quickly, and serve them over ice cream, French toast, or over bread pudding as we do at the bakery. KITCHEN NOTES:

Be careful not to drive the handle all the way through the apple, or the juice will soften

the caramel at the point where the apple is punctured. The caramel is extremely hot, so make sure to have a bowl of ice water nearby in case you burn yourself. ••••••

Lollipop or Popsicle sticks

Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil and butter or oil the foil lightly, or line with a nonstick liner. Push a lollipop stick into each apple. I use the bottom of a heavy mug to “hammer” in the sticks. Set aside.

10 to 12 10 to 12 medium

Sugar

1 cup

8 oz/225 g

Unsalted butter

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/115 g

Heavy cream

2⁄3

cup

5 1⁄2 oz/150 ml

Light corn syrup

1⁄4

cup

3 oz/85 g

Maple syrup

2 tbsp /30 ml

Blackstrap or other dark molasses

1 tbsp

Remove the pan from the heat and let the caramel cool to 180°F. One at a time, dip the apples into the hot caramel, pinch let the excess drip off the bottom, and then set them on the prepared baking sheet. If the caramel slides off the first apple, let the mixture cool for a little longer and try again. You may need to tilt the pan to dip the last few apples (to free your hands, put a wooden spoon under one side of the pan).

Vanilla extract Salt

15 ml

In a deep, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, butter, cream, corn syrup, maple syrup, molasses, vanilla, and salt and place over medium-high heat. Stir gently with a wooden spoon from time to time to make sure no sugar is sticking to the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil and cook until the mixture registers 236°F on a thermometer, 5 to 7 minutes.

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Let cool completely to set the caramel. The apples will keep, uncovered, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

165 / pastries & confections

Apples


yudhacookbook.com

CREAM DESSERTS C H O C O L AT E P O T S D E C R È M E

170

PA R F A I T

171

W H I T E C H O C O L AT E A N D L I M E PA R F A I T W I T H L I M E G R A N I TA T O A S T E D A L M O N D A N D L A V E N D E R PA R F A I T R OA S T B A N A N A W I T H M A P L E P E CA N S

174

172

173

L E M O N - B U T T E R M I L K P U D D I N G CA K E

C H O C O L AT E P U D D I N G

177

175


Cream desserts are usually the easiest desserts to make. Some of them are recognized as extravagant and elegant, such as pots de crème, and others are viewed as uncomplicated and effortless, like an old-fashioned chocolate pudding. Two recipes here are deceptive in the sense that it is difficult for others to figure out how they are made, which is partly why I like making them. The other reason is because they are tartine /

168

just so delicious. They are also incredibly easy to put together and are above average in lightness, taste, and texture. One of the recipes is a parfait, a French invention. The technique will be unusual to anyone who is even a seasoned


home baker, as it makes the lightest, most perfectly creamy “ice cream” without an ice-cream maker. It is made up of three components: a ribbon of sugar and egg yolk that is combined with whipped cream and a flavoring. The lecithin in the egg yolks keeps the mixture smooth and creamy, and the amount of sugar and the air whipped into the yolks and cream keep the frozen dessert light as a feather. It doesn’t turn granular, as even good ice cream sometimes does. I don’t know why more people don’t make it. The second unusual dessert is a pudding cake, which is basically a sponge cake that calls for a higher than usual ratio of liquid to eggs. It arrives at the table from the oven in two distinctly different dessert components, a split that takes place while it’s baking. In the bottom of the dish is a lovely lemon curd, while the top is crowned with a delicate cakelike layer. The small amount of flour and the beaten egg whites that are part of the batter magically separate from the rest of the ingredients in the oven heat, and land ever so lightly on top.

169 / cream desserts


C H O C O L AT E P OT S D E C R È M E

/

yield 8 servings

/

A pot de crème is simply a baked pudding like a flan, though it can be flavored in many different ways and is a bit more sophisticated. It is no more difficult to make than any combination of thickened cream with eggs, plus it has all the wonderful qualities of most puddings: it stores well, it makes nice individual desserts, and the custard base can take on nearly any flavoring in nearly any quantity (within reason). This chocolate version is excellent served warm or cold with unsweetened softly whipped cream. KITCHEN NOTES:

When cooking eggs with cream, you never

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

6 oz

170 g

have to worry about the mixture curdling like you do when

Heavy cream

2 3⁄4 cups

22 oz/675 ml

using milk or half-and-half. The high amount of butterfat in

Sugar

3 tbsp

45 ml

cream keeps the mixture smooth, so that even if it boils, you

Salt

pinch

Large egg yolks

8

won’t end up with a “broken” pudding. ••••••

Unsweetened softly whipped cream for serving

tartine /

170

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Have ready 8 custard cups or ramekins that hold 3⁄4 cup (6 fluid ounces/175 ml) each. Choose a baking pan or baking dish for a water bath large enough to accommodate the custard cups or ramekins without touching, and deep enough to hold water that will reach three-fourths of the way up the sides of the molds once they are added. Pour enough water into the pan to reach about halfway up the sides of the pan, and place the pan in the oven while it is heating.

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a gentle simmer. Select a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the pan over, not touching, the water. Put the chocolate in the bowl, place over the water, and heat, stirring occasionally, until the chocolate melts and is smooth. Remove from the heat. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine the cream, sugar, and salt, place over medium heat, and heat to just under a boil. Place the egg yolks in a mixing bowl and whisk until well blended. When the cream mixture is ready, remove it from the heat and slowly pour it into the melted chocolate, whisking to incorporate. Slowly add the chocolate-cream mixture to the egg yolks, again whisking well to incorporate. Pour through a fine-mesh sieve into a pitcher or large measuring cup. You should have about 1 quart (1 l). Line up the custard cups or ramekins on the countertop, and pour the mixture into them, dividing it evenly. Pull out the oven rack holding the water bath and place the molds in the bath. Pour in more water if necessary to reach three-fourths of the way up the sides of the molds. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes. To test for doneness, jiggle one of the molds; the center of the custard should still be a bit wobbly, but the outside should appear set. Remove the water bath from the oven, and remove the custards from the water bath. Let cool. The custards will continue to cook and set up as they cool. Serve warm or cold with whipped cream.


PA R FA I T

/

yield 4 to 6 servings

/

Not to be confused with the American dessert of layered ice creams, a parfait (French for “perfect”) is like a cross between ice cream and mousse, having the best characteristics of each but better—and no ice-cream maker is required. Its soft, luscious texture and lightness come from whipping egg yolks with hot sugar syrup, folding in whipped cream and flavorings, and then freezing the result. The air whipped into both parts keeps it soft, light, and scoopable straight from the freezer. As with ice cream, the additions to parfait are countless. KITCHEN NOTES:

This is a basic parfait recipe, with three

flavor variations following it.

Large egg yolks

8

Sugar

3⁄4

cup + 2 tbsp

6 oz/170 g

It is an easy recipe to prepare, but you must be sure to have

Water

2⁄3

cup

51⁄2 oz/150 ml

all of the ingredients measured and ready to go and all

Heavy cream, very cold

2 1⁄2 cups

20 oz/625 ml

Salt

1⁄4

1 ml

the equipment close at hand before you start, as timing is tsp

crucial to its success. ••••••

Prepare an ice-water bath, using a bowl large enough to hold the mixer bowl. Put the egg yolks in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment and beat on high speed until light colored, about 4 minutes.

Remove the sugar syrup from the heat and immediately add it in a thin stream to the light-colored yolks, pouring it between the whisk and the side of the bowl. The yolks will cook from the heat of the syrup and thicken considerably. Continue to beat for a few minutes on high to increase the volume and start cooling the mixture. It should be thick and pale yellow. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand and place it in the ice-water bath until cool, folding gently with a rubber spatula so as not to lose any volume. In another mixing bowl, with the clean whisk attachment or a handheld whisk, whip the cream until it holds soft peaks. Using the spatula, gently fold the cream into the yolks. If you are adding any of the flavorings that follow, don’t mix until the cream is fully incorporated. Mix just until the cream is almost combined, add your other cool or room-temperature ingredients, and finish mixing. Pour the mixture into serving glasses or into a large container from which you can easily scoop. Cover the glasses or the single container tightly and place in the freezer. The glasses will only take about an hour to freeze; the large container will take 2 to 3 hours.

171 / cream desserts

While the yolks are in the mixer, combine the sugar, salt, and water in a deep, heavy saucepan and place over medium-high heat. Stir gently with a wooden spoon from time to time to make sure that no sugar is sticking to the bottom of the pan. Bring to a boil and cook until the mixture registers 230°F on a thermometer. This should only take a few minutes.


W H I T E C H O C O L AT E A N D L I M E PA R FA I T W I T H L I M E G R A N I TA

/

yield 4 to 6 servings

/

White chocolate creates a particularly rich parfait, so I pair it with a lime granita. The flavor of the chocolate works beautifully with the acidity and perfume of the lime, and the granita will melt faster than the parfait, creating a nice light “sauce.” ••••••

White chocolate, coarsely chopped

6 oz

170 g

Parfait (page 171)

Granita

Lime

1 small

Water

2 cups

16 oz/500 ml

Sugar

2⁄3

4 1⁄2 oz/130 g

Fresh or dried kaffir lime leaves (optional)

4

Lime juice

1 cup

cup

8 oz/250 ml

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Select a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the pan over, not touching, the water. Put the white chocolate in the bowl, place over the water, and heat, stirring occasionally, until the chocolate melts and is smooth. Remove the pan from the heat and leave the bowl of chocolate over the water, where it will stay warm. Make the parfait as directed. After you have added the hot sugar syrup and the mixture is thick and pale, remove the bowl from the mixer stand and slowly pour in the warm melted chocolate, folding by hand with a rubber spatula so as not to deflate the mixture. Proceed as directed to cool, add the whipped cream, and freeze in a tightly covered container.

tartine /

172

To make the granita, use a vegetable peeler to remove the zest from the lime in large pieces. Place the zest in a nonreactive saucepan along with the water, sugar, and lime leaves (if using), place over low heat, and stir until the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and let steep for 10 minutes. Remove and discard the leaves and the zest. Stir in the lime juice and then pour into a shallow glass or stainless-steel bowl or cake pan (don’t use aluminum; the acidity of the lime juice will react with the metal). Put the container in the freezer and stir from time to time with a whisk. When ice crystals begin to form, keep stirring to break them up and create smaller crystals. Cover and return to the freezer until ready to serve. To serve, pair a large scoop of the parfait with a smaller scoop of the granita.


TOA S T E D A L M O N D A N D L AV E N D E R PA R FA I T

/

yield 4 to 6 servings

/

Look for dried lavender blossoms in the bulk tea or spice section of grocery stores. If you grow your own lavender, you will need 4 to 6 flowers. Break apart the smaller buds and discard the thin stem from the center. If you are using fresh lavender, use the top petals of the blossom for mixing into the parfait; they also make a pretty garnish. ••••••

Almonds

1 cup

5 oz/140 g

Fresh or dried lavender blossoms

2 tbsp

30 ml

Parfait (page 171)

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Coarsely chop the almonds and spread them on a baking sheet. Toast, stirring once or twice, until nicely browned, 5 to 7 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and add the lavender. The flavor of lavender varies greatly in strength, so use less in the beginning if you think you have a particularly aromatic flower. The heat from the almonds will release the essential oil from the lavender. Let cool completely.

Make the parfait as directed. Gently fold in the lavender and nuts just before the whipped cream is fully incorporated. Freeze as directed.

173 / cream desserts


R OA S T B A N A N A W I T H M A P L E P E CA N S

/

yield 4 to 6 servings

/

The addition of bananas gives frozen desserts an extra creamy texture and richness. When the bananas are sautéed, their full character comes out, making them sweeter. The caramelized sugar and butter also heightens their tropical, slightly nutty flavor, which goes beautifully with the maple pecans. ••••••

Unsalted butter

2 tbsp

30 ml

Light or dark brown sugar

2 tbsp

30 ml

Salt

pinch

Bananas, peeled

2 medium

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

5 ml

1 cup

5 oz/140 g

Parfait (page 171) Maple-Glazed Pecans (page 158)

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174

In a sauté pan, heat the butter over high heat until it foams and the foam subsides. Add the brown sugar and salt and stir into the butter with a wooden spoon. Add the bananas and sauté, turning as needed, until soft on all sides and cooked through, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, stir the vanilla into the pan juices, and spoon the pan juices over the bananas. Let the bananas cool in the pan until they can be handled, then cut crosswise into 1⁄4-inch-thick slices. Make the parfait as directed. Coarsely chop the pecans. Gently fold the banana slices and pecans into the mixture just before the whipped cream is fully incorporated. Freeze as directed.


L E M O N - B U T T E R M I L K P U D D I N G CA K E

/

yield 6 to 8 servings

/

Pudding cakes are a lesson in baking alchemy. When you mix together the ingredients for a pudding and a cake, they miraculously bake into two separate layers. The cake, incredibly light and moist, rises to the top, while a smooth, delicious pudding forms underneath. KITCHEN NOTES:

You can substitute orange juice for the

lemon juice, but make sure to keep a couple of tablespoons Sugar

1 cup

7 oz/200 g

All-purpose flour

1⁄3

cup

1 3⁄4 oz/50 g

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

of lemon juice in the recipe for a little acidity. If you use orange juice, use orange zest in place of the lemon zest. ••••••

Large eggs, separated

4

Full-fat buttermilk

11⁄2 cups

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Butter a 2-quart (2-l) soufflé dish or 6 ( 3⁄4-cup/6–fluid ounce/180-ml) or 8 ( 1⁄2-cup/ 4–fluid ounce/125-ml) ramekins. Choose a baking pan or Lemon zest, grated 2 tsp 10 ml baking dish for a water bath large enough to accommo1⁄2 cup Lemon juice 4 oz/125 ml date the soufflé dish or the ramekins without touching, and deep enough to hold water that will reach three-fourths of the way up the sides of the mold(s) when added. Pour enough water into the pan to reach about halfway up the sides of the pan, and place the pan in the oven while it is heating. 12 oz/375 ml

Place the egg whites in a mixing bowl. Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment or a handheld whisk, beat the whites until they hold soft peaks. Scoop one-third of the whites onto the yolk mixture and stir in to lighten the mixture. Gently fold in the remaining whites, being careful not to deflate the batter. Transfer the batter to the prepared dish or dishes. Pull out the oven rack holding the water bath and place the mold(s) in the bath. Pour in more water if necessary to reach three-fourths of the way up the sides of the mold(s). Bake until golden on top, 30 to 40 minutes for the soufflé dish or 25 to 35 minutes for the ramekins. Remove from the oven and serve hot, or let cool on a wire rack and serve warm or at room temperature. The cake(s) will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Rewarm in a 300°F oven for 20 minutes before serving.

175 / cream desserts

In a medium mixing bowl, whisk together the sugar, flour, and salt. In a second mixing bowl, whisk together the egg yolks, buttermilk, and lemon zest and juice until blended. Make a well in the flour mixture and pour in the egg yolk mixture. Whisk the mixtures together until smooth.


C H O C O L AT E P U D D I N G

/

yield 4 to 6 servings

/

When cold, this pudding has a thick texture, much like a pot de crème, and is firm enough to hold a spoon upright. It is not the result of being especially rich with cream or stiff from eggs, but because chocolate is melted into the pudding at the end, firming up the custard as it cools. There is cocoa powder in the mix as well, giving it an even more intense chocolate flavor. Eat the pudding with unsweetened softly whipped cream—without question. KITCHEN NOTES:

What you are making here is essentially

pastry cream. Any time that you add a hot liquid to eggs, it Whole milk

13⁄4 cups

14 oz/425 ml

is called tempering or a lié, meaning that you must add the

Heavy cream

1⁄2

cup + 2 tbsp

5 oz/155 ml

hot liquid very slowly so that the eggs don’t cook.

Cornstarch

1⁄4

cup

1 ounce/30 g

Sugar

3⁄4

cup

5 oz/140 g

Cocoa powder

3 tbsp

Large eggs

3

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

21⁄2 oz

70 g

45 ml

••••••

Have ready a fine-mesh sieve placed over a large heatproof container. Combine the milk and cream in a heavy, medium saucepan and heat to just under a boil. Mean while, in a mixing bowl, combine the cornstarch and sugar, and sift in the cocoa powder. Whisk until blended. In another mixing bowl, whisk the eggs with the salt until blended, then add to the sugar mixture and whisk until well combined.

Immediately pour the contents of the pan through the sieve. Add the chocolate and let the heat of the milk-egg mixture melt it. When the chocolate has melted, blend with an immersion blender for a full 5 minutes until no lumps are visible. Stop the blender and scrape down the sides of the container with a rubber spatula as needed. Alternatively, you may use a blender and work in small batches, or use a whisk to blend by hand, being extremely careful with the hot mixture. Portion the pudding right away, let cool, and serve at room temperature. The pudding will keep, well covered, in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.

177 / cream desserts

Slowly add half of the hot milk mixture to the egg mixture while whisking constantly. Pour the egg mixture back into the pan with the rest of the milk mixture and cook over medium heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture has visibly thickened and registers 208°F on a thermometer. This should take 5 to 7 minutes, depending on how cold your eggs are.


WITH A GLASS OF WINE GOUGÈRES

183

C H E D DA R C H E E S E C R AC K E R S

S P I C E D C O C K TA I L N U T S

186

185

W I L D M U S H R O O M TA R T

PISSALADIÈRE ON BRIOCHE

189

187


At the bakery, we are tempted from time to time to stray from all things sweet and make something savory. Sometimes it is when we want to enjoy a meal together, and sometimes it is when we are celebrating an occasion and want to have something a little salty with cocktails, like gougères or spiced nuts. During the holidays, we make thousands of bite-sized gougères for our customers. The dough is a simple choux paste, which holds its tartine /

180

shape beautifully in this tiny size, and we flavor it with different kinds of cheese, from a strong blue or soft goat cheese to a milder Gruyère or local Jack. Many seasonings can be added, too, such as fines herbes, an aromatic


mixture of chopped parsley, chervil, tarragon, and chives, or the smoked Spanish paprika known as pimentón. The pissaladière is easy to make if you already have some brioche dough on hand. But this savory tart is so good that I suggest that you make a double batch of dough just so you can make it. It is the perfect combination of Niçoise olives, anchovy, and caramelized onions over a thin crust of slightly sweet and soft brioche. When made this way, it is called a tarte boulanger, since it uses a yeast-leavened dough. You can also make it on puff pastry or a flaky tart dough, in which case it would be a tarte pâtissier.

181 / with a glass of wine


GOUGÈRES

/

yield about thirty 1 1⁄2 -inch hors d'oeuvres

/

Gougères are the perfect combination of a crusty, caramelized outside and a soft, eggy inside. They can be made ahead of time and eaten at room temperature or recrisped in a very hot oven just before serving. Typically they are served as little bites with predinner drinks or as a light snack, but you can also make them larger and fill them with meat, cheese, or greens for a satisfying meal. At Tartine, we serve these in the larger size all morning, batch after batch coming hot from the oven, as a great savory alternative to the sweet breakfast pastries. Here, I have made small ones that are good for hors d’oeuvres or snacks, and I have also included a variation for making four-inch ones. You make these featherweight puffs from one of the most versatile doughs in the pastry kitchen: pâte à choux, or choux paste. It is the same dough that you use to make

Choux paste

Nonfat milk

1 1⁄4 cups

10 oz/310 ml

éclair shells, profiterole shells, cream puffs, and some

Unsalted butter

10 tbsp

5 oz/140 g

doughnuts. Here, the choux paste is flavored with black

Salt

1 tsp

5 ml

All-purpose flour

1 cup

5 oz/140 g

Large eggs

5

Gruyère cheese, grated

3⁄4

pepper, Gruyère cheese, and thyme, although you may use Cheddar, Swiss, or pecorino and any herb you prefer. You may also vary the flavors by adding the caramelized onions or duxelles (sautéed minced mushroom with shallot). The

cup

4 oz/115 g

dough is forgiving, so that you can add almost anything to it and it will work. The pastries taste best if they are eaten

Black pepper, freshly ground

1 tsp

5 ml

Fresh thyme, minced

1 tbsp

15 ml

the day they are baked. 183

Don’t be tempted to use whole milk in

this recipe. Because of the amount of butter and cheese, the batter is rich and the whole milk will cause the larger-sized

Topping

gougères to fall. If you do not have nonfat milk, use half

Large egg

1

water and half whole milk. If you don’t have any milk at

Salt

pinch

all, water alone works well. You can form the pastries on

Grated Gruyère cheese for sprinkling

the baking sheet, place the pan in the freezer until the pastries are frozen, and then transfer them to an airtight container and return them to the freezer for up to 1 month. You can bake them straight from the freezer on a buttered

or parchment-lined baking sheet. Brush the tops lightly with egg wash made by beating a whole egg, and increase the baking time by about 10 minutes. •••••• continued

/ with a glass of wine

KITCHEN NOTES:


Preheat the oven to 350°F. Butter a baking sheet or line with parchment paper. To make the choux paste, combine the milk, butter, and salt in a heavy saucepan and place over medium heat until the butter melts and the mixture comes to a full boil. Add the flour all at once, stirring vigorously with a wooden spoon. Keep stirring until the mixture has formed a smooth mass and pulls away from the sides of the pan and some of the moisture has evaporated. This will take about 3 minutes.

tartine /

184

Transfer the paste to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or to a heatproof mixing bowl. If using a mixer, add the eggs one at a time and mix on medium speed, incorporating each egg before adding the next. When all the eggs have been added, the mixture will be very thick, smooth, and shiny. Remove the bowl from the mixer stand, add the cheese, pepper, and thyme, and mix in with a rubber spatula. If making by hand, add the eggs one at a time to the bowl and mix with a wooden spoon, incorporating each egg before adding the next one, then proceed as directed for the mixer method. Transfer the contents of the bowl to a pastry bag fitted with a 1⁄2 -inch (no. 6 or 7) plain tip, adding only as much to the bag as is comfortable to work with. Pipe 1-inch mounds onto the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 1 1⁄2 inches apart. Or, use a spoon to drop the dough in 1-inch mounds.

To make the topping, in a small bowl, whisk together the egg and salt, and then gently brush the top of each pastry with the egg wash. Lightly sprinkle the top of each pastry with a little cheese. Place the pastries in the oven immediately and bake until they have puffed, are nicely browned, and feel light for their size, about 25 minutes. These are delicious served hot or warm, or are also good at room temperature. Or, let cool completely, store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to a few days, and recrisp in a 350°F oven for 5 minutes.

Large-Sized Gougères Variation: To make 4-inch gougères, use a large spoon to form 3-inch rounds about 1 inch high on the prepared baking sheet, spacing them about 2 inches apart. Brush with the egg wash and top with the cheese. Bake until they have puffed, are light for their size, and are golden brown, 35 to 45 minutes. Remove from the oven and poke a small hole in the side of each pastry to allow steam to escape. Releasing the steam keeps them from collapsing (this step is unnecessary for the small ones). If splitting and filling, let cool to room temperature; otherwise, they may be served hot, warm, or at room temperature. Makes 8 to 10 pastries.


C H E D DA R C H E E S E C R AC K E R S

/

yield about fifty 1-inch round crackers

/

I used to find homemade crackers a little disappointing: many of them are based on bread dough, which seems like too much trouble for a cracker; the texture is seldom right; and they are too often bland. This recipe overcomes all those problems. It calls for a large amount of cheese, so make sure to use a flavorful one. If you use a sharp Cheddar or even a well-aged Gruyère, the crackers will reflect the pronounced flavor of the cheese, and you’ll have a cracker that needs no other accompaniment than a glass of good wine. KITCHEN NOTES:

Be careful with cheese substitutions.

3 3⁄4 oz/105 g

A cheese with a high butterfat content, such as Brie or

1 tsp

5 ml

Camembert, will not work. Neither will very hard cheeses,

Cayenne pepper

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

such as aged pecorino, although you may add a few table-

Black pepper, freshly ground

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Sharp Cheddar cheese, grated

2 1⁄3 cups

All-purpose flour

3⁄4

Salt

cup

spoons of a hard aged cheese for flavor. ••••••

In a small mixing bowl, stir together the flour, salt, cayenne pepper, and black pepper. Set aside. In the bowl of a Unsalted butter, at stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the 1 room temperature ⁄4 cup 2 oz/55 g cheese and butter and beat on medium speed until comWalnuts, chopped 2⁄3 cup bined. Add the flour mixture and beat on low speed until medium-fine 2 1⁄2 oz/70 g incorporated. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Mix in the walnuts on low speed. The dough should be fairly stiff, with small chunks of cheese and walnut visible. You can do these same steps with a mixing bowl and a wooden spoon, mixing the ingredients in the same order. 8 oz/225 g

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or a nonstick liner. Unwrap the log and cut crosswise into slices 1⁄8 to 1⁄4 inch thick. If you have shaped the dough into a disk, unwrap, place on a floured work surface, and roll out into a square or rectangle 1⁄8 to 1⁄4 inch thick. Using a pizza wheel or sharp knife, cut the dough into 1-inch squares, 1-by-2-inch rectangles, or whatever shape you like. Arrange the crackers on the prepared pan, spacing them about 1 inch apart. Bake the crackers until golden brown on the edges and lighter in the center, 7 to 10 minutes, depending on size and thickness. Transfer to a wire rack and let cool completely. The crackers will keep in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks. Blue Cheese Crackers Variation: Make the dough as directed, substituting 2 cups (8 ounces/225 g) crumbled

blue cheese for the Cheddar cheese and 1 teaspoon (5 ml) crumbled dried or minced fresh sage for the cayenne pepper. Cut and bake as directed.

/ with a glass of wine

Transfer the dough to parchment paper, waxed paper, or plastic wrap and shape into a log about 1 inch in diameter. Wrap well and freeze until hard, about 2 hours. Or, gather the dough into a ball, flatten into a disk, wrap well in plastic wrap, and chill in the refrigerator until firm but still pliable, about 1 hour.

185


S P I C E D C O C K TA I L N U T S

/

yield about 3 pounds

/

Be liberal with additions and substitutions here as your taste dictates. The cayenne looks like a lot, but it isn’t as fiery as you might think. The herbs become mild during roasting, so you can use more than I have included here. And, of course, you can use any single type of nut or combination of nuts. The important thing to remember is to roast the nuts long enough to bring out their full flavor. Pimentón (smoked Spanish paprika), ground cumin, and curry powder are all delicious alternatives to the seasonings included here. KITCHEN NOTES:

Stir the nuts often while they are roasting;

the ones in the corners will darken faster than the ones in

tartine /

186

Fresh thyme

3 sprigs

Fresh rosemary

2-inch sprig

Light corn syrup

2 tbsp

30 ml

Cayenne pepper

1 tbsp + 2 tsp

25 ml

Salt

1 tbsp

15 ml

Black pepper, freshly ground

1 tsp

5 ml

Raw almonds

2⁄3

cup

3 oz/100 g

Raw cashews

2⁄3

cup

4 oz/115 g

Pumpkin seeds

2⁄3

cup

3 1⁄2 oz/100 g

Raw peanuts

5 1⁄3 cups

29 1⁄2 oz/835 g

the center. ••••••

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, a nonstick liner, or aluminum foil. Pick the leaves from the thyme and rosemary sprigs, and chop the leaves coarsely. In a mixing bowl, combine the thyme, rosemary, corn syrup, cayenne pepper, salt, and black pepper and mix well. Add all the nuts and mix thoroughly with your hands or a wooden spoon. Spread the nuts evenly on the prepared baking sheet. Roast, stirring a few times with a heatproof rubber spatula or a wooden spoon to ensure the nuts color evenly, until they are fragrant and a rich brown, about 15 minutes. Let cool completely. The nuts will keep in an airtight container in a cool, dry place for up to 2 weeks.


W I L D M U S H R O O M TA R T

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 6 to 8 servings

/

This is the simplest tart, but the variety and quality of mushrooms you use will make the difference between an ordinary tart and an exceptional one. It is much like buying an excellent cut of meat: like the mushrooms, you barely have to do anything to it but season and cook it perfectly. The mushrooms are mixed with a light and tender custard made from crème fraîche and egg yolks. KITCHEN NOTES:

You want to use a good assortment of

mushrooms here. When preparing to cook them, pay atten-

Partially baked and cooled 9-inch Flaky Tart Dough tart shell (page 194)

1

Assorted fresh mushrooms

1 pound

455 g

Unsalted butter

3 tbsp

45 ml

Shallots, halved and thinly sliced

1 packed cup

4 oz/115 g

much as you deglaze a pan in which you have roasted or

Salt

1⁄4

1 ml

panfried meat—using a wooden spoon to scrape up all the

Black pepper, freshly ground

tion to their shape and size. For example, keep the bigger mushrooms, such as porcini, in large, thin slices. If using black trumpets, keep the small ones whole and slice the

tsp

larger ones once or twice lengthwise. After you have cooked the mushrooms with the shallots, you want to be sure to deglaze the pan well with the water and lemon juice—

caramelized bits. 1⁄4

tsp 1⁄2

1 ml

Lemon juice

from

lemon

Water

2 tbsp

30 ml

Nutmeg, freshly grated

1⁄4

1 ml

Fresh thyme, coarsely chopped

1 tbsp

15 ml

Crème fraîche or heavy cream

1 cup

8 oz/250 ml

Large egg yolks

3

••••••

Have the tart shell ready for filling. Preheat the oven to 350°F. 187

Prepare the mushrooms by removing the stems if necessary (if mushrooms are very fresh and tender, the stems can usually remain). Halve or slice the mushrooms as needed depending on shape and size (see Kitchen Notes).

In a heavy saucepan, melt the butter over medium-high heat. Add the shallots and sauté for a few minutes until some of them start to color. Increase the heat to high, add the mushrooms, salt, and pepper, and sauté until the mushrooms are soft and have exuded some of their liquid, 5 to 10 minutes. When the mushrooms are ready, push them to the side of the pan, add the lemon juice and water, and scrape up any brown bits from the pan bottom with a wooden spoon. Remove from the heat. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the crème fraîche or heavy cream and the egg yolks until smooth. Add the mushrooms and stir to combine. Turn the mixture into the tart shell. Bake until the custard is barely firm to the touch in the center, about 20 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack. The tart will continue to set up as it cools. Serve warm or at room temperature, sprinkled with the thyme.

/ with a glass of wine

tsp


PISSALADIÈRE ON BRIOCHE

/

yield one 9-inch tart; 6 to 8 servings

/

This makes a wonderful salty, summery, out-of-hand lunch with a glass of rosé. The tart originated in the south of France, where you find delicious niçoise olives and anchovies and great rosé. It is delicious any time of year, however, and if you have fresh cherry tomatoes, they make a great, though nontraditional addition. KITCHEN NOTES:

You can use anchovy fillets packed in olive oil or whole anchovies packed in salt. The

latter must be filleted and then well rinsed in plenty of water or milk. ••••••

Brioche dough (page 28)

10 oz

285 g

Olive oil

2 tbsp

30 ml

Yellow onions, thinly sliced

11⁄2 packed cups

6 oz/170 g

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

White wine vinegar

1⁄2

tsp

2 ml

Water

2 tbsp

Black pepper, freshly ground

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

Niçoise olives

1⁄3

cup

11⁄2 oz/40 g

Anchovy fillets

6

Cherry tomatoes (optional)

1⁄3

cup

1 ounce/30 g

Fresh thyme, chopped

1 tbsp

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Brush the bottom and sides of a 9-inch tart pan with a removable bottom with olive oil. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out dough into an even round just large enough to fit inside the tart pan. Carefully transfer the dough round to the pan, making sure it fits all the way to the sides. Allow the dough to proof for 30 to 45 minutes; the timing depends on how warm your kitchen is. It will rise not quite twice in size.

30 ml

Pit the olives and chop coarsely. Top the dough evenly with the cooled onions, leaving a 1⁄2 -inch border uncovered Heavy cream 1 tbsp 15 ml around the sides. Then arrange the anchovy fillets over the onions, and top with the olives. Halve the tomatoes (if using) and place them cut side up on the dough. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg yolk and cream. Lightly brush the uncovered edges of the tart with the yolk mixture, or use your finger to apply it if the dough is very soft. Large egg yolk

1

Bake until the crust is golden brown and the onions have further caramelized, 25 to 35 minutes. Let cool on a wire rack for at least 10 minutes before slicing. Remove the tart ring and slide the tart onto a plate or serve directly from the pan bottom. Serve warm or at room temperature, sprinkled with the thyme. It is best when eaten the same day it is made.

189 / with a glass of wine

15 ml

While the dough is proofing, heat the olive oil in a heavy sauté pan over high heat. When the oil is very hot, add the onions and salt and sauté, stirring constantly, until the onions have reduced and are well browned, about 10 minutes. Add the vinegar and water, stir well, and scrape up any brown bits from the pan bottom. Add the pepper and stir well. Remove from the heat and let cool to room temperature.


B A S I C B A K E RY R E C I P E S F L A K Y TA R T D O U G H

194

S W E E T TA R T D O U G H

196

GÉNOISE

B A S I C C H I F F O N CA K E F O R B Û C H E D E N O Ë L O R A N G E C H I F F O N CA K E PA S T R Y C R E A M

204

207

202

C O C O N U T C H I F F O N CA K E

LEMON CREAM

209

CA N D I E D F R U I T

213

198

B A S I C C H I F F O N CA K E

L E M O N C H I F F O N CA K E

205

201

203

C H O C O L AT E C H I F F O N C A K E

F R A N G I PA N E C R E A M CA N D I E D Z E S T

214

210

CA R A M E L

212

206


This chapter includes the master recipes that we make every day—the backbone of our production. You won’t find any secrets here, just some tricks that Chad and I learned while working in bakeries in France, or things invented or discovered from making these recipes over and over again, such as the best method for mixing tart dough, how to candy fruits and zest quickly, or how to avoid lumps when adding flour to a gÊnoise batter.

192

desserts, or to change the ones in the previous

tartine /

Use this chapter to create your own new chapters to suit your taste. You might use a chiffon cake with your own favorite buttercream filling, scatter the candied zest over a chocolate tart, or drizzle the caramel over pancakes or a baked apple.


F L A K Y TA R T D O U G H

/

yield two 9-inch or 10-inch tart or pie shells

/

This is an example of a baker’s recipe that you will never have to look up if you just remember the basic ratio of three to two to one, flour to butter to water. It can be scaled up and down as needed without adjustment (except for occasionally changing the water amount because of high humidity affecting the flour or the moisture content of your butter), and it always makes a perfect flaky dough if you handle it gently and keep the butter and water ice cold. At Tartine, we make this dough two different ways: one is quickly mixed together (whether you use a food processor or make it by hand) and the other is a bit more complicated but yields an even flakier dough that is like a rough puff pastry. We use the Salt

1 tsp

5 ml

second method for our galettes, which is detailed with

Water, very cold

2⁄3

5 1⁄2 oz/150 ml

the recipe (page 71).

All-purpose flour

3 cups + 2 tbsp

1 pound/455 g

KITCHEN NOTES:

Unsalted butter, very cold

1 cup + 5 tbsp

10 1⁄2 oz/300 g

cup

There are two things that you can do to

ensure a flaky crust: work the dough very briefly, making sure that some of the butter remains in pea-sized pieces (when the dough is rolled out, you should see faint streaks of butter), and chill the dough well before baking. Chilling

creates little pockets (made by the flour and water) where the butter is, which will remain after baking and is what creates the light and fork-tender texture in a well-made dough. •••••• tartine /

194

In a small bowl, add the salt to the water and stir to dissolve. Keep very cold until ready to use. To make the dough in a food processor, put the flour in the work bowl. Cut the butter into 1-inch pieces and scatter the pieces over the flour. Pulse briefly until the mixture forms large crumbs and some of the butter is still in pieces the size of peas. Add the water-and-salt mixture and pulse for several seconds until the dough begins to come together in a ball but is not completely smooth. You should still be able to see some butter chunks. To make the dough by hand, put the flour in a mixing bowl. Cut the butter into 1-inch pieces and scatter the pieces over the flour. Using a pastry blender or 2 knives, cut the butter into the flour until the mixture forms large crumbs and some of the butter is still in pieces the size of peas. Drizzle in the water-and-salt mixture and stir and toss with a fork until the dough begins to come together in a shaggy mass. Gently mix until the dough comes together into a ball but is not completely smooth. You should still be able to see some butter chunks. On a lightly floured work surface, divide the dough into 2 equal balls and shape each ball into a disk 1 inch thick. Wrap well in plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours or for up to overnight.


For recipes that call for unbaked shells, refrigerate until ready to use. If refrigerating over night, cover the shell with plastic wrap. For recipes that call for a partially baked or fully baked shell, chill the shell until firm to the touch, 30 minutes to 1 hour, before baking. This ensures the flakiest crust. The shells may also be well wrapped and frozen for up to 2 weeks at this point. It is not necessary to thaw them before continuing with the following steps for baking.

Preheat the oven to 375°F. Line the pastry shells with parchment paper and fill with pie weights. For a partially baked crust, bake until the surface looks dry and pale, with no dense or opaque areas left, about 20 minutes; to check, lift a corner of the paper. Remove from the oven and remove the weights and paper. Return the shells to the oven and bake for a few minutes longer. Check the dough while it is baking. If it is rising up in the middle, gently pierce it with the tip of a knife (be careful not to make a large hole in case you use a very liquid filling). For a fully baked shell, bake the shells until the surface looks light brown, about 25 minutes; to check, lift a corner of the paper. Remove from the oven and remove the weights and paper. Return the shells to the oven and bake until golden brown, about 5 minutes longer. Let the shells cool completely on wire racks before filling. They will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

195 / basic bakery recipes

To line a tart pan or pie dish, place a disk of dough on a lightly floured surface and roll out 1⁄8 inch thick, rolling from the center toward the edge in all directions. Lift and rotate the dough a quarter turn every few strokes to discourage sticking, and work quickly to prevent the dough from becoming warm. Lightly dust the work surface with extra flour as needed to prevent sticking. If lining a pie dish, cut out a circle 2 inches larger than the dish. If lining a tart pan with a removable bottom, cut out a circle 1 1⁄2 inches larger than the pan. Carefully transfer the round to the pie dish or tart pan (fold it in half or into quarters to simplify the transfer if necessary), easing it into the bottom and sides and then pressing gently into place. Trim the dough even with the rim of the pan with a sharp knife. If you are lining a pie dish, you can trim the dough so that there is a 1⁄2-inch overhang, fold the overhang under, and flute or crimp the edge, though at the bakery we leave the edge plain.


S W E E T TA R T D O U G H

/

yield four 9-inch tart shells or twelve 4-inch tartlet shells

/

Also called pâte sablée, this recipe is used for most of the tart shells we make at Tartine. It is from a bakery in the south of France where Chad and I worked. When I asked Patrice, the pastry chef, if I could write down the recipe, he said, “Of course, but isn’t it the same as a sablée dough in America?” This is the same recipe that just about every cooking-school student learns in France, and what most pastry shops and restaurants use, with minor variations. Like so many recipes in baking, there are few secrets here. Rather it is the individual baker’s touch that makes each product unique. This is also a dough that a baker would say “behaves well,” meaning that it can be rolled very thin, it is easy to

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 cup + 2 tbsp

9 oz/255 g

handle, and it bakes beautifully, holding its shape without

Sugar

1 cup

7 oz/200 g

slumping down into the tart pan like some doughs do. It

Salt

1⁄4

1 ml

tsp

also may be rolled out multiple times without losing its quality. One trick that we employ at the bakery is to brush

Large eggs, at room temperature

2

All-purpose flour

3 1⁄2 cups

egg wash lightly on the bottom and sides of partially baked 17 1⁄2 oz/500 g

shells. This thin coating seals the shell, creating a barrier that will keep the crust crisp longer. KITCHEN NOTES:

Egg Wash (optional)

Large egg

1

quickly by placing them in a bowl and running lukewarm

Salt

pinch

water over them for about 5 minutes. Any leftover dough can be used as a simple cookie dough. This dough keeps

196 tartine /

Eggs can be brought to room temperature

exceptionally well, so make some for use now and freeze the rest for future use (it will keep for up to 3 weeks), either in disks or in rolled-out rounds. If you roll out all the rounds to freeze for future use, place a sheet of parchment or waxed paper between them to prevent them from sticking to one another when you thaw them. ••••••

Using a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the butter, sugar, and salt and mix on medium speed until smooth. Mix in 1 egg. Add the remaining egg and mix until smooth. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the flour all at once and mix on low speed just until incorporated. On a lightly floured work surface, divide the dough into 4 equal balls and shape each ball into a disk inch thick. Wrap well in plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours or overnight.

1⁄2


To line a tart pan, place a dough disk on a lightly floured surface and roll out 1â „8 inch thick, rolling from the center toward the edge in all directions. Lift and rotate the dough a quarter turn after every few strokes, dusting underneath as necessary to discourage sticking, and work quickly to prevent the dough from becoming warm. Cut out a circle 2 inches larger than the pan. If the dough is still cool, carefully transfer the circle to the pan, easing it into the bottom and sides and then pressing gently into place. Do not stretch the dough, or the sides will shrink during baking. If the dough has become too soft to work with, put it in the refrigerator for a few minutes to firm up before transferring it to the pan. If the dough develops any tears, just patch with a little extra dough, pressing firmly to adhere. Trim the dough level with the top of the pan with a sharp knife. Place the pastry shell in the refrigerator or freezer until it is firm, about 15 minutes.

Dock (make small holes in) the bottom of the tart shell or tartlet shells with a fork or the tip of a knife, making tiny holes 2 inches apart. Place in the oven and bake for 7 to 10 minutes for a partially baked large shell or 5 to 7 minutes for tartlet shells. The pastry should be lightly colored and look dry and opaque. Check the shell(s) during baking and rotate the pans if necessary for even color. If you want to brush the shell(s) with a glaze (see headnote), beat the egg with the salt in a small bowl. A minute or two before the desired color is reached, remove the shell(s) from the oven and lightly brush the bottom and sides with the glaze. Return the shell(s) to the oven and bake until the desired color is reached and the glaze is set. For a fully baked shell, proceed as directed for a partially baked shell, but bake until golden brown, about 5 minutes longer. Let cool completely on wire racks. The pastry shells will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

197 / basic bakery recipes

If you are making tartlet shells, roll out the dough in the same way, cut out circles according to the size of your pans, and line the pans. The rest of the dough, including the scraps, can be frozen for future use.

Preheat the oven to 325°F.


GÉNOISE

/

yield one 10-inch cake

/

When made well, this classic French cake base (what Americans call sponge cake) has a perfectly uniform and delicate crumb structure. It relies on the use of simple syrup, flavored or neutral, for its moisture; otherwise, it will have a dry texture and crumb. Traditionally, this cake is paired with mousses, curds, Bavarians, buttercreams, or simply with whipped cream for a more refined version of strawberry shortcake. KITCHEN NOTES:

Unsalted butter

5 tbsp

2 1⁄2 oz/70 g

All-purpose flour

1 1⁄3 cups

6 oz/170 g

Cornstarch

1 tbsp

15 ml

Large eggs

6

Salt

pinch

Sugar

1 cup + 1 tbsp

This is the one piece of invaluable advice

that I give all bakers about mixing a génoise batter: when you add the flour, some of it invariably ends up along the sides of the bowl. The inclination is to scrape it down with your spatula, but this is what causes lumps in your génoise batter, which are impossible to smooth out. Instead, using your rubber spatula, push some of the batter up the side of

7 1⁄2

oz/210 g

the bowl where the flour is stuck and let the batter pull the flour away. If some stays, leave it. The second most common problem happens when you transfer the batter to the cake

pan. If you scrape the sides of the bowl where there is a little batter clinging, you will be dislodging a little flour, too, creating lumps. •••••• tartine /

198

Preheat the oven to 350°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not butter the sides of the pan. In a small saucepan, melt the butter over low heat, remove from the heat, and keep warm. Sift together the flour and cornstarch into a bowl and set aside. Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the eggs, salt, and sugar in the stainless-steel bowl of a stand mixer that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Whisk together and then place over the saucepan and continue to whisk until the mixture is hot to the touch (120°F), 5 to 7 minutes. Remove the bowl from over the water and place on the mixer stand. Fit the mixer with the whisk attachment and mix on medium-high speed until the batter is pale yellow, has tripled in volume, and falls from the beater in a wide ribbon that folds back on itself and slowly dissolves on the surface, 3 to 5 minutes. Using a rubber spatula, fold in the flour mixture in 3 batches, making sure you reach all the way down to the bottom of the bowl where the flour likes to sink, and pulling it all the way to the top. Scoop out a small portion of the batter into a small bowl and whisk in the warm melted butter. Gently and quickly fold the butter mixture into the batter, being careful to deflate the batter as little as possible.


Pour the batter immediately into the prepared cake pan. Bake until the top springs back when lightly touched, 40 to 45 minutes. Let cool in the pan (the sides of the pan will help hold the structure of the cake as it cools) on a wire rack. To unmold, run a small, thin knife around the sides of the pan to loosen the cake and then release and lift off the pan sides. Invert the cake, peel off the parchment, and then use as directed in individual recipes. The cake will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month.

To split the cake into layers: The easiest way to divide the cake into layers is to use a long, thin serrated knife. Place the cake on a flat surface and mark the desired thickness all the way around the cake. Work from the top to the bottom of the cake if making more than 2 layers. Holding the knife parallel to the work surface and using a sawing motion, cut through the cake, checking that the tip end and handle end of the knife are level and slicing where you marked. If you are making more than 2 layers, take off the first layer and set it aside before you begin to cut the next layer. If you aren’t using the layers right away, cover with plastic wrap so they don’t dry out. 199 / basic bakery recipes


C H I F F O N CA K E S

tartine /

200

These light, delicate cakes are an American invention, created in the 1920s. They fell out of favor for decades, but began slowly coming back in the mid-1990s. It is easy to understand why restaurants and bakeries shy away from chiffon cakes: the history of finer dessert making comes largely from Europe, and most classically trained pastry chefs in the United States were trained either in Europe or at American schools in the European tradition. Why chiffon cakes went out of fashion in home kitchens is more difficult to understand. When they became popular in the late 1940s and early 1950s, they were seen as a boon to home baking, because they were simpler to make than their European counterparts. Also, they called for folding whipped egg whites into the batter, which created the light crumb reminiscent of the génoise, and they were moister and richer than the génoise because of the higher ratio of eggs in the batter and the use of oil. The chiffon cake’s close cousin, the angel food cake, held its ground through the decades because it is fat free—no butter, no oil, no egg yolks—and because Americans like light, fluffy desserts. Angel food has a high proportion of sugar, which is largely why the cake seems so moist, as opposed to the chiffon, which gets its moist crumb from orange or lemon juice (or water in basic chiffon) and oil. In fact, in almost every case of pastry making, “moist” usually comes not from actual moisture added but from a high amount of sugar or butter or oil. Each chiffon cake recipe here has essentially the same ratio of flour to sugar to oil to eggs, with just small variations. Most of them are interchangeable in the recipes in this book, depending on the flavor you prefer. You can also use a chiffon cake in place of a génoise. Note: If you can find alum-free baking powder, it is preferable to regular baking powder, as it creates a finer crumb. Also, make sure that the eggs are at room temperature. You will get much better volume when you whip the whites if they are not cold.


yudhacookbook.com B A S I C C H I F F O N CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake

/

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not grease the sides of the pan. Sift together the flour and baking powder into a large mixing bowl. Add 1 1⁄4 cups (8 3⁄4 ounces/250 g) of the sugar and the salt and whisk to combine. In a small bowl, whisk together the oil, egg yolks, water, vanilla, and lemon zest. Make a well in the flour, add the yolk mixture, and then whisk thoroughly and quickly for about 1 minute until very smooth.

All-purpose flour

21⁄4 cups

111⁄4 oz/315 g

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Sugar

11⁄2 cups

101⁄2 oz/300 g

Salt

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml

Large egg yolks

6 (scant 1/2 cup

4 oz/125 ml)

Water

3⁄4

6 oz/175 ml

Vanilla extract

2 tsp

cup

Place the egg whites in a large mixing bowl. Using a mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, beat on medium speed until frothy. Add the cream of tartar or lemon juice and beat on medium-high speed until the whites hold soft peaks. Slowly add the remaining 1⁄4 cup (1 3⁄4 ounces/50 g) sugar and beat on medium-high speed until the whites hold firm, shiny peaks. Using a rubber spatula, scoop about one-third of the whites onto the yolk mixture and fold in gently to lighten the batter. Gently fold in the remaining whites just until combined.

Pour the batter into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with an offset spatula if necessary. Bake until a cake tester inserted into the center comes out clean, 45 to Lemon zest, grated 11⁄2 tsp 7 ml 55 minutes. Let cool in the pan (the sides of the pan will Large egg whites 10 (about 1 1⁄3 cups 11 oz/325 ml) help hold the structure of the cake as it cools) on a wire Cream of tartar or rack. To unmold, run a small, thin knife around the sides 1⁄4 tsp lemon juice 1 ml of the pan to loosen the cake and then release and lift off the pan sides. Invert the cake, peel off the parchment, and then use as directed in individual recipes. The cake will keep, well wrapped, in the refrigerator for up to 4 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month. 10 ml

/ basic bakery recipes

To split the cake into layers, follow the directions that appear with Génoise (page 199).

201


B A S I C C H I F F O N CA K E FOR BÛCHE DE NOËL

/

yield one 12-by-17-inch sheet cake

/

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 12-by-17-inch jelly-roll pan with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not grease the sides of the pan.

tartine /

202

All-purpose flour

1 cup + 2 tbsp

5 1⁄2 oz/155 g

Sugar

3⁄4

5 1⁄4 oz/150 g

Baking powder

1 tsp

5 ml

Salt

1⁄2

2 ml

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄4

cup

tsp

cup

Large egg yolks

3 (about

Water

1⁄3

2 oz/60 ml 11⁄4

cup

cup + 1 tbsp

2 oz/60 ml) 3 oz/80 ml

Vanilla extract

1 tsp

5 ml

Lemon zest, grated

3⁄4

4 ml

Large egg whites, at room temperature

5 (about 2⁄3 cup

5 1⁄2 oz/150 ml)

Cream of tartar or lemon juice

1⁄4

1 ml

tsp

tsp

Follow the directions for Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201). When measuring the sugar to mix into the first part of the batter with the yolks, use all but 3 tablespoons (45 ml). Then, when beating the whites, add the reserved 3 tablespoons sugar. Transfer the batter to the prepared pan, smoothing the top with an offset spatula if necessary. Bake until the cake is just set to the touch, 20 to 30 minutes. Let cool and then unmold as directed. As soon as the cake has cooled, use it to make the Bûche de Noël (page 101), or store it well wrapped in the refrigerator for up to 3 days or in the freezer for up to 1 month. Bring the cake to room temperature before rolling it.


L E M O N C H I F F O N CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake

/

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not grease the sides of the pan.

All-purpose flour

21⁄4 cups

111⁄4 oz/315 g

Sugar

11⁄2 cups

101⁄2 oz/300 g

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Salt

3⁄4

tsp

3 3⁄4 ml

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄2

cup

Large egg yolks

6 (scant

Water

1⁄2

cup

Lemon juice

1⁄4

cup

Lemon zest, grated

11⁄2 tsp

4 oz/125 ml 1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml) 4 oz/125 ml 2 oz/60 ml 7 ml

Large egg whites, at room temperature 10 (about 1 1⁄3 cups

11 oz/325 ml)

Cream of tartar or lemon juice

1 ml

1⁄4

tsp

Follow the directions for Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201), adding the lemon juice to the oil, egg yolks, water, and lemon zest. Bake, cool, and unmold as directed.

203 / basic bakery recipes


O R A N G E C H I F F O N CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake

/

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not grease the sides of the pan.

tartine /

204

All-purpose flour

21⁄4 cups

111⁄4 oz/315 g

Sugar

11⁄2 cups

101⁄2 oz/300 g

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Salt

3⁄4

tsp

4 ml

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/125 ml 1⁄2

Large egg yolks

6 (about

Orange juice

3⁄4

cup

Orange zest, grated

from 1 medium orange

cup

4 oz/125 ml) 6 oz/175 ml

Large egg whites, at room temperature 10 (about 1 1⁄3 cups

11 oz/325 ml)

Cream of tartar or lemon juice

1 ml

1⁄4

tsp

Follow the directions for Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201), adding the orange juice to the oil, egg yolks, water, and orange zest. Bake, cool, and unmold as directed.


C O C O N U T C H I F F O N CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake

/

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not grease the sides of the pan.

All-purpose flour

21⁄4 cups

111⁄4 oz/315 g

Sugar

11⁄2 cups

101⁄2 oz/300 g

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Nutmeg, freshly grated

1⁄4

1ml

Salt

1 tsp

5 ml

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄4

2 oz/60 ml

tsp

cup

Large egg yolks

6 (about 1⁄2 cup

4 oz/125 ml)

Water

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

Unsweetened coconut milk

3⁄4

cup

6 oz/175 ml

Large egg whites, at room temperature

10 (about 11⁄3 cups

11 oz/325 ml)

Cream of tartar

1⁄2

2 ml

tsp

Follow the directions for Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201), adding the nutmeg to the flour mixture and the coconut milk to the oil, egg yolks, and water. Bake, cool, and unmold as directed.

205 / basic bakery recipes


C H O C O L AT E C H I F F O N CA K E

/

yield one 10-inch cake

/

Preheat the oven to 325°F. Line the bottom of a 10-inch springform pan with 3-inch sides with parchment paper cut to fit exactly. Do not grease the sides of the pan.

tartine /

206

All-purpose flour

1 3⁄4 cups

8 3⁄4 oz/250 g

Cocoa powder

1⁄2

1 1⁄2 oz/40 g

Sugar

1 1⁄2 cups

10 1⁄2 oz/300 g

Baking powder

2 tsp

10 ml

Salt

3⁄4

tsp

33⁄4 ml

Vegetable oil such as safflower or sunflower

1⁄2

cup

cup

4 oz/125 ml 1⁄2

Large egg yolks

6 (about

Water

3⁄4

cup

4 oz/125 ml)

cup

6 oz/175 ml

Lemon juice

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

Lemon zest, grated

from 2 small or 1 medium lemon

Large egg whites, at room temperature 10 (about 1 1⁄3 cups

11 oz/325 ml)

Cream of tartar or lemon juice

1 ml

1⁄4

tsp

Follow the directions for Basic Chiffon Cake (page 201), adding the cocoa powder to the flour mixture. Bake, cool, and unmold as directed.


PA S T RY C R E A M

/

yield 2 1⁄2 cups (20 fluid ounces/625 ml)

/

Pastry cream is used often in this book, for simple tart fillings, for trifle and cake layers, and for filling éclairs. If you have some on hand, it makes a delicious spur-of-the-moment sauce, thinned with a bit of cream or milk and served alongside cake or fresh fruit. You can also make a quick frangipane-flavored tart filling by crushing 4 Almond Rochers (page 135) and mixing them with a batch of pastry cream. This recipe calls for whole eggs, which makes a lighter cream than some traditional French versions that call for only yolks. If you like a richer cream, use 4 yolks instead of the 2 whole eggs in the recipe. KITCHEN NOTES:

While the milk is heating, the milk solids

want to adhere to the bottom of the pan, so make sure to Whole milk

2 cups

Vanilla bean

1⁄2

bean

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

Cornstarch

16 oz/500 ml

whisk or stir the milk well every now and again. If any burn spots appear on the bottom of the pan, they can flavor the

1 ml

entire batch of milk. Taste the milk if you see any spots

3 to 4 tbsp

45 to 60 ml

and discard it if it has an acrid flavor. There is no rescuing

Sugar

1⁄2

4 oz/115 g

burned milk. The biggest concern when making pastry

Large eggs

2

Unsalted butter

4 tbsp

cup + 1 tbsp

cream is to keep the eggs from curdling. There is a fine line 2 oz/55 g

between when the pastry cream has cooked long enough to be properly thick and a moment later when it has cooked too long and the eggs have developed a grainy, curdled

look. If the cream is only slightly grainy, use an immersion blender or a countertop blender, although this the metal and turn the cream gray. Have a lightly dampened kitchen towel on hand to help stabilize the bowl of eggs as you whisk the milk into it, freeing both of your hands for pouring and whisking. ••••••

Have a bowl ready for cooling the pastry cream with a fine-mesh sieve resting in the rim. Pour the milk into a heavy saucepan. Split the vanilla bean half lengthwise and use the tip of a sharp knife to scrape the seeds from the pod halves into the milk. Add the salt, place over medium-high heat, and bring to just under a boil, stirring occasionally and making sure that the milk solids are not sticking to the bottom of the pan. The larger the batch, the more careful you need to be. continued

207 / basic bakery recipes

solution doesn’t always save the batch. Never use an aluminum pan for pastry cream. The yolks react with


Meanwhile, in a mixing bowl, whisk together the cornstarch and sugar. Use the larger amount of cornstarch for a firmer pastry cream for making Banana Cream Pie with Caramel and Chocolate (page 54) or the coconut variation that accompanies it and the smaller amount for other uses. Add the eggs and whisk until smooth.

tartine /

208

When the milk is ready, slowly ladle about one-third of the hot milk into the egg mixture, whisking constantly. Pour the egg-milk mixture back into the hot milk and continue whisking over medium heat until the custard is as thick as lightly whipped cream, about 2 minutes. In order for the cornstarch to cook and thicken fully, the mixture must come just to the boiling point. You want to see a few slow bubbles. However, if the cream is allowed to boil vigorously, you will curdle the pastry cream. Remove from heat and immediately pour through the sieve into the bowl. (If the custard stays in the hot pot, it will continue to cook.) Let cool for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally to release the heat and prevent a skim from forming on top.

Cut the butter into 1-tablespoon (15-ml) pieces. When the pastry cream is ready (it should be about 140°F), whisk the butter into the pastry cream 1 tablespoon at a time, always whisking until smooth before adding the next tablespoon. To cool the cream, cover the bowl with plastic wrap, pressing the wrap directly onto the top of the cream (the plastic wrap prevents a skin from forming on the surface). To cool it very quickly, place it in a shallow dish and press plastic wrap directly on top. Be careful whisking the cream once it is cold. Overmixing will break down the starch and thin the cream. Pastry cream will keep, well covered, in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.


LEMON CREAM

/

yield about 2 1⁄2 cups (20 fluid ounces/625 ml)

/

This recipe creates a soft, luscious, delicate, creamy filling with many uses. It is the base for one of our most popular tarts; it also makes a delicious component for a citrus trifle, can be mixed with softly whipped cream for a cake or fruit tart filling, and is wonderful alone, spread on toast. The technique of adding the butter at the end of the recipe, rather than at the beginning as with most lemon curds, creates a unique texture and flavor that is very much like “mounting” a sauce with butter just before serving it. The butter stays in emulsion because it is added at a lower temperature and is whisked as its melts. This creates a thicker and silkier final product that is also opaque because the milk solids have not sepaLemon juice

1⁄2

Whole large eggs

3

Large egg yolk

1

Sugar

3⁄4

Salt

pinch

Unsalted butter, cool

1 cup

cup + 2 tbsp

5 oz/155 ml

rated from the fat. KITCHEN NOTES:

Never use an unlined aluminum pan

when heating lemon juice or any mixture containing lemon cup

6 oz/170 g

juice. The acidity in the juice reacts with the metal, giving the dessert a metallic flavor. The finished cream keeps well in a sealed container in the refrigerator, and may be

8 oz/225 g

quickly resoftened over simmering water, whisking to keep it emulsified. ••••••

Meanwhile, cut the butter into 1-tablespoon (15-ml) pieces. When the cream is ready, leave it in the bowl if using an immersion blender, or pour it into a countertop blender. With the blender running, add the butter 1 tablespoon at a time, blending after each addition until incorporated before adding the next piece. The cream will be pale yellow and opaque and quite thick. You can use the cream immediately, or pour it into a storage container with a tight-fitting lid and refrigerate for up to 5 days. To use after refrigeration, gently heat in a stainless-steel bowl set over simmering water until it has softened.

209 / basic bakery recipes

Pour water to a depth of about 2 inches into a saucepan, place over medium heat, and bring to a simmer. Combine the lemon juice, whole eggs, egg yolk, sugar, and salt in a stainless-steel bowl that will rest securely in the rim of the saucepan over, not touching, the water. Whisk the ingredients together. (Never let the egg yolks and sugar sit together for more than a moment without stirring; the sugar will “cook” the yolks and turn them granular.) Place the bowl over the saucepan and continue to whisk until the mixture becomes very thick and registers 180°F on a thermometer. This will take 10 to 12 minutes. Remove the bowl from over the water and let cool to 140°F, stirring from time to time to release the heat.


F R A N G I PA N E C R E A M

/

yield 3 cups (24 fluid ounces/750 ml)

/

I have included two versions of frangipane cream, also called crème d’amandes (almond cream). This one is an old and traditional recipe that includes pastry cream as one of its ingredients. The pastry cream produces a lighter and moister filling than the usual mixture of eggs, butter, sugar, and almond flour, but it does take longer to prepare if you do not already have the cream on hand. Both versions are delicious, and both make very good fillings for tarts or croissants aux amandes (page 27). KITCHEN NOTES:

tartine /

210

We use natural sliced almonds (with

their skins on). They add a little flavor, but mostly they

Confectioners’ sugar

1 cup

4 oz/115 g

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

1⁄2

cup

4 oz/115 g

Sliced almonds

3⁄4

cup

2 1⁄2 oz/70 g

Large whole egg, at room temperature

1

Large egg yolk, at room temperature

1

Cornstarch

4 tsp

20 ml

Pastry Cream (page 207), at room temperature

3⁄4

6 oz/175 ml

Salt

pinch

Brandy (optional)

4 tsp

contribute an attractive color to the cream. If you prefer a filling with a lighter color, use sliced blanched almonds.

cup

20 ml

••••••

Sift the confectioners’ sugar into the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment. Add the butter and beat together on low speed to combine. Increase the speed to medium and beat until smooth and creamy. Stop the mixer and scrape down the sides of the bowl with a rubber spatula. Add the almonds, whole egg, egg yolk, cornstarch, pastry cream, salt, and brandy (if using) and beat on low speed until all the ingredients are evenly incorporated, stopping to scrape down the bowl as needed. The mixture may have a slightly “broken” appearance, which is normal. The cream will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


F R A N G I PA N E C R E A M VA R I AT I O N

/

yield 3 cups (24 fluid ounces/750 ml)

/

This variation, which is also a classic French recipe, makes a slightly more “cakey” filling. Usually you see this version made with equal parts butter, sugar, and almonds. We add the small amount of milk for a slightly moister filling. ••••••

Sliced almonds

2 cups

7 oz/200 g

Sugar

1 cup

7 oz/200 g

Unsalted butter, at room temperature

3⁄4

7 oz/200 g

Salt

pinch

Brandy (optional)

4 tsp

Large eggs

2

Whole milk

2 tbsp

cup + 2 tbsp

20 ml

30 ml

In a food processor, combine the almonds with 1⁄4 cup (1 3⁄4 ounces/50 g) of the sugar and process until finely ground. Set aside. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter on medium speed until creamy. Add the remaining 3⁄4 cup (5 1⁄4 ounces/150 g) sugar and mix to incorporate. Add the almond-sugar mixture and beat until thoroughly combined. Add the salt, brandy (if using), and 1 egg and mix until incorporated. Add the remaining egg and the milk and mix until light and fluffy. The cream will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.

211 / basic bakery recipes


CA R A M E L

/

yield about 1 1⁄2 cups (12 fluid ounces/375 ml)

/

This is an incredibly versatile sauce and cake filling, with enough body to stay put when spread over cake layers, and just thin enough to sauce ice cream. It is layered in the Lemon Meringue Cake (page 81) and Devil’s Food Layer Cake (page 96), and it is delicious pooled under the filling of Chocolate Hazelnut Tart (page 51), so that the tart creates its own sauce when it is sliced. A little bit is added to the bottom of Banana Cream Pie with Caramel and Chocolate (page 54) and its coconut variation, too. When I spoon it over simple baked fruits, like apples or figs, it becomes a whole new sauce as it mixes with the Heavy cream

2⁄3

cup

Vanilla bean

1⁄4

bean

Sugar

1 1⁄4

Water

1⁄4

cup

2 oz/60 ml

squeeze of lemon juice and a little salt bring out flavors of

Salt

1⁄4

tsp

1 ml

the butter and caramelized sugar.

Light corn syrup

2 tbsp

30 ml

KITCHEN NOTES:

Lemon juice

3⁄4

4 ml

the caramel. When you add the hot cream, the caramel will

Unsalted butter

4 tbsp

2 oz/55 g

boil furiously at first, increasing dramatically in volume.

cups

tsp

5 1⁄2 oz/150 ml

concentrated fruit juices from the roasting pan. This recipe also perfectly demonstrates how the addition of a couple

8 1⁄2

oz/240 g

of simple ingredients to a base heightens its flavor. Here, a

Be sure to use a good-sized pan for cooking

As always when caramelizing sugar, have ice water close by in case of burns. •••••• tartine /

212

Pour the cream into a small, heavy saucepan. Split the vanilla bean in half lengthwise and use the tip of a sharp knife to scrape the seeds from the pod halves into the milk. Place over medium-high heat and bring to just under a boil, stirring occasionally. Reduce the heat to low to keep the cream warm. In a medium, heavy saucepan, combine the sugar, water, salt, and corn syrup. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Then cook, without stirring, until the mixture is amber colored, 5 to 8 minutes. Remove from the heat. The mixture will continue to cook off the heat and become darker, so make sure to have your cream close by. Carefully and slowly add the cream to the sugar syrup. The mixture will boil vigorously at first. Let the mixture simmer down, and then whisk until smooth. Add the lemon juice. Let cool for about 10 minutes. Cut the butter into 1-inch chunks and add them to the caramel one at a time, whisking constantly after each addition. Then whisk the caramel periodically as it continues to cool. The caramel will keep in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.


CA N D I E D F R U I T

/

yield 1 cup (6 ounces/170 g)

/

When you candy fruit, you are replacing the water that is naturally in the cells of the fruit with sugar. At Tartine, most of the fruit that we candy for baking is quickly made and is quickly used. Our method won’t keep fruits in perfect condition for a long time, which is the goal of most commercial candied fruit makers and was also the goal of home cooks in the past, who candied their own fruits to store over the fall and winter months. The traditional method of preservation (which is still often seen in Europe, especially around the holidays) calls for cooking the fruit over a period of several days in sugar Water

1 1⁄2 cups

12 oz/375 ml

syrup that becomes progressively denser. The syrup on the

Sugar

1 1⁄2

10 1⁄2

fruit dries, developing a thin shell, and the fruit will last

Light corn syrup (optional)

2 tbsp

Fruit, cut or pitted as needed (see Note, below)

cups

oz/300 g

indefinitely without refrigeration. 30 ml

The following method will give you a product that still has the character and flavor of fresh fruit, a quality 2 cups

12 oz/340 g

missing in the long-keepers. Fruits that have a strong cell structure to start stand up best to simmering in the sugar syrup. Quince, cherries, melon rind, pineapple, and

kumquats are all good choices. Fruits that have weaker cell structures, such as berries, don’t hold up to the candying process. KITCHEN NOTES:

The addition of corn syrup to the sugar syrup prevents the sugar from crystallizing if the

fruit is stored for more than a few days. Usually I only make as much candied fruit as I need at the time, so a larger batch and use the corn syrup. You can also use cream of tartar or lemon juice in place of the corn syrup. For this recipe, you would add 1⁄4 teaspoon (1 ml) cream of tartar or 2 teaspoons (10 ml) lemon juice. ••••••

In a medium, heavy saucepan, combine the water, sugar, and corn syrup (if using) and heat over medium heat, stirring with a wooden spoon, until the sugar dissolves. Add the fruit, reduce the heat to medium-low, and cook at a gentle simmer until the fruit is translucent. Quince will take the longest, 30 to 45 minutes. Cherries, kumquats, and other soft-fleshed fruits will take less time, usually about 20 minutes. Remove from the heat and pour into a heatproof container. Let cool completely, then store the fruit in its cooking syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Note: If using quince (peeled), melon rind, pineapple, or oranges or grapefruits (with rinds on), cut

into 1⁄4-inch-thick slices. If using cherries, pit but leave whole. If using kumquats, halve or quarter and trim off stem end.

213 / basic bakery recipes

I don’t add it. However, if I end up with lots of cherries or another special fruit with a short season, I make


CA N D I E D Z E S T

/

yield 1 cup (6 ounces/170 g)

/

Candying zest is similar to candying fruit except that you must first blanch it in two changes of water to take away any bitterness and to soften the cells of the rind. Candied zest is always a good thing to have on hand to eat plain after dinner, dipped in chocolate, or to garnish a trifle or a bowl of ice cream, so make the whole batch. KITCHEN NOTES:

See the Kitchen Notes for Candied Fruit

(page 213). The same rules for the use of corn syrup (or cream

Oranges, grapefruits, lemons, or tangerines

3, 2, 5, or 5

Water

2 cups

16 oz/500 ml

Sugar

2 cups

14 oz/395 g

Light corn syrup (optional)

2 tbsp

30 ml

of tartar or lemon juice) apply when candying zest. ••••••

First, remove the zest from each citrus fruit: Using a paring knife, cut a thin slice off the top and bottom (the stem end and blossom end) of the fruit. Score the fruit in wide strips from the top to the bottom end through the rind and white pith, stopping just short of the flesh. Peel the rind away. Reserve the fruit for another use.

Transfer the zest to a small, heavy saucepan, add water to cover, and bring to a boil. Drain into a sieve, return to the pan, cover again with water, and bring to a boil. Drain in the sieve again, and then let the rind strips cool until they can be handled. Using a small spoon, scrape away some of the white pith from the zest. tartine /

214

In a medium, heavy saucepan, combine the water, sugar, and corn syrup (if using) and place over medium heat. Bring to a boil, stirring with a wooden spoon until the sugar dissolves. Add the zest, reduce the heat to medium-low, and cook at a gentle simmer until the zest strips become tender and translucent. The timing will vary according to the type of zest used and how wide the strips are. Generally, it should take no longer than 30 to 45 minutes. If there are still opaque patches visible, keep cooking. If the heat has been too high and the syrup has become too concentrated, add a little more water. You can also add a little water if the zest strips are taking longer than usual to cook. If you want to monitor the temperature of the syrup, to make sure it is at the proper candying point, clip a thermometer onto the side of the pan; the syrup should register 230°F. Remove from the heat and pour into a heatproof container. Let cool completely, then store the zest in the cooking syrup in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.


yudhacookbook.com


yudhacookbook.com SOURCES The following sources for general kitchen equipment, specialty tools,books, and ingredients all offer mail-order by both telephone and Internet.

Atlantic Spice Co. 2 Shore Road North Truro, MA 02652 800-316-7965 www.atlanticspice.com

San Francisco Herb Company 250 Fourteenth Street San Francisco, CA 94103 800-227-4530 www.sfherb.com

Spices, nuts, and seeds.

Nuts, seeds, extracts, and spices.

The Baker’s Catalogue King Arthur Flour P.O. Box 876 Norwich, VT 05055-0876 800-827-6836 www.kingarthurflour.com

Baking and pastry tools and equipment, specialty flours, nut pastes, vanilla beans, and other specialty ingredients. Bridge Kitchenware 711 Third Avenue New York, NY 10022 800-274-3435 www.bridgekitchenware.com

Kitchen tools, bakeware, and pastry and decorating equipment.

Baking and pastry tools and equipment, sheet pans, and nonstick liners; excellent source for books on pastry making.

473 Amsterdam Avenue New York, NY 10024 212-362-9734 800-930-4528 www.scharffenberger.com Chocolate in large and small quantities, cocoa powder, and chocolate nibs. Sur La Table 800-243-0852 www.surlatable.com

Bakeware, molds, springerle molds and pins and other specialty tools, appliances, and books.

217 / sources

J. B. Prince Company 36 East Thirty-first Street, Eleventh Floor New York, NY 10016 800-473-0577 www.jbprince.com

Scharffen Berger Chocolate Maker 914 Heinz Avenue Berkeley, CA 94710 510-981-4050


AC K N OW L E D G M E N T S Chad and I wish to thank the many creative and talented people that we have worked for and with

part of what each other does in a small community,

over the years, and continue to work with today.

often working for each other depending on the time

A list of acknowledgments is like the creative cycle of life that as each person who looks back sees makes perfect sense, although at the time

working for Patrick and camping in the woods with his family. There is an oven in the woods by a creek

A class trip to meet Richard Bourdon of

tartine /

of year. Richard Bourdon had visited Patrick when he was a young man with a new wife and infant son,

the work and life decisions can seem random and haphazard.

218

how the cheese-makers and cow-herders are all a

that we found while on a walk one day that Richard used to bake the bread that he was learning how to

the Berkshire Mountain Bakery in Housatonic,

make from Patrick. The oven still stands, in need of

Massachusetts, was the first of many fortuitous

repair, hopefully to be used by another baker someday.

meetings and working relationships with wonder-

Alan Scott of Ovencrafters was our first

ful bakers and their families. We traveled the snowy

stopping point when we came back from almost

Taconic Parkway all winter in 1992 to learn from

a year with Daniel and Patrick, where we learned

this intuitively gifted baker. Moving to California

more about wood-fire ovens and baking bread

was prompted by meeting one of his former

and pastry and began our first attempts at our own

employees, David Miller, who needed help open-

levain and wood-fire oven baking. Alan is a baker

ing his new bakery in northern California, where

and oven builder–idealist, and continues to inform

we met the previous owner of the bakery, Mimi

and rouse bakers from around the world in tradi-

Poncé. Newly widowed, Mimi let Chad and I pore

tional ways of all kinds of food-making. Our thanks

over her late husband Jean’s copious writings on

to all of the customers at the Berkeley farmer’s

baking as well as his recipes, inspiring us to make

market, as well as the Bolinas People’s Store,

the leap to France. Mimi introduced us to Daniel

Cowgirl Creamery, and Manka’s Inverness Lodge,

Collin, owner of Boulangerie Artisinale des

who all supported our first professional baking

Maures in the Var (a region in southwest France),

venture when no one knew who we were. Thanks to

who had helped Mimi and Jean establish their

our very first employees who helped us develop the

bakery in California some twenty years prior.

“Tartine” style of baking, Catherine Randall, Ellen

Daniel not only was open to teaching us at his

Donati, and Blake Howard, who all moved with us

beautiful wood-fire oven bakery, but allowed us

to our present location in San Francisco, where we

over time to work alongside his employees, Chad

have a much larger and also wonderful team of

with the bread bakers and me with Patrice, the

bakers. Wendy Muster, our café manager, Melissa

pastry chef, who single-handedly stocked the pastry

Roberts, our kitchen manager, along with Maya

shop and was an inspiration particularly to that

Cohlman, Kinsley Daniel, Kate Einqurt, Nuri

facet of our work that we are always striving for,

Fletcher, Sandra Holl, Steve Johnson, Likling

economy of motion. Patrick Leport is the next

Khoo, Zoe Nathan, Arturo Sanchez, Jorge Sanchez,

baker we owe much gratitude to, a close friend

Shannon Tucker, Rosie Villa-Toro, Eric Wolfinger,

of Daniel’s and owner of several wood-fire oven

Nathan Yanko, and Shiho Yoshikawa, all did recipe

bakeries in the Savoie region of France called

testing either directly or unknowingly by virtue of

Boulangerie Savoyarde. Patrick’s bakery was an

beautifully executing and adjusting our recipes

integral part of this alpine village, illustrating

on a daily basis for the café. Thank you as well to


Fausto Sierra-Echeverria, Arturo Matias, and

thanks for your help too, and for the many plates

Pablo Zanches for keeping the kitchen going.

of delicious food I thank you on behalf of all the

Julieann Moore, a baker as well, also did a tremen-

bakers and servers.

dous amount of recipe testing and copious wordprocessing for this project—your good humor apparently has no bounds, as tested by this project.

Howard Teich, we are indebted to you for the guidance that you have given us in so many ways. We are indebted to all of our investors for

Britta Fithian-Zurn, for being my most wonderful

their help in getting the bakery off the ground and

assistant.

for believing in us.

To Katherine Cowles, our agent, whose

Michel Suas, your help in getting us started

first words after our meeting were “you should

and your honest advice over the years has been

write a book”: Your encouragement and shepherd-

valuable and appreciated.

ing through each step of the whole process of cook-

Lotta, the flowers you grow have given us

book writing made this enjoyable enough to make

and the thousands of people who enjoyed cakes and

us want to do it all over again.

tarts decorated with them such beauty and pleasure

Sharon Silva, thank you for the patience, insight, suggestions, and research that you brought to this project. Our thanks as well to everyone at Chronicle Books who have helped guide the book to the beautiful cookbook that it is. Vanessa Dina, our thanks for your lovely

each spring, summer, and fall. To all of the farmers who work to provide us and our customers with exceptional food over the years, our gratitude for doing what you love so beautifully. Alice Waters, you have been an inspiration to us more than you know. We hope that we can

book design; you found the perfect balance of sim-

pass on to those who work with us the same motiva-

plicity and elegance that we strive for in our work

tion and thoughtfulness in cooking, baking, eating,

and translated it to book form.

and enjoying with mindfulness.

Thanks to France Ruffenach, whose photogalive with the work and people we share every day with. From the first day with your assistant, Cedric, we experienced a great creative collaboration. We realize such a satisfying partnership rarely happens, and we value your talent and unique eye. To our many wonderful chef-instructors at our alma mater, the Culinary Institute of America, our respect and admiration for all the styles of bread- and pastry-making that each one taught us, chiefly among them George Higgins. Ray and Judy Klein, a thousand thanks for your help in getting us started and keeping us going over the years, as well as many shared good laughs and advice. Isaac Mejia, so many

219 / acknowledgments

raphy is responsible for making this book come


yudhacookbook.com A ALMON DS

Almond Biscotti, 140 Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Almond-Lemon Tea Cake, 109–11 Almond Rochers, 135 Apple Nougatine Tart, 57–58 Bostock, 31 Bûche de Noël, 101–3 Chocolate Almond Toffee, 155–56 Croissants aux Amandes, 27 Frangipane Cream, 210–11 Frangipane Tart, 53 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63 Spiced Cocktail Nuts, 186 Toasted Almond and Lavender Parfait, 173 APP LES

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Apple Crisp, 120 Apple Nougatine Tart, 57–58 Caramel Apples, 165 Clafoutis, 123 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fruit Galettes, 71–75 varieties of, 120 APR ICO TS

tartine /

220

Cherry and Apricot Dumpling, 121 Clafoutis, 123 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fresh Fruit Tart with Bavarian Filling, 62 Fruit Galettes, 71–75 Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88

Passion Fruit and Lime Bavarian, 84–85 Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 BERR IES

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Blackberry Tart with Rose Geranium Cream, 63–65 Blueberry–Lemon Cream Chiffon Tart, 50 Buttermilk Scones, 37–39 Clafoutis, 123 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fruit Galettes, 71–75 Mixed-Berry Shortcake with BerryCaramel Sauce, 116–17 Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 Trifle of Summer Fruit, 119 BISC OTTI

Almond Biscotti, 140 Hazelnut Biscotti, 139–40 BLAC KBERR IES. BLU EB E RR IE S.

See Berries

See Berries

Blue Cheese Crackers, 185 Bostock, 31 Bourbon Hard Sauce, 107–8 BR EA D PUD DING S

Brioche Bread Pudding, 33–34 Croissant Bread Pudding, 27 Savory Bread Pudding, 42–43 Brioche, 28–30 Bostock, 31 Brioche Bread Pudding, 33–34 Pissaladière on Brioche, 189 Brittle, Peanut, 159 Brownies, 160–61 Bûche de Noël, 101–3 Buttercream, 101–2 Buttermilk Scones, 37–39

B BANANA S

C

Banana Coconut Cream Pie, 56 Banana Cream Pie with Caramel and Chocolate, 54–56 Banana-Date Tea Cake, 104 Roast Banana with Maple Pecans, 174 Basic Chiffon Cake, 201 Basic Chiffon Cake for Bûche de Noël, 202 Bavarian Cream, 84–85

CAK ES

BAV ARIANS , 8 3–90

Fromage Blanc Bavarian, 89–90

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Almond-Lemon Tea Cake, 109–11 Banana-Date Tea Cake, 104 Basic Chiffon Cake, 201 Basic Chiffon Cake for Bûche de Noël, 202 Bavarian, 83–90 Bûche de Noël, 101–3 chiffon, 200–206 Chocolate Chiffon Cake, 206

Chocolate Friands, 151–52 Chocolate Soufflé Cake, 93–95 Coconut Chiffon Cake, 205 Devil’s Food Layer Cake, 96–99 Fromage Blanc Bavarian, 89–90 Génoise, 198–99 Lemon-Buttermilk Pudding Cake, 175 Lemon Chiffon Cake, 203 Lemon Meringue Cake, 81–82 Orange Chiffon Cake, 204 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63 Passion Fruit and Lime Bavarian, 84–85 Pastel de Tres Leches, 91–92 Pumpkin Tea Cake, 105 Steamed Gingerbread Pudding with Bourbon Hard Sauce, 107–8 Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 Trifle of Summer Fruit, 119 Zucchini and Orange Marmalade Tea Cake, 106 Candied Fruit, 213 Candied Zest, 214 Caramel, 212 Caramel Apples, 165 C ASHEWS

Spiced Cocktail Nuts, 186 C HEESE

Blue Cheese Crackers, 185 Cheddar Cheese Crackers, 185 Fromage Blanc Bavarian, 89–90 Gougères, 183–84 Pain au Jambon, 27 Savory Bread Pudding, 42–43 C HERR IES

Candied Fruit, 213 Cherry and Apricot Dumpling, 121 Clafoutis, 123 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fresh Fruit Tart with Bavarian Filling, 62 Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 Chiffon cakes, 200–206 Basic Chiffon Cake, 201 Basic Chiffon Cake for Bûche de Noël, 202 Chocolate Chiffon Cake, 206 Coconut Chiffon Cake, 205 Lemon Chiffon Cake, 203 Orange Chiffon Cake, 204


CHOC OLATE

Banana Cream Pie with Caramel and Chocolate, 54–56 Brownies, 160–61 Bûche de Noël, 101–3 Chocolate Almond Toffee, 155–56 Chocolate Chiffon Cake, 206 Chocolate Friands, 151–52 Chocolate Hazelnut Ramekins, 52 Chocolate Hazelnut Tart, 51–52 Chocolate-Oatmeal-Walnut Cookies, 130–31 Chocolate Pots de Crème, 170 Chocolate Pudding, 177 Chocolate Soufflé Cake, 93–95 Chocolate Tart with Armagnac Prunes, 52 Chocolate Truffles, 157 Deluxe Double-Chocolate Cookies, 141 Devil’s Food Layer Cake, 96–99 Éclairs, 146–47 Ganache, 93–95, 96–99, 151–52 Ice-Cream Sandwich Brownies, 161 Pain au Chocolat, 27 Choux Paste, 146, 183–84 Citrus Glaze, 109, 111 Clafoutis, 123 CO CONU T

CO FFEE

Bûche de Noël, 101–3 Coffee Syrup, 101, 103 Coffee Walnut Tart, 52 CO OKIES

Almond Biscotti, 140 Almond Rochers, 135 Chocolate-Oatmeal-Walnut Cookies, 130–31 Deluxe Double-Chocolate Cookies, 141 Hazelnut Biscotti, 139–40 Orange-Oatmeal-Currant Cookies, 132 Shortbread, 129 Soft Glazed Gingerbread, 136–38 Walnut Cinnamon Slices, 133

Blue Cheese Crackers, 185 Cheddar Cheese Crackers, 185 CR EA MS

Bavarian Cream, 84–85 Frangipane Cream, 210–11 Lemon Cream, 209 Pastry Cream, 207–8 Rose Geranium Cream, 63, 65 Crisp, Apple, 120 Croissants, 21–27 Croissant Bread Pudding, 27 Croissants aux Amandes, 27 Pain au Chocolat, 27 Pain au Jambon, 27 CUR RANTS

Buttermilk Scones, 37–39 Orange-Oatmeal-Currant Cookies, 132 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63

G Galettes, Fruit, 71–75 Ganache, 93–95, 96–99, 151–52 Génoise, 198–99 GINGERB READ

Soft Glazed Gingerbread, 136–38 Steamed Gingerbread Pudding with Bourbon Hard Sauce, 107–8 G LA Z ES

Citrus Glaze, 109, 111 Thread Glaze, 136, 138 Gougères, 183–84 Granita, Lime, 172 GRAP EFR UIT

Candied Fruit, 213 Candied Zest, 214

H D

HAM

Pain au Jambon, 27 Savory Bread Pudding, 42–43

DATE S

Banana-Date Tea Cake, 104 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63 Deluxe Double-Chocolate Cookies, 141 Devil’s Food Layer Cake, 96–99 Dumpling, Cherry and Apricot, 121

H AZE LNU TS

Chocolate Hazelnut Ramekins, 52 Chocolate Hazelnut Tart, 51–52 Hazelnut Biscotti, 139–40 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63

E Éclairs, 146–47

I

F

Ice-Cream Sandwich Brownies, 161 Italian Meringue, 81–82

Far Breton, 123 Flaky Tart Dough, 194–95 Frangipane Cream, 210–11 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fresh Fruit Tart with Bavarian Filling, 62 Friands, Chocolate, 151–52 Fromage Blanc Bavarian, 89–90 FRU ITS.

See also individual fruits

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Candied Fruit, 213 Candied Zest, 214 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fresh Fruit Tart with Bavarian Filling, 62 Fruit Galettes, 71–75

K KU MQU ATS

Candied Fruit, 213 Pecan Maple Pie with Kumquats and Bourbon, 66

L LEMONS

Almond-Lemon Tea Cake, 109–11 Blueberry–Lemon Cream Chiffon Tart, 50 Candied Zest, 214 Citrus Glaze, 109, 111 Lemon Bars on Brown Butter Shortbread, 149–50 Lemon-Buttermilk Pudding Cake, 175 Lemon Chiffon Cake, 203

221 / index

Banana Coconut Cream Pie, 56 Coconut Chiffon Cake, 205 Coconut Syrup, 91 Passion Fruit and Lime Bavarian, 84–85 Pastel de Tres Leches, 91–92

Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 tips for, 115 Trifle of Summer Fruit, 119

CR AC K E RS


Lemon Cream, 209 Lemon Cream Tart, 49 Lemon Meringue Cake, 81–82 Lemon Syrup, 81 Shaker Lemon Pie, 69–70 LIMES

Lime Syrup, 84 Passion Fruit and Lime Bavarian, 84–85 White Chocolate and Lime Parfait with Lime Granita, 172

M Maple-Glazed Pecans, 158 MELONS

Candied Fruit, 213 Meringue, Italian, 81–82 Mixed-Berry Shortcake with BerryCaramel Sauce, 116–17 Mushroom Tart, Wild, 187

N NE CT A RI NES . NUTS.

See Peaches and nectarines

See also individual nuts

Brownies, 160–61 Chocolate Soufflé Cake, 93–95 Spiced Cocktail Nuts, 186

P Pain au Chocolat, 27 Pain au Jambon, 27 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63 Parfait, 171 Roast Banana with Maple Pecans, 174 Toasted Almond and Lavender Parfait, 173 White Chocolate and Lime Parfait with Lime Granita, 172 PASSI ON FR UIT

Bavarian Cream, 84–85 Passion Fruit and Lime Bavarian, 84–85 Pastel de Tres Leches, 91–92 Pastry Cream, 207–8 PEACH ES AND NECTAR INES

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Clafoutis, 123 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fresh Fruit Tart with Bavarian Filling, 62 Fruit Galettes, 71–75 Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 Trifle of Summer Fruit, 119 PEANUTS

O OATS

tartine /

222

Chocolate-Oatmeal-Walnut Cookies, 130–31 Orange-Oatmeal-Currant Cookies, 132 ONIO NS

Pissaladière on Brioche, 189 Savory Bread Pudding, 42–43 OR ANGES

Almond-Lemon Tea Cake, 109–11 Bostock, 31 Candied Fruit, 213 Candied Zest, 214 Citrus Glaze, 109, 111 Orange Chiffon Cake, 204 Orange-Oatmeal-Currant Cookies, 132 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63 Zucchini and Orange Marmalade Tea Cake, 106

Peanut Brittle, 159 Spiced Cocktail Nuts, 186 PEARS

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Clafoutis, 123 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fruit Galettes, 71–75 PECANS

Brownies, 160–61 Chocolate Soufflé Cake, 93–95 Maple-Glazed Pecans, 158 Pecan-Bourbon Pralines, 154 Pecan Maple Pie with Kumquats and Bourbon, 66 Roast Banana with Maple Pecans, 174 PIES

Banana Coconut Cream Pie, 56 Banana Cream Pie with Caramel and Chocolate, 54–56 Pecan Maple Pie with Kumquats and Bourbon, 66

Pumpkin Pie, 67 Shaker Lemon Pie, 69–70 P INEAPP LE

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Candied Fruit, 213 Pissaladière on Brioche, 189 P IST ACH IO NU TS

Bûche de Noël, 101–3 Fromage Blanc Bavarian, 89–90 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63 PLUM S

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Frangipane Tart, 53 Pots de Crème, Chocolate, 170 Pralines, Pecan-Bourbon, 154 P RU NES

Chocolate Tart with Armagnac Prunes, 52 Far Breton, 123 P UDDI NGS

Brioche Bread Pudding, 33–34 Chocolate Pudding, 177 Croissant Bread Pudding, 27 Lemon-Buttermilk Pudding Cake, 175 Savory Bread Pudding, 42–43 Steamed Gingerbread Pudding with Bourbon Hard Sauce, 107–8 PUMPKIN

Pumpkin Pie, 67 Pumpkin Tea Cake, 105

Q Quiche, 40 Q UINC E

Almond Breakfast Cake with Fresh Fruit and Crumble Topping, 35–36 Candied Fruit, 213 Frangipane Tart, 53 Panforte with Candied Quince, 162–63

R R A S P B E R R I E S . See Berries Roast Banana with Maple Pecans, 174 Rochers, Almond, 135 Rose Geranium Cream, 63, 65


TE A C A KES

S SAUC ES

Bourbon Hard Sauce, 107–8 Caramel, 212 Savory Bread Pudding, 42–43 Scones, Buttermilk, 37–39 Shaker Lemon Pie, 69–70 Shortbread, 129 Lemon Bars on Brown Butter Shortbread, 149–50 Shortcake, Mixed-Berry, with Berry Caramel Sauce, 116–17 Soft Glazed Gingerbread, 136–38 Spiced Cocktail Nuts, 186 Steamed Gingerbread Pudding with Bourbon Hard Sauce, 107–8 Strawberries. See Berries Summer Fruit Bavarian, 86–88 Sweet Tart Dough, 196–97 SY RU PS

Coconut Syrup, 91 Coffee Syrup, 101, 103 Lemon Syrup, 81 Lime Syrup, 84

T

Almond-Lemon Tea Cake, 109–11 Banana-Date Tea Cake, 104 Pumpkin Tea Cake, 105 Zucchini and Orange Marmalade Tea Cake, 106 Thread Glaze, 136, 138 Toasted Almond and Lavender Parfait, 173 Toffee, Chocolate Almond, 155–56 Trifle of Summer Fruit, 119 Truffles, Chocolate, 157

W WALNUTS

Banana-Date Tea Cake, 104 Brownies, 160–61 Chocolate-Oatmeal-Walnut Cookies, 130–31 Chocolate Soufflé Cake, 93–95 Coffee Walnut Tart, 52 Walnut Cinnamon Slices, 133 Zucchini and Orange Marmalade Tea Cake, 106 White Chocolate and Lime Parfait with Lime Granita, 172 Wild Mushroom Tart, 187

T ANGER INES

Candied Zest, 214 TARTS

Zest, Candied, 214 Zucchini and Orange Marmalade Tea Cake, 106

223 / index

Apple Nougatine Tart, 57–58 Blackberry Tart with Rose Geranium Cream, 63–65 Blueberry–Lemon Cream Chiffon Tart, 50 Chocolate Hazelnut Tart, 51–52 Chocolate Tart with Armagnac Prunes, 52 Coffee Walnut Tart, 52 Flaky Tart Dough, 194–95 Frangipane Tart, 53 Fresh Fruit Tart, 60 Fresh Fruit Tart with Bavarian Filling, 62 Fruit Galettes, 71–75 Lemon Cream Tart, 49 Pissaladière on Brioche, 189 Sweet Tart Dough, 196–97 Wild Mushroom Tart, 187

Z


yudhacookbook.com

FranceRufah Pastry chef Elisabeth M. Prueitt and her husband, renowned baker Chad Robertson, arc the co-owners

of Tartine Bakery in San Francisco. They both trained in the Culinary Arts at the Baking and Pastry schools of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York. Elisabeth and Chad traveled, trained, and cooked in France and upon their return, opened Bay Village Bakery in Point Reyes Station, California,

where they baked bread in a wood-fire brick oven and created rustically elegant pastry using many of the techniques they learned abroad. Chad's bread garnered the attention of Alain Ducasse, who wrote about

the couple in his book. Harvesting Excellence. They then relocated Bay Village Bakery to Mill Valley, where

Elisabeth's pastry and professional reputation caught the attention of local food lovers who recognized the integrity of fresh, often organic ingredients and the attention to detail in her desserts. Tartine Bakery

opened in 2002, where they continue to delight their customers, who wait patiently in a line out the door, with their cookies, tarts, cakes, and confections. Tartine Bakery has been rated in the Zagat Surrey as Best Bakery and Best Breakfast in San Francisco. Elisabeth and Chad were nominees for the 2006 James Beard Outstanding Pastry Chefs, National award.

France Ruffenach is a San Francisco-based photographer whose work has appeared in Martha Stewart Living, Real Simple, Bon AppĂŠtit. and Travel & Leisure magazines, as well as in Cupcakes!, Inner Beauty, Everyday Celebrations. RosĂŠ, and Knitting Pretty, all published by Chronicle Books.

Tartine by elisabeth  
Tartine by elisabeth  
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