Page 1

Secrets to Creamy Risotto THE BEST OF

Classic Dishes & Fresh Takes EASY PASTA SAUCES

and

RAGÙS Perfect Homemade

RAVIOLI Throw an

Antipasti Party

Heavenly Desserts REAL ITALIAN 2017

Orecchiette with Roasted Broccolini, Burst Tomatoes & Italian Sausage, p. 54


contents REAL ITALIAN 2017, NO. 119

THE BEST OF

Real Italian

26 36 48 64 76

p. 52

p. 66

appetizers soups & salads main dishes side dishes desserts

p. 84

Arugula and Fried Mozzarella Salad with Tomato-Basil Vinaigrette, p. 45

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CONTENTS

87

93

86

93 93 90 107

D E PA R T M E N T S 8

Welcome

10 On the Web 16

20

Italian Cheeses

Everyone knows ParmigianoReggiano, but there are a lot of Italian cheeses to love. Stock up on these favorites and start cooking.

Classic Sauces

Seven recipes to dress up your pasta.

86

Test Kitchen Tips, techniques, ingredients.

92

Credits

93

Sources

94

Nutrition

96

Recipe Index

98

Last Bite

This versatile, brightly flavored butter is tasty slathered on toast, tossed with vegetables, and more.

Pp 4

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Cover photography by Scott Phillips; food styling by Ronne Day.


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24 Medjool dates, pitted

Press a piece of the cheese into each date and gently pinch the date closed to enclose the cheese.

12 slices of Prosciutto di Parma (about 4½ oz.), sliced in half lengthwise

Fold one piece of the prosciutto in half lengthwise to create a long strip, then wrap snugly

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w e lc o m e

the best of

Real Italian Issue Editor Sarah Opdahl

Issue Art Director Brittany Carlson

Cover Art Director Teresa Fernandes Issue Copy Editor Diane Sinitsky

Editorial Director Kathy Kingsley

Art Director Teresa Fernandes

Senior Editor Joanne Smart

Food Editor Lisa Lahey

Senior Copy/ Chris Hoelck Production Editor

Staff Photographer Scott Phillips

Senior Food Ronne Day Editor/Stylist Food Editor/ Diana Andrews Test Kitchen Manager

Artichoke Torta, p. 28

Art/Production Tinsley Morrison Coordinator

Test Kitchen Assistant Joan Velush Test Kitchen Intern William Stewart

Mangia!

Editors at Large Jennifer Armentrout Susie Middleton

italian food is beloved for its crave - worthy dishes , from

Contributing Editors Abigail Johnson Dodge Rebecca Freedman Tony Rosenfeld Molly Stevens Jill Silverman Hough (drinks) Joanne Weir

fresh pasta and creamy polenta to rich meatballs and flavorful ragùs. Though going out for Italian food is an option, of course, we think it’s even more fun to cook authentic meals at home. That’s why we’ve developed this special issue of Fine Cooking, featuring a

Senior Managing Editor, Carolyn Mandarano Books

range of delicious and satisfying Italian dishes: classic starters, like

Senior Web Producer Sarah Breckenridge

Salad with Olives and Garlic Croutons on p. 41; traditional main

Video Director Colin Russell

courses, like the Eggplant Parmigiana on p. 53; and sweet finales, such as the luscious Panna Cotta on p. 84, to name a few. We hope they’ll inspire you to start cooking Real Italian tonight! —The Fine Cooking Editors

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the tasty Caponata on p. 34; refreshing salads, such as the Escarole

r e a l i ta l i a n 2 0 1 7

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Stunning Stuffed Pastas From ravioli to tortellini, really good stuffed pasta can be revelatory: savory or rich fillings nestled in delicate, ethereal pasta sheets, cooked until just tender and simply sauced. But if you didn’t grow up learning the technique from your nonna, our collection of authentic recipes and how-tos can help you master the art of stuffed pasta. Go to Fine Cooking.com/stuffed-pasta.

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White Pizza Recipes

We love traditional pizza, but lately, it’s white pizza that has us swooning. Some of the country’s best pizza places feature them, and we’ve gathered their recipes into this collection. These are not ricotta- and mozzarellaladen pizzas but brilliant combinations of traditional thin crusts and creative toppings (think potatoes, pistachios, and broccolini to name a few), adding up to incredible flavor and amazing texture. See FineCooking.com/ white-pizzas.

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Sweet, Nutty Grana Padano Whether it stars on a cheese platter, tops a gratin, or flavors a sauce or filling, as in the recipes here, Grana Padano is a must for the weekly menu. An aged, hard cheese, Grana Padano is made with semi-skim milk from the Po River valley of northern Italy, following a tradition created by monks in 1100 AD. Available in three vintages (see below), Grana Padano has a remarkable taste and texture that guarantees it’s a cheese you’ll want to keep on hand.

Meatballs with Roasted Tomato Sauce Serves 4

T H RE E DE LI C I OUS V I NTAGE S • Aged between 9 and 16 months, Grana Padano PDO is softer and less grainy than mature versions. Pale yellow in color, its taste is mild, milky, and delicate. Add this cheese to sauces and gratins, shave it on salads, and more.The lightness of this cheese makes it perfect with young white and sparkling wines. • With a soft straw-yellow color, Grana Padano “over 16 months” has a grainier consistency and crumbles when cut. The sweetness in its flavor is less noticeable, and it has a stronger, tangy taste that equally suits it for grating or cheese platters. Try it in dishes ranging from quiche and vegetable pie to risotto and soup. It pairs well with young, fresh red wines of moderate intensity and body.

2 Tbs. olive oil 1¼ cups finely chopped onions 3 Tbs. finely chopped garlic 2 tsp. dried basil 1 tsp. dried oregano 1 tsp. crushed dried rosemary 4 14.5-oz. cans fireroasted tomatoes 1 14.5-oz. can tomato sauce 2½ cups finely grated Grana Padano; more shaved for serving Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1½ lb. 90% lean ground beef 1 cup fresh bread crumbs 4 slices bacon, finely chopped 1 large egg, beaten 1 Tbs. toasted crushed fennel seed

In a large pot, add the olive oil

• Aged for at least 20 months, Grana Padano RISERVA is distinctly grainy in texture, rich in flavor, and deep straw-yellow in color. Fabulous on a cheese platter, it is also delicious cooked. Due to its distinct flavor, it should be enjoyed with a soft red, intense, tannic wine that has a moderate to high alcohol content and a lingering and persistent flavor, but also with a full-bodied and rich red wine.

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over medium high heat until shimmering. Add 1 cup onions and sauté until beginning to brown. Add 2 Tbs. garlic, the basil, oregano, and rosemary and continue to sauté for another 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes and sauce, 1½ cups water, 1½ cups Grana Padano, ½ tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. pepper. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a simmer. In a medium bowl, combine the beef, breadcrumbs, bacon, egg, remaining cup of finely grated Grana Padano, remaining 1 Tbs. garlic, fennel seed, ½ tsp. salt, and ¼ tsp. pepper. Shape into small meatballs, about 1½ inches in diameter and drop into the simmering sauce. Continue cooking for an hour, until the sauce is thickened and the meatballs are cooked through. Add more water as needed. Serve the meatballs and sauce with pasta and top with shaved Grana Padano.

Tagliatelle with Broccolini Pesto Serves 4

¾ cup plus 1 Tbs. extra virgin olive oil 1 Tbs. finely chopped garlic 2 bunches (16 oz.) Broccolini, trimmed, chopped, and blanched until just tender (reserve ¼ cup buds for garnish) 2 oz. finely grated Grana Padano; more grated or shaved for serving ½ cup toasted walnuts ¼ cup chopped sun-dried tomatoes 3 Tbs. honey ¼ tsp. red pepper flakes Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 12 oz. tagliatelle pasta, cooked to al dente, some pasta water reserved

In a small skillet, heat 1 Tbs. oil and the garlic over medium heat until the garlic begins to sizzle. Transfer to a food processor, then add the Broccolini, Grana Padano, walnuts, sun-dried tomatoes, honey, pepper flakes, ¾ tsp. salt, and ½ tsp. pepper and pulse. Add the remaining oil in pulses until combined. Toss the pasta and pesto with enough pasta water to loosen. Divide the pasta among four large shallow bowls and top with some more Grana Padano.


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Italian Cheeses Everyone knows Parmigiano-Reggiano, but there are a lot of Italian cheeses to love. Stock up on these favorites and start cooking.

Mozzarella A mild-tasting Italian cheese made from cow’s milk, mozzarella comes in two distinct types. Fresh mozzarella is ball-shaped and packed in a whey-water mixture. The balls range in size from 8-oz. softballs to tiny bocconcini. The texture is soft and springy, and the flavor is sweet and milky. Smoked mozzarella is made from the fresh version and has a toasty appearance and smoky flavor. Lowmoisture mozzarella is sold as plastic-wrapped bricks and is a popular cheese for topping pizza in the U.S. because of its shreddable texture and meltability. Low-moisture mozzarella is available in both whole-milk and part-skim versions; in our test kitchen, we’ve found that whole-milk mozzarella tends to melt more smoothly. Most supermarkets sell fresh mozzarella in their deli section, though for a real treat, seek out the artisanal fresh mozzarella made by local Italian cheese shops. Lowmoisture mozzarella is sold in the dairy section of the supermarket with other plastic-wrapped block cheeses. Keep fresh mozzarella submerged in the liquid it’s sold in, and use it within two days of buying. TRY IT: Eggplant Parmigiana, p. 53

Grana Padano While we love Parmigiano-Reggiano for its salty, nutty, complex flavor, it has a rival that deserves to be better known in the United States: Grana Padano. Grana Padano has a slightly sweeter and subtler flavor than that of ParmigianoReggiano and is equally capable of holding its own on a cheese board or shaved over carpaccio or grated over pasta. They’re both aged cow’s milk “grana” cheeses, meaning they have a grainy texture resulting from amino acid crystals. Both are produced using similar methods in the Po River Valley of northern Italy, but the PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) of Grana Padano covers a far larger area than that of Parmigiano-Reggiano, so it’s less expensive. Grana Padano should be kept in the refrigerator, tightly wrapped in parchment, for up to three months. Rewrap it in a new piece of parchment every time you use it. TRY IT: Raw Artichoke, Portobello, and Fennel Salad, p. 43

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Ricotta Salata Ricotta salata is a crumbly cheese that makes a great garnish for pasta and tacos. Ricotta, Italian for “recooked,” is a product of the waste-not process of reheating—or recooking—the whey produced from making other cheeses, like Parmigiano-Reggiano, and adding citric acid to make new curds. It can be made from the whey of cow’s, sheep’s, or goat’s milk. To make ricotta salata (“salted ricotta”), the ricotta (see p. 19) is mixed with salt, pressed for firmness, and aged for two to four weeks. Keep ricotta salata well wrapped in the refrigerator. TRY IT: Shaved Squash Carpaccio with Capers and Ricotta Salata, p. 69

Asiago A semi-firm Italian cow’s milk cheese, Asiago has a mild, slightly tangy flavor. Most recipes that call for grating the cheese are recommending aged Asiago, which is also the most widely available kind in the United States. Aged Asiago is firm and slightly spicy, perfect for grating over pasta and salad or for serving as part of a cheese course. Fresh Asiago (Asiago Pressato) has a creamy yet delicate flavor and melts well. It’s always best to buy a chunk of cheese and grate it yourself rather than buying preshredded, which dries out and loses flavor fast. A pale beige interior with small holes throughout is expected. The rind of Asiago is not eaten, so remove it before shredding or grating. If serving as part of a cheese course, let it warm up at room temperature. Wrap the cheese tightly in plastic wrap and keep refrigerated. TRY IT: Gratinéed Tomatoes with Asiago and Fresh Herbs, p. 75

Burrata Burrata (boor-rah-tah), a fresh mozzarella-like cheese from the Italian region of Puglia, is prized for its two textures (a soft, elastic, spongy outer layer wrapped around a creamy, oozy interior) and its rich milky flavor. Some say Burrata (derived from burro,, butter in Italian) was first created as a means to use up leftover scraps of mozzarella cheese. The cheesemakers would add cream to the scraps and wrap them in a pouch made from a larger piece of mozzarella. As with regular mozzarella, Burrata was originally made with water buffalo milk but is now more typically made with cow’s milk. Best sliced with a serrated knife, Burrata is delicious paired with crusty bread and flavorful ingredients like prosciutto, tomatoes, olives, nuts, and herbs. Look for Burrata in well-stocked groceries, gourmet markets, and cheese shops. Highly perishable, burrata should be eaten within 24 hours of purchase and is considered past its prime after about 48 hours. TRY IT:: Heirloom Tomato and Burrata Salad with Tomato Conserva Vinaigrette, p. 39

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I TA L I A N C H E E S E S

Mascarpone Mascarpone is a thick and buttery double- to triplecream cow’s milk cheese (containing over 60% and often over 75% milk fat). It’s slightly sweet with a faint yellow hue and spans dishes from starters to sweets. Try mixing mascarpone into pasta with asparagus and mushrooms, or fold it into polenta. For simple desserts, serve mascarpone with fresh figs, pears, or berries, or dollop a spoonful alongside fruit pies or tarts. Keep mascarpone tightly covered in the refrigerator. TRY IT: Tiramisù, p. 83

Fontina Rich and nutty, Fontina cheese is a semi-soft cow’s milk variety from Italy. Fontina is pale cream and features holes known as “eyes.” This cheese is equally delicious served on a cheese platter or when melted in a cooked dish. Try Fontina in gratins, on tarts, and featured in sandwiches. When shopping for Fontina, look for cheeses with even color. Depending on how aged the cheese is, there may be a strong aroma. Semi-soft soft cheeses like Fontina should be eaten within 10 to 14 days. TRY IT: Grilled Prosciutto, Fontina, and Sun-Dried Tomatoes, Finecooking.com

Gorgonzola There are two varieties of Gorgonzola: Mountain (aged) and Dolce (sweet). Both are made from cow’s milk. Mountain Gorgonzola has a crumbly, dry texture and a potent blue flavor that’s best if left unheated and served with fruits like pears and apples or with nuts and sweet wine to offset its intensity. Dolce Gorgonzola is sweet and mild with a rich, creamy interior that makes it an excellent choice for cooking. It has an ivory-colored interior that can be lightly or thickly streaked with bluish-green veins in layers. When aged more than six months, the flavor and aroma of Gorgonzola can be quite strong—sometimes downright stinky because of its brine-washed rind. Because of this tendency, pay particular attention to the quality of any Gorgonzola you buy (an interior that’s more yellow than ivory is another sign of excessive aging). Wrap Gorgonzola in parchment and store in the refrigerator. TRY IT: Porcini Mushroom and Gorgonzola Risotto, p. 72

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Ricotta Ricotta—which translates from Italian as “recooked”—is a soft, fresh cheese made from the whey left over in the production of other cheeses. In the traditional method, the whey is left to ferment for up to 24 hours, then heated until the protein in the whey forms into small curds. These days, ricotta is often made with a combination of whey and fresh milk. The texture is creamy, though slightly grainy, and the flavor is milky and sweet. Ricotta is a common ingredient in Italian desserts, as well as filled and baked pasta dishes. Keep fresh ricotta well wrapped in the refrigerator and use within two days (even after one day, you’ll notice a decline in quality). Supermarket ricotta will last several days longer in the fridge once it’s opened. TRY IT: Cannoli Cookies, p. 79

Pecorino Pecorino is often misunderstood. To those who buy it in American supermarkets, it’s a dry, tangy, oversalted hard cheese that’s hardly fit for grating onto pasta, let alone enjoying with wine and crackers. But there’s much more to Pecorino than meets the aisles. There are dozens of varieties, each with its own texture and flavor. In some of its best versions, Pecorino is a rich, earthy, pleasantly sharp and peppery cheese with a firm yet creamy texture that’s perfect for nibbling. Pecorino (derived from pecora, Italian for sheep) is a sheep’s milk cheese that’s been produced all over central and southern Italy since well before the rise of the Roman

Empire. Made with either pasteurized or unpasteurized milk, Pecorino can be aged anywhere from 20 days—resulting in a softtextured, mild-flavored cheese with an edible rind— to up to a year for harder, more pungent cheeses. Try Pecorino cheese on a cheese plate with jam or mostarda or grate it on pasta, risotto, or soups. Pecorino should be loosely wrapped and stored in the refrigerator. TRY IT:: Amatriciana Sauce, p. 22

Provolone Provolone is an Italian cheese made from cow’s milk. A sturdy cheese, provolone is perfect for slicing or shredding and featuring in sandwiches or on pizzas. The flavors can range from mild and sweet to sharp, based on the amount of time it ages. Store provolone wrapped in parchment and then plastic in the refrigerator. TRY IT: Baked Provolone with Tomatoes, Marjoram, and Balsamic, p. 28

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Classic Sauces Seven recipes to dress up your pasta.

basil pesto To make more than 1 cup of pesto, pound or process multiple batches instead of doubling the recipe in a single batch. Yields about 1 cup 33/4 oz. (5 cups packed) fresh basil leaves 1/4 oz. (1/4 cup) pine nuts

1 large clove garlic, peeled

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil; more for storing

1 oz. grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano (1/2 cup from a box grater; 1 cup from a rasp grater)

To make pesto in a mortar

Put 1 cup of the basil in a mortar and pound and grind with the pestle until broken down. Continue adding basil to the mortar, 1 cup at a time, until all of the basil is broken down nearly to a paste. Add the pine nuts, garlic, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/8 tsp. pepper and continue to mash until completely broken down. Moving the pestle in a circular motion, gradually mix in the oil and then the cheese. Season to taste with more salt and pepper. To make pesto in a food processor

Pulse the basil, pine nuts, garlic, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/8 tsp. pepper in a food processor until finely chopped. With the motor running, slowly pour the olive oil into the feed tube and process, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl as needed, until the mixture forms a thick paste. Transfer to a medium bowl and stir in the Parmigiano. Season to taste with more salt and pepper. To store: You can store pesto in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week or in the freezer for up to 3 months. To refrigerate, transfer the pesto to an airtight container and pour enough oil over it to create a thin layer. This will prevent the pesto from oxidizing and changing color. To freeze, omit the oil layer and portion the pesto into small plastic freezer bags or ice cube trays so you can defrost only as much as you’ll use at one time. If using ice cube trays, freeze until solid, and then transfer the cubes to a plastic freezer bag for storage. Defrost overnight in the refrigerator.

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ways to use pesto A sauce this versatile (and delicious) is perfect for pasta, but you can also: • • • • •

dress a cold potato or pasta salad stir into vegetable soup use as a topping for grilled meats and fish spread onto sandwiches scoop onto slices of toasted baguette or crackers


fresh tomato and basil sauce A wide, shallow pan is essential to creating this fast sauce. Use a 10- or 11-inch skillet whose wide surface area and lack of depth allow the tomatoes to cook down quickly. Top with ricotta salata, if you like. Serves 4 to 5

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

3 large cloves garlic, sliced as thinly as possible

2 lb. cherry tomatoes, rinsed and halved

1 tsp. kosher salt; more to taste

Freshly ground black pepper

1 cup loosely packed fresh basil leaves (from about one small bunch), very thinly sliced

In a 10- or 11-inch sauté pan, heat the oil and garlic over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is softened but not browned, about 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes, salt, and pepper to taste. Toss gently to coat and then raise the heat to medium. Simmer, stirring occasionally and adjusting the heat to maintain a lively but not too vigorous simmer, until the tomatoes have been reduced to a thick, pulpy sauce, 15 to 20 minutes. Remove from the heat. Sprinkle on the basil and stir to combine thoroughly.

alfredo sauce Just a few basic ingredients—butter, flour, milk, and nutmeg— make up this rich, creamy sauce. Toss it with your favorite pasta or try layering it in a lasagne. Yields about 11/2 cups

11/2 oz. (3 Tbs.) unsalted butter 3 Tbs. unbleached all-purpose flour

13/4 cups whole milk, heated 1/2 tsp. kosher salt 1/8 tsp. freshly ground black pepper Small pinch of freshly grated nutmeg

In a 2-quart saucepan, melt the butter over medium-low heat. Add the flour and cook, whisking constantly for 2 to 3 minutes. Do not let the mixture brown. Slowly whisk in the hot milk and bring just to a simmer, whisking frequently. Reduce the heat to low and cook, whisking often,

until the sauce has thickened to a creamy, gravy-like consistency and no longer tastes of raw flour, 6 to 8 minutes for a single batch, 10 to 12 minutes for a double batch. Remove from the heat and whisk in the salt, pepper, and nutmeg. If not using right away, transfer to a bowl and press a piece of plastic wrap directly on the surface of the sauce to keep a skin from forming. Plan to use the sauce within 30 minutes because it thickens if it’s left to sit for too long. If that should happen, add a little warm milk and whisk well to thin it.

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c l a s s i c s au c e s

amatriciana sauce Sweet cherry tomatoes and salty pancetta star in this tasty pan sauce. It’s great for more than just pasta: Try spooning it over polenta or seared pork chops. Serves 4 to 5

2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium red onion, cut into 1/4-inch dice (to yield about 2 cups)

2 1/4-inch-thick slices pancetta, cut into short strips (1/4 inch wide and 1/2 inch long)

11/2 lb. cherry tomatoes, rinsed and halved 1/8 tsp. cayenne

ragù alla bolognese Gently toss fresh or dried pasta with this ragù the Italian way, ladling it in gradually so it evenly coats the noodles but ­doesn’t overwhelm or saturate them. Yields about 41/2 cups, enough for 11/4 to 11/2 lb. of pasta; serves 6 to 8

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 small yellow onion, finely diced

1/2 medium carrot, peeled and finely diced

1 medium rib celery, finely diced

1 lb. ground pork (preferably from the ­shoulder)

1/4 lb. thickly sliced Prosciutto di Parma, very finely diced Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste 1/2 cup dry white wine

1 2  8-oz. can Italian plum tomatoes with their juices, passed through a food mill to ­remove their seeds

1 cup homemade or lower-salt canned chicken broth or beef broth

1/2 cup hot milk

Heat the butter and oil in a small Dutch oven or a wide, heavybased sauce­pan over medium heat. When the butter begins to foam, add the onion, carrot, and celery and cook, stirring ­occasionally, until they’re lightly

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golden and soft, 5 to 7 minutes. Raise the heat to high, add the pork and prosciutto, and season lightly with salt and pepper. Cook, stirring and breaking up the pork with a large spoon until the meat loses its raw color, 3 to 5 minutes (the meat won’t brown). Add the wine and cook, stirring, until it’s almost completely reduced, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the tomatoes and the broth. As soon as the liquid comes to a boil, reduce the heat to low and cook the sauce at a bare simmer for 2 hours. Add the hot milk and simmer half an hour longer, stirring occasionally. At this point, the sauce should have a thick but saucy consistency and a light reddish-brown color. If the sauce has t­ hickened before the c ­ ooking time is up, cover the pot. If the sauce is still too thin at the end of cooking, continue to simmer gently, uncovered, until it’s thick. Taste and adjust the seasonings before serving tossed with your favorite pasta.

1 tsp. kosher salt; more to taste

In a 10- or 11-inch sauté pan, heat the oil and onion over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the onion is softened but not browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Add the pancetta and cook, stirring, until the pancetta has begun to render its fat and the onion and pancetta are roughly the same muted shade of purple, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the tomatoes, cayenne, and salt. Simmer, stirring occasionally and adjusting the heat to maintain a lively but not too vigorous simmer, until the tomatoes have been reduced to a thick, pulpy sauce, 15 to 20 minutes.


OUR AGING ROOMS At BelGioioso, cheesemaking is an art. Our American GranaÂŽ, an 18-month Extra Aged Parmesan, takes patience to produce. We deliberately choose not to cut corners and aging rooms are our commitment to traditional cheesemaking methods. By aging on natural wooden shelves, our Master Cheesemakers follow the proper steps to ensure what is best for this cheese. Available in the specialty cheese section in wedges and shredded cups.

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c l a s s i c s au c e s

quick marinara with toasted garlic and rosemary There’s no need to open a jar of sauce when you can whisk this homemade creation together in the time it takes to cook a pot of pasta. This is a large batch, so use the extra as a base for stews, pizzas, and sautés. It will also keep in the freezer for at least 3 months. Yields about 51/2 cups of sauce

2 28-oz. cans plum tomatoes with their juices (6 cups) (preferably San Marzano)

3 Tbs. olive oil

3 medium cloves garlic, chopped

1 tsp. chopped fresh rosemary

1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

vodka sauce This take on a favorite Italian-American dish is more tomatoey than most versions. For a creamier sauce, add another 2 Tbs. cream. Toss with 12 oz. penne. Serves 4

1 28-oz. can whole peeled plum tomatoes in juice, preferably San Marzano

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

5 large cloves garlic, smashed

1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes 1/3 cup vodka 1/2 cup heavy cream 11/2 tsp. kosher salt 1/2 cup coarsely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano

2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Pour the tomatoes into a large bowl and use your hands to break them up. Heat the oil and garlic in a 12-inch skillet over mediumlow heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is golden brown, about 4 minutes. Discard the garlic. Add the tomatoes (and their juice) and the red pepper flakes to the garlic oil; raise the heat to medium high and cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens slightly, about 8 minutes. Add the vodka and cook for about 2 minutes to mellow the alcohol. Stir in the heavy cream and salt. Toss with pasta and top with coarsely grated cheese and parsley.

For more classic sauces: • sausage ragù, p. 52 • carbonara, p. 58 • clam, p. 50 • piccata, p. 54 • brown butter, p. 61 • scampi, p. 57

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1 tsp. granulated sugar (optional)

Strain off and discard 1/2 cup of the tomatoes’ juices (this will give the sauce a thicker consistency). Heat the oil and garlic in a 4-quart saucepan over medium heat until the garlic sizzles steadily and turns golden brown in places, about 3 minutes. Add the rosemary and red pepper flakes;

reduce the heat to medium low, and cook, stirring, for 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes and their remaining juices, 1 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper, and bring to a boil. Reduce to a gentle simmer, cover with the lid ajar, and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, so the flavors meld and the sauce reduces slightly. Using an immersion blender or working in batches in a regular blender, purée the sauce. Taste the sauce and season with more salt, pepper, or red pepper flakes if needed. If too acidic, add the sugar. Serve immediately or let cool to room temperature and refrigerate for up to 1 week, or freeze in zip-top bags or airtight containers.


©2016 SALOV North America Corp.

For 150 years, Filippo Berio has honored our founder’s passion, artistry and commitment to excellence. Our exquisite olive oils, crafted by using only the finest olives, help inspire cooking enthusiasts all over the world to create meals that are simple, flavorful, and healthful.

For recipes and more, visit www.filippoberio.com or text “Berio” to 313131 and have recipes delivered to your inbox.


Artichoke Torta, p. 28


Appetizers antipasti Kick off the party with zesty olives, cheese crisps, and more.

Artichoke Torta, p. 28 Baked Provolone with Tomatoes, Marjoram, and Balsamic, p. 28 Pears and Arugula Wrapped in Prosciutto, p. 29 Sweet and Sour Pickled Peppers, p. 30 Parmigiano-Pistachio Frico, p. 31 Arancini, p. 32 Bruschetta with Fig and Walnut Anchoiade, p. 32 Seared Carpaccio-Style Shoulder Petite Tender, p. 33 Zesty Lemon Olives, p. 34 Sweet and Sour Eggplant Relish (Caponata), p. 34 Pan-Fried Polenta with Mushrooms, p. 35


appetizers

artichoke torta Choose small, tender artichokes, about the size of a golf ball. If these aren’t available, use larger chokes, paring them down to their bottoms, removing the choke with the sharp edge of a spoon, and cutting them into pieces before cooking them. If you’re in a hurry, use frozen artichoke hearts. (See the photo on p. 26.) Yields one 8-inch torta; serves 10 12 small spring artichokes or 5 to 6 globe artichokes

2 Tbs. olive oil

2 shallots, minced

Juice of 1/4 lemon 1/2 cup water Kosher salt

1 bunch (10 oz.) spinach, cleaned and stemmed 8 large eggs

1/2 cup half-and-half Freshly ground black pepper to taste 3/4 cup grated creamy Havarti cheese (also called Dofino) 1/2 cup grated ParmigianoReggiano or Grana Padano

1 small bunch fresh basil, stemmed and coarsely chopped

2 oz. prosciutto, sliced thin and cut into small squares

Heat the oven to 375°F. Pare the artichokes down to the tender centers (or bottoms if using larger arti­chokes). Cut them in half. In a medium nonstick frying pan, heat 1 Tbs. of the olive oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook about 1 minute. Add the artichokes, lemon juice, and water, and sprinkle with 1/2 tsp. salt. Cover and cook until the artichokes are tender in the center when pierced with the tip of a knife, 10 to 20 minutes depending on their size (for frozen artichokes, thaw them and cook 5 minutes). Uncover and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until all the liquid has evaporated. Let cool. In a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the spinach for 2 minutes. Drain in a ­col­ander and refresh with cold ­water. With

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your hands, squeeze out as much water as pos­sible. Transfer the spinach to a cutting board and chop it finely. Crack the eggs into a large bowl, pour in the half-and-half, and whisk to combine. Season with about 1 tsp. salt and a few turns of the pepper mill. Add the cheeses, chopped spinach, basil, prosciutto, and the artichoke mixture and stir well. Choose a baking dish or a small roasting pan large enough to hold an 8-inch nonstick f­ rying pan. Add hot w ­ ater to the dish to cover about one-quarter of the frying pan’s depth. This will act as a water bath for c ­ ooking the torta. Heat the remaining 1 Tbs. olive oil in the nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat until a drop of the egg mixture sputters when added to the pan. Add the egg m ­ ixture and cook for 4 to 5 minutes over medium-high heat. With a spatula, lift the torta away from the edges of the pan to gauge its progress; when you see that the torta has set around the edges, remove the pan from the heat and immediately put it in the water bath to stop the browning. Put the pan and water bath in the oven and bake u ­ ntil the torta is firm in the center, 40 to 45 minutes. Remove the frying pan from the water bath, cut the torta into 1-inch chunks, and turn it out, bottom side up, on a cutting board. Let cool for 10 to 15 minutes. Serve the torta pieces, top side up, at room temperature.

baked provolone with tomatoes, marjoram, and balsamic Thick slices of provolone baked under a tangy-sweet tomato topping make a to-die-for starter or a light lunch with a green salad. Serve with warm, crusty bread. Serves 4

4 1/4-inch-thick rounds provolone cheese

1 medium tomato (about 8 oz.), cored and cut into small dice

1 small clove garlic, minced

1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 tsp. chopped fresh marjoram or oregano

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 tsp. balsamic vinegar

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F. Arrange four 5- to 6-inch individual shallow gratin dishes on a rimmed baking sheet. Put 1 round of provolone in each dish. In a small bowl, combine the tomato, garlic, oil, marjoram, 1/4 tsp. salt, and a few grinds of pepper. Divide the tomato mixture among the four gratin dishes, scattering it over and around the cheese. Bake until the cheese is slightly melted, about 5 minutes. Drizzle each serving with 1/4 tsp. of the balsamic vinegar and serve immediately.


pears and arugula wrapped in prosciutto Sweet and salty, this appetizer is sure to please guests. Yields 12 pieces 12 thin slices Prosciutto di Parma (about 1/3 lb.) 12 leaves arugula, thick stem removed; more for garnish

2 Anjou or Comice pears, cored and cut into 6Â wedges each

Lay a piece of prosciutto on a flat surface and put an arugula leaf down the center. Put a pear wedge in the center of the arugula. Drape each end of the prosciutto over the pear. Arrange the pears, sticking outward, on a platter in a circular pattern, with arugula or fresh herbs in the center, if you like. This may be made 2Â hours ahead, covered with plastic wrap, and refrigerated.

prosciutto Prosciutto is a hindquarter cut of pork that's cured, dried, and aged. Thinly sliced, the best ones are ever-so-slightly sweet with just the right degree of saltiness and a silken texture that melts in your mouth. Traditionally the best prosciutto is from Italy, Prosciutto di Parma. It is best eaten plain or wrapped around fruits or vegetables. That said, prosciutto is also great cooked—it can make a flavorful addition to soups, stews, pasta sauces, and egg dishes.

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appetizers

sweet and sour pickled peppers This agrodolce recipe enhances bell peppers’ silky texture and builds their flavor to nearly addictive levels. Use only red peppers for a classic version, or add some color with a mix of red, yellow, orange, and green. Yields about 11/2 pints 21/4 lb. (6 to 7 medium) bell peppers (red, yellow, orange, green, or a mixture)

2 Tbs. finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 Tbs. small (nonpareil) capers, drained

3/4 cup white-wine vinegar 3/4 cup spring or filtered water

3 Tbs. granulated sugar

1 tsp. fine sea salt

1 clove garlic, very thinly sliced

1 cup extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed

Run 2 pint-size mason jars and their lids through the hottest dishwasher cycle to sanitize.

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Prepare a medium-high (400°F to 475°F) gas or charcoal grill fire, or position an oven rack 4 inches from the broiler and heat the broiler on high. Char the peppers on all sides on the grill or on a rimmed baking sheet under the broiler, turning them every few minutes with tongs. Transfer to a medium heatproof bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let steam until cool enough to handle, about 10 minutes. Stem, seed, and skin the peppers, then cut lengthwise into thin (1/4 inch) strips. Return

to the bowl, and stir in the parsley and capers. Combine the vinegar, water, sugar, salt, and garlic in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring to dissolve the sugar and salt. Boil the brine for 2 minutes, pour it over the peppers, and let steep for 1 hour. Reserve a few tablespoons of the brine and then drain the peppers. Pack the peppers, capers, and garlic into the jars. Spoon 1 Tbs. of the reserved brine into each jar, then add enough oil to cover the peppers

completely. Screw on the lids, and let the peppers sit at room temperature for 24 hours. Check to make sure they are still completely submerged; if not, add more oil to cover. Refrigerate the peppers, and let them cure for 1 week before serving. The peppers will keep in the fridge for up to 3 months. To serve, remove from the jar only as much as you plan to use, and bring to room temperature to liquefy the oil. Top off the jar with more oil to keep the remaining peppers submerged, and return to the refrigerator.


parmigiano-pistachio frico These delicate cheese crisps are a perfect predinner nibble, ideally with a glass of something sparkling. You’ll need a lot of cheese to make them—grinding it in a food processor is a great time-saver. Yields 24; serves 8 to 10

6 oz. Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano, finely ground in a food processor (11/2 cups)

11/2 oz. (1/4 cup) shelled pistachios, coarsely chopped

pick a place for your pickled peppers • Serve over thick grilled pork chops. • Toss with cooked pasta, olive oil, and freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano. • Pile onto a ciabatta roll with prosciutto and mozzarella. • Fold into a frittata. • Scatter over pizza.

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Line 2 large baking sheets with parchment. Sprinkle 1 scant Tbs. of the cheese on the parchment in a line 4 inches long and 1 inch wide. Repeat to make more lines spaced about 11/2 inches apart (12 on each sheet). Bake 1 sheet for 7 minutes, then remove from the oven and sprinkle each frico with about 1/2 tsp. of the pistachios. Return to the oven and bake until bubbling and golden, 3 to 5 minutes more. Transfer the parchment to a rack and gently loosen the frico from the parchment with a thin metal spatula. Repeat with the other sheet. Let cool completely before serving. (The frico will keep in an airtight container for up to 5 days.)

why filtered water? Vegetables and fruits pickled in agrodolce pick up all of the flavors in the brine—that’s the whole point, after all. Because water is a main component of the brine, it’s recommended that you filter your tap water or use bottled spring water. This way, you can be sure your pickles won’t take on any off flavors from municipal water-treatment chemicals, such as chlorine, or naturally occurring minerals in well water, like sulfur.

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appetizers

arancini If you have any of the delicious risotto from the recipe on p. 72 left over, these classic Italian mozzarella-stuffed fried rice balls are a tasty way to use it up. Yields about 15

2 cups cold leftover risotto (see recipe on p. 72)

1 large egg

2 cups fine fresh breadcrumbs

5 oz. fresh mozzarella, cut into 3/4-inch cubes

6 cups vegetable oil, for frying

Kosher salt

Stir together the risotto and egg until thoroughly combined. Put the breadcrumbs in a shallow bowl. Roll a small handful of risotto into a ball about 11/2 inches in diameter, gently push a cube of mozzarella into the center, and reshape the ball, covering the cheese completely. Coat in the breadcrumbs and transfer to a plate. Repeat until all of the risotto is used. Pour the vegetable oil into a 3-quart saucepan and heat to 350°F over mediumhigh heat. Working in batches of 5 or 6, fry the arancini, turning occasionally, until browned and heated through, about 4 minutes. Transfer to a plate lined with paper towels to drain. Sprinkle with salt and serve.

bruschetta with fig and walnut anchoiade All of the topping ingredients should be cut into small, manageable pieces. More topping may fall off this way, but it will be easier to eat. Serves 8 to 10; yields about 3/4 cup topping For the bruschetta Extra-virgin olive oil as needed, about 1/2 cup

1 lb. rustic country bread or crusty baguette, sliced 1/2 inch thick (cut baguettes on the diagonal)

1 to 2 cloves garlic, peeled and halved (optional)

for the topping

3 oz. dried figs (about 8), stems removed, flesh coarsely chopped

1 oz. (1/4 cup) shelled walnut halves

8 to 10 oil-packed anchovy fillets

3 cloves garlic

Kosher salt 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 tsp. Cognac

Freshly ground black pepper Shavings of ParmigianoReggiano or Grana Padano (shaved with a vegetable peeler), for garnish Make the bruschetta

Coat one or two rimmed baking sheets with olive oil and set the bread slices on top in a s­ ingle

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layer. Brush the tops with a little more oil and set aside until you’re ready to grill. Light a charcoal fire and heat it until you can hold your hand above the grate for no more than 2 seconds or heat a gas grill to medium high. Grill the bread until one side has dark grill marks or is a deep golden brown all over and then turn to toast the other side. As soon as the slices are done, rub with the cut side of the garlic, if using, and drizzle with more oil. Make the topping

Put the figs, walnuts, anchovies, garlic, and 1/4 tsp. salt in a food processor. Process until finely chopped. Add the olive oil, Cognac, and a few twists of ­pepper and process again to make a somewhat coarse paste. Taste and adjust the seasonings, if necessary. Spread the anchoiade on the grilled bread and top with a few of the cheese shavings.


seared carpaccio-style shoulder petite tender Quick-pickled shallots give thin, silky slices of meat (and the accompany­ing spinach salad) a tangy punch. A good substitute for petite tender is the similarly shaped beef tenderloin. Serves 4 as an appetizer

1 8- to 10-oz. shoulder petite tender

Kosher salt 1/4 cup plus 1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 medium shallots, halved through the root and very thinly sliced lengthwise (about 1 cup)

1/4 cup Champagne or white-wine vinegar

4 oz. baby spinach (4 packed cups)

Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon, and freshly ground black pepper

Pat the petite tender dry and season it all over with 1/2 tsp. kosher salt. Heat 1 Tbs. of the oil in a heavy-duty 10-inch skillet over high heat until shimmering hot. Add the petite tender

and sear on all sides, 4 to 5 minutes total. Transfer to a cutting board and cool to room temperature; cut crosswise into 20 slices. Put a 2-foot-long piece of plastic wrap on the work surface. Lay some of the slices on the plastic, leaving 2 to 3 inches between each. Top with another piece of plastic wrap and pound the slices with a meat mallet until paper thin. Repeat with the remaining slices. Refrigerate for at least 30 minutes before serving. (The meat can be pounded up to 1 day ahead; refrigerate it rolled up in the plastic wrap.) In a small bowl, soak the shallots in the vinegar until slightly softened, about

30 minutes. Transfer 2 Tbs. of the vinegar to a small bowl and whisk in the remaining 1/4 cup oil and a pinch of kosher salt. To serve, strain the shallots, discarding the remaining vinegar. In a large bowl, toss the shallots with the spinach and just enough of the vinaigrette to lightly coat the leaves. Divide the slices of beef among 4 dinner plates, arranging them in a single layer with just a little overlap. Drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette and sprinkle with a pinch of sea salt. Mound the spinach next to the beef and season the spinach and beef with a few grinds of pepper.

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appetizers

zesty lemon olives Lemon and herbs turn ordinary olives into something special. Make a batch or two to have on hand when guests drop by; they’ll keep in the refrigerator for a few weeks. Yields 1 pint

1 pint oil- or brine-packed olives, green or black or a mix

1/4 tsp. kosher salt 1/2 tsp. black peppercorns

3 bay leaves

Several sprigs of rosemary or thyme 1/2 tsp. fennel seeds, lightly crushed

4 or 5 cloves garlic, cut in half lengthwise

Big pinch of dried red chile flakes (optional)

2 medium lemons

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

If using brine-packed olives, drain them. In a medium bowl, combine the olives, salt, pepper­ corns, bay leaves, herb sprigs, fennel seeds, garlic, and chile flakes, if using. Zest the lemons in whatever size zest you like: a mix of finely grated zest for the brightest flavor and larger strips for color is nice. Add the zest and oil to the olives and mix well. Pour and scrape into a covered jar and refrigerate overnight to let the flavors mingle before serving.

sweet and sour eggplant relish (caponata) Tangy-sweet caponata is best made a day ahead so its flavors have time to mingle. Serve at room temperature with pita chips or other crisps as a snack or hors d’oeuvre. It keeps for about a week in the refrigerator. Yields about 4 cups

1 medium eggplant (about 11/2 lb.), unpeeled, top and bottom trimmed

Kosher salt 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed

3 large inner ribs celery, sliced crosswise 1/2 inch thick

1/2 yellow bell pepper, cut into 1/2-inch dice 1/2 red bell pepper, cut into 1/2-inch dice

1 small yellow onion, chopped

1 14-oz. can diced tomatoes (with their juices)

2 Tbs. red-wine vinegar

4 tsp. granulated sugar

2 anchovy fillets, minced (optional)

1/4 cup green olives, pitted and slivered

3 Tbs. drained and rinsed capers (coarsely chopped if large)

Cut the eggplant into 1-inch cubes. Spread the cubes on a baking sheet lined with paper towels, sprinkle with 1 Tbs. salt, and let sit for 1 hour. Pat dry with more paper towels; there’s no need to rinse. Heat the oil in a small Dutch oven or large saucepan over medium-high heat until hot. Working in batches to avoid crowding the pan, fry the eggplant, stirring occasionally, until deep golden brown on several sides, 5 to 6 minutes per batch. Adjust the heat as

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needed to keep the oil hot but not smoking. Transfer each batch with a slotted spoon to dry paper towels to drain. Reduce the heat to m ­ edium, and if the pan is dry, add 1 Tbs. oil. Add the celery, sprinkle with salt, and cook, stirring frequently, until softened with just a hint of crunch, about 5 minutes. Transfer the celery to a bowl. If the pan is dry, add 1 Tbs. oil. Add the peppers, sprinkle with salt, and cook, stirring frequently, until softened, 5 to 6 minutes. Transfer to the bowl with the celery. If the pan is dry, add another 1 Tbs. oil. Add the onion, sprinkle with salt, and cook, stirring frequently, until softened and starting to brown around the edges, 3 to 5 minutes. Increase the heat to medium high and pour in the tomatoes and their juices. Add the vinegar, sugar, and anchovies, if using. Bring to a vigorous simmer and cook until the juices have thickened slightly to the consistency of tomato soup, 3 to 5 minutes. Add all the cooked vegetables and the olives and capers. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer for another 5 minutes. Let cool completely and then cover and refrigerate overnight. Before serving, bring to room temperature and add salt to taste.


pan-fried polenta with mushrooms Pan-frying squares of leftover polenta is a delicious way to transform the classic, comforting side dish. This version, topped with a sautĂŠ of mixed mushrooms, can be a first course or hearty side for roast chicken or steak. Serves 6

3 cups hot polenta (see recipe on p. 66)

1 Tbs. olive oil

4 Tbs. unsalted butter

1 lb. mixed fresh mushrooms, trimmed and sliced 1/4 inch thick

Kosher salt

2 cloves garlic, minced

2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

Freshly ground black pepper

1 oz. (1/4 cup) shaved ParmigianoReggiano or Grana Padano

Spread the polenta 1/2 inch thick in a 8x8-inch baking dish. Cool to room temperature, then cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Heat the oil and 1 Tbs. of the butter in a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat until the butter foams. Add the mushrooms, season with salt, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms begin to brown, about 7 minutes. Add the garlic and continue cooking, stirring often, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat, stir in 1 Tbs. of the remaining butter and the parsley.

Season to taste with salt and pepper. Keep warm. Meanwhile, invert the polenta onto a cutting board and cut into six 2x3-inch rectangles. Melt the remaining 2 Tbs. butter in a 12-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat. Arrange the polenta in the skillet in a single layer and cook, undisturbed, until golden brown on the bottom, about 5 minutes. Flip and cook until golden, about 4 minutes more. Top the polenta with the mushrooms, garnish with the cheese, and serve.

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Arugula and Fried Mozzarella Salad with Tomato-Basil Vinaigrette, p. 45


Soups + Salads Zuppe + Insal atE In Italy, soup is served before and salad after the main course. Wherever they appear on the menu, these dishes will be welcome. Shellfish with Fennel, Escarole, and Kale, p. 38 Heirloom Tomato and Burrata Salad with Tomato Conserva Vinaigrette, p. 39 Chicken Meatball and Escarole Soup, p. 39 Grilled Sourdough Panzanella, p. 40 Escarole Salad with Olives and Garlic Croutons, p. 41 Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup, p. 41 Tortellini en Brodo, p. 42 Raw Artichoke, Portobello, and Fennel Salad, p. 43 Tuscan Peasant Soup with Rosemary and Pancetta, p. 44 Arugula and Fried Mozzarella Salad with Tomato-Basil Vinaigrette, p. 45 Farmers’ Market Minestrone, p. 46 Caesar Salad, p. 47


soups + salads

shellfish with fennel, escarole, and kale Serve this flavorful dish with crusty bread for sopping up the broth. Serves 4

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

½ tsp. fresh rosemary, minced

2 Tbs. olive oil

Finely grated zest of half a lemon (2 tsp.)

12 grape tomatoes

½ cup thinly sliced fennel

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced

1 cup thinly sliced escarole leaves

1 Tbs. amontillado sherry

1 cup fish broth or bottled clam juice

16 littleneck clams, scrubbed 16 mussels, debearded and scrubbed 6½ oz. (1 cup) medium shrimp (41 to 50 per lb.; preferably wild), peeled and deveined, with tails left intact

1 cup thinly sliced kale leaves

1/8 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes ¼ cup fresh flat-leaf parsley; more for garnish

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1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

In a small saucepan, heat the butter over medium heat until it turns golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Pour into a small bowl and set aside. In a 12-inch skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-high heat. Add the tomatoes and cook until they start to blister, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the fennel and garlic. Cook, shaking the pan, until the garlic becomes golden brown, 2  to 3 minutes. Add the escarole and stir for 1 minute. Add the sherry, raise the heat to high, and cook until it evaporates, about

30 seconds. Add the fish broth and boil until it reduces slightly, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the clams, cover, and cook for 2 minutes. Add the mussels, cover, and cook for 2 minutes. Add the shrimp, cover, and cook for 1 minute. With a slotted spoon, transfer the open shellfish and shrimp to a large bowl and cover loosely with foil. Toss any that do not open. Stir the kale and red pepper flakes into the broth and cook until the kale wilts, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat and add the parsley and rosemary. Pour in the browned butter. Add the lemon zest and juice. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Distribute the broth, vegetables, and seafood among 4 wide, deep bowls. Garnish with parsley.


chicken meatball and escarole soup Served with crusty bread, this quick spin on Italian wedding soup makes a satisfying dinner. Handle the chicken mixture gently; packing the meat too tightly will make the meatballs tough. Serves 4 3 Tbs. plain fresh breadcrumbs ¼ cup finely grated Parmigiano-reggiano or Grana Padano; more for serving 2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper ½ lb. ground chicken 1 large egg 1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

heirloom tomato and burrata salad with tomato conserva vinaigrette Tomato lovers, this is for you: ripe tomatoes, creamy Burrata, and fresh basil, topped with a tomato conserva and balsamic vinaigrette. The vinaigrette is also delicious over grilled fish, eggplant, or zucchini. If you can’t find Burrata, substitute sliced fresh mozzarella. Serves 4 ¼ cup Tomato Conserva (recipe below), finely chopped ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 tsp. red-wine vinegar Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1¼ lb. large ripe tomatoes, preferably heirloom, cored and sliced ½ inch thick 8 oz. Burrata (1 large or 2 small balls), quartered or halved to yield 4 pieces 16 to 20 small whole fresh basil leaves Flaky sea salt, such as Maldon, for serving

In a small bowl, whisk the conserva with the oil, vinegar, 1 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper. Arrange the tomato slices and Burrata on 4 salad plates. Scatter the basil leaves and drizzle the vinaigrette over the tomatoes and cheese. Sprinkle lightly with sea salt and serve.

tomato conserva

These tomatoes can also be added to just about any dish that wants some rich flavor. They need 5 to 6 hours in the oven, so plan accordingly. Yields about 3 cups

4 lb. ripe, meaty tomatoes, such as beefsteak or plum, cored and sliced crosswise ½ inch thick 2 medium cloves garlic, smashed and peeled ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Position racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Divide the tomatoes and garlic between two large rimmed baking sheets. Drizzle the oil over the tomatoes and season with 1 tsp. salt and several grinds of pepper. Gently toss the tomatoes to evenly coat with the oil and then spread in a single layer. Put the sheets in the oven and lower the heat to 225°F. Slowly roast, switching the positions of the sheets halfway through, until the tomatoes look like juicy sun-dried tomatoes, wrinkly and slightly browned in spots, 5 to 6 hours. let the tomatoes cool for at least 10 minutes before serving or using. (The conserva can be refrigerated in an airtight container for up to 1 week or frozen for up to 2 months.)

1 small yellow onion, cut into small dice 1 small carrot, cut into small dice 1 medium celery stalk, cut into small dice 1 quart lower-salt chicken broth 1 3- to 4-inch sprig fresh rosemary 5 cups thinly sliced escarole

Put the breadcrumbs in a medium bowl and moisten with 1/2 Tbs. water. Mix in the cheese, parsley, 3/4 tsp. salt, and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Add the ground chicken and egg and mix until just combined. Scoop out 1 Tbs. of the chicken mixture and, with damp hands, roll it into a 3/4-inch meatball. Transfer to a plate and shape the remaining meatballs. Heat the oil in a 5-quart pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and 1 tsp. salt; cook until tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the chicken broth, rosemary, and 2 cups water; bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Gently add the meatballs, reduce the heat to medium low to maintain a gentle simmer, and cook for 10 minutes. Add the escarole and continue to simmer until the meatballs are cooked through and the escarole is wilted, about 5 minutes. Discard the rosemary and season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve sprinkled with grated cheese.

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soups + salads

grilled sourdough panzanella Bread salad is a great way to both use up leftover bread and showcase summer tomatoes. Bread salads are common in the Mediterranean and the Middle East, where cooks use stale bread as the primary ingredient. In this Italian version, the bread is charred on the grill for added flavor. Yields about 6 cups; serves 4 to 6

4 1/2-inch-thick slices (about 8 oz.) from the center of a round sourdough loaf (a boule)

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 small shallot, sliced into thin rings

3 Tbs. red-wine vinegar

1 small clove garlic, coarsely chopped

11/2 lb. ripe, meaty tomatoes, cut into 1/2-inch dice (about 31/2 cups)

1 small English cucumber, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch dice (about 11/2 cups)

3 Tbs. chopped fresh basil

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3 Tbs. chopped fresh mint

2 Tbs. capers, drained and rinsed

Heat a gas grill with all burners on medium. Brush the bread with 1/4 cup of the oil and season it with 1/4 tsp. kosher salt and a few grinds of pepper. Grill the bread on both sides, checking frequently, until nicely browned, 3 to 4 minutes per side. When the bread is cool enough to handle, cut it into 1/2-inch cubes. In a small bowl, soak the shallot in the vinegar for 10 minutes. With a slotted spoon,

transfer the shallot to a large bowl, reserving the vinegar. Sprinkle the garlic with 1/4 tsp. kosher salt and mash it into a paste on a cutting board with the side of a chef’s knife. Whisk the mashed garlic, the remaining 1/4 cup olive oil, 1/4 tsp. kosher salt, and 1/8 tsp. pepper into the reserved vinegar. Toss the bread cubes, tomatoes, cucumber, basil, mint, capers, and vinaigrette in the bowl with the shallot. Season the panzanella to taste with kosher salt and pepper and serve.


escarole salad with olives and garlic croutons With its garlicky greens, crunchy croutons, and salty anchovies, this salad is reminiscent of a classic Caesar salad but without the creaminess. Long, thin shavings of Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano would make a delicious addition. Serves 6 2 large heads escarole (1 lb. each) 2 medium cloves garlic, peeled Kosher salt 3 Tbs. plus ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil 6 oz. country-style bread, preferably day-old, crusts removed, torn into rustic bite-size pieces (about 4 cups) 4 anchovy fillets, rinsed 2 Tbs. red-wine vinegar; more as needed ½ cup black olives, such as niçoise, rinsed well, pitted, and coarsely chopped Freshly ground black pepper

To prep the escarole, remove the green outer leaves and discard or reserve for another use. Trim off any dark green tips and cut off the root end. Then cut or tear the leaves into bitesize pieces (you should have about 12 cups). Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F.

Put the garlic in a mortar, add a pinch of salt, and pound to a paste with a pestle. Or mince and then mash to a paste with the side of a chef’s knife. In a small bowl, combine half of the garlic with 3 Tbs. of the olive oil. Put the bread on a rimmed baking sheet and toss with the garlic oil to coat evenly. Spread the bread out, season lightly with salt, and bake until crisp and light golden brown outside and tender inside, about 10 minutes. Set aside to cool on the baking sheet. Pound or mince the anchovies to a paste. In a small bowl, combine the anchovy paste with the remaining garlic paste and the vinegar. let sit for 5 to 10 minutes. Whisk in the remaining 1/2 cup olive oil and stir in the olives. Taste with a leaf of escarole and season the vinaigrette with more vinegar or salt if necessary.

Put the escarole in a large bowl and season with salt and pepper. Gently toss the salad with just enough vinaigrette to lightly coat the greens. Taste and add more salt or vinaigrette if necessary. Add the croutons and toss again. Gently transfer the salad to a platter or individual serving plates, evenly distributing the croutons that may have fallen to the bottom of the bowl. Drizzle any remaining vinaigrette on the salad and serve.

cannellini bean and kale soup This hearty Tuscan soup is full of flavor. The crinkly, deep-green leaves of Lacinato kale (also called dinosaur or black kale) are ideal, but any variety of kale will work. Serve with a crusty baguette. Serves 4 1½ Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil 1 large yellow onion, finely chopped (1½ cups) 2 medium carrots, peeled and finely chopped (3/4 cup) 2 medium celery stalks, finely chopped (3/4 cup) 1½ tsp. minced fresh rosemary 2 Tbs. tomato paste 2 large cloves garlic, minced (1 Tbs.) 1 quart homemade or lower-salt vegetable broth 2 15-oz. cans cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 6 oz. lacinato kale, center ribs removed, leaves chopped (about 4 firmly packed cups) 1 Parmigiano-reggiano or Grana Padano rind (1x3 inches; optional)

1½ tsp. cider vinegar Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Heat 1 Tbs. of the oil in a 4- to 5-quart pot over medium heat. Add the onion, carrots, celery, and rosemary and cook, stirring occasionally, until the vegetables begin to soften, about 6 minutes. Add the tomato paste and garlic and cook until fragrant, 45 seconds. Add the broth, beans, kale, and cheese rind (if using). Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to medium low, and simmer gently until the vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes. Stir the cider vinegar into the soup and season to taste with salt and pepper. ladle 13/4 cups of the soup into a wide, shallow bowl, cover, and keep warm.

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soups + salads

tortellini en brodo This comforting dish of stuffed pasta in a hearty broth is a tradition in northern Italy. It’s often served as a first course, followed by a pork or veal roast and winter vegetables. Both the tortellini and the broth can be made ahead. Serves 14; yields about 6 quarts broth and about 200 tortellini For the broth

1 4-lb. chicken, cut into 6 pieces

2 lb. veal bones or veal shank

2 lb. beef stew meat or scraps

1 medium yellow onion, quartered

2 medium carrots, cut into large pieces

2 ribs celery, cut into large pieces

1 3-inch-square ParmigianoReggiano or Grana Padano rind (optional)

Kosher salt For the filling

1 oz. (2 Tbs.) unsalted butter

5 oz. boneless pork loin, trimmed and cut into 1/2-inch cubes (about 1 cup)

1/2 cup dry white wine

3 oz. sliced Prosciutto di Parma, coarsely chopped (2/3 cup)

3 oz. sliced mortadella, coarsely chopped (3/4 cup)

1 oz. freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano (1/2 cup grated on the small holes of a box grater)

Freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano

Remove the chicken and discard or save the meat for another use. Using a slotted spoon, discard the remaining solids from the broth. Strain the broth through a fine strainer into a large bowl. Line the strainer with a clean, thin dishtowel or cheesecloth and strain the broth again into another large bowl. You should have about 6 quarts of broth. Transfer the broth to storage containers and refrigerate overnight. Remove the fat and reserve the broth.

Make the broth

Make the filling

1/2 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg

1 large egg, lightly beaten

Kosher salt For the pasta dough 101/2 oz. (2 1/3 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more as needed

4 large eggs

For serving

Wash the chicken, veal bones, beef, and vegetables under cold running water. Put all of the broth ingredients, except the salt, in a 10-quart pot and add 61/2 quarts (26 cups) cold water. Partially cover the pot and bring to a simmer over medium heat. As soon as the water begins to bubble, reduce the heat to low and, with a fine-mesh skimmer or a large spoon, skim off and discard any foam that has risen to the surface. Partially cover the pot and simmer gently until the broth is flavorful, about 21/2 hours. Add 1 Tbs. salt during the last few minutes of cooking.

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Melt the butter in a 10-inch skillet over ­medium heat. Add the pork and cook, stirring, until lightly golden and cooked through, about 4 minutes. Increase the heat to high, pour in the wine, and stir until it is almost evaporated, 3 to 5 minutes. Let cool slightly. Transfer the pork and its juices to a food processor. Add the prosciutto and morta­ della and pulse until the mixture is very finely chopped (but not puréed). Transfer the filling to a medium bowl and add the Parmigiano, nutmeg, egg, and 3/4 tsp. salt. Mix well. (The filling should be moist and

just a little sticky.) Cover with plastic and refrigerate. Make the pasta dough

On a large wooden board or other work surface, shape the flour into a mound. Using your fingers, make a round well in the center of the flour. Carefully crack the eggs into the well, making sure they don’t escape the walls of the well. Lightly beat the eggs with a fork. Begin to incorporate flour into the eggs with the fork, starting from the inner rim of the well, until about half of the flour is incorporated and a soft dough begins to form. With a dough scraper, push all of the remaining flour to one side of the board. Scrape off and discard the bits and pieces of dough attached to the board. Wash and dry your hands. Begin adding some of the flour you have pushed aside into the soft dough, kneading it gently with the heels of your hands as you incorporate the additional flour and the dough becomes firmer. Keep the board clean and dust it with flour as you knead to prevent the dough from sticking. After kneading for 8 to 10 minutes, the


dough should be smooth, elastic, and just a little sticky. Press one finger into the center of the dough; if it comes out barely moist, the dough is ready to be rolled out. If the dough is still quite sticky, add a little more flour and knead it for another 2 to 3 minutes until soft and pliable. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and let it rest at room temperature for 20 to 30 minutes. Roll the pasta

Unwrap the dough and knead it for a minute or two. Set the rollers of a pasta machine at their widest. Cut off a piece of dough about the size of a small lemon and flatten it with the palm of your hand to about 1/2 inch thick. As you work, keep the rest of the dough wrapped in plastic. Dust the piece of dough lightly with flour and run it through the machine. Fold the rolled dough in half and run it through the machine again, pressing it with your fingertips into the rollers. Repeat this step four or five times, dusting the dough with flour if it becomes sticky, until smooth and elastic. Change the rollers to the next setting down and roll out the dough without folding. Repeat rolling the sheet of dough (without folding) through the pasta machine, decreasing the settings until the pasta is 1/8 inch thick. On a floured wooden board, cut the dough into 11/2-inch squares. Keep the squares covered with plastic as you shape the tortellini.

raw artichoke, portobello, and fennel salad Raw artichokes have a mild, intriguing flavor and firm texture. A quick soak in vinaigrette not only enhances their flavor but also tenderizes them a bit. Be sure to slice all the vegetables as thinly as possible, either with a knife, mandoline, or the slicing blade of your food processor. Serves 4 ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

4 large cloves garlic, smashed

2 oz. thinly sliced pancetta

2 Tbs. sherry vinegar

½ tsp. finely chopped fresh dill Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 large fresh artichoke hearts, sliced very thinly

½ small fennel bulb, sliced very thinly crosswise, fronds reserved for garnish

4 oz. cremini mushrooms, sliced very thinly

1 oz. shaved Grana Padano

Heat the oil and garlic in a 12-inch skillet over medium heat, turning as needed, until the garlic is golden brown, about 2 minutes. Transfer to a small bowl and let sit for about 10 minutes. Discard the garlic.

Meanwhile, cook the pancetta in the skillet over medium heat until crisp, 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer to a paper towel– lined plate, let cool to room temperature, and crumble. Add any rendered pancetta fat to the garlic oil. Whisk in the vinegar, dill, ¼ tsp. salt, and 1/8 tsp. pepper. In a medium bowl, toss the artichoke hearts with 1 Tbs. of the vinaigrette and let sit for 10 minutes. In another bowl, toss the sliced fennel and mushrooms with 2 tsp. of the vinaigrette. Divide the fennel and mushrooms among four plates. Top with the artichokes, pancetta, and cheese. Garnish with the fennel fronds, drizzle with the remaining vinaigrette, and serve.

Shape the tortellini

Put about 1/8 tsp. of the filling in the center of a pasta square. Bring one corner over the filling toward the corner diagonally opposite and fold into a triangle. Press around the filling to seal. Bend the tortellino around your finger with one corner slightly overlapping the other and press to seal. The tortellino will look like a crown. Transfer to a large rimmed baking sheet lined with a clean kitchen towel. Arrange the tortellini in a single layer without letting them touch (you’ll need 2 to 3 baking sheets) and cover with another clean towel. Repeat the filling and shaping with the remaining pasta and filling. Cook and serve

You can make as many or as few servings as you like. For each serving, you’ll need 11/2 cups of broth and 14 tortellini. Bring the broth to a boil in a large pot over medium heat. Gently drop the tortellini into the pot. Cook until they rise to the surface and are tender but still firm to the bite, 2 to 3 minutes for fresh, 4 to 5 minutes for frozen. Remove the pot from the heat. Ladle the tortellini and broth into serving bowls, sprinkle with grated cheese, and serve immediately.

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soups + salads

tuscan peasant soup with rosemary and pancetta This Italian soup, which has as many variations as there are cooks, contains beans, vegetables, and fresh breadcrumbs and makes a hearty and satisfying one-dish meal. Yields 31/2 quarts; serves 6 to 8

5 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 tsp. kosher salt; more as needed

Freshly ground black pepper

2 Tbs. minced garlic

1 to 2 tsp. fresh lemon juice

11/4 cups small-diced pancetta (about 6 oz. or 6 thick slices)

1 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. minced fresh rosemary

1 cup fresh breadcrumbs, toasted

4 cups large-diced Savoy cabbage (about ½ small head)

1 tsp. ground coriander

1 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano

2 cups medium-diced onion (10 to 12 oz. or 2 small)

11/2 cups medium-diced carrot (about 4 medium carrots)

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1 28-oz. can diced tomatoes, drained

7 cups homemade or lower-salt canned chicken broth

2 151/2-oz. cans small white beans, rinsed and drained (about 21/2 cups, drained)

Heat 2 Tbs. of the olive oil in a 4- to 5-quart Dutch oven over medium heat. When hot, add the pancetta and cook, stirring frequently, until quite shrunken, golden brown, and crisp (the oil will also be golden brown), about 6 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat and with a slotted spoon or strainer carefully transfer the pancetta to a paper towel–lined plate. Pour off and discard all but 2 Tbs. of the fat from the pan. Return the pot to medium-high heat and add the chopped cabbage. Cook the cabbage, stirring occasionally, until limp and browned around the edges, about 3 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat again and transfer the cabbage to another plate. Put the pot back over medium heat and add 2 Tbs. more of the olive oil. When the oil is hot, add the onions, carrots, and salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onions are softened and the vegetables are browned around the edges and beginning to stick to the bottom of the pan, 8 to 9 minutes. Add the last 1 Tbs. of olive oil, the garlic, 1 Tbs. of the fresh rosemary, and the ground coriander and cook, stirring, until the garlic is fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes, stir together, and cook the mixture 2 to 3 more minutes. Return the cabbage to the pan and add the chicken broth. Stir well, bring to a boil, and reduce to a simmer. Cook for 10 to 15 minutes to infuse the broth with the flavor of the vegetables. Add the beans, bring back to a simmer, and cook for a minute or two. Remove the pan from the heat, stir in the remaining 1 tsp. fresh rosemary, and let rest a few minutes. Taste the soup and add lemon juice to brighten it—you’ll want at least 1 tsp. Season with more salt if necessary and a few grinds of fresh pepper. Serve the soup hot, garnished with the reserved pancetta crisps, the toasted breadcrumbs, and the grated cheese.


arugula and fried mozzarella salad with tomato-basil vinaigrette If you want to turn this into a main-course dinner salad, serve it with chicken or pork sausage. Serves 4

1 l arge (about 7 oz.) smoked mozzarella

1 large egg

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 cup fine fresh breadcrumbs

11/2 cups medium diced fresh tomatoes 1/3 cup loosely packed basil leaves, roughly chopped

1 medium clove garlic, minced (about 1 tsp.)

1/4 cup plus 3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 tsp. balsamic vinegar

5 oz. baby arugula (about 6 cups loosely packed), washed and dried

Slice the mozzarella into 8 slices and then again in half crosswise, so that you have 16 pieces of cheese. Whisk the egg in a medium bowl with a pinch of

salt and pepper. Put the breadcrumbs in another medium bowl. Working with a few pieces at a time, dip the cheese in the egg, turning to coat all sides of the cheese. Dredge the cheese in the breadcrumbs, pressing to help the crumbs adhere and cover the cheese as much as possible. Transfer the breaded cheese slices to a plate and refrigerate until ready to cook. You can prepare the cheese up to 1 hour ahead. Discard any leftover egg and crumbs. In a small bowl, combine the tomatoes, basil, and garlic and season with 1/2 tsp. salt and a few grinds of pepper. Let the tomato mixture sit for 5 minutes and then add 1/4 cup of the oil and the vinegar.

Heat 11/2 Tbs. of the oil in a 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Put half of the cheese in the pan and cook until the breadcrumbs turn golden, 30 to 60 seconds. Use two forks to turn the cheese and cook until the second side is golden, another 30 to 60 seconds. Transfer the cheese to a plate. Using the remaining 11/2 Tbs. oil, repeat with the second batch of cheese. Put the arugula in a large bowl. Stir the tomato mixture and toss it with the arugula. Taste and add salt as needed. Arrange the salad on a platter or portion among four plates. Top with the cheese, sprinkle with black pepper, and serve immediately.

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soups + salads

farmers’ market minestrone The word minestrone means “big soup” in Italian, and that’s just what this is: a richly flavored, chunky vegetable-and-pasta soup. This version is in bianco, which is to say, white, or without tomato. Feel free to add a couple of diced peeled plum tomatoes, if you like. Serves 6 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 oz. (1/2 cup) finely grated ParmigianoReggiano or Grana Padano; more for serving

3 medium celery ribs, cut into 1/4-inch pieces

2 medium carrots, cut into 1/4-inch pieces

2 medium cloves garlic, minced

1 medium red onion, cut into 1/4-inch pieces

2 Tbs. minced fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 small eggplant, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 large red potato, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 medium yellow squash, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

1 medium zucchini, cut into 1/2-inch pieces

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper Kernels from 1 ear fresh corn

6 to 8 cups lower-salt vegetable or chicken broth

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1 cup dried tubetti or small pasta shells

1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil

Warm the oil in a 5-quart heavy-duty pot over medium-low heat. When it’s warm—not hot—add the celery, carrots, garlic, onion, and parsley. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the onion is translucent and the carrots have begun to soften, about 10 minutes. Stir in the eggplant, potato, yellow squash, zucchini, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a few grinds of pepper. Cook, stirring often (the potato tends to stick to the bottom of the pot), until the vegetables are tender but still hold their shape, 15 to 20 minutes.

Add the corn and 6 cups of the broth; bring to a boil. Turn the heat down to low, partially cover, and simmer gently for 10 minutes. Return to a boil and stir in the pasta. Simmer, stirring once or twice, until the pasta is al dente or even a little bit more tender; cooking time will depend on the shape and brand of pasta you use. Add more broth to thin the soup, if you like. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Remove from the heat and stir in the cheese and basil. Let cool to warm or room temperature before serving; the soup will thicken as it cools. Serve with additional grated cheese at the table.


caesar salad If you don’t have a large mortar and pestle, you can easily make a garlic paste with a chef’s knife. Keep in mind that this is a zesty, assertive dressing that comes into balance nicely when combined with the cool, crisp romaine and salty cheese. Serves 4 to 6 For the croutons

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

11/2 cups torn pieces from a baguette or other crusty bread Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper

leaves aside for another use. Separate the leaves of the heart and slice them into pieces about 3 inches long (leave the smallest leaves whole) to yield a heaping 8 cups of loosely packed leaves. Rinse and dry very thoroughly. Put the garlic and a pinch of coarse salt in a large (3- to 4-cup) mortar. Using a pestle, pound the garlic into a creamy, juicy paste. Add the anchovies, mashing until they’re b ­ roken down into bits. Add the egg yolk, working the mixture into a paste. Work in the mustard and then the lemon

juice. Blend in a pinch of black pepper, the Tabasco, and the Worcestershire. Switch to a whisk and drizzle in the olive oil, whisk­ ing con­tinuously until blended and creamy. Put the lettuce, parsley, and croutons in a large bowl. Season with salt and ­pepper and toss. Add the dressing and toss to coat thoroughly. S ­ prinkle with 2 to 3 Tbs. of the cheese and toss again. Serve immediately with the remaining cheese on the side. Note: If you’re serving this salad to anyone with a compro-

mised immune system, r­ eplace the raw egg yolk in the dressing with the yolk from a soft-boiled egg, or omit the egg yolk altogether.

Switch from a pestle to a whisk to ­finish the dressing. Drizzle in the oil slowly for the creamiest results.

For the salad

2 large heads romaine lettuce

2 small cloves garlic

Coarse salt

4 oil-packed anchovy fillets, rinsed and patted dry

1 egg yolk

1 tsp. Dijon mustard

Juice from 1/2 lemon (about 4 tsp.) Freshly ground black pepper Dash of Tabasco or other hot sauce Scant 1/4 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/3 cup loosely packed flat-leaf parsley leaves 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano Make the croutons

Warm the oil in a medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add the bread pieces, toss to coat, and cook, turning periodically, until golden on the outside but still tender inside, 12 to 15 minutes. Let them cool in one layer on paper ­towels. Season with salt and pepper to taste. make the salad

Remove the outer leaves of the romaine until you reach the tightly packed heart (the leaves will be much paler); set the outer

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Lasagne Bolognese with Herbed Ricotta, p. 50


Main Dishes Il Secondo Here are classics and twists on Italian favorites, from cheesy pizza to velvety-tender osso buco. Lasagne Bolognese with Herbed Ricotta, p. 50 Linguine with Clam Sauce, p. 50 Gnocchi with Sausage and Leek RagĂš, p. 52 Eggplant Parmigiana, p. 53 Chicken Piccata, p. 54 Orecchiette with Roasted Broccolini, Burst Tomatoes, and Italian Sausage, p. 54 Fresh Tomato and Garlic Pizza, p. 56 Shrimp Scampi, p. 57 Pasta Carbonara, p. 58 Slow-Cooker Osso Buco, p. 58 Classic Chicken Cacciatore, p. 59 Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli with Lemon Brown Butter, p. 61 Sweet and Sour Sicilian Braised Chicken (Pollo Agrodolce), p. 62 Spaghetti and Meatballs, p. 63


main dishes

lasagne bolognese with herbed ricotta This meaty, deeply flavored lasagne is a welcome dish on a chilly night. (See the photo on p. 48.) Serves 4 Kosher salt 1/4 cup olive oil; more as needed for the noodles

1 lb. fresh or dry lasagne noodles

1 cup finely chopped onion

1 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. chopped fresh oregano

2 tsp. dried basil

2 Tbs. finely chopped garlic

3 cups fresh ricotta

1/4 cup finely grated Grana Padano; more for serving Freshly ground black pepper

1 Tbs. ground fennel seed

2 lb. lean ground beef

1/2 cup white wine

4 cups favorite marinara sauce

1/4 cup fresh basil Extra-virgin olive oil, for serving

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. If the lasagne noodles come in sheets, cut into pieces approximately 3 x 5 inches. Cook the lasagne noodles according to package directions. Rinse and transfer to a lightly oiled sheet pan, placing lightly oiled parchment between layers of noodles. In a small skillet, heat 2 Tbs. of the olive oil over medium-­high heat until shimmering. Add the onion and sauté until golden, about 3 minutes. Lower the heat to medium and add the oregano, dried basil, and garlic and continue to cook for another minute. Transfer to a medium bowl and combine with the ricotta, Grana Padano, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper and set aside. In a large skillet, heat the remaining 2 Tbs. olive oil over medium heat, add the fennel seed, and cook until toasted and aromatic, about 1 minute. Add the ground beef and cook, breaking up into small pieces, until browned, 4 to 5 minutes. Raise the heat to medium high, add the wine, and cook until the liquid has evaporated, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the marinara sauce and bring to a simmer, then cover and keep warm. Spoon a little sauce in the center of 4 plates, then place a noodle on top of the sauce. Working in alternating layers starting with the bolognese, put about 1/2 cup on top of the first noodle, add another noodle, and top with 1/3 cup of the ricotta mixture. Repeat twice, ending with the sauce and then a sprinkling of grated cheese and fresh basil. Serve with the remaining grated cheese.

linguine with clam sauce Garlicky and comforting, this pasta dish is a perennial crowd pleaser. A bit of crushed red pepper flake is a nice addition for those who like it hot. Serves 4 to 6

4 lb. littleneck or Manila clams, or cockles

Kosher salt ½ cup dry white wine, such as Pinot Grigio

1 lb. linguine or spaghetti

1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

2 to 3 medium cloves garlic, minced

Freshly ground black pepper

2 Tbs. finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes (optional)

Scrub the clams under cold running water, then place in a deep bowl and cover with cool water. Add 2 Tbs. salt and

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swirl with your hands to dissolve the salt. Let sit for about 30 minutes at room temperature to purge any grit. Without disturbing the sediment in the bowl, transfer the clams to a colander and rinse with cold water. Discard any open clams that don’t close when tapped. Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a rolling boil. Put the clams and wine in a heavy-duty 5- to 6-quart pot. Cover and cook over medium-high heat, shaking the pot occasionally, until the clams have opened, 7 to 10 minutes. Remove from the heat, uncover, and let sit until cool enough to handle, about 5 minutes. Transfer the clams from their shells to a medium bowl, leaving a few intact for garnish, if you like. If using littlenecks, remove the tough adductor muscles on each side of each clam. Discard any clams that didn’t open during cooking. Strain the cooking liquid through a sieve lined with dampened cheesecloth or paper towels into the bowl. Rinse and dry the pot.

Cook the pasta in the boiling water, stirring occasionally, until slightly firmer than al dente, about 1 minute less than package directions. Reserve 1 cup of the pasta water, and drain. Meanwhile, warm 1/4 cup of the oil and the garlic in the clam pot over medium-high heat until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the clams, including the ones in shells, if using, and the cooking liquid, and bring to a simmer. Season with ½ tsp. each salt and pepper. Keep warm on low heat. Add the drained pasta, the remaining 1/4 cup oil, the parsley, and red pepper flakes, if using, to the sauce. Cook over high heat for 1 minute to meld the flavors, thinning out the sauce as needed with some of the reserved pasta water. The pasta should be moist and well coated with sauce. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Distribute among shallow bowls, and serve.

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main dishes

gnocchi with sausage and leek ragĂš You can make this sauce ahead and refrigerate it, covered, for up to 5 days or freeze it for up to 1 month. Yields about 3 cups ragĂš; serves 6 FOR THE SAUCE

1 28-oz. can whole peeled tomatoes (preferably San Marzano)

1/2 lb. sweet Italian sausage (about 2 links)

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 large leek (white and light green parts only), trimmed, halved lengthwise, rinsed well, and cut crosswise into thin half-moon slices (about 11/2 cups)

2 tsp. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 tsp. chopped fresh thyme

1 tsp. chopped fresh marjoram

1 tsp. minced garlic (about 1 medium clove)

1/2 tsp. kosher salt; more to taste Freshly ground black pepper FOR THE GNOCCHI Kosher salt

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1 recipe Potato Gnocchi (see p. 88)

1 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano (optional)

Make the sauce

Put the tomatoes and their juices in a food processor and pulse 4 or 5 times until the tomatoes are crushed but not completely purĂŠed. Remove the sausage from its casing and tear the sausage apart with your hands into coarse pieces. Heat 1 Tbs. of the olive oil in a 12-inch skillet over medium-high heat. Add the sausage and cook, further breaking it apart with a wooden spoon, until lightly browned and almost completely cooked through, 3 to 5 minutes. With a slotted spoon, transfer the sausage to a plate. Add the remaining 2 Tbs. olive oil to the pan, then add the leek, parsley, thyme, marjoram, garlic, and salt. Cook, stirring, until the leek is soft and fragrant, about 3 minutes. Adjust the heat if the garlic or leek shows any sign of burning. Add the tomatoes and reserved sausage and stir well to combine, scraping up any

browned bits on the bottom of the pan. Bring to a vigorous simmer and then reduce the heat to medium low. Cover the pan with the lid slightly ajar and simmer gently for 45 minutes. If the sauce is bubbling too fast, reduce the heat to low. Remove the lid and if the sauce seems watery, continue to simmer, stirring occasionally, until reduced to a thick sauce consistency. Adjust the seasoning to taste with salt and pepper. Cook the gnocchi and toss with the sauce

Bring a large pot of well-salted water to a boil over high heat. To get the gnocchi into the boiling water, fold the parchment ends to form a chute and gently shake the gnocchi out, taking care not to clump them together as you drop them in. Give one gentle stir, wait until the gnocchi all float to the surface of the water, and then cook them for 1 minute. Carefully drain the gnocchi in a colander. Transfer them to the sauce and gently toss to coat. Serve immediately, topped with cheese, if using.


eggplant parmigiana This authentic Italian recipe might surprise you—the eggplant is not breaded, so the result is a lighter, less greasy dish. Serves 6 as a first course; 4 as a main course FOR THE EGGPLANT 21/2 lb. eggplant (about 4 small or 2 medium-large) Kosher salt

3 cups olive oil (or a blend of olive and canola oils)

FOR THE SAUCE

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 large cloves garlic, peeled and cut in half

31/2 lb. plum tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and coarsely chopped, or two 28-oz. cans diced tomatoes (preferably San Marzano), drained Kosher salt 12 large fresh basil leaves, torn in half FOR ASSEMBLING

6 oz. fresh mozzarella, torn into 1/2-inch pieces

11/4 cups lightly packed freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano (31/4 oz.)

Turn off the heat, remove the garlic, and stir in the basil leaves. Season to taste with more salt, if necessary, and set aside. Fry the eggplant

Dry the eggplant by lining a large plate with a paper towel and setting a few slices on it. Top with another paper towel and layer on a few more slices. Repeat until you run out of slices. Attach a candy thermometer to the side of a 3- or 4-quart saucepan. Add the olive oil and heat over medium-high heat. When the oil reaches 375°F, add as many eggplant slices as will fit comfortably in a single layer. Don’t crowd the pan. If you don’t have a candy thermometer, you can test the oil temperature by dipping a tip of one eggplant slice in the oil. If it immediately sizzles, the oil is ready. Cook, turning once, until golden brown on both sides, about 2 minutes on the first side and 1 minute more on the second. Working quickly, pick up each slice with a slotted spoon and press the back of another large spoon against the slice to squeeze out as much oil as possible. Transfer to a plate lined

with paper towels. Repeat until all the slices are fried, layering the fried eggplant between paper towels and adjusting the heat as necessary to maintain the frying temperature. Assemble and bake

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F. Layer about one-third of the eggplant slices so they overlap slightly on the bottom of a 10x8-inch (or similar size) baking dish. With the back of a spoon or an offset spatula, spread about one-third of the tomato sauce in a very thin layer over the eggplant. Evenly sprinkle about half of the mozzarella and 1/3 cup of the Parmigiano or Grana Padano over the tomato sauce. Make another layer with one-third of the eggplant, one-third of the tomato sauce, the remaining mozzarella, and 1/3 cup Parmigiano or Grana Padano. Make one last layer with the remaining eggplant, tomato sauce, and cheese. Bake until the cheese has melted evenly and the top is bubbly, with browned edges, 20 to 25 minutes. Let rest for at least 15 minutes before serving.

Prepare the eggplant

Peel the eggplant and cut each crosswise into 1/4-inch-thick slices. Cover the bottom and sides of a large colander with a few eggplant slices and sprinkle generously with salt. Top with more layers of eggplant and salt until you run out of slices (you’ll end up with 5 or 6 layers). Let the colander sit in the sink or over a large bowl for at least 30 minutes and up to 2 hours. The salt will draw out water and reduce the eggplant’s ability to absorb oil. make the sauce

Heat the 3 Tbs. oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant and barely golden, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the tomatoes and 1/2 tsp. salt. Raise the heat to medium high and cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes begin to break down into a sauce, 20 to 25 minutes. If the sauce begins to dry up before the tomatoes break down, add warm water 1 Tbs. at a time. Lower the heat to medium and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until you have a thick, chunky sauce, 5 to 10 minutes more. (Too much liquid in the sauce will make the finished dish watery.)

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chicken piccata Capers, lemon juice, and parsley are the signature ingredients of this classic Italian dish. Serve it with orzo, rice, or over angel hair pasta. Serves 4

8 boneless, skinless, thin-cut (1/4- to 1/2-inch-thick) chicken breast cutlets (about 11/2 lb.)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 to 3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil; more as needed

3 Tbs. capers, rinsed and chopped

2 medium cloves garlic, thinly sliced

3/4 cup lower-salt chicken broth

2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice; more as needed

1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 Tbs. unsalted butter

Season the chicken with 1 tsp. salt and 1/2 tsp. pepper. Heat 1 Tbs. of the oil in a 12-inch heavy-duty skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add as many cutlets as will fit in a single layer and cook until lightly browned on both sides and just cooked through, 1 to 3 minutes per side. Shingle the chicken on a platter and tent with foil. Repeat with the remaining chicken, adding another tablespoon of oil between batches if the pan seems dry. Reduce the heat to medium and add the capers, garlic, and the remaining 1 Tbs. oil to the pan. Cook, stirring, until the garlic softens and becomes fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the chicken broth and lemon juice, raise the heat to high, and cook, stirring, until the mixture reduces by about half, 3 to 4 minutes. Off the heat, swirl in half of the parsley and the butter and season with more lemon juice, salt, and pepper to taste. Drizzle the sauce over the chicken breasts, sprinkle with the remaining parsley, and serve immediately.

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cover recipe

orecchiette with roasted broccolini, burst tomatoes, and italian sausage Quick and easy, this flavorful dish is perfect for a weeknight. Serves 4 1/4 cup plus 3 Tbs. olive oil

2 Tbs. lemon juice; more to taste

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 12 oz. Broccolini, trimmed 12 oz. orecchiette

1 lb. fresh hot Italian sausage

1/2 medium red onion, thinly sliced, about 1 cup

1 lb. grape tomatoes

1 Tbs. finely chopped garlic

1/2 cup white wine 1/2 cups whole-milk ricotta Extra-virgin olive oil, for serving 1/4 cup thinly sliced fresh basil

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F. In a small bowl, whisk together 2 Tbs. of the olive oil, the lemon juice, 1/4 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper. On a large rimmed sheet pan, toss the Broccolini with the 3 Tbs. olive oil, 1/2 tsp. salt, and 1/4 tsp. pepper, transfer to the oven, and roast until the Broccolini is tender-crisp and browned in places, 12 to 15 minutes. Remove from the oven and chop into 1-inch pieces. Meanwhile, cook the pasta according to package directions until al dente. Drain, reserving 1 cup of the pasta water, and return to the pot. Add the lemon juice mixture and toss. Meanwhile, in a large skillet, heat 1 Tbs. of the olive oil over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the sausage and sautÊ, breaking the sausage into smaller pieces, until the sausage is browned, 7 to 8 minutes. Transfer the sausage to a plate and drain the fat from the pan. Add the remaining 1 Tbs. oil and the onions and sautÊ until golden brown, about 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and garlic and continue to cook until some of the tomatoes start to burst, 2 to 4 minutes. Add the wine and scrape the bottom to deglaze the pan. Transfer the mixture and the Broccolini to the pot and toss, adding pasta water to loosen, if necessary. Season to taste with salt, pepper, and more lemon juice. Transfer to a large serving bowl or divide among 4 bowls, top with the ricotta, a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil, and the fresh basil and serve.


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fresh tomato and garlic pizza Flavored with a little oregano, this is a pizza lover’s dream pie, especially when made with perfectly ripe, local summer tomatoes. Goat cheese adds to the fresh feel of the pizza. Yields two 10- to 11-inch pizzas; serves 4 Flour for the peel

2 8-oz. balls pizza dough (homemade or store-bought) at room temperature

4 to 6 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

6 Tbs. minced garlic

11/2 cups coarsely grated mozzarella 2 medium ripe tomatoes, sliced between 1/8 and 1/4 inch thick Flaky sea salt

3 oz. fresh goat cheese, crumbled

1 cup coarsely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano

2 pinches of dried oregano

Put a pizza stone on the lowest rack of the oven, heat the oven to 550°F, and let the stone heat for at least 30 minutes.

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Lightly flour a pizza peel. Stretch one dough ball into a 10- to 11-inch round and transfer it to the peel. Brush the dough with oil and sprinkle with half of the garlic. Top with half of the mozzarella and enough tomato slices to cover most of the surface in a single layer. Season very lightly with salt. Top the tomatoes with half of the goat cheese and Parmigiano or Grana Padano. Drizzle with another 1 Tbs. of the oil and sprinkle with a pinch of oregano. Slide the dough onto the hot stone and bake until the cheese is melted and the crust is nicely browned, about 8 minutes. Transfer to a cutting board. Repeat to make the second pizza.


shrimp scampi Bright and full of flavor, shrimp scampi is quick enough for a weeknight meal, but it’s also sophisticated enough for a dinner party. Serve it with pasta, rice, or crusty bread to sop up the garlicky butter sauce. Serves 4 1½ lb. extra-jumbo shrimp (16 to 20 per lb.), peeled and deveined (shells reserved), tails left on, if you like

Crushed red pepper flakes (optional)

1 medium carrot, chopped

1 medium rib celery, chopped

In a 4-quart saucepan, combine the reserved shrimp shells, carrot, celery, onion, and bay leaf. Add 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook for 30 minutes . Strain the stock through a fine-mesh sieve and reserve ¼ cup for the scampi. (Freeze the rest for other uses.) Pat the shrimp dry and season with ½ tsp. salt and 1/4 tsp. pepper. In a 12-inch heavy-duty skillet, melt 3 Tbs. of the butter over medium heat. Add the parsley, garlic, and lemon zest and cook, stirring occasionally, until the garlic

1 small yellow onion, halved

1 bay leaf

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 oz. (4 Tbs.) unsalted butter

¼ cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

3 large cloves garlic, minced (2 Tbs.)

1 Tbs. finely grated lemon zest

¼ cup dry white wine

1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Lemon wedges for serving

is lightly golden, 1 to 2 minutes. Raise the heat to high, add the shrimp, and cook until they start to turn pink, about 1 minute. Add the wine and cook until reduced by half, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the reserved shrimp stock and simmer until the shrimp are just cooked through, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the lemon juice and crushed red pepper flakes, if using, and stir to coat. With a slotted spoon, transfer the shrimp to a serving plate. Whisk the remaining 1 Tbs. butter into the sauce. If the sauce seems thin, simmer it gently for a minute or two to thicken. Season to taste with salt and pepper, pour over the shrimp, and serve with the lemon wedges on the side.

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pasta carbonara Choose high-quality ingredients and this dish will be a stunner. Eat the pasta hot, while the sauce is still smooth and creamy. Serves 4 to 6

1 lb. dried spaghetti, linguine, or bucatini (preferably imported from Italy)

Kosher salt ½ lb. guanciale or pancetta, cut into ¼-inch dice

2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

3 large eggs, at room temperature

4 oz. finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano (about 31/2 cups using a rasp grater)

Freshly ground black pepper

Bring an 8-quart pot of water to a boil. Add the pasta and 2 Tbs. salt and cook until al dente, about 1 minute less than the package directions, stirring often to prevent sticking. Reserve 1 cup of the water and then drain the pasta. Meanwhile, put the guanciale or pancetta and olive oil in a 12-inch heavy-duty skillet (not cast iron), and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until golden brown but not yet crisp, 3 to 5 minutes for guanciale; 5 to 7 minutes for pancetta (you don’t want to render all the fat). Remove the skillet from the heat. In a medium bowl, whisk the eggs, cheese, and 1/4 tsp. black pepper until well combined. Slowly whisk in 1/4 cup of the reserved pasta water. Immediately after draining the pasta, add it to the skillet and then quickly pour in the egg mixture, tossing continuously with tongs, until the pasta is well coated, 15 to 30 seconds. Add more of the reserved pasta cooking water if needed to achieve a creamy consistency. Serve hot, sprinkled with additional black pepper to taste.

slow-cooker osso buco There are two tricks to this recipe: browning the veal shanks before they go into the slow cooker and reducing the sauce before serving. The result is an osso buco you’d be hard-pressed to distinguish from the laborintensive classic (trust us). Serves 4 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

4 1½- to 2-inch-thick veal shanks (about 21/2 lb.)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 Tbs. unsalted butter

1 cup dry white wine

1 141/2-oz. can diced tomatoes

3/4 cup lower-salt chicken broth

1 small red onion, chopped (11/2 cups)

1 medium carrot, peeled and cut into ¼-inch-thick rounds (1/2 cup)

1 stalk celery, chopped (1/2 cup)

5 sprigs fresh thyme

3 Tbs. finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 Tbs. finely grated lemon zest

1 large clove garlic, minced (1 tsp.)

Put the flour in a wide, shallow dish. Season the veal shanks all

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over with salt and pepper and dredge in the flour; shake off the excess flour. Heat a 12-inch skillet over medium heat. Add the butter, and when it foams, add the shanks to the skillet. Cook until golden, turning once, about 10 minutes. Transfer the shanks to a slow cooker. Add the wine to the skillet. Scrape up any browned bits from the bottom of the skillet and pour the contents of the skillet into the slow cooker. Add the tomatoes and their juices, chicken broth, onion, carrot, celery, and thyme. Cover and cook on low heat for 6 to 8 hours—the meat will be very tender and almost falling off the bone. Transfer the shanks to a platter and cover with foil to keep warm. Pour the sauce from the slow cooker into a large skillet. Simmer over medium heat until reduced to about 2 cups, 10 to 15 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Meanwhile, in a small bowl, combine the parsley, lemon zest, and garlic to make a gremolata. Serve the veal shanks topped with the sauce and the gremolata.


classic chicken cacciatore In Italy, starchy dishes like polenta and pasta are typically served on their own as a first course, but if you’re being nontraditional, either would make a great accompaniment to this dish. Serves 4

1 4-lb. chicken

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

1 medium yellow onion, cut into small dice

¾ cup dry red wine

4 fresh sage leaves

2 3-inch sprigs fresh rosemary

2 sprigs fresh flat-leaf parsley

2 bay leaves, preferably fresh

1 28-oz. can whole plum tomatoes, finely chopped, juice reserved

prep and cook the cacciatore

Cut the chicken into 8 serving pieces: With a boning knife or chef’s knife, cut each leg off the chicken above the thigh bone. Then separate each leg into drumstick and thigh following the line of fat on the underside. With kitchen shears, cut out the back bone and discard. With a chef’s knife, cut through the breastbone so you have 2 breast halves with the wing attached. Cut across each breast to separate it into 2 pieces 1 . Pat the chicken dry and season generously with salt and pepper. Heat 2 Tbs. of the oil in an 11- to 12-inch straight-sided sauté pan over medium-high heat until shimmering hot. Working in two batches, cook the chicken until golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes per side. (Reduce the heat to medium for the second batch if the brown bits sticking to the pan get too dark.) Transfer the chicken to a plate.

Pour off all but a thin layer of fat from the pan. Lower the heat to medium and add the remaining 1 Tbs. oil. Add the onion and a pinch of salt and cook, stirring and scraping up any browned bits with a wooden spatula, until the onion is tender and lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the red wine, raise the heat to medium high, and boil until the wine is reduced by half, 3 to 5 minutes. Tie the herbs together in a bouquet garni and add to the pan along with the tomatoes and their juice. Return the chicken pieces to the pan, turn to coat them in the sauce, and gently simmer, uncovered, turning the chicken occasionally, until just cooked through, 25 to 30 minutes 2 . Using tongs, transfer the chicken to plates or a serving platter. Remove the herbs and season the sauce to taste with salt and pepper. Spoon the sauce over the chicken, and serve.

1 When cutting up the chicken, don’t remove the wings from the breasts. Instead, cut the breasts in half with the wings still attached, which gives you two meaty serving pieces.

2 After an initial sear, the chicken is braised in tomatoes, wine, and herbs. A gentle simmer allows the meat to cook through while the flavors of the sauce develop.

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filling the pasta

Place teaspoonfuls of filling 1 inch apart on the pasta sheets.

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Lift the edge of the sheet up and over the filling.

Eliminate any air and seal the pasta well by lightly moistening the dough and pressing it firmly closed.


swiss chard and ricotta ravioli with lemon brown butter The classic combination of Swiss chard and mild ricotta filling these delicate ravioli is accented by a little nutmeg and lemon zest; a nutty brown-butter sauce is simple enough that it lets the filling flavors shine. Yields 40 to 50 ravioli; serves 4 as a main course or 6 to 8 as a first course For the dough

7 oz. (1 1/3 cups plus 2 Tbs.) 00 flour; more as needed

13/4 oz. (1/4 cup plus 1 Tbs.) semola rimacinata (fine flour) or unbleached all-purpose flour

6 large egg yolks

1 large egg

11/2 tsp. extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 tsp. kosher salt For the filling

6 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 cloves garlic, smashed

3/4 lb. Swiss chard, stemmed, washed, and cut into bite-size pieces (about 3 cups) Kosher salt 11/2 cups whole-milk ricotta cheese 3/4 oz. (3/4 cup) finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano 1/2 tsp. finely grated lemon zest 1/8 tsp. freshly grated nutmeg For cooking and serving Kosher salt

4 oz. (1/2 cup) unsalted butter

2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

Make the dough

Dump the flours on a work surface and mix to combine them. Make a deep, wide well in the center, making sure there is some flour on the bottom so the eggs are not directly on the surface. Add the egg yolks, whole egg, oil, and salt. Using a fork, beat the wet ingredients until combined, staying in the center and being careful that the eggs don’t breach the wall. (If any does, gather it up and reinforce the wall.) Begin mixing in the flour from the inside of the wall, a little at a time, until the dough is too stiff to mix with the fork. Scrape the dough off the fork and continue mixing by hand, folding it and forming it into a single mass. If necessary, use a bench scraper to move the dough and to scrape any dried bits to the side. Lightly flour the work surface and knead the dough for at least 5 minutes, adding more flour if needed to keep the dough from sticking to your hands. Continue kneading until the

dough is a smooth ball that feels soft like your earlobe. Wrap the dough loosely in plastic and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. (Let it warm up a little before rolling, if necessary.) Prepare the filling

Heat 3 Tbs. of the oil in a 6- to 7-quart Dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add the garlic and brown on both sides, about 2 minutes total. Discard the garlic and add the chard. Cook, stirring, until tender, about 2 minutes. Season with 1/2 tsp. salt. Drain the greens and wring out excess liquid in a clean towel. Let cool to room temperature. Combine the greens and the ricotta in a medium bowl. Add the Parmigiano, the remaining 3 Tbs. oil, zest, nutmeg, and 1/2 tsp. salt and mix well. Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days. Roll the dough

Set up a pasta machine on a large work surface. Set the machine to its widest setting. Flatten the dough with your hand or a rolling pin and divide it into pieces. (If you’re comfortable rolling dough, in half is fine; otherwise, divide it into 3 or 4 pieces to get shorter sheets.) Working with one piece at a time and keeping the other pieces wrapped in plastic or a cloth, run the dough through the widest setting on the machine a couple of times, flouring as needed, to work the dough. Move the rollers to the next setting and pass the dough through. Continue notching down by one setting and passing the dough through each time. Stop rolling when you can see the outline of your hand through the dough; this may not be the thinnest setting on some machines. Cut the sheet crosswise into 2-foot lengths to make them easier to work with and trim the long sides to make neat rectangles. (If you need to stack them, very lightly flour them.) Cover loosely with plastic wrap or a clean kitchen towel. Repeat with the remaining pieces of pasta.

lightly moisten the entire strip with water using a spray bottle or a pastry brush. Spoon rounded teaspoonfuls of the filling 1 inch apart along the center of the sheet. Lift the top edge of the strip and bring it down to meet the bottom, letting it fall loosely over the filling and lining up the edges. Using your fingers, gently press on the dough close to each mound to coax out any trapped air, and then press on the edges to seal completely. Using a fluted pastry wheel or a knife, trim the long, unfolded edge of the ravioli if you like. Then cut the pasta between the mounds to form individual ravioli. Transfer the ravioli to the prepared baking sheet in a single layer. Repeat with the remaining dough and filling. You can cook the ravioli right away or cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days (you can also freeze them; see Make Ahead, below). Cook and serve the ravioli

When ready to serve, bring a pot of well-salted water to a boil. Meanwhile, melt the butter in a skillet or saucepan over medium-high heat, whisking occasionally, until the milk solids turn brown. Whisk in the lemon juice and season to taste with salt. Gently slide the ravioli (fresh or frozen) into the water and cook until tender, 3 to 5 minutes. Use a skimmer to remove the ravioli from the water as draining them in a colander can damage them. Serve the ravioli with the butter sauce. Make ahead: The dough can be refrigerated, wrapped in plastic, for up to 2 days before rolling and shaping the ravioli. The filling can be refrigerated, covered, for up to 2 days. The uncooked ravioli can be frozen for up to a month: Freeze them uncovered on their tray until rock hard, then transfer to zip-top bags and return to the freezer. There’s no need to thaw them before cooking.

Make the ravioli

Lightly flour a rimmed baking sheet or tray. Working with one pasta sheet at a time, very

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sweet and sour sicilian braised chicken (pollo agrodolce) In Sicily, this dish would be served with a vege­table like artichokes or sautéed greens, probably after a simple pasta. For a onecourse meal, serve the chicken with plain couscous, which is not at all traditional but delicious. Serves 4

4 whole chicken legs, cut into thighs and drumsticks (31/2 to 4 lb. total)

Salt and freshly ground black pepper Flour for dredging 1/3 cup olive oil; plus a drizzle of your best extra-virgin oil to finish the dish

1 small onion, cut into small dice

1 small rib celery, cut into small dice

1 small carrot, cut into small dice

1 Tbs. sugar

2 Tbs. good-quality white-wine vinegar (you might need a bit more, depending on the strength of your vinegar)

1/2 cup dry white wine

1 cup homemade or lower-salt canned chicken stock

1 bay leaf

1/4 cup golden raisins 1/4 cup pine nuts, lightly toasted

2 Tbs. capers, preferably salt-packed Sicilian capers, soaked in cool water and rinsed

A few large sprigs fresh mint, leaves lightly chopped (about 2 Tbs.); plus a few sprigs for garnish

Pat the chicken pieces dry, season them with salt and pepper, and dredge them lightly in the flour, tapping off any excess. Heat a large sauté pan fitted with a lid over medium-high heat and add the 1/3 cup olive oil. When the oil is hot, add the chicken pieces (in batches, if necessary), browning them very well on both sides. When browned, remove

the chicken from the pan and set aside. Pour off all but about 3 Tbs. of the fat from the pan. Turn the heat to medium low and add the onion, celery, and carrot. Sauté until they’re soft and fragrant, 6 to 7 minutes. Add the sugar and vinegar to the pan and let it ­bubble for about 1 minute. Return the chicken pieces to the pan and turn them over in the vegetables once or twice to coat them. I­ ncrease the heat to medium and add the wine, letting it boil until almost evaporated. Add the chicken stock and bay leaf, cover the pan, and simmer on low heat until the chicken is just about tender, 30 to 35 minutes, turning the pieces once or twice during cooking.

Add the raisins, pine nuts, and ­capers and simmer to blend the flavors, about 5 minutes longer. The sauce should be r­ educed and thickened but still pourable. If it looks too dry, add a splash of chicken stock or w ­ ater. Taste for seasoning. It should have a nice balance b ­ etween sweet and sour but not be too ­aggressive. Add more salt, ­pepper, a splash of vinegar, or a pinch of sugar to balance the flavors. Arrange the chicken on a large ­serving platter. To the pan, add a drizzle off your best ­extra-­virgin olive oil and the chopped mint and mix it into the sauce. Pour the sauce over the chicken and garnish with the mint sprigs.


spaghetti and meatballs Plenty of oregano and a touch of fennel make these tender meatballs super flavorful. The high proportion of pork in the meatballs gives them a great texture, but meatloaf mix— equal parts beef, veal, and pork—is an easy-to-find substitute. Serves 6 to 8 FOR THE SAUCE

make the sauce

1/2 cup olive oil

Heat the olive oil in a heavy-duty 4-quart saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, oregano, and bay leaf. Cook, stirring often, until the onion is soft, 6 to 10 minutes. Add the tomato paste and cook, stirring constantly, until darkened, 3 to 4 minutes. Add the tomatoes and their juice and 1 tsp. salt. Bring to a boil and then simmer over low heat, stirring frequently, until the sauce has reduced by about a third, 40 to 60 minutes. Remove the bay leaf and season to taste with salt. Keep warm, covered. (The sauce can also be refrigerated for up to 5 days or frozen for 1 month.)

1 large yellow onion, chopped (11/2 cups)

3 medium cloves garlic, crushed

2 tsp. chopped fresh oregano or 1 tsp. dry oregano

1 bay leaf

1 Tbs. tomato paste

2 26- to 28-oz. containers diced tomatoes, preferably Pomì brand

Kosher salt FOR THE MEATBALLS

1 Tbs. olive oil

8 oz. ground pork

6 oz. 80% lean ground beef

6 oz. ground veal

1 cup coarse fresh white breadcrumbs

1/2 cup whole-milk ricotta

2 large eggs

2 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 Tbs. chopped fresh oregano or 11/2 tsp. dry oregano

1/2 tsp. freshly ground fennel seed 1/8 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes Kosher salt FOR THE PASTA Kosher salt 11/2 lb. dried spaghetti

Make the meatballs

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 450°F. Coat the bottom and sides of an 8x8-inch baking dish with the olive oil. Set aside. Combine the ground meats, breadcrumbs, ricotta, eggs, parsley, oregano, fennel seed, red pepper flakes, and 2 tsp. salt in a large bowl. Mix gently but thoroughly with your hands. Divide the meat into 16 golf ball–size portions using a 2-oz., 2-inch-diameter ice cream scoop or your hands; roll with wet hands to make them round. Arrange the balls snugly in the baking dish.

Bake the meatballs until they register about 90°F on an instant-read thermometer and are firm to the touch, 10 to 12 minutes. (If you’ve made the tomato sauce ahead, heat it while the meatballs are cooking.) Remove the meatballs from the oven and drain excess fat, if there is any, from the pan. Ladle half of the sauce over them, return them to the oven, and continue to bake until an instant-read thermometer inserted into one reads 165°F, about 15 minutes. (The meatballs can be refrigerated for up to 3 days or frozen for 2 weeks.) Cook the pasta

Bring a large covered pot of well-salted water to a rolling boil. Add the pasta and cook, stirring occasionally, for 2 minutes less than package timing for al dente. Reserve 2 cups of the pasta water and drain. Return the pasta to the pot and mix with the remaining sauce. Add 1 cup pasta water to thin the sauce and cook over medium heat until the pasta is al dente, 2 to 3 minutes. Add more pasta water if necessary, and season to taste with salt. Transfer the spaghetti to a large heated serving bowl. Top with the meatballs and their sauce and serve.

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Roasted Carrots and Shallots with Oil-Cured Olives and Gremolata, p. 66


Side Dishes Contorni Vegetables and grains bring great flavor to the Italian table.

Roasted Carrots and Shallots with Oil-Cured Olives and Gremolata, p. 66

Spinach Farrotto, p. 70

Herbed Ricotta Polenta, p. 66

Risotto, p. 72

Fennel and Red Onion with Arugula, p. 67 Creamy Baked Leeks with Garlic, Thyme, and Parmigiano, p. 68 Shaved Squash Carpaccio with Capers and Ricotta Salata, p. 69 Italian Green Beans with Tomatoes and Balsamic, p. 70

Broccolini with Olives and Capers, p. 71

Quick-Braised Baby Artichokes with Garlic, Mint, and Parsley, p. 73 Garlic Bread, p. 74 Braised Fingerling Potatoes with Fennel, Olives, and Thyme, p. 74 GratinĂŠed Tomatoes with Asiago and Fresh Herbs, p. 75


side dishes

roasted carrots and shallots with oil-cured olives and gremolata The sweet earthiness of the carrots pairs perfectly with the briny flavor of the olives. (See the photo on p. 64.) Serves 6 1/2 cup finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley Zest of 1 medium lemon, finely chopped (11/2 to 2 Tbs.) 1 tsp. minced garlic 2 lb. medium carrots 1 cup 1/4-inch-thick-sliced shallot rounds (3 or 4 medium shallots) 1 Tbs. fresh thyme leaves 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 tsp. kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup pitted and thinly sliced oil-cured olives

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 425°F. Toss the parsley, lemon zest, and garlic in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and set aside. This mixture is called gremolata. Peel the carrots and slice in half lengthwise. Cut the carrots so that they are of equal size. Put the carrots on a large rimmed baking sheet and toss with the shallots, thyme, olive oil, salt, and several grinds of pepper. Arrange the carrots in a single layer. Roast the carrots, tossing occasionally, until they are tender and ever so slightly browned, 20 to 30 minutes. Remove from the oven, add the olives, and sprinkle with the gremolata. Adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. Pass the remaining gremolata at the table.

herbed ricotta polenta Creamy-sweet ricotta and tender summer herbs give this polenta a sunny flavor profile, making it an excellent match for a simple roast chicken or seared steaks. Serves 8 11 oz. (2 cups) polenta (not instant or quick-cooking) 3 cups boiling water 3 cups lower-salt chicken broth or water; more as needed Fine sea salt 1 packed cup fresh basil 1/2 cup loosely packed fresh flatleaf parsley 1 to 2 Tbs. loosely packed fresh marjoram 2 oz. (2 cups) finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano; more for serving 1/2 cup whole-milk ricotta 11/2 oz. (3 Tbs.) unsalted butter, cut into 6 pieces Freshly ground black pepper SOaK THE POLEnTa

Put the polenta in a 4-quart heavy-duty saucepan and whisk in the boiling water. Cover and let sit at room temperature for at least 8 and up to 12 hours. COOK THE POLEnTa

cut evenly It’s very important that you cut the carrots in pieces of about the same size. Unevenly sized pieces won’t roast and brown in the same amount of time, and you’ll end up with both overroasted and underroasted vegetables.

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in a 2-quart saucepan, bring the broth to a boil. Whisk the broth and 1 tsp. salt into the polenta, loosening it and breaking up any clumps. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, whisking once or twice, about 5 minutes. Turn the heat down to maintain a simmer and continue cook-

ing, whisking constantly, until the polenta thickens from soupy to porridge-like, about 2 minutes. Turn the heat down to low. Cover and cook, stirring vigorously and scraping the bottom of the pan with a wooden spoon or spatula every couple of minutes. When you can see the bottom of the pan as you drag the spoon across it, 5 to 10 minutes later, begin tasting the polenta; it’s done when it’s thick, creamy, and tender. it should be granular but not gritty. While the polenta cooks, pulse the basil, parsley, and marjoram in a food processor until finely chopped, about seven 1-second pulses; don’t overprocess into a paste. Remove the polenta from the heat, and stir in the cheeses, butter, chopped herbs, and ½ tsp. pepper until the butter is melted. Season to taste and serve right away, passing more Parmigiano or Grana Padano at the table. Make ahead: After soaking the polenta at room temperature, you can refrigerate it, covered, for up to 2 days.


fennel and red onion with arugula If you can’t find baby arugula, larger leaves are fine. Just discard any large stems, tear the leaves into bite-size pieces, and be sure they’re washed well. Serves 4

2 cups loosely packed baby arugula

21/2 Tbs. olive oil

1 medium-large bulb fennel, cored and cut into 1/4-inchthick slices (to yield about 2 cups); fronds reserved for garnish

1 cup 1/8- to 1/4-inch-thick half-moon slices red onion

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 large clove garlic, minced

1/4 cup orange juice, preferably fresh

4 Kalamata olives, pitted and coarsely chopped

Scatter the arugula in a wide, shallow serving bowl. Heat a large (preferably 12-inch) skillet over medium-high heat for 1 minute. Pour in 2 Tbs. of the oil and swirl to coat the pan. As soon as the oil is s­ himmering— but not smoking—add the fennel and onion in an even layer. Season with salt and pepper and let the vegetables cook

undisturbed until they have begun to brown, about 2 minutes. Stir occasionally until the fennel and onion are tender and deep golden brown in places, about another 5 minutes. If the vege­ tables seem to be cooking too fast or the bottom of the pan is starting to burn, lower the heat to medium. (If using an electric stovetop, take the pan off the burner momentarily to let the pan cool.) Clear a space in the

center of the pan and add the remaining 1/2 Tbs. oil and then the garlic. Let cook u ­ ntil the garlic is fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the orange juice and stir to combine with the vegetables. Pour the mixture over the arugula and toss to combine and to wilt the arugula. Season to taste with salt and pepper, sprinkle with the chopped olives and chopped fennel fronds, and serve immediately.


sides

creamy baked leeks with garlic, thyme, and parmigiano This simple recipe doesn’t require the cook’s attention at the last minute—but it will get the attention of your onion-loving guests. If possible, choose leeks that are all about the same size. Serves 8

1 tsp. unsalted butter

Kosher salt

8 medium-large leeks (ideally with several inches of white)

2 tsp. lightly chopped fresh thyme

1 cup heavy cream

2 large cloves garlic, smashed and peeled

1/3 cup finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano

Heat the oven to 350°F. Rub the bottom of a shallow 10x15-inch (or similar) rectangular baking dish with the butter. Sprinkle 1/4 tsp. salt over the bottom of the pan. Cut the dark green portion and all but about 1 inch of the light green off the top of the leeks. Peel away any tough or damaged outer leaves. Trim the ends by cutting the roots but leaving a bit of the base intact to hold the leek together. Cut each leek in half lengthwise. Gently wash each half under running water, fanning open the

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layers to rinse as thoroughly as possible. Pat the leeks dry and then arrange them cut side down in the baking dish. They should all fit snugly, but if they are crowded, turn a few on their sides. Sprinkle the thyme and 1/4 tsp. salt over the leeks. Heat the cream and garlic in a small saucepan over high heat. As soon as the cream comes to a rolling boil (watch carefully and don’t let it boil over), remove the pan from the heat and let sit for 5 minutes. Pour the cream and garlic evenly over the leeks. Cover the leeks with a piece of parchment cut to fit inside the pan. Bake the leeks until the thickest ends are tender all the way through when pierced with a paring knife and the cream is almost entirely reduced, about 35 minutes. Sprinkle the leeks with the cheese and salt to taste. Bake just until the cheese melts, an additional 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer the leeks to a warm serving platter. Make ahead: You can wash and trim the leeks and arrange them in the buttered baking dish 6 hours ahead.


shaved squash carpaccio with capers and ricotta salata Refreshing and light, this is a perfect first course or side for a summer dinner. Make it up to a few hours in advance, keeping it covered and chilled and adding the salt, pepper, cheese, capers, and thyme just before serving. Serves 4 3 medium yellow summer squash or zucchini, or a mix (about 1 lb.) 1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice 1 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 oz. ricotta salata or Manchego 1 Tbs. brined capers, drained and chopped

Using a vegetable peeler, shave off long strips of squash, rotating the squash in your hand as you work around the seed-filled center. (Stop when it becomes difficult to shave, and discard the seedy centers.) Arrange the strips on a large platter, overlapping them slightly. Drizzle with the lemon juice and olive oil. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Use a vegetable peeler to shave the ricotta salata over the squash. Top with the capers and serve.

capers

Tangy Mediterranean dishes like penne alla puttanesca, chicken piccata, or side dishes such as the one above get their delicious briny punch from capers. Small but packed with sharp flavor, capers are the unopened flower buds of the caper shrub, which grows all over the Mediterranean coast. Unappetizing when fresh, capers are usually sun-dried and cured in a mixture of brine and vinegar or in salt.

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side dishes

italian green beans with tomatoes and balsamic This is a speedy version of slow-cooked Italian green beans. Sauté the haricots verts quickly to preserve their delicate texture, then toss them with a sauce of plum tomatoes and balsamic vinegar. Serves 6 Kosher salt ¾ lb. haricots verts, trimmed

2 Tbs. olive oil

2 medium cloves garlic, smashed

2 large plum tomatoes, roughly chopped and puréed in a food processor

1 Tbs. balsamic vinegar

Freshly ground black pepper Shavings of ParmigianoReggiano or Grana Padano, for garnish (optional)

Bring a pot of well-salted water to a boil. Add the beans and cook until bright green and just tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and immediately plunge in a large bowl of

ice water. Let cool for 3 to 4 minutes. Drain and set aside. In a large (12-inch) skillet, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook for about 1 minute. Add the tomatoes and vinegar, sprinkle with ½ tsp. each salt and pepper, and cook, stirring, until the mixture reduces by half, about 2 minutes. Add the beans to the pan and cook until warmed through and coated with the tomato mixture, about 1 minute. Taste the beans and season with salt and pepper if needed; garnish with shavings of cheese if you like. Serve immediately.

spinach farrotto Inspired by risotto but made with farro instead of rice, this quick and simple side dish is excellent served alongside grilled sausage, roast chicken, or steak. Serves 4

3 cups lower-salt chicken or vegetable broth

3 Tbs. unsalted butter

2 Tbs. thinly sliced shallot

1 cup pearled farro

1/4 cup dry white wine

4 oz. Brinata or Brie, rind removed and chopped

3 oz. baby spinach

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

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1 Tbs. thinly sliced scallions


broccolini with olives and capers Broccolini is a more delicate version of its larger cousin, broccoli (which is just fine to use in this recipe if you can’t find Broccolini). The entire stalk is edible, and there’s no need to trim it. Serves 8 Kosher salt

4 medium bunches Broccolini (2 to 21/2 lb.)

6 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

2 tsp. minced garlic

2 Tbs. chopped pitted Kalamata olives

2 Tbs. chopped capers (rinse only if salt-packed)

Freshly ground black pepper

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the Broccolini and stir to separate the stems. When the water returns to a boil, adjust the heat to a simmer and cook until crisp tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Drain well. (The Broccolini may be prepared to this point up to 1 day ahead and refrigerated.) Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic and cook until softened, about 1 minute, taking care not to let it get any color. Add the olives and capers and cook for 1 minute more. Add the Broccolini and toss to coat. If the Broccolini was cooked ahead, keep tossing until heated through. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve.

In a small saucepan, warm the chicken or vegetable broth. Melt 2 Tbs. of the butter in a 3-quart saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the shallot and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes. Add the farro and stir to coat. Add the wine and cook, stirring often, until absorbed, about 1 minute. Add 1/2 cup of the broth and cook, stirring, until absorbed. Repeat, adding the broth 1/2 cup at a time, until tender but still tooth­ some, about 25 minutes. Add the Brie and the remaining 1 Tbs. butter; stir until melted. Stir in the spinach until wilted. Season to taste with salt and pepper, top with the scallions, and serve.

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side dishes

risotto To avoid overcooking your risotto, taste it frequently, beginning about 15 minutes after you add the first ladleful of broth. Yields 5 cups; serves 6 as a first course

2 Tbs. olive oil

1 medium yellow onion, finely chopped

3 cups lower-salt chicken broth

14½ oz. (2 cups) arborio, vialone nano, or carnaroli rice 1/2 cup dry white wine, such as Sauvignon Blanc or Pinot Grigio

1 oz. (2 Tbs.) unsalted butter, cut into 4 pieces

2 oz. finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano or Grana Padano (2 cups using a rasp grater)

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

In a wide, heavy-duty 5- to 6-quart pot, heat the olive oil over medium-low heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until soft and translucent, 5 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, in a 3-quart saucepan, bring the broth and 3 cups of water to a bare simmer over medium-low heat. Add the rice to the onion and stir with a wooden spatula until the grains are coated with oil, slightly translucent around the edges, and opaque in the center, 2 to 3 minutes. Add the wine, raise the heat to medium, and stir until almost evaporated, about 1 minute. Using a large ladle, add about 3/4 cup of the broth. Stir, mixing any rice sticking to the pot’s sides back into the mixture, until most of the broth is absorbed, the rice no longer seems loose when you shake the pot, and a wide trail forms when you run the spatula across the bottom of the pot. Continue to add broth in ¾-cup incre­ ments, stirring constantly and scraping around the edge of the pot, until the rice is al dente (still a bit firm to the bite but without a hard or crunchy center) and most of the broth is absorbed, 18 to 22 minutes. (You may or may not use all of the broth; if you run out, use hot water.) Immediately turn off the heat. Add another ¾ cup broth and the butter, the cheese, and salt and pepper to taste, and stir quickly. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and let sit for 5 minutes. Stir again and serve. Variations Butternut Squash, Pancetta, and Sage

Add 4 oz. chopped pancetta with the onions

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and cook as directed. Add 3 cups 1/2-inchdiced butternut squash and cook, stirring, for 5 minutes. Continue with the basic risotto. Add 1 Tbs. chopped fresh sage along with the butter and cheese. Porcini Mushroom and Gorgonzola

baking sheet, toss with 2 Tbs. olive oil and roast at 375°F, stirring once, until tender and golden, about 30 minutes. Make the basic risotto. Add the roasted fennel, fennel fronds, 1 tsp. finely grated lemon zest, and 1 Tbs. lemon juice along with the butter and cheese.

Gently simmer 1/2 oz. dried porcini mushrooms in 1/2 cup heavy cream until softened, about 5 minutes. Remove the mushrooms from the cream, coarsely chop, and return to the cream. Cover and keep warm while you make the basic risotto. At the end, instead of broth and butter, add the mushroom cream, 4 oz. room-temperature Gorgonzola, and just ½ oz. finely grated cheese. Shrimp, Cherry Tomatoes, and Saffron

On a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet, roast 3 cups cherry tomatoes tossed with 1 Tbs. olive oil at 450°F until soft and brown in spots, 15 to 20 minutes. In a large skillet, cook 1 lb. shelled and deveined large (31 to 35 per lb.) shrimp in 1 Tbs. olive oil over mediumhigh heat until just opaque, about 2 minutes. Instead of chicken broth, make the basic risotto with fish stock or bottled clam juice heated with a large pinch of saffron. Add the shrimp and tomatoes along with the butter and cheese. Roasted Fennel and Lemon

Remove the fronds from 1 lb. fennel, chop, and set aside. Trim and cut the fennel bulb into ½-inch pieces. On a large heavy-duty

add broth in increments

Add more broth when your spatula leaves a trail through the rice. Adding broth in small amounts keeps the grains close together to create friction while stirring, which releases the starch that makes risotto creamy.


quick-braised baby artichokes with garlic, mint, and parsley This classic Roman dish includes two of the artichoke’s best friends: fresh herbs and lemon juice. Its simplicity requires the freshest artichokes you can find. Serves 4 16 baby artichokes, trimmed and halved, or 12 large artichokes, trimmed to the heart and quartered 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

4 medium cloves garlic, minced (11/2 Tbs.)

1 Tbs. fresh lemon juice

1/2 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint

Drain the artichokes and blot dry with a dishtowel. In a 12-inch skillet, heat 2 Tbs. of the olive oil over mediumhigh heat until shimmering hot. Add half of the artichokes cut side down, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook until golden brown, 3 to 4 minutes. As each one browns, flip it and brown the outside, about 2 minutes more. Transfer to a bowl and repeat with the remaining 2 Tbs. oil and the second batch of artichokes. Reduce the heat to medium and add the reserved cooked artichokes to the ones in the skillet, along with the garlic. Cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add 1/2 cup water and the lemon juice; bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover, and simmer until just tender, about 20 minutes. Uncover the pan, stir in the parsley and mint, raise the heat to medium, and simmer until any remaining liquid is mostly evaporated, 1 to 2 minutes. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and serve.

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side dishes

garlic bread Making a compound butter with sautéed instead of raw garlic helps mellow the flavor, while baking the bread in a paper bag helps crisp up the crust. You can adjust the amount of garlic to suit your tolerance: 1 clove for mild or up to 4 for high potency. Yields one loaf of bread; serves 8 to 10

2 Tbs. fruity olive oil

3 cloves garlic, finely minced or puréed (about 3 tsp.)

3/4 tsp. coarse salt

1 tsp. coarsely ground black pepper

1/4 lb. cold unsalted butter, in small dice or thin slices

1 1-lb. loaf Italian bread (preferably a thin-crusted style)

Heat the oven to 400°F. In a small skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the garlic, salt, and pepper and cook, sizzling gently for about 2 minutes, stirring occasionally. The garlic should soften and become fragrant but not brown. Put the butter in a small bowl and pour the oil and garlic over it. Blend until smooth enough to spread evenly. Make diagonal slices in the bread at 3/4-inch intervals, stopping short of the bottom crust. Slather some of the garlic butter into each cut. Slip the loaf back into the paper bag that it came in (or use a torn paper grocery bag; avoid those with printing or plastic on them). Wet the entire bag with a spray bottle or a very fast pass under the faucet. Pop the package into the oven and bake until it smells of popcorn and the crust is crisp, 10 to 15 minutes.

braised fingerling potatoes with fennel, olives, and thyme This rustic side dish is great with roasted lamb or pork. Serves 4

Variations

For herbed garlic bread, add 1/4 cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley or 2 Tbs. chopped fresh thyme, oregano, chives, or basil to the butter along with the garlic.

3/4 lb. fingerling potatoes (7 or 8 medium), cut lengthwise into 1/4-inch-thick slices

3 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt

1 small bulb fennel, trimmed and halved lengthwise, then cut lengthwise into 1/2-inchthick slices

1 medium sweet onion, thinly sliced

1/2 cup lower-salt chicken broth

3 sprigs fresh thyme, plus 2 tsp. chopped fresh thyme for garnish

Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup pitted Niçoise olives

Heat the oven to 375°F. Heat 11/2 Tbs. of the oil in a 10-inch straight-sided sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and 1/4 tsp. salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes begin to brown, about 7 minutes. Transfer the potatoes to a plate.

Add the remaining 11/2 Tbs. oil and the fennel to the pan with a pinch of salt and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 5 minutes. Add the onion to the pan and cook, stirring often, until starting to soften and lightly brown, 2 minutes more. Add the broth and bring to a boil. Gently nestle the potatoes into the fennelonion mixture and add the thyme sprigs. Cover the pan and braise in the oven until the potatoes and fennel are tender, about 20 minutes. Uncover the pan, add the olives, and continue to braise until most of the liquid has evaporated and the vegetables are meltingly tender, another 10 minutes. Remove from the oven, discard the thyme sprigs, and season to taste with salt and pepper. Garnish with the chopped thyme and serve.


gratinĂŠed tomatoes with asiago and fresh herbs Slices of ripe tomato are sprinkled with cheesy, herb-flecked breadcrumbs and then quickly run under the broiler until the crumbs are browned and crisp. They make a great pairing with grilled or broiled steak or chicken. Serves 6 Extra-virgin olive oil

3 medium beefsteak tomatoes (about 6 oz. each), sliced 1/4 inch thick

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 1/4 cup coarse fresh breadcrumbs 1/4 cup finely grated Asiago cheese

1 Tbs. chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley

1 tsp. coarsely chopped fresh thyme

Position a rack 6 inches from the broiler element and heat the broiler on high. Lightly oil a 10x12-inch (or similar size) broiler-safe baking dish. Arrange the tomato slices in the baking dish in a single, slightly overlapping layer. Sprinkle with 1/4 tsp salt. In a small bowl, mix together the bread­ crumbs, Asiago, parsley, thyme, 2 tsp. olive

oil, a pinch of salt, and 1/8 tsp. pepper. Sprinkle the breadcrumb mixture evenly over the tomatoes. Broil until the breadcrumbs are a deep golden brown, 2 to 3 minutes. Drizzle with more olive oil and serve immediately.

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Zabaglione with Summer Fruit, p. 78


Desserts dolci End the meal with crowd-pleasing sweets, including traditional tiramisĂš, refreshing granita, and more.

Zabaglione with Summer Fruit, p. 78 Cannoli Cookies, p. 79 Chocolate-Hazelnut Semifreddo, p. 80 Pistachio Amaretti, p. 81 Rustic Fig and Raspberry Mini Crostatas, p. 82 TiramisĂš, p. 83 Classic Panna Cotta with Brandied Cherry Sauce, p. 84 Dried Cherry and Almond Biscotti with White Chocolate, p. 85 Clementine Granita, p. 85


desserts

zabaglione with summer fruit Classic zabaglione is made with dry Marsala, but a spicy, floral Riesling pairs beautifully with ripe summer fruit. Look for an Alsatian-style dry or off-dry Riesling, or t­ ry Champagne, Sauternes, Vouvray, or Marsala, varying the amount of sugar to balance the sweetness of the wine. (See the photo on p. 76.) Serves 6

4 large egg yolks

1/4 cup granulated sugar (or up to 1/3 cup if using a wine that isn’t as sweet) 1/2 cup Riesling 1/2 tsp. unflavored powdered gelatin, softened in 1 Tbs. water

1 Tbs. boiling water

1 cup whipping cream

1 Tbs. Amaretto or brandy, or to taste

4 to 5 cups peeled, sliced summer fruit, like a mix of peaches, necta­rines, and berries

1/3 cup crushed almond macaroons or biscotti (or 6 Amaretti di Saronno cookies, crumbled)

Fill a large bowl halfway with ice water. Set a large metal bowl on top of a pan of barely simmer-

ing water over m ­ edium-low heat (the water level should be about 2 inches below the bottom of the bowl). Put the yolks and sugar in the bowl and whisk vigorously until the yolks begin to thicken and lighten in color. Pour in the Riesling and continue whisking until the mixture is thick enough so that the whisk leaves a trail as it passes through the mixture. This may take 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the heat of the water. Remove from the heat and whisk for a ­ nother minute or so. In a small bowl, dissolve the softened gelatin in the boiling water. Slowly whisk this into the zabaglione. Set the custard bowl over the ice-water bath to cool while you whip the cream to stiff peaks. With a rubber spatula, fold

the whipped cream and liqueur into the custard. Refrigerate for at least 4 hours but no more than 24 hours. To serve, arrange the fruit in six parfait glasses or dessert bowls. Spoon the zabaglione over the fruit and garnish with the cookie crumbs. Note: The gelatin prevents the zabaglione from separating in the ­refrigerator and lets you make the dessert up to a day ahead. If you plan to make the dessert the day you serve it, you can omit the gelatin, but be sure to chill the custard for 2 hours.

whip to the right consistency Whip the zabaglione in a bowl set over a pot of simmering water until the whisk’s wires leave a trail.

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cannoli cookies

These cakey cookies are enriched with whole-milk ricotta and scented with grated orange zest. Yields about thirty-two 21/2-inch cookies

9 oz. (2 cups) all-purpose flour

1/2 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. table salt

4 oz. (1/2 cup) unsalted butter, softened at room temperature

1/4 cup whole-milk ricotta, at room temperature

1 cup granulated sugar

1 tsp. finely grated orange zest

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

1 large egg, at room temperature

41/2 oz. (3/4 cup) chocolate chips

In a medium bowl, whisk the flour with the baking soda and salt until well blended. With a stand mixer (use the paddle attachment) or a hand mixer, beat the butter and ricotta on medium-high speed until light and fluffy, about 2 minutes.

Add the sugar, orange zest, and vanilla; beat until blended, about 3 minutes. Scrape the bowl. On medium speed, add the egg and beat until blended. Add the flour ­mixture and mix on low speed until almost completely blended. Pour in the chocolate chips and continue mixing until just in­corporated. Scrape the dough down from the sides of the bowl, cover with plastic, and refrigerate until slightly firmer, about half an hour. Heat the oven to 350°F. Line large b ­ aking sheets with nonstick baking liners or parchment. Drop the batter by rounded table­spoons about 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets. Bake until the cookies are light golden, about 15 minutes. Let

the cookies cool on the sheets on racks for 5 minutes before transferring them to racks to cool completely. Store at room temperature or freeze in an airtight container, separating the cookie layers with waxed paper.

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desserts

chocolate-hazelnut semifreddo Based on the classic pairing of chocolate and hazelnuts, this treat gets its hazelnut flavor from Nutella, an Italian hazelnut-cocoa spread available at the supermarket. Be sure to use a dark chocolate with at least 70% cocoa solids to temper the Nutella’s sweetness. Serves 8

1 cup cold heavy cream

Make the zabaglione

4 large egg yolks, at room temperature

Clean and dry the beaters. In a 4-quart saucepan, bring 11/2 inches of water to a boil over high heat and then lower the heat to maintain a gentle simmer. Put the egg yolks, 1/4 cup of the sugar, and the milk in a medium metal bowl and set the bowl over the pan of simmering water; make sure the bottom of the bowl doesn’t touch the water. Beat on medium speed, frequently scraping down the sides of the bowl with a silicone spatula, until the zabaglione is thick, almost doubled in volume, and the beaters leave a trail when you lift them, about 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat, leaving the bowl over the water. Fold the chocolate and Nutella into the zabaglione until melted and smooth. Remove the bowl from the pan and set aside.

1/2 cup granulated sugar

3 Tbs. whole milk

4 oz. dark chocolate (70% to 85%), finely ground in a food processor (11/4 cups)

1/2 cup Nutella

2 large egg whites, at room temperature

1/2 tsp. cream of tartar 1/4 tsp. table salt

Thoroughly chill a large metal bowl and the beaters of an electric hand mixer. Line the bottom and long sides of a 9x5-inch loaf pan with a 12x20-inch piece of plastic wrap, leaving 4-inch overhangs on the long sides. Smooth the plastic along the sides and into the corners; it’s OK if there are wrinkles. The plastic will not completely cover the short sides. Whip the cream

Beat the cream in the chilled bowl with the chilled beaters on medium-high speed just until firm peaks form, 1 to 2 minutes. Refrigerate.

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Make the meringue

Clean and dry the beaters. Return the pan to the heat and maintain the water at a gentle simmer. Put the egg whites, the remaining 1/4 cup of sugar, the cream of tartar, and salt in a large metal bowl and set it over the pan of water. Beat on medium speed, occasionally scraping down the sides of the bowl with a clean silicone spatula, until light, fluffy, and

shiny, about 3 minutes. Remove the bowl from the pan and continue beating until the meringue is very thick and billowy, about 2 minutes more. FOLD AND FREEZE

Use a silicone spatula to gently fold the zabaglione into the meringue and then fold in the whipped cream until no streaks remain. Scrape the mixture into the prepared pan and smooth the top with an offset spatula, scraping off excess if necessary to create a level top. Wrap the overhanging plastic over the top to cover and freeze for at least 6 hours and up to 3 days. Unmold and serve

Peel back the plastic wrap from the top of the semifreddo. Invert the pan over a cutting board or serving platter. Lift off the pan, holding the overhanging plastic down on one side and then the other. Remove the plastic wrap. If the semifreddo looks wrinkled, warm a long knife or small offset spatula under hot running water, wipe the blade dry, and run it over the wrinkles to smooth them out. Slice the semifreddo crosswise into 1-inchthick pieces to serve.


pistachio amaretti These cookies are crisp on the outside, chewy on the inside, and a subtle shade of green all over. Pistachios are grown in Sicily, so it’s traditional for Sicilians to make amaretti with them instead of almonds. If you can’t find skinned pistachios, removing the peels is a bit of a chore but worth it to get pure pistachio taste. These cookies are not as crisp as store-bought, but baking them longer will make them crispier. Yields 32 cookies 71/2 oz. shelled unsalted pistachios, preferably skinned (11/2 cups)

1 cup granulated sugar

2 large egg whites

1 tsp. pure almond extract

Nonstick cooking spray Confectioners’ sugar for dusting

If the pistachios have skins on them, place them in a heatproof bowl and pour boiling water over them. Let sit for 4 minutes, then drain. Wrap the nuts in a clean kitchen towel and roll them back and forth to loosen the skins, then finish skinning them by hand. Place the pistachios and sugar in a food processor. Process until the nuts are very finely ground but not pasty, 30 to 60 seconds.

With the motor running, pour in the egg whites and almond extract. Process until the mixture balls up around the blade and then relaxes into a thick, sticky paste, about 30 seconds 1 . It should be thick enough to scoop with a spoon. Line two large baking sheets with parchment, and coat the parchment with cooking spray. Using two teaspoons, drop heaping spoonfuls of the paste in mounds onto the baking sheets (about 2 tsp. per mound), leaving 2 inches of space between (about 16 per baking sheet). Smooth and round out the tops with lightly moistened fingers 2 , but don’t press down or flatten the mounds. Let sit, uncovered, for 1 hour. Meanwhile, position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 300°F. Bake the amaretti, one sheet at a time, until they are just set on top and beginning to color, 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer the baking sheets to cooling racks and let cool completely. Dust lightly with confectioners’ sugar. The amaretti will keep for 1 week in an airtight container at room temperature.

handling the dough

1 Use a food processor to mix the dough until it balls up around the blade.

2 Place spoonfuls of dough 2 inches apart and lightly smooth the tops.

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desserts

rustic fig and raspberry mini crostatas An inspired combination of figs, raspberries, fresh thyme, orange zest, and honey makes these Italian-style pies an unexpected change from the familiar. Yields 10 FOR THE DOUGH

1/3 cup plus 2 Tbs. granulated sugar

71/2 oz. (1 2/3 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour

1 Tbs. fresh thyme, roughly chopped

33/4 oz. (¾ cup) whole-wheat flour

2 tsp. finely grated orange zest

¼ cup plus ½ Tbs. granulated sugar

3 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. graham cracker crumbs

1 oz. (2 Tbs.) cold unsalted butter, cut into 10 thin slices

1 tsp. ground cinnamon

½ tsp. kosher salt

9 oz. (1 cup plus 2 Tbs.) cold unsalted butter, cut into small pieces

FOR THE FILLING 3/4 lb. small fresh figs (preferably Brown Turkey), quartered (about 2 cups)

6 oz. fresh raspberries (11/2 cups)

3 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. honey

1½ Tbs. heavy cream Make the dough

Put the flours, sugar, cinnamon, and salt in a food processor. Add the butter and pulse in short bursts until the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add 3 Tbs. cold water and pulse. If the mixture seems dry, add water 1 Tbs. at a time, pulsing until the dough just starts to

come together. Do not overprocess. Turn the dough out onto a clean work surface, gather it together, and portion it into ten 21/2-oz. rounds. Flatten them into disks, wrap individually in plastic, and refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 3 days. When ready to bake, position racks in the bottom and top thirds of the oven and heat the oven to 400°F. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with parchment. On a lightly floured surface with a lightly floured rolling pin, roll each dough disk into a 5½-inch round that’s about 1/8 inch thick. Put 5 rounds on each baking sheet. Make the filling

In a medium bowl, lightly toss the figs, raspberries, 1/3 cup of the sugar, the honey, thyme, and orange zest until combined. Assemble and bake the crostatas

Sprinkle each round of dough with 1 tsp. graham cracker crumbs, leaving a ½-inch border. Put a generous ¼ cup of the fig mixture in the center of each dough round, mounding the fruit. Top each tart with a butter slice. Fold the edges of the dough over some of the fruit to create a 1-inch rim, leaving the center exposed. Work your way around, pleating the dough as you go. With a pastry brush, brush the crust of each crostata with cream and sprinkle the crusts and filling with the remaining 2 Tbs. sugar. Bake until the crostatas are golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes, swapping and rotating the baking sheets’ positions about halfway through baking. Transfer the baking sheets to racks to cool for about 5 minutes. Then loosen the crostatas with an offset spatula and let cool completely on the sheets. The crostatas are best the day they’re made.


cocoa powder topping Use a fine-mesh sieve to finish off the tiramisù with a generous dusting of cocoa powder just before serving.

tiramisù This recipe calls for uncooked eggs, so keep the tiramisù refrigerated and serve it within 48 hours. If the uncooked eggs in this dish are a concern, use pasteurized eggs. Serves 10 to 12

5 cups hot brewed espresso (or double-strength drip coffee made with espresso roast)

1 cup plus 2 Tbs. granulated sugar

2 Tbs. rum, or more to taste (optional)

4 large eggs, separated

16 oz. (2 cups) mascarpone cheese About 46 ladyfingers or savoiardi cookies, preferably Balocco, Bonomi, or Elledi brands

2 Tbs. unsweetened cocoa powder or 1 to 2 oz. bittersweet chocolate

Pour the coffee in a large bowl and add 2 Tbs. of the sugar while it’s still hot. Stir well and let it cool to room temperature. Add the rum, if using. Combine the egg yolks and the remaining 1 cup sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Beat on mediumhigh speed until the yolks are pale yellow and fluffy, about 5 minutes. (The mixture will be fairly thick at first.) Add the mascarpone and

beat until it’s fully incorporated into a smooth cream, 2 to 3 minutes more. Transfer to a large bowl. Thoroughly wash and dry the stand mixer bowl and whisk. Put the egg whites in the bowl, and whip on medium-high speed until they form medium-stiff peaks when you lift the beaters (the tips should curl over onto themselves just a little). With a rubber spatula, fold about one-quarter of the beaten whites into the mascarpone cream to lighten it. Then gently fold in the remaining whites, taking care not to deflate them. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate. Submerge one ladyfinger in the cooled coffee until the coffee penetrates about halfway through, leaving the core dry (break it to check). This can take from 1 to 12 seconds, depending on the type of ladyfinger. You don’t want the ladyfinger to get completely soaked or it’ll become soggy and fall apart. You should be able to feel that the outside is soft, but the inside is still firm.

Once you’ve determined the correct soaking time, submerge each ladyfinger individually, gently shake out excess coffee, and immediately set it in a 9x13-inch baking dish; continue until you have one tight layer that covers the bottom of the dish. (You may need to break a few ladyfingers to fit in snugly.) Spread one-half of the mascarpone cream evenly on top of the ladyfingers. Repeat the soaking procedure with the remaining ladyfingers to create a second snug layer, arranging them on top of the mascarpone cream as you did for the first layer. Spread the rest of the mascarpone cream evenly on top. Cover the dish with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 2 hours. Before serving, sift the cocoa powder or finely grate the chocolate over the top to evenly cover.

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desserts

classic panna cotta with brandied cherry sauce Light and simple, panna cotta is all about texture. It should be a bit wobbly on the plate and then melt quickly in your mouth. The sauce is inspired by the classic cherry cheesecake topping. The brandy is subtle but adds a bit of depth and sophistication. Serves 6 For the sauce 12 oz. (about 21/2 cups) fresh or frozen sweet cherries 1/4 cup brandy

3 Tbs. granulated sugar

2 Tbs. plus 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Pinch of table salt 11/2 tsp. cornstarch

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

For the panna cotta Cooking spray

3 cups half-and-half

2 tsp. unflavored powdered gelatin

1/3 cup granulated sugar

1 tsp. pure vanilla extract

Pinch of table salt Make the sauce

If using fresh cherries, pit and halve them. If using frozen, thaw, drain, and halve them. In a 2-quart saucepan, whisk together the brandy, sugar, lemon juice, and salt. Stir in the cherries. Bring to a boil over medium heat,

stirring occasionally. Reduce to a simmer and cook until the liquid thickens enough to coat the back of a spoon, about 5 minutes. In a small bowl, stir the cornstarch with 1 tsp. water. Add to the cherry sauce and cook until thickened, about 2 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the vanilla. Let cool to room temperature. If the sauce thickens during cooling, stir in water, 1 tsp. at a time, until it reaches your desired consistency. Make the panna cottas

Lightly spray six 6- to 8-oz. ramekins, small bowls, or pastry molds with cooking spray. Put 11/2 cups of the half-and-half in a 2-quart saucepan and sprinkle with the gelatin. Allow the gelatin to soften for about 5 minutes. Place the saucepan over low heat and whisk in the sugar until the gelatin and sugar are completely dissolved, 2 to 3 minutes. Rub a little between your fingers to check. (Avoid simmering, which destroys the gelatin’s thickening ability; if you see bubbles, remove from the heat and let it cool.)

Off the heat, whisk in the remaining 11/2 cups half-and-half, the vanilla, and salt. Transfer the mixture to a large measuring cup and divide among the prepared ramekins. Cover loosely with plastic wrap. Refrigerate until set, 1 to 2 hours. Serve the panna cottas in their ramekins, or unmold: Moisten six serving plates with a little warm water (this makes it easier to center the panna cottas). Loosen the edges of a panna cotta with a fingertip, then slowly invert it onto a plate. Gently jiggle the ramekin side to side until the panna cotta slips out. Lift the ramekin, reposition the panna cotta on the plate, if needed, and pat the plate dry. Serve, chilled for a firm panna cotta or at room temperature for a softer one, with the sauce. Make ahead: The sauce can be covered and refrigerated for up to 1 week. The panna cottas can be made 1 day ahead and refrigerated, covered.

To make the panna cotta vegetarian, you can use vegan gelatin in place of regular gelatin.

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clementine granita This granita is a refreshingly light and delightful finish to a rich meal. And it’s a snap to make. Yields about 1 quart; serves 4

3/4 cup granulated sugar 2 Tbs. finely chopped clementine zest (from 2 to 3 medium clementines)

Kosher salt

dried cherry and almond biscotti with white chocolate Here, cherries jubilee—sweet cherries in a spiked syrup over vanilla ice cream—becomes biscotti with dried cherries, toasted almonds, and white chocolate. Yields about 3 dozen cookies 111/4 oz. (21/2 cups) unbleached allpurpose flour; more as needed

1 cup granulated sugar

13/4 tsp. baking powder 3/4 tsp. table salt

9 oz. (13/4 cups) dried cherries

3 oz. (3/4 cup) slivered almonds, toasted

3 large eggs

3 Tbs. kirsch or brandy

1/2 tsp. pure almond extract 14 to 16 oz. white chocolate, chopped

Position a rack in the center of the oven and heat the oven to 350°F. Line a large cookie sheet with parchment or a nonstick baking liner. In a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, and salt on medium-low speed until well blended. On low speed, mix in the cherries and almonds. In a small bowl, whisk the eggs, kirsch, and almond extract. Slowly pour in the egg mixture. Mix until the dough comes together in large, moist clumps, about 1 minute. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead to incorporate any remaining dry ingredients. Divide into 2 equal piles. Shape each pile into a log

10 inches long and about 4 inches wide, lightly flouring your hands as needed (the dough will be sticky). Position the logs on the cookie sheet about 4 inches apart. Bake until the tops are cracked and spring back slightly when pressed, 32 to 36 minutes. Transfer the sheet to a rack and leave until the logs are cool enough to handle, about 10 minutes. Reduce the oven temperature to 300°F. Carefully peel the logs from the parchment and transfer to a cutting board. Using a serrated knife, cut each log on a sharp angle into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Return the slices to the cookie sheet and arrange them cut side down. It’s OK if they touch because they won’t spread. Bake until the biscotti are dried to your taste, 10 minutes (for slightly moist) to 20 minutes (for super-dry and crunchy), turning them over halfway through baking. Transfer the cookie sheet to a rack and let the biscotti cool completely. They will still give slightly when pressed but will harden as they cool. When the biscotti are cool, melt the white chocolate in a microwave or in a heatproof bowl set in a skillet of barely simmering water. Dip one end of each biscotti in the chocolate and place on a baking sheet lined with fresh parchment until set, about 30 minutes. Store in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks or freeze for up to 1 month.

3 cups fresh clementine juice, with pulp (from 18 to 20 medium clementines or about 4 lb.)

In a small saucepan, stir together the sugar, zest, a pinch of salt, and 3/4 cup water. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook, stirring, until the sugar dissolves and the syrup is clear, about 2 minutes. Set aside to cool slightly as you juice the clementines. Stir the juice and syrup together, pour into a small metal pan, such as a loaf pan, cover with plastic, and freeze for 2 hours. Stir the mixture with a spoon, breaking up the portions that have become solid, and return to the freezer. Stir every 30 minutes until the mixture is evenly icy and granular, about 2 hours more. Cover and return to the freezer until ready to serve. The granita may be made up to 1 week ahead. To serve, scrape with a spoon to loosen the mixture, and spoon into small bowls or glasses.

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test kitchen T i p s • T e c h n i q u e s • i n g r e d i e n ts

Making fresh pasta? You’ll need a machine. See our advice on the facing page.

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eQUipMeNT

iNGreDieNT

roll on: musings on pasta machines

What exactly is polenta?

If you’re in the market for a pasta rolling machine, you’ll quickly see you can spend anywhere from $30 for a small hand-cranked machine (like the one shown on the facing page) to $1,500 for a motorized restaurant-grade machine, with plenty of models and prices for both kinds in between. Which to choose? Call us old-fashioned, but we love the hand-cranked kind. Making pasta this way feels to us as it should: rustic and homey. Because the ravioli recipe on p. 61 makes a small amount, a hand-cranked model will easily get the job done. The advantage, aside from a lower price, is that you control the speed of the rollers. Hand-cranked models are smaller than most motorized models, too, making them easy to store. On the downside, you have only two hands, which can make it challenging to handle the pasta sheet while also cranking the machine. Although the noise of a motorized model can be obnoxious, the automatic rolling lets you use both hands for feeding and catching the pasta sheet. It’s a good choice if you’re making large amounts of pasta.

It’s a simple question with a complicated answer. Let’s start with cornmeal, which is ground dried corn. It can be fine, medium,

Tip

Why should i save the pasta cooking water? If you’re making the pasta carbonara on p. 58, the recipe calls for reserving a cup of the pasta cooking water. The water contains starch, which can help thicken sauce. Restaurant chefs often slightly undercook pasta in boiling water and then finish cooking it right in the sauce over high heat with some of the pasta water, all while shaking the pan vigorously. The shaking releases even more starch from the surface of the pasta and helps to further thicken the sauce. And if the pasta absorbs so much of the sauce that it seems dry, another splash of the cooking water is the perfect fix. To help you remember to save the water, put a measuring cup in your colander. It will act as a visual cue to scoop out and reserve some of the pasta cooking water before you drain it.

Cornmeal

Grits

Polenta

or coarse in texture and white, yellow, or blue in color. Polenta is a type of cornmeal and so are grits. To confuse matters more, both of those terms also refer to a finished dish. But there are a few key differences: Grits are traditionally made from dent corn, a softer corn variety with a dent in the top of each kernel (hence its name). Polenta is typically made from flint corn, a much harder variety than dent corn. Because it comes from harder corn, its granules retain their shape even after long cooking, giving polenta (the dish) a coarser texture and more rustic mouthfeel than grits. That said, some producers don’t label or even make their cornmeal products according to these definitions. When we buy it for recipes like the Herbed ricotta polenta on p. 66, we look for Bob’s Red Mill’s “Corn Grits Also Known As Polenta,” which have wonderful texture and flavor (if a somewhat confusing label). Alpina Savoie “Polenta Tradition/Medium” is another excellent choice. Avoid “instant” or “quick cooking” polenta, which won’t have the deep corn flavor and toothsome texture you want.

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test kitchen recipe

potato gnocchi Making light, delicate gnocchi is easier than you’d think. Use the finished pasta in the Gnocchi with Sausage and Leek Ragù on p. 52. Serves 6

2 lb. russet potatoes (about 4 medium), scrubbed

63/4 oz. (11/2 cups) unbleached all-purpose flour; more for kneading and rolling

1 tsp. kosher salt

1 large egg, lightly beaten

Peel and put the potatoes in a large pot. Fill the pot with enough cold water to cover the potatoes by at least 2 inches and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium, partially cover the pot, and simmer the potatoes until they are com­pletely tender and easily pierced with a skewer, 30 to 35 minutes. Drain the potatoes, let them cool just enough that you can handle them, and then peel them. Cut them in half crosswise and pass them through a ricer into a large bowl. Let cool until almost at room temperature, at least 20 minutes.

Lightly flour a work surface. In a small bowl, mix the flour with the salt. Add the egg to the potatoes and then add the flour mixture. Mix with your hands until the flour is moistened and the dough starts to clump together; the dough will still be a bit crumbly at this point 1 . Gather the dough together and press it against the bottom of the bowl until you have a uniform mass. Transfer it to the floured surface and wash your hands. Knead gently until the flour is fully incor­ porated and the dough is soft, smooth, and a little sticky, 30 seconds to 1 minute 2 . (Don’t overmix it, or the gnocchi will be tough; the dough should feel very delicate.) Move the dough to one side, making sure the surface underneath it is well floured. Cover it with a clean kitchen towel. Cover two large rimmed baking sheets with parchment and sprinkle lightly with flour. Remove any lingering bits of dough from

your work surface and lightly reflour the surface. Tear off a piece of dough about the size of a large lemon and put the towel back on the rest of the dough so it doesn’t dry out. With the palms of both hands, roll the dough piece on the floured surface into a rope about 3/4 inch in diameter 3 . With a sharp knife or a bench knife, cut the rope crosswise every 3/4 inch to make roughly 3/4-inch-square gnocchi 4 . Arrange the gnocchi in a single layer on the parchmentcovered baking sheets, making sure they don’t touch. Repeat until you run out of dough, reflouring the work surface as needed. When all the gnocchi have been cut and spread out on the baking sheets, sprinkle them with a little more flour. If you’re going to use the gnocchi within 2 to 3 hours, they can sit out on the counter. Or, transfer them to a large zip-top bag or several smaller bags and freeze for up to 2 months.

How to make gnocchi

1

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The gnocchi dough will still be a bit crumbly when you first mix the potatoes with the flour and eggs.

r e a l i ta l i a n 2 0 1 7

2

You want the final dough to be soft, smooth, and a little sticky. For gnocchi with a fluffy texture, don’t knead the dough past the point where the flour is fully incorporated into the potatoes.

3

Move the palms of your hands back and forth to roll the torn-off portion into a long rope.

4

When you cut the rope into small square gnocchi, try to make them as uniform as possible.


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test kitchen

tip

Soak clams for thorough cleaning No one likes grit with their clams, which is why it’s a good idea to soak clams in salted water (to mimic the sea) for a half hour before using them in recipes like Linguine with Clam Sauce (p. 50). Since clams are filter feeders, they will suck in the clean water and eliminate any sand and debris. After their soak, lift them out with your hands instead of dumping them into a colander. That way, any sediment is left behind.

technique

Don’t fear the beard Mussels have what’s called a byssal thread, or beard. It’s a group of fibers that grow from between their shells and connect them to rocks or ropes. These beards are not edible, and in the past, debearding mussels made preparation tedious. Fortunately, most mussel farmers are now debearding them before sending them to market, but if you see any brown threads poking out from a mussel shell when you’re prepping them for the Shellfish with Fennel, Escarole, and Kale on p. 38, simply grasp them between your thumb and forefinger, and pull.

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recipe

Two easy butter sauces Simple butter sauces are perfect for recipes like the Ravioli on p. 61 because they let the flavors of the fillings shine. But they’re also great with any pasta.

burro fuso Burro fuso translates as “melted butter,” and there’s not much more to this recipe than that. Serves 4

Melt 4 oz. (1/2 cup) unsalted butter along with 1/4 cup pasta cooking water or tap water in a skillet or saucepan over medium-low heat. Whisk to emulsify and season to taste with kosher salt.

lemon brown butter Letting the butter cook until browned gives it a toasty flavor. Try it on asparagus or fish as well as ravioli. Serves 4 Heat 4 oz. (1/2 cup) unsalted butter in a skillet or saucepan over mediumhigh heat, whisking occasionally, until the milk solids turn brown. Whisk in 2 Tbs. fresh lemon juice and season to taste with kosher salt.


NOW ON PBS! ALL NEW SEASON 4 Moveable Feast with Fine Cooking returns for Season 4 with host Pete Evans stirring up fun. Join us for pop-up feasts across the country – new locations, new chefs and artisans, and fabulous new dishes. For showtimes, recipes, and more, go to

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credits

Many of the recipes and photos in this issue have appeared previously in Fine Cooking. Listed here are the original authors and issue numbers. Unless otherwise noted, all photos are by Scott Phillips.

classic sauces Basil Pesto, Samantha Seneviratne, #105 Fresh Tomato and Basil Sauce, Domenica Marchetti, #73 Alfredo Sauce, Joyce Goldstein, #82 Ragù alla Bolognese, Biba Caggiano, #53 Amatriciana Sauce, Domenica Marchetti, #73 Vodka Sauce, Julissa Roberts, #135 Quick Marinara with Toasted Garlic and Rosemary, from Big Buy Cooking by Tony Rosenfeld, photo: Maren Caruso

appetizers Artichoke Torta, Paul Bertolli, #25 Baked Provolone with Tomatoes, Marjoram, and Balsamic, Melissa Pellegrino, #112 Pears and Arugula Wrapped in Prosciutto, Diane Rosen Worthington, #12 Sweet and Sour Pickled Peppers, Domenica Marchetti, #142 Parmigiano-Pistachio Frico, Shelley Wiseman, #120 Arancini, Julissa Roberts, #119 Bruschetta with Fig and Walnut Anchoiade, Tasha DeSerio, #58 Seared Carpaccio-Style Shoulder Petite Tender, Lynne Curry, #124 Zesty Lemon Olives, Ruth Lively, #55 Sweet and Sour Eggplant Relish (Caponata), Jennifer Armentrout, #73 Pan-Fried Polenta with Mushrooms, Maria Speck, FineCooking.com Web-only recipe

soups & salads Shellfish with Fennel, Escarole, and Kale, Michelle Bernstein, #108

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Heirloom Tomato and Burrata Salad with Tomato Conserva Vinaigrette, Mark Vetri, #124 Chicken Meatball and Escarole Soup, Melissa Pellegrino, #115 Grilled Sourdough Panzanella, Allison Ehri Kreitler, #80 Escarole Salad with Olives and Garlic Croutons, Tasha DeSerio, #114 Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup, Ivy Manning, #103 Tortellini en Brodo, Bibi Caggiano, #108 Raw Artichoke, Portobello, and Fennel Salad, Ronne Day, #140 Tuscan Peasant Soup with Rosemary and Pancetta, Susie Middleton, #83 Arugula and Fried Mozzarella Salad with Tomato-Basil Vinaigrette, Eva Katz, #72 Farmers’ Market Minestrone, Domenica Marchetti, #130 Caesar Salad, Ana Sortun, #46

main dishes Lasagne Bolognese with Herbed Ricotta, Ronne Day, not previously published Linguine with Clam Sauce, Micol Negrin, #130 Gnocchi with Sausage and Leek Ragù, Laura Giannatempo, #90 Eggplant Parmigiana, Laura Giannatempo,#100 Chicken Piccata, Tony Rosenfeld, #93 Orecchiette with Roasted Broccolini, Burst Tomatoes, and Italian Sausage, Ronne Day, not previously published Fresh Tomato and Garlic Pizza, Bill Jacobs, #135 Shrimp Scampi, Melissa Pellegrino, #134 Pasta Carbonara, Micol Negrin, #121

Slow-Cooker Osso Buco, Allison Fishman, #103 Classic Chicken Cacciatore, Melissa Pellegrino, #119 Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli with Lemon Brown Butter, Michael Tusk, #133, photo: Ed Anderson Sweet and Sour Sicilian Braised Chicken (Pollo Agrodolce), Erica DeMane, #45 Spaghetti and Meatballs, Daniel Holzman, #125

side dishes Roasted Carrots and Shallots with Oil-Cured Olives and Gremolata, Suzanne Goin, #82 Herbed Ricotta Polenta, Maria Speck, #131 Fennel and Red Onion with Arugula, Maryellen Driscoll, #62 Creamy Baked Leeks with Garlic, Thyme, and Parmigiano Garlic Bread, Susie Middleton, #101 Shaved Squash Carpaccio with Capers and Ricotta Salata, Liz Pearson, #142 Italian Green Beans with Tomatoes and Balsamic, from Big Buy Cooking by Tony Rosenfeld, photo: Maren Caruso Spinach Farrotto, Erica Clark, #137 Broccolini with Olives and Capers, Bruce Aidells & Nancy Oakes, #102, photo: Christopher Hirsheimer Risotto, Joanne Weir, #119 Quick-Braised Baby Artichokes with Garlic, Mint, and Parsley, Sara Jenkins, #104 Garlic Bread, Steve Hunter, #43, photo: Amy Albert Braised Fingerling Potatoes with Fennel, Olives, and Thyme, Melissa Pellegrino, #101 Gratinéed Tomatoes with Asiago and Fresh Herbs, Melissa Pellegrino, #112

desserts Zabaglione with Summer Fruit, Molly Stevens, #58 Cannoli Cookies, Judi Terrell Linden, #61 Chocolate-Hazelnut Semifreddo, Bruce Weinstein & Mark Scarbrough, #124 Pistachio Amaretti, Domenica Marchetti, #138 Rustic Fig and Raspberry Mini Crostatas, Karen Barker, #106, photo: Alexandra Grablewski Tiramisù, Laura Giannatempo, #77 Classic Panna Cotta with Brandied Cherry Sauce, Faith Durand, #140 Dried Cherry and Almond Biscotti with White Chocolate, Abigail Johnson Dodge, #108 Clementine Granita, Ruth Lively, #82

last bite Citrus and Cheese Butter, Jason Sobocinski, #137

Some of the recipes and photos in this issue were excerpted from this book:

Big Buy Cooking by Fine Cooking (The Taunton Press, 2010); photos © Maren ­Caruso; food stylist: Katie Christ.


sOUrces

pasta carbonara, page 58 • Aux Delices des Bois guanciale, $4.95, 4 oz., Olioandolive.com, 877-556-5483.

heirloom tomato and burrata salad, page 39

spaghetti and meatballs, page 63 • Pomì chopped tomatoes, $3.82 for a 26.4-oz. carton, Luckyvitamin.com, 888-635-0474.

• Burrata cheese, $11.99, Murrayscheese.com, 888-692-4339.

spinach farrotto, page 70 • Pearled farro, $4.99, 1 lb., Nuts.com, 800-558-6887.

swiss chard and ricotta ravioli, page 61 From Williams-sonoma.com, 877-812-6235:

• Dual-blade pasta and pastry cutter, $12.95

From Pastacheese.com, 800-386-9198:

• Antico Molino Napoli Antimo Caputo “00” Flour, $4.99 for

rustic fig and raspberry mini crostatas, page 82 • Unbleached parchment baking sheets, $3.95 for 24 sheets, Ifyoucare.com, 888-281-6400.

braised fingerling potatoes with fennel, olives, and thyme, page 74 • 10-inch straight-sided sauté

2.2 lb.

• Caputo Semola Di Grano Duro

pan, All-Clad, $199.95, Amazon.com.

Rimacinata (fine semolina flour), $4.99 for 2.2 lb.

tortellini en brodo, page 42 • Mortadella, $9.99, 1.1 lb., Italydepot .com, 201-729-0739.

• Prosciutto di Parma, $10.99 for 3 oz.,

Murrayscheese.com, 888-692-4339.

F I N E C O O K I N G .C O M

93


nutrition Recipe

Calories (kcal)

Fat Cal (kcal)

Protein (g)

Carb (g)

Total Fat (g)

Sat Fat (g)

Mono Fat (g)

Poly Fat (g)

Chol (mg)

Sodium (mg)

Fiber (g)

CLASSIC SAUCES, p. 20

Basil Pesto (per 1 Tbs.)

70

60

1

0

7

1

5

1

0

75

0

Fresh Tomato and Basil Sauce

214

161

7

9

18

7

7

1

30

584

3

Alfredo Sauce (per ¼ cup)

110

70

3

6

8

5

2

0

20

125

0

Ragù alla Bolognese

280

190

15

7

21

8

10

2

65

620

1

Amatriciana Sauce

164

118

5

8

13

3

4

1

16

655

2

Vodka Sauce

350

240

5

11

27

10

13

2

40

1320

2

Quick Marinara with Toasted Garlic and Rosemary

70

35

1

7

3.5

.5

2.5

0

0

560

1

Artichoke Torta

210

120

14

10

13

5

5

1

190

950

4

Baked Provolone with Tomatoes and Balsamic

310

220

20

3

24

14

8

1

55

750

0

Pears and Arugula Wrapped in Prosciutto

60

44

5

5

1.5

.5

.5

0

10

470

1

Sweet and Sour Pickled Peppers (per 1 oz.)

15

5

0

2

.5

0

0

0

0

15

0

Parmigiano-Pistachio Frico

100

60

7

2

7

3

2.5

1

15

260

0

Arancini

130

60

4

11

7

2.5

2.5

1.5

25

230

0

Bruschetta with Fig and Walnut Anchoiade

260

140

6

29

15.5

2.5

9.5

2.5

5

480

3

Seared Carpaccio-Style Shoulder Petite Tender

230

180

11

2

20

4

14

2

35

200

1

Zesty Lemon Olives

30

25

0

1

3

0

2.5

0

0

150

0

Sweet and Sour Eggplant Relish (Caponata) (per 1 Tbs.)

23

17

0

1

2

0

1

0

0

150

0

240

100

5

29

11

6

4

.5

25

840

2

Shellfish with Fennel, Escarole, and Kale

290

140

27

10

16

5

7

2

125

800

2

Heirloom Tomato and Burrata Salad with Vinaigrette

270

260

0

2

29

4

21

3

0

310

1

Tomato Conserva (per ¼ cup)

110

80

1

6

9

1.5

7

1

0

100

2

Chicken Meatball and Escarole Soup

220

110

20

10

12

3.5

6

2

100

730

3

Grilled Sourdough Panzanella

370

180

7

40

20

3

14

2.5

0

760

4

Escarole Salad with Olives and Garlic Croutons

290

150

11

22

17

2.5

11

2

15

1200

7

Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup

280

50

12

46

6

1

2.5

1.5

0

700

12

Tortellini en Brodo

240

80

18

22

9

3.5

3.5

1

95

580

1

Raw Artichoke, Portobello, and Fennel Salad

250

170

8

14

19

4.5

12

2

15

300

4

Tuscan Peasant Soup with Rosemary and Pancetta

370

160

17

37

18

4.5

10

2

20

1010

8

Arugula and Fried Mozzarella Salad with Vinaigrette

444

348

14

11

39

12

19

3

79

649

2

Farmers’ Market Minestrone

350

140

9

39

15

2.5

10

2

0

550

6

Caesar Salad

230

180

7

8

20

4

13

2

45

1040

2

Lasagne Bolognese with Herbed Ricotta

990

430

57

78

48

19

20

3.5

165

1080

7

Linguine with Clam Sauce

530

180

22

60

21

3

13

2.5

30

880

3

Gnocchi with Sausage and Leek Ragù

440

130

14

63

14

4

8

1.5

50

1140

6

Eggplant Parmigiana

580

460

13

21

52

11

33

5

25

320

9

APPETIZERS, p. 26

Pan-Fried Polenta with Mushrooms SOUPS & SALADS, p. 36

MAIN DISHES, p. 48

The nutritional analyses have been calculated by a registered dietitian at Nutritional Solutions in Melville, New York. When a recipe gives a choice of ingredients, the first choice is the one used. Optional ingre­ dients with measured amounts are included; ingredients with­out specific quantities are not. Analyses are per serving; when a range of ingredient amounts or servings is given, the smaller amount or portion is used. When the quantities of salt and pepper aren’t specified, the analysis is based on 1/4 tsp. salt and 1/8 tsp. pepper per serving for entrées, and 1/8 tsp. salt and 1/16 tsp. pepper per serving for side dishes.

94

real i tal i an 2 0 1 7


Recipe

Calories (kcal)

Fat Cal (kcal)

Protein (g)

Carb (g)

Total Fat (g)

Sat Fat (g)

Mono Fat (g)

Poly Fat (g)

Chol (mg)

Sodium (mg)

Fiber (g)

Chicken Piccata

380

140

55

2

16

4.5

8

2

155

620

0

Orecchiette with Broccolini, Tomatoes, and Sausage

920

450

31

81

50

12

31

6

50

970

7

Fresh Tomato and Garlic Pizza

780

390

32

62

44

15

20

3

60

2000

3

Shrimp Scampi

300

130

35

3

14

8

3.5

1.5

290

400

0

Pasta Carbonara

540

200

26

57

23

8

10

2.5

135

750

2

Slow-Cooker Osso Buco

460

170

46

15

19

9

7

1

205

710

1

Classic Chicken Cacciatore

600

260

61

9

29

8

12

6

190

500

2

Swiss Chard and Ricotta Ravioli with Brown Butter

360

200

13

27

22

7

12

2

190

350

2

Sweet and Sour Sicilian Braised Chicken

630

360

36

29

40

8

22

7

105

540

2

Spaghetti and Meatballs

660

250

29

72

28

7

16

3

95

810

7

Roasted Carrots & Shallots w/ Oil-Cured Olives & Gremolata

200

130

2

17

14

2

10

1.5

0

400

5

Herbed Ricotta Polenta

270

90

10

35

10

5

2.5

0

25

450

3

Fennel and Red Onion with Arugula

120

90

1

8

10

1

7

1

0

330

2

Creamy Baked Leeks with Garlic, Thyme, and Parmigiano

170

110

2

14

12

7

3.5

.5

45

105

2

Shaved Squash Carpaccio with Capers and Ricotta Salata

90

60

4

4

7

2.5

3.5

.5

5

320

1

SIDE DISHES, p. 64

Italian Green Beans with Tomatoes and Balsamic

60

40

1

5

4.5

.5

3.5

.5

0

100

2

Spinach Farrotto

370

170

17

35

19

11

5

1.5

50

390

5

Broccolini with Olives and Capers

140

100

4

9

11

1.5

8

1

0

420

1

Risotto

410

120

13

57

13

5

6

1.5

20

330

1

Quick-Braised Baby Artichokes with Garlic, Mint & Parsley

210

120

6

20

14

2

10

1.5

0

300

10

Garlic Bread

140

70

3

14

8

4

3

1

15

220

1

Braised Fingerling Potatoes with Fennel, Olives, and Thyme

210

120

4

22

13

2

9

1.5

0

290

4

GratinĂŠed Tomatoes with Asiago and Fresh Herbs

45

25

2

4

3

1

1.5

0

5

70

1

Zabaglione with Summer Fruit

310

180

4

26

19

11

6

1

200

50

2

Cannoli Cookies

100

40

1

15

4.5

2.5

1.5

0

15

60

0

Chocolate-Hazelnut Semifreddo

370

230

5

32

25

12

6

1

135

115

3

Pistachio Amaretti (per cookie)

70

25

2

9

3

0

1.5

1

0

0

1

450

220

5

55

25

15

6

1

65

75

4

DESSERTS, p. 76

Rustic Fig and Raspberry Mini Crostatas TiramisĂš

420

210

10

46

23

11

8

2

275

120

1

Classic Panna Cotta

200

120

4

16

14

9

4

.5

45

75

0

Brandied Cherry Sauce

90

0

1

16

0

0

0

0

25

14

1

Dried Cherry and Almond Biscotti w/ White Chocolate

160

50

3

23

6

2.5

1

0

20

85

1

Clementine Granita

230

5

1

57

0

0

0

0

0

35

1

240

10

7

52

1

0

0

0

35

210

3

45

40

1

0

4.5

3

1

0

15

45

0

TEST KITCHEN, p. 86

Potato Gnocchi LAST BITE, p. 98

Citrus and Cheese Butter (per 1 Tbs.)

f i necook i ng . com

95


RECIPE INDEX

Cover Recipe orecchiette with Roasted Broccolini, Burst Tomatoes, and italian Sausage .................................... 54

Beef Lasagne Bolognese with Herbed Ricotta............................................. 50 Ragù alla Bolognese .....................................22 Seared carpaccio-Style Shoulder Petite Tender ..............................33 Spaghetti and meatballs............................ 63

Pork & Lamb Artichoke Torta .............................................28 gnocchi with Sausage and Leek Ragù ...............................................52 orecchiette with Roasted Broccolini, Burst Tomatoes, and italian Sausage ..................................... 54 Pasta carbonara...........................................58 Pears and Arugula Wrapped in Prosciutto ...............................29

Poultry chicken meatball and escarole Soup .............................................. 39 chicken Piccata ........................................... 54 classic chicken cacciatore ..................... 59 Sweet and Sour Sicilian Braised chicken (Pollo Agrodolce)........ 62

Fish & Shellfish Linguine with clam Sauce.........................50 Shellfish with fennel, escarole, and kale ....................................... 38 Shrimp Scampi..............................................57

Pasta & Grains Herbed Ricotta Polenta................................ 66 Linguine with clam Sauce.........................50 orecchiette with Roasted Broccolini, Burst Tomatoes, and italian Sausage ..................................... 54

Pan-fried Polenta with mushrooms ...........................................35 Pasta carbonara...........................................58 Risotto ..............................................................72 Swiss chard and Ricotta Ravioli with Lemon Brown Butter ............ 61

Slow-cooker osso Buco ............................58 p. 69

Vegetarian Mains cannellini Bean and kale Soup................. 41 eggplant Parmigiana ....................................53 fresh Tomato and garlic Pizza.................56

Salads Arugula and fried mozzarella Salad with Tomato-Basil Vinaigrette ......45 caesar Salad ..................................................47 escarole Salad with olives and garlic croutons .................................... 41 grilled Sourdough Panzanella ................. 40

96

R e A L i TA L i A n 2 0 1 7


p. 41

Quick-Braised Baby Artichokes with Garlic, Mint, and Parsley������������������������73

p. 56

Roasted Carrots and Shallots with Oil-Cured Olives and Gremolata������������������������������������������������66 Shaved Squash Carpaccio with Capers and Ricotta Salata����������������������������69 Spinach Farrotto���������������������������������������������70

Starters Heirloom Tomato and Burrata Salad with Tomato Conserva Vinaigrette����������������������������������39

Arancini�����������������������������������������������������������32

Raw Artichoke, Portobello, and Fennel Salad������������������������������������������43

Baked Provolone with Tomatoes, Marjoram, and Balsamic�����������������������������28

Artichoke Torta���������������������������������������������28

Bruschetta with Fig and Walnut Anchoiade���������������������������������������32

Soups Cannellini Bean and Kale Soup���������������� 41 Chicken Meatball and Escarole Soup�����������������������������������������������39 Farmers’ Market Minestrone���������������������46 Shellfish with Fennel, Escarole, and Kale����������������������������������������38 Tortellini en Brodo����������������������������������������42 Tuscan Peasant Soup with Rosemary and Pancetta��������������������������� 44

Pan-Fried Polenta with Mushrooms�������35 Parmigiano-Pistachio Frico������������������������31 Pears and Arugula Wrapped in Prosciutto�������������������������������29 Sweet and Sour Eggplant Relish (Caponata)����������������������������������������34 Sweet and Sour Pickled Peppers������������ 30 Zesty Lemon Olives�������������������������������������34

Sauces & Toppings Alfredo Sauce�������������������������������������������������21

Side Dishes

Amatriciana Sauce�������������������������������������� 22

Braised Fingerling Potatoes with Fennel, Olives, and Thyme������������������� 74

Basil Pesto������������������������������������������������������20

Broccolini with Olives and Capers����������������71 Creamy Baked Leeks with Garlic, Thyme, and Parmigiano��������������������68 Fennel and Red Onion with Arugula������������67 Garlic Bread����������������������������������������������������� 74 Gratinéed Tomatoes with Asiago and Fresh Herbs��������������������������������75 Italian Green Beans with Tomatoes and Balsamic�������������������������������70

Desserts Cannoli Cookies��������������������������������������������79 Chocolate-Hazelnut Semifreddo ��������� 80

Citrus and Cheese Butter��������������������������98

Classic Panna Cotta with Brandied Cherry Sauce������������������������������84

Fresh Tomato and Basil Sauce������������������21

Clementine Granita�������������������������������������85

Quick Marinara with Toasted Garlic and Rosemary�����������������������������������24

Dried Cherry and Almond Biscotti with White Chocolate�����������������85

Ragù alla Bolognese������������������������������������� 22

Pistachio Amaretti��������������������������������������� 81

Vodka Sauce��������������������������������������������������24

Rustic Fig and Raspberry Mini Crostatas�����������������������������������������������82 Tiramisù����������������������������������������������������������83 Zabaglione with Summer Fruit�����������������78

f i n e c o o k i n g .c o m

97


Last Bite

Top It Off This versatile, brightly flavored butter is tasty slathered on toast, tossed with vegetables, and more.

citrus and cheese butter Bianco Sardo is an aged sheep’s milk Sardinian cheese. It pairs nicely with citrus, and since it’s not too salty, it won’t overpower fruit notes. If you can’t find it, use a high-quality Pecorino. Yields about 11/2 cups

4 oz. (8 Tbs.) unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 oz. Bianco Sardo or Pecorino romano, finely grated with a rasp (about 2 cups)

1 Tbs. finely grated lemon zest

1 Tbs. finely grated lime zest

1 tsp. finely grated orange zest

With an electric mixer or by hand, mix all of the ingredients in a medium bowl until combined. You can refrigerate the butter for up to 5 days or freeze it for up to 1 month.

98

r e a l i ta l i a n 2 0 1 7


BottegaVinaiaWine.com

Š2017 Palm Bay International Boca Raton, Fl.

A campaign ďŹ nanced according to EC regulation N. 1308/13


Gluten free pizza can be a little sticky.

But not with IF YOU CARE Non-Stick Unbleached Parchment Paper! RECIPE Ingredients: Crust: • 1 ½ lbs raw cauliflower florets • ½ cup ricotta cheese • 3 eggs, beaten • 1 cup grated parmesan cheese • 1 tsp dried Italian herbs • 1 tsp garlic powder or granules • ¼ tsp La Baleine Fine Sea Salt Toppings: • ¾ cup marinara sauce of your choice • 4 cloves garlic, finely minced • ¼ cup parmesan cheese, grated • 12 oz mozzarella, sliced • 4-5 campari tomatoes, sliced • 3 oz prosciutto • 1 cup basil leaves

Gluten Free Cauliflower Pizza Makes One 14” Pizza

1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. 2. Place the cauliflower florets in a food processor until there is a fine flour-like consistency. 3. Place the cauliflower flour in a square of doubled up If You Care Cheesecloth and squeeze out all excess moisture. Line a baking sheet with If You Care Parchment Paper and place the cauliflower rice on the sheet, then bake for 12 minutes. 4. Remove the cauliflower rice from the baking sheet and set aside to let cool. 5. Once the cauliflower rice is cooled, add the eggs and cheeses, blending together. Then add the herbs, garlic powder and sea salt and mix until smooth. 6. Line another baking sheet or pizza pan with If You Care Parchment Paper then pat out a round crust with cauliflower mixture. Bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden brown, then remove from the oven and set aside. 7. When crust has cooled, top with marinara sauce, garlic and parmesan cheese, then mozzarella, tomatoes and prosciutto. 8. Bake for 25 minutes then top with basil leaves, slice and serve.

Sustainable. FSC and Compostable Certified. Non-GMO. Non-Toxic. Gluten and Allergen Free. Totally Chlorine Free. Vegetarian. No Perflourinated Chemicals (PFCs). All Natural.

ifyoucare.com

Fine cooking italian 2017  
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