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DEZINO CAMINO v.2


TABLE OF CONTENTS Start Somewhere .............................................................. pg.2 Research ................................................................................ pg.12 Its Coming Together ......................................................... pg.23 Redesign ............................................................................... pg.41 The Brand ............................................................................. pg.57 What I learned .................................................................... pg.65


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LET THE JOURNEY BEGIN


I HAD TO FIND A TOPIC

Much of my work has been in the exploration of sound and rhythm and going into the thesis project I knew that sound would be the only subject that I’d continue to have in an interest with.


CYMATICS Cymatics is the study of visible sound and vibration, a subset of modal phenomena. Typically the surface of a plate, diaphragm, or membrane is vibrated, and regions of maximum and minimum displacement are made visible in a thin coating of particles, paste, or liquid. Different patterns emerge in the excitatory medium depending on the geometry of the plate and the driving frequency. The apparatus employed can be simple, such as the ancient Chinese spouting bowl, or Chinese singing fountain, in which copper handles are rubbed and cause the copper bottom elements to vibrate. Other examples are a Chladni Plate or advanced such as the CymaScope, a laboratory instrument that makes visible the inherent geometries within sound and music.


CYMATICS ABSTRACT:

PROJECT DESCRIPTION:

Korry Bass 452 Thesis Proposal

Everyday we encounter different sounds and background noise, which effects us in different ways. With the study by of cymatics Physicist Hans Jenny we can also see that sounds has visual form related to its vibrational frequencies. However, these studies do not reveal any practical applications of his findings. I will explore how the forms that appear in the studies of Hans Jenny can be useful in designing room and spaces. Over the course of the semester I plan to perform a number of experiments, based off of the research Hans Jenny the “father of cymatics�. This will allow me to show that cymatics has uses in design and everyday life. I will conduct interviews with people who use sound to enhance spaces such as interior designers or even sound artist. The findings of Hans Jenny show that sounds affect physical material in different ways. That way in which sound affects a metal maybe different than how it affects wood. This could be useful when it comes to material selection when designing. I plan to build scale models that would aid in the experiments and representations of the ideas. I will also explore the mechanics behind acoustic instruments because form has alot to do with how acoustic instruments sound, I believe that this can be applicable to some of my experiments. I want this project to inform designers and people who are interested in cymatics that it can have modern day implications in our everyday life. My findings could become part of a handbook or even become ways to manipulate sound.


Hans Jenny A physicist and pioneer of cymatics, conducted many experiments that show the cymatic phenomena using different surfaces and materials. After completing his doctorate he taught science at the Rudolph Steiner school in Zurich for four years, before setting up his own medical practice in the Swiss village of Dornach.

Jennys naturalistic approach to his work informed his view of Cymatics & sound and their part in the creation of the universe. Jenny was an advocate of the idea that Cymatics described a sound-matrix at work in nature, an invisible driving force that could create everything from the wave-like shape of a mountain range to the stripes on a zebra or the petals on a flower


OBSERVATION Cymatics shows us that sounds vibrations create forms that can be made visible.

ARGUMENT The research of Hans Jenny didn’t yield any practical uses of cymatics, but some of the cymatic findings can be applied to interior spaces.


NOW WHAT...


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RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH RESEARCH


...AND LOTS OF IT!


INTERVIEWS

John Stuart Reid Hi Korry, Your prospective use of cymatics in building design is the first I have come across; you are almost certainly breaking new ground. So, congratulations on your vision.

supervisor to realize that cymatics is still in its infancy as a science. But please see the attached brief review of Hans Jenny’s books “Cymatics” and my brief review of “The Mereon Matrix.” These reviews are currently unpublished but will be published in the next week or so. If your supervisor has any doubts about the robustness/ validity of cymatics as a technique or principle just show him

“Your prospective use of cymatics in building design is the first I have come across; you are almost certainly breaking new ground.” or her those reviews and they should dispel all doubts. The Mereon Matrix authors include Dr Louis Kaufmann, one of the world’s leading mathematicians, specializing in Topology. He was one of the Mereon team members who witnessed the CymaScope in action in the London hotel room mentioned in the review.

Here is a brief overview of the subject that should help:

He was one of the Mereon team members who witnessed the CymaScope in action in the London hotel room mentioned in the review.

Cymatics is the [emergent] science of visible sound. I say ‘emergent’ because it may be important for your course

In general, cymatic effects occur whenever sound encounters a membrane. The imprinting of what are generally


termed ‘standing waves’ on a membrane is of course a phenomenon that is generally (though not always) invisible to the unaided eye but can be revealed with special lighting techniques. The effect occurs when the wavelength of a given sound exactly matches one or more dimensions of the room or containment chamber. What constitutes a membrane? Any medium that has sonic resonance. The dimensions of the medium can be anything from planet size to the microscopic realm. An example of planet-wide cymatics is the giant hexagon in Saturn’s atmosphere, which is almost certainly the result of cymatic forces in a vapor medium. See attached graphic that shows the hypothetical principles, as yet unproven, but I believe that is the mechanism at work, or something close to it. An example of cymatics in the microscopic realm is sound imprinting a pattern of acoustic energy on the surface membrane of a living cell. See attached graphic depicting this. We are soon to engage in a series of experiments to image sound in the microscopic realm on the surface membrane of living cells. In terms of the mass of the medium that can be imprinted by sound, vapors, as mentioned above, are clearly at the low end of the mass scale while at the upper end of the scale, steel, aluminum, brass or glass plates of any dimension and up to 1/2 inch thick can be imprinted cymatically, in some cases even 1-inch thick is possible.

All timber surfaces, of any size or thickness are also cymatically resonant. So what cannot be imprinted by sound? Masonry, because it’s mass and density is, in general, too great. But the exception to this rule is granite or other resonant stones slabs that have been cut to relatively slim profiles of up to 6 inches thick, ideally not edge held but perhaps centrally suspended, or held at only one edge. An example of a resonant granite structure of that thickness is the walls of the sarcophagus in the Great Pyramid’s King’s Chamber. Even at 6-inches thick the sarcophagus walls are highly resonant. To summarize, to imprint a sound (cymatically) on a surface, the surface has to be able to flex minutely, which also means it is resonant. One way to tell if a surface has that quality is by tapping it with your knuckles or a rubber hammer. If it rings/ resonates then it is cymatically ‘live’. If it doesn’t ring it is cymatically dead. There are exceptions to this method, such as the surface membrane of water, which obviously you can’t tap, yet the water’s surface has resonant qualities. An alternative to applying cymatic principles, in which the surface of a given body must be resonant, one can also employ reverberance principles to design spaces. See below, in answers to your specific questions, how reverberance can be utilized.


Q: Can cymatic principles and understanding help us in designing a space? (Such as making a space that absorbs sound shapes, amplify sound naturally, etc) JSR: Yes. Ideally you should work with both modal formulae and reverberance formulae to design spaces that relate to specific frequencies. For example, you may wish to design an essentially circular chamber or square chamber of masonry, which is unable to resonate cymatically. However, instead, you can use reverberance principles. Say you desire the chamber to reverberate with the primary Schumann Cavity Resonance (7.83 Hertz), imbuing the room with frequencies that some consider to be the heart beat of the planet. Some of the formulae for reverberance can be found in my booklet Egyptian Sonics (available from our on-line store) with the worked example of the King’s Chamber. If you need further guidance on formulae you may be able to find what you need on line or I could guide you but my time would need to be compensated. Q: Do different materials affect the way sound vibrates on it? JSR: Yes, as described above some materials are highly resonant whereas others are acoustically dead. Q: Is there such a thing as materials resistant to sound? JSR: Yes, there are materials that absorb sound and feature virtually

zero sonic reflection. Such materials can be useful where require a space to be acoustically neutral. This can be achieved by combining some hard surfaces in the space and some soft surfaces, such as acoustic tiles or upholstered furniture. Or if you need a room to be acoustically dead, such as an anechoic chamber, you would apply acoustic panels to the walls, ceiling, and even the floor, beneath open mesh steel panels. Acoustic panels can be obtained from specialist companies. Q: Does the shape of a physical object (in a room) have an effect on the cymatic “sound shape”? JSR: Yes, all audible sounds are spherical in their space form so although acoustic engineers talk about ‘wave length’ they are really talking about the distance that the sonic bubble expands and contracts at a given frequency. Since sound is literally round the ideal shapes of objects in a room needed to minimize disturbances to the sound field are therefore round or at least curvy. By minimizing disturbances in the sound field you are maximizing cymatic and reverberance effects. Best wishes,

John CymaScope.com


Evan Meaney He gave me great advice on implementing sound enhancing devices into a space. (Devices such as: parabolic microphones, sound reactive microphones, etc.

The materials that you use are important. They have to be resonant to sound to apply cymatics to them. Shape plays an important apart on sound resonance as well.


Nikola Tesla

Acoustic resonance is the tendency of an acoustic system to absorb more energy when it is forced or driven at a frequency that matches one of its own natural frequencies of vibration (its resonance frequency) than it does at other frequencies. The term acoustic resonance is sometimes used to narrow mechanical resonance to the frequency range of human hearing, but since acoustics is defined in general terms concerning vibrational waves in matter acoustic resonance can occur at frequencies outside the range of human hearing. An acoustically resonant object usually has more than one resonance frequency, especially at harmonics of the strongest resonance. It will easily vibrate at those frequencies, and vibrate less strongly at other frequencies. Acoustic resonance is an important consideration for instrument builders, as most acoustic instruments use resonators, such as the strings and body of a violin, the length of tube in a flute, and the shape of a drum membrane. (For mammals the membrane by having different resonance on either end so that high frequencies are concentrated on one end and low frequencies on the other.

RE SO NA NC E


Tesla


Instrument Making


I looked into how instrument making can help shine light one how acoustics work on a small scale.


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I created system that gives the User a modular system that changes that way sound interacts with the space.


This is a line of furniture that a plane to have created later on in this project life. I want to eventually have a line of furniture that all hear reflect sound throughout a room.


Objects within the space working to direct sound


Personal umbrella and Sound Porjector. Inspired by cymatics to evenly distribute sound across the surface.

Compatible with the sonichair


NO JUST... NO

Sometimes you have to explore an idea, fail at it, and then move on.

hmm...


Somtimes as a designer you chase a dead end idea however the journey to get there and the things you learn are equally as successful as a good project.


Time To Build I wanted to create the sound dishes in to demonstrate my idea. They did work, however they weren’t aesthetically pleasing so I ended up scrapping it in order to save time and money. Maybe will I pursue this later on in this projects life.

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This is the scale model chair I wanted to create in order to show my concept plus I wanted sometime unique something like a “poster child� for soniform.


The Paralander New line of soniform chairs that are designed to work with the soniform stand alone units. Unique Design Slender profile doesn’t interfere with sound wave propogation.


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Time To Redesign Visuals


I needed to get some decent renderings of my ideas. So I had to turn to 3d renderings. I had to learned the Maya 3d software and create my ideas within 3weeks. Yeah I was being WAAAAY too ambitious!


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THE BRAND

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soniform

soniform soniform soniform

nexa reg


The basis behind the brand is to conveniently accommodate to out audience. It split into two sides a residential side and commercial side. This helped me to develop ways in which the company would communicate and be recognized by its customers.

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I created a simple style guide to help develop and idea and values of the company. I wanted a personable color palette that wasn’t corporate feeling. In the following pages I created business cards, envelops, and brochure that all follow this design.

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SYNOPSIS OF WHAT I’VE LEARNED

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Its made me think that a project is more that producing a logo and identity, but that it was much more depth within it. You have to create a story or a purpose that people can latch on to and then allow that to lead the design. From now on I will use this ideology in process.

I learned quite a bunch from this project. Its taught me to be ambitious but within your limitations. I took on quite a lot this semester, in regards to this project, and in the future I will be sure not be sooo ambitious that it make me fall short.

From my small scales tests and fullsized test I think I was successful in proving that it can work, but I believe I fell short on the aesthetic side of things. But I think with more exploration of materials I’ll come to something that is practical and works.

The presentations helped me gain an idea of how to capture the essence of an idea. I also know to double, triple, quadruple check the presentation for missing slides or grammar/spelling errors. I will say I wish I made the presentations more personal than corporate.


“I’m no Hans Jenny or Nikola Tesla but I’m a damn good explorer of an idea.” ‑ Korry Bass


Dezino Camino v2