Page 1

2017-2018

Getting Around

What’s Inside • Top 10 Things to Do • Suggested Itineraries • Maps • Where to Camp • Safety Information

C. Douce P.Zizka

Également offert en français

Kootenay National Park


P. Zizka

Connect With Nature

OUR STORY Indigenous peoples were the first to discover naturally forming ochre in small streams flowing through the Vermilion Plain. Mixing the red clay with fish oil or animal grease, they painted their bodies, clothes and tipis, and drew pictures on the rocks. Nineteenth century prospectors soon followed, mining the ochre by hand to create pigment for paint. The Paint Pots lie near the north end of the Banff-Windermere Highway, the road that runs through Kootenay National Park. The highway, completed in 1923, was conceived to draw tourists to the picturesque scenes on either side of the road, while opening commercial links east of the Rockies. Kootenay is the only national park to feature both glacier-clad peaks along the Continental Divide and semi-arid grasslands in the Columbia Valley. Apart from ochre deposits, Kootenay boasts a geological heritage to inspire any artist—from Burgess Shale fossils to the dolomite walls of Marble Canyon and the rust covered cliffs above Radium Hot Springs. In 2003, dramatic wildfires in the Vermilion Valley revealed glaciers hanging above the flame-scorched forest, further enhancing the park’s natural legacy.

A UNESCO WORLD HERITAGE SITE Four of the mountain national parks—Banff, Jasper, Yoho and Kootenay—are recognized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization as part of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site, for the benefit and enjoyment of all nations. Among the attributes that warranted this designation were vast wilderness, diversity of flora and fauna, outstanding natural beauty and features such as Lake Louise, Maligne Lake, the Columbia Icefield and the Burgess Shale. 2


Top 10 Things to Do STANLEY GLACIER BURGESS SHALE GUIDED HIKES Meet your ancient ancestors and hold a piece of earth’s history on a guided hike to the Stanley Glacier fossil site. Reservations are required. Visit reservations.pc.gc.ca to book your spot!

P. Zizka

AN OTENTIK STAY Discover camping like never before. Bring your family for a relaxing stay in one of Kootenay’s oTENTik tent-cabins. Hike, explore the village of Radium or go for a dip in the hot springs. See 3 on page 7.

SOAK IN SOME HISTORY

C. Douce

Make sure your journey to Kootenay includes a soak in the Radium Hot Springs’ soothing waters. Surrounded by dramatic cliffs, the hot and cool pools offer opportunities to unwind or play with the kids. Towels, lockers and swimsuits are available for rent. See on page 7.

EXPLORA KOOTENAY Admire the work of fire and ice as you drive the scenic Banff-Windermere Highway from Castle Junction to Radium. Download Kootenay’s Explora app and listen to stories about the park. Visit parkscanada.gc.ca/knp-app to download.

JUNIPER TRAIL

O. Robinson

Take a hike along the 3.2 km (2 mi) Juniper Trail from the park gate to the hot springs. Get a bird’s eye view of the Columbia Valley, then relax and #sharethechair from Parks Canada’s red chairs overlooking the Radium Hot Springs. See 1 on page 7.

REDSTREAK RESTORATION TRAIL Take a short stroll from Redstreak Campground along the Redstreak Restoration Trail. Learn how fire keeps forests healthy and creates habitat for bighorn sheep and badgers. Don’t forget your camera! See 4 on page 7.

MARBLE CANYON

M. Oliver

Admire the power of rushing water cascading through a spectacular limestone gorge. Follow the bridges to a thundering waterfall and snap a selfie from the red chairs. See 11 on page 6.

OLIVE LAKE Unwind and enjoy a picnic by this olive green lake near the summit of Sinclair Pass. Look for brook trout and other signs of wildlife as you stroll along the gentle boardwalk trail. See 7 on page 7.

KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK VISITOR CENTRE

S. Morgan

Listen to stories from the Ktunaxa First Nation and discover the role fire has played in Kootenay’s landscape at the Kootenay National Park Visitor Centre in the village of Radium Hot Springs. See on page 7.

BACKCOUNTRY FUN Looking for adventure? Lace up your hiking boots for an epic 55 km (34 mi) multi-day adventure on the Rockwall Trail—one of the Rockies’ most inspiring backcountry routes. Enjoy dramatic views of alpine meadows and hanging glaciers.

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M. Oliver

Suggested Itineraries

HALF-DAY ADVENTURES

A FULL DAY OF FUN

PACK A PICNIC LUNCH

DRIVE THROUGH HISTORY

On foot or by car, Kootenay National Park is the perfect place for a half-day adventure. Enjoy a picnic lunch at the Valleyview or Vermilion Crossing day-use areas.

It once took a full day in a Ford Model T to drive from Banff to Radium Hot Springs. Today, you can enjoy the sights and sounds of Kootenay and make it to your destination before dark.

Bask in the sun and take a short walk along the shore of the Vermilion River. Hike from the village of Radium Hot Spring or drive the Redstreak Campground Road to enjoy views of the Columbia Valley from the Valleyview Trail. Watch for Bighorn sheep and deer throughout the Redstreak area. TAKE A HIKE! Bring the whole family for a half-day hike from Marble Canyon to the Paint Pots. Snap a selfie and enjoy the view from the red chairs along the Marble Canyon Trail. Admire wildflowers and rushing turquoise blue waters as you stroll along the trail beside the Vermilion River on your way to a First Nations cultural site. Stand next to new trees and see how tall a lodgepole pine tree can grow in 14 years! Gaze into the Paint Pots, three small emerald green pools, as these iron-rich mineral springs stain the surrounding earth red, before hiking back to your car.

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• Stand on the dividing line between the Pacific and Atlantic watersheds at the Continental Divide. See what a forest looks like 40 years after a fire on the Fireweed trail. • Admire the dramatic colours and sounds of Marble Canyon’s deep, carved chasms as this trail criss-crosses the narrow gorge and takes you into the heart of a recent wildfire. • Keep your binoculars ready! Wildlife, such as bears, deer, wolves and bighorn sheep, can sometimes be spotted along the highway. • Enjoy breathtaking views of the Mitchell and Vermilion ranges from the Kootenay Valley Viewpoint. • Get a bird’s eye view of Sinclair Canyon on a 6 km return (3.7 mi) hike along the Juniper / Sinclair Trail. • Pull out your swimsuits, relax and enjoy a refreshing dip in the Radium Hot Springs.


Village of Radium Map Legend 3 Campground oTENTiks Theatre Sani dump Parking Disabled access Day-use area Visitor centre Hot springs Red chairs

Banff

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2.2 km

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Kootenay Valley Viewpoint

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Mt Sinclair

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MOUNT ASSINIBOINE PROVINCIAL PARK

Mt Harkin 2980 m

Mt Daer

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This is not a topographical map and is not suitable for route-finding.

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Radium Hot Springs Area Trails

14 Stanley Glacier

27 Honeymoon Pass / Verdant

21 Helmet / Ochre Junction

Olive Lake

13 Fireweed Loops

20 Floe Lake

Redstreak Creek

26 Rockwall

19 Hawk Creek & Ball Pass

Valleyview

12 Paint Pots to Marble Canyon

18 Kindersley / Sinclair Loop

Redstreak Restoration

25 Tumbling / Helmet / Ochre

17 Prospector’s Valley

Redstreak Loop

11 Marble Canyon

16 Simpson River

Redstreak Campground

24 Helmet Creek & Falls

15 Kimpton Creek

Juniper / Sinclair Canyon

Difficult

10 Paint Pots

9

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Type

6 km

gain / loss 260 m

Redstreak Campground

1.5 hours

4.6 km

gain / loss 30 m

Redstreak Loop

45 minutes

2.2 km

90 m

Redstreak Restoration

20 minutes

1 km

5m

Valleyview

45 minutes

2.4 km

125 m

Olive Lake

15 minutes

0.5 km

0m

Cobb Lake

2 hours

5.4 km

loss 190 m

Dog Lake

1.5 hours

5.2 km

40 m

Paint Pots

40 minutes

2 km

25 m

Marble Canyon

30 minutes

1.6 km

20 m

Paint Pots to Marble Canyon

2 hours

6.8 km

40 m

Fireweed Loops

30 minutes

0.5 and 2 km

20 m

Stanley Glacier

3 hours

8.4 km

356 m

Kindersley / Sinclair Loop

6 hours

17.5 km

1055 m

Hawk Creek and Ball Pass

7 hours

20.2 km

885 m

Floe Lake

7 hours

21 km

715 m

Helmet Creek and Falls

2 to 3 days

30 km

310 m

Tumbling / Helmet / Ochre

2 to 3 days

38 km

800 m

Rockwall

3 to 4 days

55 km

gain / loss 2600 m

Disab le

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Sani D

k-up Full H oo

Electr

Day Hikes Multi-Day

Where to Camp

Campgrounds

ive Pro grams d Acc ess

2 hours

Cookin g She lter Drink ing W ater oTENT ik

Juniper / Sinclair Canyon

Pit Toil ets Show ers Firepit

Elevation Gain

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Distance (return)

ical

Estimated time (return)

Short Hikes

Hiking Trail

Hiking trails are shown on previous page. Trail reports and hiking maps are available from the Kootenay National Park Visitor Centre and at parkscanada.gc.ca/Kootenaytrails.

Where to Hike

Open Dates

Sites

Prices

$21.50

KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK 1

Marble Canyon

June 22 - September 4

61

2

McLeod Meadows

June 15 - September 18

88

3 4

Redstreak Crook’s Meadow

May 1 - October 9

242

Call 250-347-2218 for information on non-profit group camping reservations and fees.

1

Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved.

PLANNING TO CAMP IN ANOTHER PARK? BOOK ONLINE OR CALL AHEAD FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS. The mountain parks offer extraordinary camping experiences, ranging from full-service RV sites to pristine backcountry settings. Many campsites can be reserved and most fill up quickly. Call ahead or go online for availability and recommendations. Backcountry camping is only permitted at designated sites with a backcountry camping permit.

FRONTCOUNTRY: 1-877-RESERVE (737-3783) OR RESERVATION.PC.GC.CA BACKCOUNTRY: 250-347-9505 8

$21.50 $27.40 $38.20


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Drink in

Cookin g

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Sani D

Electr

Campgrounds

Full H oo

k-up

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Where to Camp

Open Dates

Sites

YOHO NATIONAL PARK 1

Hoodoo Creek

June 22 - September 4

30

2

Takakkaw Falls (walk-in)

June 22 - October 9

35

3

Kicking Horse

May 18 - October 9

88

4

Monarch

May 4 - September 4

44

BANFF NATIONAL PARK Tunnel Mt. Village I

May 11 - October 2

618

Tunnel Mt. Village II

Open year round

188

May 11 - October 2

321

June 22- September 5

380

Tunnel Mt. Trailer Two Jack Main

May 11 - October 2

74

Johnston Canyon

May 25 - September 25

132

Castle Mountain

May 25 - September 11

43

Two Jack Lakeside

To be determined

72

May 30 - September 28

206

Open year round (starting May 1 2017)

189

June 1 - October 10

32

To be determined

45

June 24 - September 5

116

June 1 - October 10

50

May 10 - September 30

43

Pocahontas

May 17 - September 17

140

Snaring

May 17 - September 24

66

Protection Mountain Lake Louise Tent Lake Louise Trailer Mosquito Creek Silverhorn Waterfowl Lakes Rampart Creek Rocky Mountain House NHS - Historic Forts

JASPER NATIONAL PARK

Whistlers

May 3 - October 9

781

Wapiti (summer)

May 3 - October 9

364

Wapiti (winter)

October 10 - May 1, 2018

93

Wabasso

May 17 - September 17

231

Kerkeslin

June 21 - September 4

42

Honeymoon Lake

May 17 - September 17

35

Jonas

May 17 - September 17

25

Icefield Centre RV

March 31 - October 30

100

May 17 - October 9

33

May 31 - September 17

46

Icefield (tents only) Wilcox Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved.

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Stay Safe and Enjoy MOUNTAIN SAFETY

A. Athwal

Unpredictable mountain weather can change road and trail conditions instantly and wildlife can be anywhere, any time. These simple precautions will help ensure you have a safe and enjoyable visit. • • • • • •

Parks Canada

(Insert image here)

• •

Visit drivebc.ca and 511.alberta to check road conditions prior to heading out. Obey speed limits and watch for wildlife on the roadside. Stay on designated roads, trails and other hardened surfaces. Keep a ‘Bare’ campsite. Visit parkscanada.gc.ca/bare-campsite. Make noise on the trails and let wildlife know you are coming. Research and plan overnight trips including potential trail restrictions and closures, avalanche conditions and mandatory backcountry permits. Visit parkscanada.gc.ca/knp-backcountry and avalanche.pc.gc.ca for safety tips. Let someone know your plans. Cell phones are not reliable in the wilderness. Keep clear of cliffs, ledges and fast moving water.

PARK REGULATIONS

C. Douce

M. Macullo

Following park regulations while enjoying your national parks will help protect you, the land and our wildlife:

Keep pets on a leash and under control at all times. Please collect and properly discard pet feces.

Take only photographs. It is illegal to pick flowers, mushrooms, cut down trees, branches, remove cultural artifacts or fossils, or otherwise cause damage to natural objects or living things.

Be considerate of your neighbours. Liquor consumption is prohibited in public places, day-use areas, and during set periods in campgrounds. Respect quiet hours and liquor bans in campgrounds.

Stay out of closed areas. Area closures or activity restrictions are implemented when visitors are at risk or when wildlife requires additional protection. Signs indicate the areas impacted.

Be careful with fire. Fires are permitted only in designated areas with fireboxes or firepits. Extinguish fires completely. Do not use deadwood, bark or branches for fuel. Report wildfires immediately.

Buy fishing permits. Anglers require a national park fishing permit, available at Parks Canada visitor centres. Provincial licenses are not valid in national parks.

Going boating? Motors are not allowed on most lakes.

Motorized off-road travel is not permitted.

M. Macullo

THE CANADA NATIONAL PARKS ACT Park Wardens are responsible for enforcing park regulations as required by the Canada National Parks Act. To report national park violations, call 24 hours a day, 7 days per week. 1-888-927-3367 (Banff, Yoho, Kootenay and Waterton Lakes) 1-877-852-3100 (Jasper, Mount Revelstoke and Glacier) Visit pc.gc.ca/mtnregulations Violators will be charged, be required to appear in court and could pay fines of up to $25 000.

10


Protecting Wildlife WILDLIFE IN KOOTENAY NEED YOUR HELP National parks help protect uniquely Canadian landscapes and the ecosystems that wildlife depend on for their survival. When visitors disturb or entice wildlife, the natural character of national parks diminishes. Parks Canada staff make special efforts to ensure your safety and protect wildlife in national parks. By learning more about wildlife you can help ensure your wildlife encounters are positive for both you and the wildlife.

Human Food Kills Wildlife

Wildlife quickly find any food, scented items or garbage that is left unattended. Eating these unnatural foods teaches the wildlife to approach people for an easy meal.

Once wildlife develop a taste for human food, they often become aggressive in their search for more. This places you and others in danger. These wild animals will come into your picnic site or campsite in search of food or garbage that is not properly stored.

Wildlife that eat human food or garbage become aggressive with people. This puts both people and wildlife at risk of being hurt or killed.

Do Not Litter, Put Garbage in its Proper Place Wildlife will feed on garbage: littering means feeding wildlife. Ensure all garbage and recycling are disposed in wildlife proof bins immediately. • If you see garbage or recycling left outside in Kootenay National Park, please inform Visitor Services at 250-347-9505 (see hours on pg 15). • After hours, please call Parks Canada Banff Dispatch at 403-762-1470.

How to Use the Wildlife Proof Garbage Bins The garbage bins in Banff National Park are wildlife proof. 1) To use, place your hand inside the handle and push to the very back to release the latch.

2) Always ensure the lid is closed tight after you are finished.

11


Protecting Wildlife Properly Store All Food and Scented Items A clean campsite or picnic area does not have anything that will attract wildlife (food, garbage, food-related or scented items). Never leave these items where wildlife can access them:

ALL food-related and scented items MUST be stored away in your car,

a hard-sided trailer or RV,

• Coolers – full or empty

• Garbage/wrappers

• Scented products – such as shampoo, toothpaste, candles, citronella, dish soap, sunscreen, lip balm, dish towels

• Dishes/pots/cutlery – clean or dirty

• Barbecues – clean or dirty

• Empty beverage containers

• Any other items used for food preparation or that have a smell or scent

• Food – wrapped, unwrapped, or in containers

• Pet food/bowls – full or empty • Bottles/cans – open or unopened

or in a campground food storage locker.

Never leave food or scented items unattended or in a tent for any amount of time.

Always Keep Your Campsite or Picnic Area Clean When you are done cooking or eating at your picnic table, all food, food-related and scented items MUST be stored: • In a hard-sided vehicle, trailer or motor home (not in tents or tent trailers) • In campground food storage lockers Non-food items such as lawn chairs, tables or lanterns may be left outside. Items such as coolers, cook stoves, dish towels and toothpaste must be properly stored. Dump dish water down outdoor sinks or at the sani-dump in campgrounds.

All food, food-related and scented items MUST be stored away.

12

Cooler, stove and dishes (dirty or clean) MUST be stored away.

Non-food items may be left outside.


Protecting Wildlife Do Not Approach or Entice Wildlife. Give Them Space.

Do not surround, crowd or follow an animal. Use zoom or show the animal in its natural surroundings and crop the image later.

Photograph wildlife from a vehicle or safe distance • 30 metres for deer, elk and moose • 100 metres for cougars, bears, coyotes and wolves

Don’t make sounds to startle animals to get a better photo.

If you make them move, you are too close.

If You See Wildlife By the Road Always slow down. If you do stop (not recommended for the safety of wildlife): • Be aware of the traffic around you. • Pull over where it is safe to do so. • Use your hazard lights to alert other drivers. • Watch for a few moments, take a quick photo, and then move on. • If a traffic jam develops, move on. It is unsafe for people and wildlife.

Parks Canada

• Stay in your vehicle.

Staying Safe with Pets • Pets must be kept on a leash at all times. • Pets attract wildlife and may be attacked by carnivores (bears, cougars, wolves and coyotes) if they are left outside unattended, especially at night. • Do not leave pet food out. If you walk away, store food dishes – empty or full. Always store food dishes at night.

Keeping Your Children Safe • Bears, cougars, wolves and coyotes may be curious about children and can attack them. • Keep children in immediate sight and within close reach at all times. • Children should avoid playing in or near areas with tall grass or dense bushes. • Never allow children to pet, feed or pose with wildlife. 13


Mountain Stories MEET PARKS CANADA’S INTERPRETERS Do you want to discover more about the uniqueness of Yoho’s natural and cultural heritage? Friendly and knowledgeable interpreters are here to help you connect to these special places protected by Parks Canada.

Parks Canada

Watch for interpreters at campgrounds and popular day-use areas in Yoho National Park in the summer months. Check parkscanada.gc.ca/Yoho-interpretation for more information on interpretive experiences in Yoho.

WILDLIFE VIEWING TIPS Your best chance of observing wild animals is by giving them space to feed, rest and keep their young safe. Help keep them wild: •

• • • •

For further information pick up a copy of Keep the Wild in Wildlife at a Parks Canada Visitor Centre or visit parkscanada.gc.ca/bears-and-people To report wolf, bear or cougar sightings call 403-762-1473.

Canada turns 150 in 2017! Parks Canada’s treasured natural and historic places will host special programs and events to commemorate the milestones that contributed to the Canada of today, strong and free. Experience what inspired Canada! parkscanada.gc.ca

Learn about our current projects: pc.gc.ca/ ynp-infrastructure

BEAR

WITH US

as we work to restore your national parks.

14

M. Oliver

2017

K. Woods

Peter Essick

Stay at least three (3) bus lengths (30 m) away from elk, deer and bighorn sheep. Stay at least ten (10) bus lengths (100 m) away from bears, cougars and wolves. NEVER feed or approach wildlife. Keep pets under control and on a leash at all times. Keep children in sight and within close range at all times. Consider carrying bear spray when on the trails. Keep it accessible and know how and when to use it.


Want More?

WANT MORE INFORMATION ABOUT KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK? Find us online at:

facebook.com/KootenayNP,

twitter.com/KootenayNP or parkscanada.gc.ca/Kootenay.

These detailed brochures are available online or for pick-up at a Parks Canada visitor centre.

Stop by the Friends of Kootenay store in the Kootenay National Park Visitor Centre for souvenirs, guidebooks and topographical maps.

WANT MORE INFORMATION ON OTHER MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARKS? BANFF

YOHO

Banff Visitor Centre: 403-762-1550 Lake Louise Visitor Centre: 403-522-3833 pc.gc.ca/banff

Yoho Visitor Centre: 250-343-6783 pc.gc.ca/yoho

Lake Louise Visitor Centre hours: Jan 1 - April 30: 9:00 - 4:30 7days/week May 1 - May 30: 9:00 - 5:00 7days/week June 1 - Sept 30: 8:30 - 7:00 7days/week Oct 1 - Dec 31: 9:00 - 5:00 7days/week Banff Lake Louise Tourism: 403-762-8421 banfflakelouise.com

JASPER Jasper Information Centre: 780-852-6176 pc.gc.ca/jasper Tourism Jasper: 780-852-6236 jasper.travel

KOOTENAY Kootenay Visitor Centre: 250-347-9505 pc.gc.ca/kootenay Kootenay Visitor Centre hours: May 18 - June 18: 9:00 - 5:00 7days/week June 19 - Sept 4: 9:00 - 7:00 7days/week Sept 5 - Oct 8: 9:00 - 5:00 7days/week Oct 9 closed for winter

Yoho Visitor Centre hours: Jan 1 - April 30: 9:00 - 4:30 7days/week May 1 - May 30: 9:00 - 5:00 7days/week June 1 - Sept 30: 8:30 - 7:00 7days/week Oct 1 - Dec 31: 9:00 - 5:00 7days/week Accommodations and attractions in Field: field.ca Tourism Golden: 1-800-622-4653 tourismgolden.com

MOUNT REVELSTOKE AND GLACIER Rogers Pass Discovery Centre: 250-837-7500 pc.gc.ca/glacier • pc.gc.ca/revelstoke Tourism Revelstoke: 1-800-487-1493 seerevelstoke.com

WATERTON LAKES Waterton Lakes Visitor Centre: 403-859-5133 pc.gc.ca/waterton Waterton Chamber of Commerce mywaterton.ca

Tourism Radium/Radium Chamber of Commerce: 1-888-347-9331 RadiumHotSprings.com

15


Edmonton

! . 16

( !

Hinton

a

to Fort St. James National Historic Site

16

( Jasper !

to Vancouver

a

Jasper National Park

!5

11 "

ì

Ü

( !

0 10 20 0

10

Rocky Mountain House National Historic Site

! .

Columbia Icefield

40 kilometres 20 miles

! 93N

Yoho National Park !(Field

Banff National Park ( !

Alberta 2 £

Banff ! ( Canmore ( !

95 ! Kootenay

Glacier National ( ! Revelstoke Park

22 !

Lake Louise

( ! Golden

Mount Revelstoke National Park

! .

Calgary

National 93S ! Park

to Vancouver

a

distance

chart Calgary

©Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada Catalogue No: R64-438/2016E ISBN: 978-0-660-03986-2

Red Deer

ff an

B

128

British Columbia

ry

a alg

C

bia lumield o C ef Ic

Columbia Icefield

188 316

Edmonton

423 295 461

Field (Yoho NP)

85 213 157 508

Jasper

Radium ( ! Hot Springs

ì

( ! Invermere

2 £

! 95 ! 93

n

nto

o dm

Bar U Ranch National Historic Site

E

22 !

) ld NP Fie oho (Y er sp 291 419 103 361 260 Ja

e

uis

o eL

k

La

gs ium prin d a Radium R ot S Hot Springs 132 260 261 555 157 361 130 H n lde Golden 134 262 207 557 57 307 85 105 Go Lake Louise 58 186 130 481 27 233

3 "

e

ok

t els

v

Re

Revelstoke

282 410 355 705 197 455 224 253 148

Vancouver

856 984 928 1279 771 798 794 818 713 565

Waterton

395 266 582 568 476 687 453 395 532 681 1140

er

uv

o nc

Va

Distances are shown in kilometres. To convert distances to miles, multiply by 0.62.

6 "

Waterton Lakes National Park

FOR EMERGENCIES DIAL 911 (Police, Fire and Ambulance) Road reports: Visit 511.alberta.ca or Drivebc.ca Cell phone coverage is not reliable in all areas of the mountain parks.

!5

Kootenay National Park  

Everything you need to know about Kootenay National Park. Located in the Kootenay Rockies region of British Columbia, Canada.

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