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— US Holocaust Memorial Museum Behind Barbed Wire http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?MediaId=3627 Ludwig Meidner, Behind Barbed Wire, not dated. Charcoal, 69.7 x 55.8 cm. — Juedisches Museum der Stadt Frankfurt Corpses http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?MediaId=3629 Ludwig Meidner, Corpses, not dated. Charcoal and watercolor, 55.5 x 75.8 cm.

— Juedisches Museum der Stadt Frankfurt Massacres in Poland http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/media_ph.php?MediaId=3630 Ludwig Meidner, from the cycle of drawings he called "Massacres in Poland". 1940s.

— Juedisches Museum der Stadt Frankfurt Place cards for Ludwig Meidner http://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10005922 Artist and poet Ludwig Meidner (1884-1966) was the foremost and most radical exponent of a second wave of Expressionism, a movement which championed the cause of the exploited and suppressed. Military service during World War I also made Meidner an avowed pacifist. He advanced socialist goals in his 1919 An alle Künstler, Dichter, Musiker (To all Artists, Poets, and Musicians). This work challenged the existing social order and urged artists to become socialists and protect the "greater good." In 1933, Meidner was placed on the list of banned writers and artists. Monographs about Meidner were burned during the Nazi book burnings of 1933. Also in danger because of his Jewishness, Meidner left Germany in 1939, and did not return until 1953.

Art history  

Art History Creative Writing Story and Art History Video Link with Script

Art history  

Art History Creative Writing Story and Art History Video Link with Script

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