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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

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JUNE 1, 2019

JULY ISSUE:

CARLA

NAPPER Subscribe on our website to get access to our next issue. Do you want to get "First Access"? Be sure to also subscribe to our mailing list. Each subscriber on our mailing list will receive our new issue in your email first before it is public to the community.

MEET THE KOINDA KINFOLK Income Imari

Asset Antoine Conscious Callie

Definition Dede

Pops

Wealthy Willette

LAFE TAYLOR ILLUSTRATOR

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From the FORERUNNER Hi Koindans!

TAKIYAH NOBLE

FORERUNNER / CONTENT STRATEGIST

TIA ROSS

EDITOR IN CHIEF

JAY EDMOND

MARKETING DIRECTOR

KEVIN VAIN

CREATIVE DIRECTOR

RACHEL KNOX

Thank you for inspiring the launch of the Koindanomics Magazine. Our goal is to become the world's largest SuSu-driven subscription magazine. We teach members of the African diaspora and African Descendants of Slaves how to become GLOBAL financial citizens. We understand that our community not only needs education about how financial systems work, but we need a sustainable way to access capital to participate in these systems. That is why we are making efforts to address both the educational and financial needs in our community and your patience, loyalty, love, consistency, and support is what will make that happen.  I believe you are in the midst of a powerful movement. You are witnessing the creation of a very special project. Here at Koindanomics Magazine, we believe we are stronger together than we are apart. 

We are excited to build a multimedia rich educational platform that reflects our ancestral roots of collectivism. We learn collectively, teach collectively, and share our resources collectively. Here, using the power of our collective knowledge and resources, we will teach you how to overcome the financial systems that were historically used to oppress you. Please get yourself acquainted with your Koinda kinfolk. We are a community of people who love you and want to see you succeed in all aspects of your life. As you explore the digital magazine and the website, please get to know your illustrated educators, your educational teachers, and your community. Consider them family. This is truly an extraordinary group and your life will be greatly enriched. Blessings! 

DESIGNER / CONTENT CURATOR Final Logo

LAFE TAYLOR

ILLUSTRATOR

CARLA NAPPER ANALYTICS SPECIALIST

MAGAZINE

On The Cover Meet Robert White III A.K.A. “BIG ROB”

Koindanomics Magazine Mailing Address: 1321 Upland Drive Suite 2452 Houston, TX 77043-4718 info@koindamagazine.com Ph: 1-866-2KOINDA

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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DEBT ELIMINATION

// Table of Contents

MEET OUR SPONSORS

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KEEPING WEALTH Asset Protection, Trusts, etc.

UN EMPLOYMENT RATE KNOW THE TRUTH

INCOME 18 4

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Learn the different types of income and the types of taxation associated with each. Issue #1

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

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ON THE COVER

Featured Story: Meet Robert White III

THE LOGICAL

HARD WORK

error OF SUCCESS

IS NOT ALL IT TAKES 31 Join the movement

KEEPING WEALTH

KEEPING IT REAL

Real Talk, Real Facts, Real People

Asset Protection, Trusts, etc.

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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DIAMOND SPONSOR

JUNE 1, 2019

KEVIN VAIN “We are stronger together.” Kevin Vain, an ol’ country boy from Waco, TX, somehow made his way through Dallas, TX to Las Vegas, NV and now resides back in Dallas. He is a very talented artist and designer who continue to push himself to create something that will be memorable. He developed an entrepreneurial spirit during his time in Las Vegas when he was working with other entrepreneurs, musicians; and creative. Kevin received his bachelors degree in graphic design at the Art Institute of Dallas in 2012. He started to master the technical side of design and wanted to move into the theory of how design works and how to create multi-platform designs that convey his clients

messages. He then graduated with his masters degree in media design at Full Sail University in 2015. Ultimately, he strives to create projects that influence and educate the Black community in a positive way. Kevin started his business CoLAB Creative Group, LLC in 2016 and is currently taking on minority-based businesses to help them maneuver around the barriers of starting a business in America. He continues to educate himself on new trends and concepts to improve his path as well as others behind him. He is an educator and enjoys teaching other creative and business owners how to make an impact in their community.

info@colabcreativegroup.com www.colabcreativegroup.com (682) 302-4332

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

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Together We Stand We would like to give a special thank you to our sponsors. Without them this amazing magazine would not be possible. With your contribution and labor we will do our best to give our black community the content to set them free.

#LetsStandTogether

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

ERNEST GAINS

PLATINUM SPONSOR

VISIT WEBSITE for full bio

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SHANETTE WILLIAMS

JUNE 1, 2019

Business Website: kheirloom.com Business Email Contact: admin@kheirloom.com

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Shanette Williams is the CEO and founder of Kheirloom Investments, a real estate investment firm. The firm specializes in traditional real estate acquisitions as well as wholesale real estate for both commercial and residential assets. Kheirloom Investments has a solid portfolio which includes 15 single home residential properties, an eight-unit apartment complex, two four-unit apartment buildings, and a new procurement of beachfront property specifically for future residential development. The company also works to provide affordable housing for individuals and offers real estate solutions for distressed property owners. Shanette Williams holds a bachelor of science degree in nursing and has had a successful career in the medical field for well over 15 years. She is also a U.S. Army veteran and a Certified Blockchain Expert. Married with two sons, she’s a proud grandmother of two. Her motivation to build Kheirloom Investments began with the desire to create generational wealth for her family. As she learned more about real estate, she realized that her pursuit could also be used to address one of the key concerns

within the community of African descendants of slaves–housing. Shanette truly believes in and supports the Koinda mission and core values. Her chief aim is to add value to the group by sharing valuable information and assisting other members. For her the Koinda community is like an extended family that not only shows love but actively supports one another. When the Koinda community established its own cryptocurrency, it was a match made in the heavens. The cryptocurrency has denominations of Garvey and CJ’s, named in honor of Marcus Garvey and Madame C.J. Walker. It is a popular medium of exchange for products and services within the Koinda Market where members advertise, buy, and sell products and services from businesses belonging to its members. Shanette’s support for the Koindanomics magazine extends beyond just the financial. She is excited to be offering educational courses on her channel. The goal of her channel will be to educate and empower the “everyday” person to move from being a consumer to becoming an investor in real estate.

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

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JAY EDMOND Montreal native Jay Edmond has been a digital marketer and entrepreneur for over ten years. After studying human resources and financial product management, he changed career paths to music production.  It was during this experience that he saw just how powerful attention-grabbing, high-quality graphics could be. 

In 2017, he founded Jay Edmond Marketing, a video production agency that specializes in creating high-quality short ads for small businesses looking to gain visibility and engagement on social media. His passion is equipping new entrepreneurs on how to succeed with their small businesses. Jay is bilingual, fluent in both English and French.

PLATINUM SPONSOR

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M O V I N G FORWARD

JUNE 1, 2019

Deb t Elimin a tion “Choose your profession and your debt wisely,” a fellow Koindanomics member once said. We are going to show you how to use free tools to help you calculate and eliminate personal debt.

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// Keeping Wealth

“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

If you find yourself ready to take control of your finances, the first step will always be to address your debt. Not to invest. This might seem counterintuitive at first, but let’s think of it this way. The problem with debt is that the money you pay in interest, penalties, and fees on top of the initial amount owed accumulates at a rate faster than you can make money with your labor. Think about the cost of the last fee you paid. Did you even make that amount of money in a single day on your job after taxes were taken out? In order to take control of your finances, you will need to achieve three objectives:

1. Eliminating your debt by any means necessary 2. Increasing your investments 3. Building an emergency fund

Luckily, there are incredibly affordable tools available to empower you to achieve these objectives. To eliminate your debt, it is imperative that you track your expenses and spending habits with a third-party software application. You should never trust your memory or your monthly bank statements. When you have an application tracking every little purchase you make, you will be absolutely mortified by your spending habits. However, it will empower you because you’ll become more conscious about what you’re spending. The software that we recommend is a conscious spending plan called YNAB. It’s an acronym for You Need a Budget. Forget cash in envelopes. This software was actually designed to mimic a person’s natural spending habits. That’s why it has been such a success among so many users. Unlike other budgeting software, it DOESN’T want you to budget your money based on what you expect to earn in a month. Instead, it makes you budget your money AS YOU RECEIVE IT. Typically, the average person spends money as they receive it and treats themselves with rewards as

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soon as they see money hit their account. This pattern of behavior is also what makes most people broke. They start unconsciously spending money on phantom expenses like coffee and other quiet “nickel-and-dime” expenses. Rather than telling you to be responsible and deny yourself your rewards, it encourages you to give every dollar a responsibility or a job. It is very important that you recognize this way of thinking about the software; otherwise, it will be very confusing for you to operate. Instead of working against your behavior, it works with it to make you aware of your behavior and gives you the flexibility to adjust throughout the month, but still stay on track with your financial goals.

Ready to start eliminated debt? Sign up for YNAB by using the link below and receive your first month for free: http://bit.ly/km-ynabl After setting up your account, watch this quick tutorial to get familiar with how the system works. http://bit.ly/km-ynab-tut

YNAB

is a tool that lets you see where you are overspending on a granular level. Knowing where you are overspending in finite detail is great, but sometimes you can’t see the forest because you’re focusing on the trees. The next publication will show you how to set up a personal financial statement using Google Sheets. This is going to give you an overview of your budget as a whole so you can see where you are overspending and depleting your long- term wealth. When you use a combination of a personal budgeting tool in conjunction with a personal financial statement, you will be equipped to implement a plan of action to redirect your money into the right vehicles that will grow your wealth.

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JUNE 1, 2019

LAFE TAYLOR

PLATINUM SPONSOR

Lafe Taylor is a tech entrepreneur, business mentor, podcaster, story teller, cooperative director, graphic designer, social commentator, and, last but not least, an artist. A Lexington entrepreneur and co-founder of a tech startup that raised over $2.5 million in VC venture capital funding, Lafe has been passionate about art off and on all of his life. Within the last few years, Lafe started putting more time and energy into the development of his artistic

skills as they had taken a back seat to work and venture. Lafe’s artistic influences range from cartoons, motion graphics, fine art, and character development. His love for cartoons derives from the elegance of how simple lines can convey emotions and tell meaningful stories. Lafe’s art can be viewed via his Instagram page @lafetaylor. His work is also available at https://lafespace.com.

www.lafespace.com info@lafespace.com

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

Conscious Callie Hey Koindans! My name is Conscious Callie and I teach you how to analyze racism from an economic and legal perspective. Although it's hard not to get wrapped up in the emotion of racism, it's important to remember WHY it was created in the first place. Racism, race superiority, and anti-black ideology were all created to justify an economic system where resources were stolen and stripped from a collective group of people so they could be maldistributed to a small group of individuals. One of the most powerful ways to combat racism is to understand it as an economic system. At Koindanomics Magazine, we work with Frame-

works, Formulas, and Functions (systems). These tools help you navigate through complicated concepts and situations. We explain racism through the combined works of many sociologists, one of them being Joe R. Feagin. Since racism is designed to be complicated and subtle, let's start by identifying the three forms of racism.

3 Forms of Racism: 1. Structural racism, 2. Institutional racism, and 3. Individual racism.

7 Symptoms of Systemic Racism: 1. A wealth gap (limiting wealth potential) 2. Discrimination in employment (resulting in unemployment or underemployment and limiting income potential) 3. Discrimination in housing 4. Higher government surveillance 5. Higher rates of incarceration and arrests 6. Higher rates of infant mortality, and 7. Shorter life spans

Think of it as a funnel. • Structural racism is how the entire system of racism is developed, maintained, and protected. • Institutional racism is how racism is practiced in social institutions and political institutions to allow structural racism to continue. • Individual racism is what personal ideas, assumptions, and world views are developed, maintained, and protected to allow institutional racism to continue. All three forms of racism use the following nine mechanisms of racism. 9 Mechanisms of Racism: 1.    Impoverishment of people of color to enrich Whites 2.    Vested group interests among Whites 3.    Alienating race relations between Whites and people of color 4.    Costs and burdens of racism are borne by people of color (mental and physical health) 5.    White elitism through educational institutions

​​​​​​​

6.    White elitism through politics & law 7.    White elitism through mass media 8.    Racist ideology, and 9.    Resistance to racism (White fragility)

The nine mechanisms of racism are designed to cause seven symptoms for people of color.

The Conscious Callie Way: Now that you have learned the three forms of racism, the nine mechanisms of racism, and the seven symptoms of racism, I want you to do an exercise. Ask "Who profits from..." and then finish the rest of the question with a mechanism or symptom of racism. For example, "Who profits from discrimination in housing?" "Who profits from higher rates of incarceration and arrests?" Now you're starting to think the Conscious Callie way. Once you know how to identify the profiteers from racism, you can be better equipped to beat them at their game.

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CALLIE Join the movement

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// Section Title Hey Fam,

My name is Income Imari and I teach you about money, income, and business. I work really closely with Wealthy Willette and Asset Antoine to make sure the money I make works extra hard for me. Before we get started with our lessons over the next few issues of the magazine, it's important to know what money is. Money is any agreed-upon object to be used as a medium of exchange between a COMMUNITY OF PEOPLE to transact goods and services. In other words: ANY AGREED-UPON OBJECT BY A COMMUNITY OF PEOPLE to give to each other in exchange for goods or services. Shells, cocoa beans, mobile minutes, or time can all be forms of money; it’s up to the community. What makes money work is when a large community of people agree to use it for payment. Money can also be disenfranchised when the community agrees to stop using it as a form of payment. There are Many modern-day societies exist that do not use money that was issued to them by their government to transact goods and services. There are six different types of money. 6 Types of Money: 1. Time 2. Currency - ANY FORM OF MONEY that is in use and circulating among a community of people (ex: gold and silver) 3. Fiat Currency - ​​​​​​​fiat: an arbitrary order or formal authorization or decree; currency: the fact  or quality of being generally accepted or in use. Fiat + Currency = an arbitrary order or decree to make some thing generally accepted and to put it in use. An object that a government of a specific country issues to its population and tells them to use it and accept it to trade goods and services. 4. Legal Tender - government accepts it as adequate payment for TAXES and/or DEBT 5. Complimentary Currencies - any form of money people issue to themselves to exchange goods and services and to address poor distribution of government issued currencies and resources (ex: cowry shells, MPesa, WIR) 6. Digital Currencies - any electronic form of money people issue to themselves to exchange goods and services and address poor distribution of government issued currencies and resources (Bitcoin, Garveys) Typically, you store fiat currency, legal tender, or digital currencies in two types of accounts. 2 Types of Accounts for Your Money: 1. Demand Deposit Accounts - these accounts allow you to deposit your money and 16 Koindanomics Issue #1 of your money without withdraw any or all MAGAZINE

prior notice. Be careful, withdrawing certain amounts of money will trigger the bank teller to report your transaction to your tax authority or even criminal investigative agencies if they suspect you are doing something illegal. These accounts typically pay very low interest rates and charge you money for handling the account. 2. Term Deposit Accounts - these accounts are also referred to as time deposits. You deposit your money into this type of account for a predetermined amount of time. You cannot withdraw funds from this account before the chosen time period or you will get a fee or fine as a financial penalty. You will typically earn interest on these accounts. This is known as Interest Income. Then there are two types of wallets to transact from your accounts, 2 Types of Wallets for Your Accounts: 1. Physical wallets - this is a billfold that you keep on you or in a safe place to store your money. It is best to use a physical wallet and cash if you want to maintain some level of privacy. 2. Digital wallets - this is an electronic device or an online service that safely and secures a user's payment information so he or she does not have to give it to the seller. The electronic device or service will then send payment to the seller for goods and services and will simultaneously withdraw the money from the account holder's account for reimbursement. If you paid attention to Conscious Callie's lesson, then you learned that one of the mechanisms of structural and institutional racism is to impoverish people of color to enrich whites. One of the symptoms of this mechanism is high rates of unemployment or underemployment in our community. The type of money we earn by working for someone else is called earned income. It's typically the first way we learn about income as we're growing up. When our ability to earn income is limited, then it limits our ability to accumulate assets. If you pay attention to Asset Antoine's lessons, assets are supposed to be accumulated so you can turn them back into cash during time periods called Asset Time Horizons. When we can't earn income to buy assets, that means we can't create assets to create short-term wealth, mid-term wealth, long-term wealth, or legacy wealth.  This is why it is important for you to learn the other types of income you can generate outside of earned income. There are seven types of income you can earn and they each have different rates at which they are taxed.

JUNE 1, 2019 7 Types of Income: 1. Earned Income - this is the type of income you earn by working for someone else. 2. Profit Income - this is the type of income you earn by selling a product or service to someone else. Typically the service is you leveraging someone else's labor so you don't have to actually work. In that case, if you were doing the service, it would be earned income. 3. Interest Income - this is the type of income you earn when you lend money and the debtor pays you interest. 4. Dividend Income - this is the type of income you earn when a company you have invested in pays its owners a percentage of their profits 5. Rental Income - this is the type of income you earn when a person pays you rent to use one of your buildings and/or land. There is another type of way to earn rental income through REITs (real estate investment trusts) and NNN (net-net-net) leases 6. Capital Gains - this is the type of income you earn when you own an asset, it increases in value, and you sell it for a higher value than what you bought it. The increase in value is called appreciation. When you cash in on that appreciation, it is called capital gains. 7. Royalty Income - this is the type of income you earn when someone pays you to use your creative works and inventions. The purpose of generating income is to accumulate assets that you can cash in during certain Asset Time Horizons, but you have to protect it from the many ways that it can be taken away from you. That's where Wealthy Willette is there to help.

If you can: • increase your income, • decrease your personal debt, • diversify the types of income you have, • accumulate assets while avoiding the wealth inhibitors that Wealthy Willette discusses in her lessons, you will have a solid foundation to achieve financial security and eradicate economic oppression. Starting a Business to Supplement Income Since structural unemployment in our community is so rampant, many of us have started side hustles to make ends meet. Side hustles and businesses are both vehicles for the type of income called profit income. In future issues of the magazine, we are going to discuss all twenty parts that every business has in common, no matter how big or small it is, and koindamagazine.com tools you can use to expand your reach to consum-


ers all over the world–not just your home country. Here are the twenty parts of any business.

20 Parts of a Business:

1. Business Idea

2. Product Portfolio 3. Revenue Model 4. Customer Portfolio 5. Market Position 6. Ownership and Board 7. Employees 8. Partnerships 9. Business Processes 10. Legal Issues 11. Facilities 12. IT Systems 13. Production and Deliveries 14. Funding 15. Financials 16. Branding 17. Communication and PR 18. Sales and Service 19. Marketing 20. Networking

Income

IMARI Join the movement


// Income

JUNE 1, 2019

UN

EMPLOYMENT RATE KNOW THE TRUTH

In 2018, media headlines heavily focused on the reduction in the Black unemployment rate, often citing how it reached historic lows. In fact, President Trump took to Twitter in January and tweeted, “Somebody please inform Jay-Z that because of my policies, Black Unemployment has just been reported to be at the LOWEST RATE EVER RECORDED!” Don’t be deceived. Black unemployment rate is not at an all-time low. Besides the unemployment rate is the most unreliable statistic…” “EVER RECORDED.”

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The Department of Labor calculates the unemployment rate based on the number of people who are currently looking for work within a four-week period and compares it to the previous four-week period. Those who have been looking for work beyond the four-week period are no longer included in the calculation. We all know that many people are looking for work far beyond a four-week period. Click here to see how this formula is justified. A better gauge of labor market health is called the Non-Employment Index (NEI). This index does not exclude those who have been looking for employment longer than the a four-week period. According to the NEI, the more accurate unemployment rate is 7.8, a which was 0.1% decline since January 2018.

All that aside, let’s just pretend like the unemployment rate was a reliable statistic. Using the available data, the unemployment rate among Blacks is twice as high as the unemployment rate of Whites. Wonder why Jay-Z wasn’t informed about that little detail? Black unemployment rate being double the

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// Income

“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

rate of Whites is nothing new. It has been that way for the last forty years. See an interactive map of the data at https:// www.macrotrends.net/2508/unemployment-rate-by-race Don’t you think that Blacks, being the minority group, should have a lower unemployment rate than the “majority” group? Why has this disparity not been corrected by the so-called pro-equality community(folks??). Because the majority have a vested interest in keeping the system in a state that continues to benefit them. They will never unravel the system because unraveling the system would work against their benefits as individuals.

For example, White people as a majority have historically opposed or eliminated diversity-increasing programs within jobs. The result is that it leaves minorities susceptible to higher rates of unemployment or being underemploymented. Rather than fight to amend the existing financial systems, it is wise for marginalized people to spend their energy and resources to create an alternative system in which they have a vested interest. That said, researchers have determined something that every Black person should know. In 2018, institutions, economists, and policy-makers were investigating how to close the racial income and racial wealth gap. While Trump was boasting about decreasing the Black unemployment rate, scholars from Duke University were busy busting

myths about what it takes to close the racial wealth gap. In this powerful report, the scholars explained why: achieving higher education, owning a home, buying from other black business owners, saving more money, improving financial literacy, entrepreneurship, and emulating the success of other successful minorities will NOT improve the racial wealth gap. In the next publication, we’ll discuss underrepresentation and highlight the most lucrative jobs, both present-day and historically, and why there is underrepresentation by minorities amongst these jobs.

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JUNE 1, 2019

ASSET ANTOINE WHAT'S UP, SKINFOLK! My name is Asset Antoine and I am here to teach you about assets. Back in the day, I was a hustler. Not just any hustler, but the BEST hustler. No one could out-work me. But as I got older, I discovered I didn't want to work as hard or as many long hours. I needed to find a legal way to make money work for me. That's when I learned about assets. Assets make my money work for me instead of me working for my money. They're like little workers that earn money for me while I am sleeping or vacationing and I get to live life like a boss. To understand what an asset is, you first have to understand a term called Economic Value. Economic Value is the MAXIMUM amount a consumer is willing to pay in a free market economy. The Economic Value often exceeds the market value.  Think about any item you purchased. If you were to sell it, the maximum amount of money someone is willing to pay for it is called the economic value. Remember, since it's a free market economy, anyone else can sell any item to your potential buyer and undercut your price. That's why economic value is the maximum amount a CONSUMER is willing to pay for the item, not what YOU paid for it. YOU were a consumer who provided Economic Value to the seller who sold you the item.  A lot of people mistakenly think that an asset always appreciates in value. That's not always true. Assets can still depreciate in value, but still be an asset. That's because the definition of an asset is any tangible or intangible property that can be owned or controlled to produce positive economic value.  For example, an ice cream machine is a depreciating asset. Although the ice cream machine will not be valued at the same price a year from now, it still produces a product that the consumer is willing to pay the maximum amount for in a free market economy. Did you notice the important keywords in the definition of an asset?  Intangible  Tangible  Property  Owned 

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Once again, an asset is any tangible or intangible property that can be owned or controlled to produce positive economic value. Assets are divided into what is called Asset Classes. An asset class is a group of securities that: 1. have similar characteristics, 2. behave similarly in the marketplace, and 3. is subject to the same laws and regulations There are four Different Asset Classes. 4 Asset Classes: 1. Cash and Cash Equivalents - these are accounts that can easily be converted to cash 2. Equities (stocks) - this is when you own a piece of a company 3. Fixed Income (bonds) - this is when you loan money to a government or a company to receive interest income on your money 4. Real Estate and Commodities - this is when you own residential and/or commercial buildings, developed or raw land, and precious metals like gold and silver Let's take a look at different types of assets within these four asset classes: • Real estate and Raw Land • Cash and Cash Equivalents: This includes treasury bills, bank certificates of deposit, banker's acceptance (international trade), commercial paper (this is when a corporation needs to finance its accounts receivables) • Cash Value Life Insurance • Controlling Interest in Profitable Businesses • Stocks: S&P, SSE Comp, Nikkei 225 - stocks include ownership in companies that are sold on marketplaces called stock exchanges. The companies are identified by symbols called tickers. These ticker symbols allow you to see what is happening to specific companies on these exchanges. • Bonds/Interest Rates: This includes the eurodollar, 10-Year, T-Note, Bund (Germany), GILT-edged securities, etc. • Currencies/FX/Forex: This includes the USD, EUR, JPY, GBP, AUD, CHF, CNY, etc. • Cryptocurrencies: This includes Bitcoin, Ethereum, etc. • Metals: This includes gold, silver, copper, platinum • Futures • Commodities (Energies: oil, natural gas, electricity/ Softs: coffee, sugar, cotton/ Meats: lean hogs, feeder cattle​​​​​​​/ Agriculturals: wheat, corn, soybeans) • ETFs (Exchange Traded Funds) • LEAP Options • Mutual Funds

In future issues of the Koindanomics Magazine, I am going to teach you a powerful framework on how to identify and accumulate assets to achieve certain financial goals you have in your life. You do this by determining what the purpose of the asset is and then placing that asset in what are called Asset Time Horizons. Asset Time Horizons are time frames that you choose to turn part of or all of your asset into cash for you to live a comfortable lifestyle. The four asset time horizons are: 4 Asset Time Horizons: 1. Short-term: these are assets you intend to liquidate in one year 2. Mid-term: these are assets you intend to partially or fully liquidate in 2 - 29 years 3. Long-term: these are assets you intend to partially or fully liquidate in 30 - 65 years 4. Legacy: these are assets that you never intend to liquidate, but pass on to future generations


// On The Cover

“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

MEET

Robert White III

A.K.A. "BIG ROB"

SILVER SPONSOR Robert "Big Rob" White III loves his community so much that he made a donation to educate our members through this publication.

Robert White III is a involved in the following organizations: • Koindanomics, • One Love Coop LLC, • Uplifiting Us Cooperative, • Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League He is also a Block Developer Representative for Buy the Block, an organization that specializes in creating real estate investment opportunities in exploited and forgotten neighborhoods within the United States. Takiyah: Big Rob, tell me a little bit about yourself. Where were you born? What was your childhood like? And please share any details that you

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feel are relevant to understanding you as the man you are today. Big Rob: I was born February 18, 1980, in St. Louis, Missouri. I spent 354 days on the Missouri side of the river in St. Louis, just nine days prior to my first birthday. My maternal grandmother passed away and she owned a house in Brooklyn, Illinois (Brooklyn, Illinois, is located two miles north of East St. Louis, Illinois and three miles northeast of downtown St. Louis, Missouri). It was paid off, but none of my mother’s siblings wanted the house. Since my parents were a young couple living in an apartment, my parents decided to move to the Illinois side of the river into the house.

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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// On The Cover I grew up in my grandmother’s house until the summer before my senior year in high school. My parents were looking to find a better place to live for six to seven years. They wanted to move into a house where there was a better school district, but it was a challenge due to limited resources and poor credit scores. Finally, the summer before my senior year, we moved back to the Missouri side of the river (St. Louis area) and they were able to get a house. I credit growing up in Brooklyn for instilling in me a strong propensity for overcoming adversity, a sense of community values, and a high regard for racial and cultural pride. Takiyah: Who were the most influential people in your life? How did they influence you? Big Rob: My working-class parents. They instilled the value of education in me at a young age. My father’s parents were sharecroppers from the Yazoo, Mississippi, area. My father and his siblings were the first generation to grow up and live in the “North” (St. Louis, Missouri). My mother’s parents owned a local popular confectionery in the Village of Brooklyn, Illinois. My parents told me that I essentially had three options after high school. I could go to work, go to the military, or go to college. College is the option they promoted the most. My mother is a retired educator. She worked with preschoolers, so she was very influential in my committing my life to serving and working in education for the youth. My father was a factory worker. He worked for a company called Hussmann Refrigeration. They make the industrial size freezers that we see in supermarkets. My father was a factory worker for 40 years. He was a sheet-metal worker. My father, as a factory worker, had to deal with some grueling work conditions. For example, if it was 90 degrees outside, he was working inside where it was 95 to 105 degrees because the machines were running, but there was no air conditioning in parts of the factory. He faced grueling, back-breaking labor and a lot of health issues as a result of the factory work. My father made it plain. “Go to college and get a job where they pay you to think because this manual labor isn’t worth it.” In addition to my parents, there were so many people in my church and my community who were influential in my life. I can honestly say that I had a decent village and support system. People saw something in me, early on, and they

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JUNE 1, 2019 constantly worked to affirm me. They constantly worked to create environments and circumstances that were nurturing to me. I grew up in a small community of 1200 people. We didn’t have a public library. We didn’t have a community center. We only had 50 high school students and about 250 students total (K12). We didn’t have a lot of social clubs. We didn’t have a yearbook. We didn’t have a lot of options to keep us out of trouble. My family moved to St. Louis the summer between my junior and senior years of high school. I went from a class of about 12 to 400+ students. It was a whole different ball game and world, and I had to adjust quickly. My transition into my senior year of high school was way more challenging than my freshman year of college. I grew up in the ‘hood during the height of the crack epidemic , which was bad in the entire St. Louis metro area. It impacted me in a lot of ways. I had uncles, cousins, and others close to me addicted to the drug. It showed me what the hard reality of being a black person in America with a lack of opportunity and resources was like. Because of that environment, my parents sheltered me a lot. My friends were exposed to sex, violence, and drug-dealing as early as 10 years old, and my peers would make fun of me because I wasn’t involved in street activities. I was a square, or a nerd, because I had a lot of people telling me that the street life wasn’t for me. I often joke and tell people that being a fat and shy nerd in the ‘hood wasn’t a good life. I was a “Blerd” even before there was a term to describe a part of my reality. To have active parents that deliberately sheltered me from that impacted my growth and development. It was good because I wasn’t exposed to a lot of things I shouldn’t have been, but it was bad because I was naive and lacked some common-sense street smarts that I needed while living in the ‘hood.

Another person who influenced me was a Title 1 reading teacher, elder, and educator, Miss Clotee Summers. She impacted my life in a way that she may or may not have realized. Although I didn’t need her services, I liked that she used to bring books into class that today’s generation would call “Black Excellence.” She introduced us to books like Great Black Inventors, Great Black Politicians, Great Black Athletes, and Great Black Kings and Queens. These books allowed me to see myself outside of the context of slavery. They showed me that Blacks had a long, illustrious history that didn’t start with slavery. Fourth grade was when I really became interested in developing a sense of Black pride. Those books heightened my interest in reading and my interest in my culture. So, Black pride was instilled in me from a young age. Marcus Garvey is another influential person to me. I had to do a research paper on him in high school and I learned about his life. I fell in love with his life, his work, and I have been fascinated with it ever since. In fact, I joined the organization that he created called the Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League (UNIA-ACL). As you may or may not know, Brooklyn, Illinois, is America’s first incorporated town, thanks to “Mother” Priscilla Baltimore. Brooklyn, Illinois, wasn’t full-out afrocentric, but most of my teachers had gone to HBCUs. At this point in my life, I acknowledge “Mother” Priscilla Baltimore as a guiding force for my life work. Community oral tradition credits Priscilla Baltimore with leading eleven families, both free and enslaved, across the Mississippi River from Missouri (a slave state) to Illinois (a free state) to start a maroon community that would eventually be incorporated as Brooklyn, Illinois. According to oral tradition, Baltimore and the eleven founding families were residing in Brooklyn as early as 1829, although historical documentation to validate this hasn’t yet been discovered . An interesting fact about Brooklyn is that Annie Malone, the “real” first Black millionaire and mentor/employer of Madame C.J. Walker [Curious Cleophus: (rumor has it that Walker would go on to steal Malone’s products and sell them as her own under a different product name)], developed some of her earliest products and brought her business to life while living in Brooklyn, Illinois. Seeking a new opportunity to grow provided by the 1904 World’s Fair, Malone moved to St. Louis and set up shop. The unfortunate thing about growing up Brooklyn Proud was realizing that I’m from a

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III place with so much history and a great early legacy is that many people have never heard about Brooklyn and know of its significance (both on a national and local level). Those who do know about Brooklyn tend to associate it only with the vice industry, crime, famously known strip clubs, and decline. I set out to change all of that. Takiyah: Robert, you know that I follow you on Facebook. I see that you are very vocal about capitalism NOT being a solution to solve the economic condition of Blacks in America. Why do you feel that Black capitalism is not the solution? Big Rob: If you look at the development of capitalism, you will see that it is tied very closely with colonialism. This is a blanket statement, but we come from a people who was invested in the well-being of the collective. They were vested in the building up of each other and humanity at large. They also understood that this earth is NOT OURS. It contradicted the western concepts of ownership, but through capitalism and colonialism, you get this sense of ownership. Capitalism and colonialism breeds this sense of “I have the right to claim a stake into another culture, land, civilization, and even resources.” So, colonialism and capitalism, not using the two interchangeably, but recognizing there is a strong relationship between the two breeds a strong environment of independence rather than interdependence. It creates the environment for exploitation. The exploitation manifests itself from everything to controlling the labor force and manipulating work conditions in favor of those in control of the workforce. It breeds an environment for more competition rather than collaboration. It breeds an environment of violence. There are so many other adverse factors and circumstances that don’t add value to people or humanity at large. Capitalism constantly serves as a parasite that sucks blood and energy out of people. Think about the fact that we give the best eight hours of our day to someone else other than our family. We’re not using that eight hours to do something like work on our families or our spiritual development. Even if we don’t work eight hours, we’re EXPECTED to give those eight valuable hours to building up someone else’s dream in a structure that really doesn’t favor the working class. The structure puts us in a situation where we have health issues like my father. Capitalism impacts relationships and marriages. It creates

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situations where fathers can’t go to their daughters’ recitals or sons’ basketball games because they’re either working or they are too tired from working. It has many adverse consequences. We have to explore existing alternatives or create a new reality. Takiyah: If Black capitalism is not a viable solution to the oppressive conditions of Blacks in America, in your opinion, what is and why? Robert: Before I attempt to offer my humble opinion on this matter, I must first offer a few disclaimers. • The first disclaimer is that my understanding of historical patterns and practices followed by implications and political education and context is limited to an extent and still evolving. I don’t profess to be an expert and I am not beyond critique and challenge. • The second disclaimer is that I don’t often operate under the premise that there is “the answer.” It more so must come from a space that I may offer “an answer” among many answers. We deal with complex and multifaceted issues and it can be dangerous to get trapped into one way of doing, being, or thinking. • The third disclaimer is that although my aim is to be as disciplined, concise, and scientific in my critique of a position without attacking a person or people, I sometimes fall short of that bar. I get caught up in a display of unprincipled overly emotional rant due to my authentically Hue-Man nature and selfish tendencies. • The fourth and final disclaimer is that I take the approach of offering more suggestions than solutions. Many times we think that we’ve assessed a problem, but what we’re seeing is the manifested symptoms. There is an underlying foundation to those symptoms. We tend to look at things from a macro lens and miss what can be gained from the micro level. We may not arrive at the final solution in our time, but offering up many solutions will at least move us Final Logo closer in my opinion.

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POPS: Hu (pronounced hue) is a spiritual term described to be the Sound of all sounds. It has been called the language of life and all of humanity. Many spiritual practitioners will sing “hu” as a way to deepen their spiritual connection to their Creator and as a way to practice self-healing from emotional ailments. Hu typically refers to awakening yourself spiritually to acknowledge, embrace, and respect individual energy, collective energy, and energetic forces nested within energy. Most practitioners of hu will write it as “hue” to make the reader aware the writer is placing special emphasis of the spiritual consciousness that exists within mankind, rather than mankind itself. Now that I have made my disclaimers, I’ll attempt to offer several suggestions related to this specific question. As I stated earlier, like many other societal issues this is layered and not always straightforward. What we do understand about capitalism is that it’s parasitic by nature, self-serving, very individualistic, not socially or economically responsible, exclusive, not equitable for all, and it produces the grounds for several other adverse circumstances and conditions. If you pay attention to world events, you can see that capitalism is at a place of crisis and weakening. It’s been stated over time that doing or engaging in something time after time and expecting different results is insanity. Is not upholding a system that powers those who oppress us insanity? Historical patterns and practices over time has shown us that capitalism and colonialism gave birth to the conditions that lead to the murder, rape, enslavement, and exploitation of Afrikan and other darker hues of people around the world. The Black capitalists would prefer to take an approach of reform and uphold the existing system. Black capitalists better their stake in the existing system while the anti-capitalist would rather take on a revolutionary approach to upend its existence. Anti-capitalists devote their time, energy, Hue-Man power, and resources to create a new or better equitable system. In terms of suggestions I offer the following: Study, Support and Sustain, and Start. Study - In terms of studying I recommend that we revisit our collective and cultural history. We should study the history of other collectivist cul-

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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// On The Cover tures to see how they operated economically in a pre-enslavement or pre-colonialism context. It’s important that we understand economic practices, systems, and structures that they had in place. We need to know the role economics played in their day-to-day lives. What was the evolution of economics? How was economics used for political uses? What were the implications of their economic systems, structures, and practices? The ancestors and those who have come before us have literally laid down the foundational work with a path and a blueprint for us to follow. It's up to us to tap into that epigenetic encoding to gain access to all that has been embedded within us. This is just as much spiritual, mental, and emotional work as it is boots-to-theground work. Our studying shouldn't be confined solely to the past. I think that it's as equally important for us to explore what systems and structures are in play today. One example is the New Economy Coalition. It is an alternative economy, which proposes that the economic system, as we know it, needs a drastic overhaul. The New Economy Coalition emphasizes the well-being of people and responsible stewardship of the planet. This way of thinking rivals the thinking that profit should be placed above the planet and the people that inhabit it. Participating in the solidarity economy could prove to be fruitful for our community. The gains manifested from such participation may not always result in dollars and cents, but it promotes participation in fair trade and ethical purchasing, establishing cooperatives (especially worker cooperatives), and solidarity lending. The New Economy Coalition held their third Common Bound gathering in St. Louis this past summer. I served as a host to a young Harvard student from Mexico who worked with youth in her native country. I also met some amazing people doing amazing work like forming housing cooperatives in the Bay area to counter gentrification. It also allowed me to further establish and solidify a rapport with Comrades from Cooperation Jackson that I had met previously during the groundbreaking events and work in Jackson, Mississippi. Support and Sustain - I, for one, participate in the practice of timebanking. Timebanking is a system that uses time as currency rather than money. Timebanking affirms that we all have some skill, ability, knowledge, or resource that adds value to the collective good. Those skills add value to the well-being of our communities and Hue-Manity at large.

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JUNE 1, 2019 In this current system of capitalism, variables such where you are born, how you are born, and the circumstances of your birth largely impact your access to capital and other resources. If you think about it, time is an equalizer. What do I mean? Despite one’s gender, political affiliation, size, ethnicity or race, religious beliefs, etc., we all have been equally distributed 24 hours per day. Timebanking takes the emphasis away from monetary exchanges. Instead, our time is the currency and can be used to access resources to meet our day-to-day needs and wants. Using time as currency creates more economically equitable conditions for all. Timebanking allows people an opportunity to receive things or services that they may not have had the capital to afford. To gain a better understanding of the practice of timebanking and to learn more about the Cowry Collective Timebank, the one in which I participate here in St. Louis, visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rv3TD2WPwwY and https://news.stlpublicradio. org/post/timebanking-offers-st-louisans-alternative-currency-platform-exchange-services#stream/0. The emergence of Blockchain technology and alternative economies like Cryptocurrency present us new opportunities for collective advancement and innovation. The idea of currency that transcends nationality and the idea of being your own bank puts us in positions that we have been excluded from in the past. I appreciate innovators in the Crypto and Blockchain space like Sinclair Skinner of Bitmari who take a cultural approach to an economic crisis. Skinner promotes the use of cryptocurrency to move capital throughout the Afrikan diaspora while avoiding exploitive remittance fees and skimming off the top. Using cryptocurrency to move resources along within the diaspora also speeds up the process and eliminates the need for going through multiple channels and gatekeepers. This in turn makes the dissemination of resources to demographics where there’s great lack and disparities more efficient and effective.

Definition Dede Says: Remittance Fees - transfer fees; the cost to send money to someone.

POPS: Remittance Fees and exchange rate margins are ways that banks and other financial institutions nickel-and-dime wealth. Most money transfers happen when migrants send money to their friends and family in developing countries. Annually, nearly $320 billion in remittance fees is paid to banks and financial institutions. • Banks typically charge 13% of the total amount of money sent • Post offices typically charge between 9% of the total amount of money sent • Money transfer operators typically charge between 7% of the total amount of money sent By lowering or eliminating remittance fees, more money can be sent to people all over the globe who need it the most. An exchange rate margin is another way that banks and other financial institutions nickel-and-dime wealth. Every country has its own currency. When you travel from one country to another country, you will often have to switch (exchange) the currency you use in your home country to the type of currency that is used in your destination country. The exchange rate is how most people find out how much one currency is worth compared to another currency. For example, as of the time of this writing, the exchange rate for the dollar to the Swedish Krona is 1: 9.24. One United States Dollar is worth 9.24 Swedish Kronas. Big banks and other large institutions create the Interbank Market and they define what the exchange rates are between currencies. Big banks will give a quote of exchange rates to smaller banks and money-operators. That quote is called the Interbank Rate. This is the amount the larger banks are going to charge the smaller banks to switch the currency. Once the smaller bank or money operator gets that number, they add an additional amount on top of that called the Margin Rate. The Interbank Rate + Margin Rate is what the smaller bank or money operator quotes you as a service charge. So, not only will you pay the cost the larger bank charges the smaller bank, but you will pay koindamagazine.com


“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

the margin rate so the smaller bank or money-operator makes a profit for exchanging the currency. For example: If the Interbank Rate for converting Euros to British Pounds is 1.18 and the small bank or money operator charges you, 1.16 as an Exchange Rate, that means you paid 0.02 in the Margin Rate, also known as the Exchange Rate Margin.

Big Rob: Many of our businesses and institutions far too often find themselves in a place where their existence is short-lived or stifled due to lack of support and resources. There are so many brilliant ideas in our community that can’t get off of the ground due to a lack of resources. This is where we, as everyday responsible consumers and community members, come into play. It’s up to us to take a consistent, open, and honest look at our efforts to support our own. We must challenge ourselves to go above and beyond to patronize Black-Owned Businesses THAT HAVE A VESTED INTERESTED IN ADVANCING OUR COLLECTIVE PLIGHT. It’s my belief that supporting a Black-Owned Business that only looks to get rich off the community, come up financially individually, or lacks a desire to move us ahead collectively is not the type of business we need to support with our dollars. We don’t need more parasites in our community or culture that simply change the color and complexion. If there aren’t many Black-Owned Businesses in your community that don’t have the desire to advance the collective, then look for platforms like www.webuyblack.com or the www.theblackmall.com to patronize. At the least, patronize the lady on your block selling plates out of her house. In this way you’re supporting your local economy and knowing exactly where your dollars are going. I’ve been seeing a meme floating around lately that states that Black-Owned Businesses don’t need more capital but instead need more support from us. As we patronize our Black-Owned Businesses, we should also encourage and empower them to hire those within their own community. I’m not saying that this will necessarily be an easy task to accomplish, but it’s very necessary. Too many of us have to go to work daily on the proverbial professional plantation for people that don’t have our best interest at hand. How much more empowered would we be if we got ourselves, our family members, our friends, and neighbors

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off of that plantation and provided them with a decent living, fair working conditions, and an environment that promotes a sense of collective good, well-being, and fictive kinship? Support should be a two-way street.

Equity - a person’s ownership in corporation; typically a publicly traded company. Equity is the difference between how much a company owns (assets) and how much a company owes (liabilities). Assets - Liabilities = Equity

Fictive Kinship - a term used by anthropologists and ethnographers to describe the connection people have to each other outside of blood and marriage. By contrast, true kinship, is a term used to describe the connection people have to each other through blood and marriage.

Definition Dede Says:

We vote daily by the use of our dollars. What do I mean? It’s my opinion that even more than participating in two-party politics and the electoral process, that the primary political participation involves our daily choices about money. Profit and power are the primary political engine of capitalism. We either give a vote of approval or confidence to a business, their products or services, and practices by spending our money with them. By patronizing a business we willingly or unwillingly say that we support who they are, what they’re about, and how they do business. On the other hand, by not spending our money with them, we submit a vote of no confidence. We as consumers have to vote with our dollars daily. Our refusal to spend our dollars send a message out that we don’t agree with: • the values or value or things offered, • their business practices, • their hiring practices, or • their social responsibility (or lack thereof) practices, etc. Crowdinvesting is another recent option that makes practicing cooperative economics possible. Crowdinvesting provides everyday people like you and me, non-accredited investors, the chance to buy into startups and businesses on the ground floor. Depending on the platform used, one may be able to purchase equity into a company for under $100. This not only provides businesses and initiatives with capital to start up or expand a project but also gives the person making an investment some type of perk for taking the risk.

Non-Accredited Investor - a person who does not meet the net worth requirements of the Securities Exchange Commission Regulation D.

Securities - a negotiable, interchangeable financial instrument that has monetary value. If it is a stock, it represents ownership in a publicly-traded corporation. If it is a bond, it represents being a creditor to a governmental body. If it is an option, it represents the rights of ownership in a publicly-traded corporation.

POPS: The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is an independent agency of the United States federal government. The agency is responsible for creating rules about investing, enforcing those rules, and regulating how stocks and options operate in the United States. The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 created the Securities and Exchange Commission. One of the laws that SEC enforces is called the Securities Exchange Act of 1933. This law requires that any company who wants to sell securities must register with Securities Exchange Commission; otherwise, they must meet certain qualifications to not have to register. The provision that explains these qualifications so they do not have to register is called Regulation D. Regulation D defines that an accredited investor is an individual who has a net worth of $1 million and earns $200,000 per year or $300,000 per year with their spouse. Anyone who does not meet this criteria is considered a non-accredited investor.

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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// On The Cover Start - To the last point stated I want to emphasize the importance of starting new businesses. This, hopefully, will put us in a position to have something to not just benefit us in this moment but that we can also leave behind for upcoming generations. Our aims must be long-term in nature. The reality is that we may not see the progress that we think we should in this generation, but we still should put in the legwork necessary to impact future generations. We may be placed here to start what future generations may finish at a later time. Takiyah: How and why did you become a part of Koindanomics? Big Rob: I first became aware of Lamar Wilson from Dr. Boyce Watkins’ initial Digital Underground Weekend back in December 2017. I was still fairly new to the Crypto game and was always happy to find people that not only looked like me in the space, but those who also had a heart for the people. I was looking to find people who had a passion to educate and bring many of us along on the journey. I would watch Lamar’s Facebook live broadcasts after that event and I eventually learned about the Black Coin Group. If I can be honest, the name alone attracted me to the group. The content and the people in it kept me hanging around. I think I joined that group in January 2018. Since then, I’ve been around to witness the group undergo several name changes and exponentially grow in a relatively short amount of time. I was a part of an unofficial delegation of Koindians that traveled to Chicago for the first ever Wakandacon. I got to meet many of the lovely faces and personalities that I became acquainted with who were active in the online Facebook group. It was legit like meeting family members for the first time. That weekend provided me with an opportunity to sit down, break bread, and chat with some beautiful melanated minds from around the country. I haven’t been as active on Discord as I should be, but I know that there’s always a spot there for me and an opportunity to reconnect and re-engage with the community at any moment. Takiyah: How and why did you become a part of One Love Coop and Uplifting Us Cooperative?

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JUNE 1, 2019 Big Rob: That answer is fairly simple. It’s my humble belief that we can’t continue to talk about cooperative economics without building, maintaining, supporting, and growing co-ops that are exclusively or predominantly for us and by us. As a Garveyite, I tend to take a Race First and self-determination, self-reliance, and self-governing approach to institution and structure building. If self-preservation is the first law of nature and charity starts at home, then it only makes sense that we build and support our own structures such as co-ops. It's in the spirit of collaboration and sowing a seed of love into the culture that I've partnered with you on this initial issue of OUR publication. We have to put projects that are for us and by us at the forefront of our minds. It's been said that how we spend our time and money is a reflection of what we value. Well damn it, I want to put my time and money where my mouth is. I want to do my part to show US that we're valuable beyond measure!

fication. The platform empowers the community by literally introducing us to opportunities that we buy into and become stakeholders. I recently got involved with Buy the Block in another way. I’m proud to say that I’m now a Developer Representative working closely with Buy the Block to promote the platform, drum up business, and do some of the initial early legwork to get campaigns live and launched on www.buytheblock.com. I became aware of the opportunity by following and interacting with Buy the Block and Buy Black Economics on Instagram. The call was put out for individuals to apply and I reached out as soon as I saw the post. One of the BTB collaborators, Lynn, led me through a short vetting process via direct message. I received the training and now here I am, ready to serve. What started out simply as a personal following of an Instagram profile led to building a professional working relationship with an entity that I know will make a positive impact in our community. The approach that Buy the Block takes and the use of crowdinvesting to practice cooperative economics to build up institutions within our community will have positive psychological impact on Afrikan people. Takiyah: In your opinion, what is the most important initiative our community needs to execute with a sense of urgency?

Takiyah: How and why did you become a part of Buy the Block? Big Rob: I want to say I initially heard about Buy the Block maybe over a year ago. The name alone spoke to strength, solidarity, and support. Over the past few months I’ve been seeing more social advertisement about the crowdinvesting platform. I viewed the platform and saw that there were several amazing offers on the site. I eventually connected with Sista Ena, a fellow Koindian, and made an investment in her Roots and Vines Cafe offering. I’ve actually grown to love and appreciate Sista Ena and have built a healthy relationship with her. I really dig Buy the Block’s head-on approach to countering gentri-

Big Rob: I think that initiatives like this are important. Let’s be honest, everyone doesn’t have equitable access to the most basic of financial literacy. Exposure and education are two crucial elements for elevation. When you add the political education, historical context of finance, and analytical components to this type of financial education, you literally create an extremely valuable offering to the community. We have to find a nice balance when we do something like this. We can’t assume that everyone has a working understanding of basic economic concepts, terminology, and even practices. If I can be completely honest, the topic of economics as a whole is still very much overwhelming and unfamiliar to me. In making sure that we’re not assuming that everyone is at the same starting point, we also want to avoid dumbing it down and stereotypically assume that people don’t want to be in the know or aren’t capable of being in the know. As you and I both know, there are some that prey on and pimp the people’s lack of knowl-

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III edge. I do believe that one should be fairly compensated for their skills, abilities, knowledge, and experience, but some folks are out here charging ridiculously high prices for courses that often uphold the exact suppressive system we need to upend. These “financial literacy experts” often end up preaching the sort of respectability politics that condemns the spending habits and behaviors of the oppressed instead of condemning the corrupt system and the conditions within the system that create oppression and disparities. Although it is important that we get financial backers, it is equally important that we get supporters who may not be in a position to offer financial assistance to sustain initiatives like this. We have to find a way to get this info into the hands of the people who need it most for free or an inexpensive rate while creating a way to cover the costs that go into the production and mass distribution of info provided in a publication such as this. We also have to look at what the people value the most and find a way to introduce those elements into what they could all benefit from. This also means meeting the very real and tangible needs of the people in our community as a way to gain access to their mind, heart, and ears. Takiyah: Is there any last advice you would like to share with our community? Indeed. Since I come from a communication studies background with an emphasis on public speaking emphasis, I tend to have an interest on words, meanings, and their impact. For example, if we explore the word community, we can break it down into “comm” and “unity.” Breaking the word down gives us a hint as to what we need to be an effective mass. A community is just a group of people that live amongst one another. A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity. This doesn’t mean that everyone will always agree or even like one another. What it does show us is that communities should be made up of compassion, communication, comprehension, and comradery. Unity should be gained through a sense of consensus. We must work even harder at becoming a strong, surviving, and thriving community. Hue-Man capital and capacity are two of the greatest currencies that exist beyond culture, class, time, etc. We are Earth’s greatest resource. I would also encourage us to both individually and collectively study to show thyself approved, know thyself, and always gain to get an under-

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standing. We are literally the original beings and blueprint for all Hue-Manity, civilization, culture, and even currency. As we reflect on the 400th year of return, the Sankofa spirit dwells deep within us and will take us back to a place that we once knew. It’s in that place that we’ll find our true selves, our true value and worth, and everything that we’ve been in search of. No amount of money can ever be enough to buy that! We much govern ourselves accordingly and understand where true value lies. Let me get off of my soapbox now :-) Takiyah: What's the best way to contact you to learn more about you and become a part of the solutions you mentioned in this interview? Big Rob: I’m very simple to get a hold of. Anyone interested in offering a word of critique, challenge, or even celebration can call or text me at 573-3409877 or email me at rlwhite3@gmail.com. Let’s engage in some truthful, tactful, and diplomatic dialogue and discourse. I would love to chat more with individuals that simply want to know more about me, learn more about Buy the Block and get assistance in launching a crowdinvesting campaign, learn more about Koinda, One Love Co-Op, or the Us Lifting Us Co-op, or just shoot the breeze. I can also be found on Facebook under my real government name (Robert White III). Let’s connect and network!

Robert “Big Rob” White III’s Recommended Resources: • Buy the Block www.buytheblock.com • One Love Cooperative www.onelovecoop.com • Uplifting Us Cooperative www.usliftingus.com • Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League www.theunia-acl.com • New Economy Coalition neweconomy.net • Timebank https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=Rv3TD2WPwwY and https://news. stlpublicradio.org/post/timebanking-offers-st-louisans-alternative-currency-platform-exchange-services#stream/0 • We Buy Black webuyblack.com • The Black Mall shop.theblackmall.com • Bitmari bitmari.com • Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice www.psupress.org/books/ titles/978-0-271-06216-7.html • Black Agenda Report www.blackagendareport.com • Black Agenda Radio: News, Commentary, and Analysis from the Black Left • https://soundcloud.com/user-208734627 • I Mix What I Like: Emancipatory Journalism and Revolutionary Beat Reporting www.imixwhatilike.org (NOTE: I’m a fan of Dr. Jared Ball and all of his work but I strongly suggest that you pay attention to his work centered around the Myth of Black Buying Power) • Black Talk Radio Network www.blacktalkradionetwork.com/ • The Nigga Factory https://www.brotherspeech.com/the-nigga-factory

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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// Section Title

JULY 2019

Are you the next

JUNE 1, 2019

BUSINESS OF THE

MONTH

In July, we will be featuring a business that has proven to make impressive traction in their business and their community. Each business owner will have a chance to have an advertorial created for them to highlight their success and some key takeaways that other businesses can use to gain traction. If you have a business you would like to submit for us to review, send us an email at business@koindamagazine.com. Koindanomics By Prostock-studio 28 Photo Issue #1 MAGAZINE

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CARLA NAPPER

// Section Title

“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity� - Robert "Big ROB" White III

Carla Napper is the CEO of CNapp Enterprizes LLC, a marketing research consulting firm. Although her firm currently focuses on the emerging hemp industry, she has been advising businesses using tailored research studies and designs for well over a decade. Carla plays by the numbers. CNapp, pronounced snap, supports individuals as they learn about their businesses based on data. Her detailed analysis helps

her clients to identify their target markets, assess their strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats, and provides an overall valuation of the current economic environment as it pertains to their goods and services. Her sophisticated use of statistics allows her to provide effective strategies to move businesses forward. cnappenterprizesllc@gmail.com

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ROBERT WHITE III

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// Section Title

Hello, Koindans, My name is Wealthy Willette, and I'm here to show you how to protect your wealth. Many of us are taught to just make money, but we don't think about protecting it until we're faced with the threat of losing it. The average person makes money, tries to save it, and then hopefully invests it. This is a surefire way to make sure you always struggle to get it. Some say money is a tool. Some say money is a master. Others say money is a slave. I personally view money as my pet. I groom money to my liking to be used for my pleasure, and it's something I domesticate by keeping it in my house. By keeping it out of the reach of others who want to abuse my money, it grows in a way that keeps me comfortable. Luckily, that's also the acronym for my strategy: PET. PET stands for Protection, Estate Planning, and Taxation. You're a Koindan, so by default you are extraordinary. I don't want you to think of money the way ordinary people do. I want you to think of money as your personal pet too. The next time you entertain a money-making opportunity, I want you to first put it through the PET strategy. To use the PET strategy, just ask three simple questions. They are: Before I make this money, how do I plan to PROTECT it from: • Lawsuits (civil, criminal, family) • Inflation • Government seizure like Civil Forfeiture • Asset freezes and other restrictions to access my money • Banking collapses • National debt and other government schemas that are financially insolvent (like Social Security funds and unfunded pension obligations) • Natural disasters • Personal crises • Governments restricting my passports Then I would like you to ask yourself: "Before I make this money, how do I plan on protecting this money when I pass this down to future generations for my ESTATE PLANNING? When I pass it on to them, how will I protect my future Koindanomics 30 generations from: Issue #1 MAGAZINE

JUNE 1, 2019

• Lawsuits (civil, criminal, family) • Inflation • Government seizure like Civil Forfeiture • Asset freezes and other restrictions to access their money • Banking collapses • National debt and other government schemas that are financially insolvent (like Social Security funds and unfunded pension obligations) • Natural disasters • Personal crises • Governments restricting their passports" Then I would like you to ask yourself, "How do I protect this money from incurring legally unnecessary TAXES?" The PET Strategy encourages you to critically think about how you are going to play an offensive game to these things that destroy your ability to wealth. There are 10 Inhibitors to Wealth. Here's what they are.

• National debt • Unnecessary taxes • Solely dependent on the strength or weakness (inflation) of one currency (no hedge against the currency of your home country) • Lack of protection against banking collapses because all of your accounts are in one bank in one country—typically your home country. This is especially problematic if your home country is a poor banking jurisdiction like the United States. • Lack of protection against capital controls; this is when a bank chooses to seize or freeze your assets • Lack of protection against the personal lawsuits and government-sanctioned seizures like civil forfeiture • Lack of protection against natural disasters and other personal crises • Lack of protection against people controls; this is when you only have one passport and a government can restrict your movement to other countries.

10 Inhibitors to Wealth: • Low income • High personal debt Wealth Inhibitor Tool to Combat the Wealth Inhibitor Low Income

Diversify your income to include earned income, profit income, interest income, dividend income, rental income, capital gains, and royalty income

High Personal Debt

Classify your expenses into four categories: lifestyle expenses, destructive expenses, productive expenses, and protective expenses. Spending trackers.[where does this go?]

National Debt/ Social Security/ Pensions

Self-directed retirement structures, offshore IRA-LLCs, offshore real assets, value investing in international companies on international stock exchanges, value investing in international assets outside of the stock markets

Taxation

Foreign Earned Income Exclusion, offshore IRA-LLCs, cash value life insurance policies written in states that offer total protection from creditor seizure of the surrender cash value, tax-free trade zones and enterprise zones, and tax-treatise stair-stepping

Inflation

Complementary currencies, physical precious metal, foreign fiat currencies in highly stable banking jurisdictions, investment in international companies on international stock exchanges, foreign real estate and raw land, domestic real estate and raw land, foreign agricultural land, domestic agricultural land, and private equity investing

Banking Collapses

Physical cash, international bank accounts, physical precious metals, foreign fiat currencies in highly stable banking jurisdictions

Capital Controls

International bank accounts that do not have a banking branch which is located in your home country to prevent "long-arm reach"

Lawsuits/ Civil Forfeiture International Asset Protection Trusts, international corporations, international private storage vaults Natural Disasters/ Personal Crisis

Alternative energy sources, property and casualty insurance, travel insurance, medical tourism

People Controls

Permanent foreign residencies, second passports/citizenship


// Keeping Wealth

“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III Phoo By Jacob Lund

America has a funny way of telling people that all it takes to succeed in life is hard work, motivation, and tenacity, despite laws and government policies that decrease their chances of success.

T

he largest and most successful institutions throughout the world have had some form of government subsidy; however, America has deflected the scrutiny of how its policies create an unleveled playing field by shifting the responsibility for success solely on the individual trying to succeed. Unfortunately, motivation, hard work, and perseverance aren’t attriJoin the movement

HARD WORK

IS NOT ALL IT TAKES

By Takiyah Noble

butes that are quantifiably measured. They also aren’t attributes that CAUSE economic prosperity. Sure, they may have a CORRELATIVE relationship, but definitely not a causal one. However, 10 factors are both measurable and quantifiable, and they have a direct link to economic prosperity. Below are the following factors: 1. Low income 2. High personal debt

3. 4. 5. 6.

National debt Unnecessary taxes Solely dependent on the strength or weakness (inflation) of one currency (no hedge against the currency of your home country) Lack of protection against banking collapses because all of your accounts are in one bank in one country; typically your home country. This is especially problematic

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// Keeping Wealth 7. 8. 9. 10.

if your home country is a poor banking jurisdiction like the United States. Lack of protection against capital controls; this is when a bank chooses to seize or freeze your assets Lack of protection against the personal lawsuits and government-sanctioned seizures like civil forfeiture Lack of protection against natural disasters and other personal crisis Lack of protection against people controls; this is when you only have one passport and a government can restrict your movement to other countries.

By Scanrail

Koindanomics’ publications aim at addressing each of the above factors and demonstrate unconventional ways to achieve them. Article 5 of this publication will address personal debt, but let’s continue examining the myth that hard work is all it takes. So, let’s unveil some details that the media leaves out about entrepreneurial golden boys—you know, the guys that grew their fortunes with humble beginnings. They started their businesses from their college dorms, garages, or co-living spaces. These golden boys include Mark Zuckerberg, Bill Gates, and Jeff Bezos. Bill Gates. The sensationalized version of the Gates story is that he started his company from his dorm room. 32

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Here’s what the media and gurus leave out. Although Bill Gates was hardworking, his family enrolled him into an expensive private school that had rare, state-of-the-art computers to which the average child would not have access. So, Bill Gates had thousands of programming experience and already sold software that ran on personal computers before he enrolled in college With previous market testing, Gates and his partner had already founded Microsoft by the time he was enrolled in college. Gates didn’t officially drop out, he simply failed out of college due to the growth and success of Microsoft; however, if Microsoft failed, Gates always had the option to return to his Ivy -League education, with his parent’s footing the bill. Mark Zuckerberg. The sensationalized version of the Zuckerberg story is that he started his company from his co-living space. Here’s what the media and the gurus leave out. In addition to paying Zuckerberg’s tuition at Harvard University, his parents gave him working capital in exchange for shares of Facebook. They are now billionaires, along with their son. Jeff Bezos. The sensationalized story of Jeff Bezos is that he started Amazon from a garage. The media and the gurus leave out that Jeff ’s parents, Mike and Jackie Bezos, gave him $245,573.00 in exchange for shares in Amazon. Those shares are now worth $30 billion. Bezo’s’ expansioncontinued because he received Wall Street backing and, billions of dollars in tax-payer- funded subsidies. He also pays his lowest-level employees salaries of 11%-17% below market value. Typically, entrepreneurship is to recycle an ever-expanding circuit of wealth of white players. They are typically given a competitive advantage because the previous generation’s wealth can afford them opportunities to continue the cycle of wealth, as it is designed. Let’s compare this with the statistics of the overwhelming majority of businesses owners who fail, particularly those

who come from marginalized communities, due to under-capitalization, lack of market access, theft, or destruction ofassets. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Survey of Business Owners: • 90% of Black-owned or Latno-owned businesses do not have one employee other than the business owner. • 97% of Black-female-owned companies do not have one employee other than the business owner According to reports prepared for the Center for Global Policy Solutions: • 67.3% of businesses without employees had annual sales of less than $25,000 per year. If this is the only source of income, then it is not enough to keep the owner and their respective family out of poverty. • Conversely, 57.9% of businesses with employees had annual sales in excess of $249,999. Needless to say, it is more likely that the business is earning enough money to provide for their owners. According to the data in from the Small Business Administration: • 70.9% of all businesses are White owned. These businesses account for 88% of all sales in the United States and 86.5% of U.S. employment opportunities. • 12.2% of all businesses are Latino-owned. These businesses account for 4% of all sales in the United States and account for 4.2%

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

of U.S. employment opportunities. • 9.5% of all businesses are Black-owned. These businesses account for 1.3% of total American sales and 1.7% of U.S. employment opportunities. Additionally: • White businesses start with an average of $106,702 in capital • Black businesses start with an average of $35,205 in capital • Less than 3% of venture capital funding goes to Black or Latino founders • Less than 1% of venture capital funding goes to Black orLatino female founders. The last two statistics are important to emphasize because it shows the decreaseded likelihood that minority owners will be able to grow their organizations to provide jobs in their local communities. Althoug entrepreneurship can improve the incomes of their individual families, without additional funding it doesn’t improve the community at-large. Furthermore, organizations require more money as it grows. The diagram reflects the twenty components that must be developed in any organization to get it to run like a welloiled engine.

BUSINESS CONCEPT

Business Size

CUSTOMER RELATIONS

Networking Sales & Service

Revenue Model

Branding Financials

Ownership & Board Employees

Funding

Partnerships Business Procedures ORGANIZATION

IT Systems

Legal Issues

OPERATIONS

The amount of capital required to develop these components excludes nonwealthy individuals from being able to competitively participate.

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// Section Title

JUNE 1, 2019

POPS

It’s no secret that the media plays mind games. They distract us with sensationalism so we

are confused about our priorities, villanize us at home, and misrepresent us to rest of the world. Well, Pops is here to set the record

straight. He keeps it real. He’ll give it to you straight. No chaser.

Koindanomics MAGAZINE

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// Keeping It Real

“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity” - Robert "Big ROB" White III

THE LOGICAL The culprit of logical error of success is survivorship bias Survivorship bias is an error in logic where you heavily concentrate on a person who made it past a selection process while overlooking those who did not, often because of their lack of visibility. In plain English, since you only focus on people who succeed, you don’t pay attention to the overwhelming majority of people who don’t. It is extremely important to know what survivorship bias is because it will make you analyze the success rate and failure rate of a larger system as a whole. Your standard financial advisor, entrepreneurial guru, news anchor, or favorite entertainer will tell you that they succeeded because they had an insane work ethic and unbreakable motivation. Not taking anything away from successful people, but when you listen to their stories, I encourage you to think of two words and two words only: survivorship bias. Nothing less and nothing more. Financial advisors, media talking heads, and

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error entrepreneurial gurus will tell you that you shouldn’t associate with “losers” because, after all, they are “losers,” and “losers” can’t teach you anything except how to lose. That is simply not true, an overwhelming number of people who fail can teach you about the selection process of the system they are trying to get through. For example, less than 1% of American actors make more than $50,000 per year in the entertainment industry. Think about the 1% of those who survived the selection process: Kevin Hart, Steve Harvey, Taraji P. Henson, Viola Davis, Kerry Washington, etc. Do you believe that 99% of comedians trying to succeed in the industry ARE NOT funnier than Kevin Hart? Do you believe that 99% of actresses trying to succeed

OF SUCCESS in the entertainment industry are not as talented as Kerry Washington? Or is it more likely that they had the resources and/ or the willingness to comply with the “underbelly” (unwritten rules) of the industry to make it through the selection process? Survivorship bias is very dangerous for your finances and your overall well-being. It leads to the following errors in logic: Logical Error #1: Overly Optimistic About Chances of Success Survivorship bias typically leads to an individual being overly optimistic about their chances of success because

they have ignored failures and because the individual often is unaware of the unwritten rules of a system.

Logical Error #2: We Made

It Because We’re Special Another common error in logic produced by survivorship bias is the false belief that a person or object has some special property, attribute, or characteristic rather than just acknowledging it as a coincidence.

Feature: Meet Robert White III A.K.A. BIG ROB

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// Keeping It Real Wikipedia provides an excellent example of how this error in logic plays out. So, we’ll just use the example that Wikipedia uses. If three out of five students with the best college grades came from the same high school, one might falsely believe that the high school has an incredibly strong educational curriculum. Instead of following this false belief and automatically enrolling your child in this elite high school, let’s deconstruct this scenario more carefully, acknowledging survivorship bias. First, it simply means that the three students just survived the selection process of the college in question. So, the next logical question would be, how

JUNE 1, 2019

many students didn’t survive the selection process? What were the “written” and “unwritten” rules of the selection process? Do we have a full data set of the high school in question? Do we have the grades of EVERY single high school student who attended that particular high school? To which college did the high school students with the HIGHEST grades apply? Did they apply to different colleges? If they didn’t apply to that particular college, they naturally wouldn’t be a part of the selection process.

Logical Error #3: Believing There is a Causal Relationship Between People, Objects, or Events Rather than a

DO YOU BELIEVE THAT 99% OF COMEDIANS TRYING TO SUCCEED IN THE INDUSTRY ARE NOT FUNNIER THAN KEVIN HART?

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Correlative Relationship A causal relationship means one event CAUSES the other event to happen. Using the example above, the causal relationship would be that the strength of the education caused the students to have high marks. Then the high marks of the students caused them to be accepted into the college. This is simply not true. If we deconstruct this scenario with the questions presented above, we see that there is simply a CORRELATIVE relationship. A correlation is when there is a connection between two or more independent people, objects, events, or occurrences. As you can see, it just so happens that the same students from the same school applied to the same college and were selected. That doesn’t necessarily mean that the students had the highest grades in the high school. For all we know, they could have had the lowest grades. It simply tells us that they survived the selection process of the college to which they applied. So, the next time you hear someone tell you that he came from nothing and forged his path against all odds, remember that you are simply listening to someone who survived. There is nothing wrong with listening to a survivor as long as it doesn’t skew your perception of the likelihood of success. Instead, it’s much wiser to know WHY the majority of people fail and then strategically plan accordingly to circumvent the systematic failure.

Definition Dede Says: BIAS noun

bi·​as | \ bī-s \ Definition 1a : an inclination of temperament or outlook especially a: a personal and sometimes unreasoned judgment : PREJUDICE b : an instance of such prejudice c : BENT, TENDENCY (1) : deviation of the expected value of a statistical estimate from the quantity it estimates (2) : systematic error introduced into sampling or testing by selecting or encouraging one outcome or answer over others

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// Business Directory

JUNE 1, 2019

Let's Do Business

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“A community is a common unit moving in the direction of unity� - Robert "Big ROB" White III

Be the first to place your business listing in our magazine. Koindanomics Magazine is doing our part to drive more visibility to Black-owned businesses. Each edition will feature one business and you will also see a list of new businesses that have joined our online business directory. If you just want your business to be listed in this upcoming issue, please visit our website and review our advertising section. Prices will be listed accordingly.

Help us support our Black Businesses across the world and #LetsGrowTogether

Online Business Directory will launch in July 2019

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Koindanomics The world’s only Susu subscription magazine

MAGAZINE

Is Your Home Country Treating You and Your Money With Respect? The Koindanomics Magazine is based on financial sovereignty. Financial sovereignty means that an individual doesn’t feel compelled to keep all of their valuable resources and assets in one country simply because he/she was born there. Instead, financially sovereign individuals legally move their assets and resources where they are treated best. Our magazine teaches the African diaspora and African Descendants of Slaves how to find global resources to create, protect, and grow their wealth.

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Koindanomics Magazine - June 2019 | Issue #1  

This is our official 1st publication of the Koindanomics Magazine. This issue will introduce you to our sponsors that helped us make this h...

Koindanomics Magazine - June 2019 | Issue #1  

This is our official 1st publication of the Koindanomics Magazine. This issue will introduce you to our sponsors that helped us make this h...

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