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26

14

36

The front cover on the theme of training shows a photograph of Guy Jost at STUDER in Thun

IN THIS MOTION EDITION YOU WILL FIND: WELCOME Stephan Nell, CEO of Körber Schleifring AG, on grinding

29

machine service

4

NEWS Grinding machines throughout the world; 200th STUDER

for MAPAL; EMO; Thousandth S33; Superb software; Demo Days

8

INNOVATION A new lease of life for grinding machines: An overhaul

allows the lifetime of grinding machines to be extended and the machine value to be preserved in the long term

14

18

INSIDE What are you doing now? SCHLEIFRING Group employees

on their concrete contribution to success

20

INTERVIEW The secret of precision: Elena Richter, archer, Dr.-Ing. Christian

Wenzel, expert in precision machines at the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology, and Michael Horn, COO of the SCHLEIFRING Group, in conversation

26

A DAY WITH … … Beat Oderbolz. The Head of Innovation and Product

Management at Ewag AG visits customers all over the world 2

BLOHM and RazorTec from BLOHM and JUNG, MÄGERLE MGC-L-210.50.110, WALTER HELICHECK, BLOHM Prokos, MIKROSA KRONOS L 550

36

INTERNATIONAL Putting down roots in China: Proven quality and local solu-

tions – these are the success factors of the SCHLEIFRING Group in the Asian growth market

40

IDEAS The global stage: Sociologists Geert and Gert Jan Hofstede

study the basic dispositions of members of different national cultures. These are also important for globally operating companies

INDEPTH

From apprentice to world skills champion: There are currently 116 apprentices in the SCHLEIFRING Group. One of them is representing STUDER at the “WorldSkills” championship

TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY News from the SCHLEIFRING Group: GreenCap from

43

INTOUCH The Motion calendar: the most important trade fairs and dates EDITORIAL DETAILS PUBLISHER Körber Schleifring AG, Jubiläumsstraße 95, 3005 Bern RESPONSIBLE Sandro Bottazzo CHIEF EDITOR Michael Hopp (responsible for the purposes of press law) ART DIRECTION Jessica Winter MANAGING EDITOR Niels Baumgarten PICTURE EDITING Sylvi Egert AUTHORS Klaus Jopp, Heinz-Jürgen Köhler (copy editor), Merle-Sophie Röhl, Ira Schrörs LAYOUT Tobias Heidmeier PRODUCTION Claude Hellweg (Mgr.), Stefanie Albrecht PUBLISHING HOUSE AND ADDRESS OF EDITORIAL OFFICE HOFFMANN UND CAMPE VERLAG GmbH,

Harvestehuder Weg 42, 20149 Hamburg, Tel. +49.40.44 188-457, Fax +49.40.44 188-236 MANAGEMENT Christian Breid, Dr. Kai Laakmann, Bernd Ziesemer PUBLICATION MANAGER Inga Borg LITHO PX2, Hamburg PRINTING Neef-Stumme premium printing, Wittingen. Printed on FSC®-certified paper (FSC® - C 1857)

Cover: Guy Jost, Photos: Guy Jost (3); Jackson Lowen, privat

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WELCOME

“SOLUTIONS FOR OUR CUSTOMERS – THAT’S OUR BUSINESS. WE PRESENT A FEW OF THEM IN THIS MOTION EDITION.” DEAR READERS, the revised Motion, which we presented to you towards the end of last year, has been well received. In your feedback you mentioned the practical, service-oriented articles, but also the high-quality, aesthetically pleasing appearance. Naturally this praise serves as an incentive for us to BECOME EVEN BETTER FROM ONE EDITION TO THE NEXT. Let’s see if this Motion edition can also live up to this claim.

We have focused the selection of contents even more strongly this time on service topics relating to all aspects of grinding machines. Because: WE OFFER MORE THAN JUST MACHINES,WE OFFER SOLUTIONS – APPLICATIONS, SERVICES AND KNOW-HOW. The SCHLEIFRING Group sells more than just the machine: it accompanies its customers throughout the whole process, which extends over the entire LIFECYCLE OF A MACHINE, so over many years. This also includes the OVERHAUL OF MACHINES – from simple spindle replacement through assembly overhaul to control retrofits, complete overhauls and also conversion to new production processes … You can read about which options are available to you from page 8. The companies in the SCHLEIFRING Group have production plants in Switzerland, Germany, Czechia, America and China, as well as sales and service offices in America, Asia and Western and Eastern Europe.

WE OFFER SOLUTIONS THAT MEET OUR CUSTOMERS´ NEEDS. I wish you enjoyable reading!

Stephan Nell, CEO, Körber Schleifring AG “We see not just the machine, but the whole process.”

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

NEWS

1912 SCHAUDT: First exports to Western Europe

1952 BLOHM: First HFS to Canada

1946 MÄGERLE: First F10 to Eindhoven, Netherlands

ASIA 28,000 machines

EUROPE 84,000 machines

20 %

60 % 1943 STUDER: First export to the USA 1951 BLOHM: First HFS to the USA

NORTH AND SOUTH AMERICA 28,000 machines

20 %

1951 JUNG: First G60 to Zurich, Switzerland

1951 BLOHM: First HFS 6 to Brazil

GRINDING MACHINES THROUGHOUT THE WORLD

1931 STUDER: First export to the Soviet Union 1930s MIKROSA: Machine exports to the aviation industry in the Soviet Union

1950 JUNG: First G60 to Milan, Italy

1955 WALTER: First AMS 500 automatic cutter head grinding machine in the Soviet Union 1957 EWAG: WS 11 to Japan

1946 MÄGERLE: First F10 to Damascus, Syria

1950 MÄGERLE: First export of five F7s to India 1951 BLOHM: First HFS 6 to India

1937 STUDER: First export to China 1951 BLOHM: First HFS 9 to China

THE COMPANIES OF THE SCHLEIFRING GROUP have been manufacturing grinding machines for more than 100 yeras. More than 140,000 have been produced in this time. Sales efforts were focused on the whole world from the outset. In 1912 SCHAUDT delivered its first machine within Europe. In 1931 STUDER exported to the former Soviet Union for the first time, and to China in 1937. The SCHLEIFRING Group operates production plants in China, Germany, Switzerland and Czechia, as well as sales and service offices in America, Asia and Europe.

STUDER

THE 200TH STUDER FOR MAPAL MAPAL IS A GLOBALLY OPERATING SPECIALIST in tailor-made precision tools. For its produc-

tion, the company has relied on grinding machines from the SCHLEIFRING Group for the last 35 years. “At that time STUDER was able to offer us a very cost-effective solution with the OC machines. We then developed such a good business relationship that we subsequently returned to them time and again for larger and more stable machines”, explains Dr. Dieter Kress, Managing Partner of MAPAL. At the end of last year he expanded the MAPAL Group’s machinery with the 200th STUDER cylindrical grinding machine. “The manufacture of a new replaceable head 4

tool range entailed complex grinding tasks. The new S41 was perfectly suited for this purpose”, says Martin Steimle, Production Manager at MAPAL. But the long-established Aalen company doesn’t just rely on STUDER grinding machines. More than 100 EWAG and WALTER tool grinding machines and six flat grinding machines from BLOHM and JUNG are also used by MAPAL worldwide. CONTACT michele.fahrni@studer.com

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INNOVATION. Save the date:

UNVEILING SEPTEMBER 16, 2013

Photos: Deutsche Messe AG

12pm (CET) on the SCHLEIFRING exhibition stand B46 in Hall 11 or via live streaming at www.schleifring.net/EMO.

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

NEWS

STUDER

STUDER WINS AWARDS “OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH INDIA CANNOT BE REDUCED TO BOLLYWOOD FILM SEQUENCES IN THE BERNESE OBERLAND.” Fred W. Gaegauf, Chairman of the Management Board of STUDER

STUDER

STUDER CELEBRATES THE 1000TH S33 COINCIDENCE OR PLAN? STUDER produced the

thousandth machine in its best-selling S33 series in the hundredth year after the company’s foundation. STUDER celebrated this occasion at the 16th IMTEX Indian Machine Tool Exhibition, which took place from 24 – 30 January 2013 in Bangalore. Customers, press representatives and employees of Körber Schleifring India were invited to the special anniversary event. And Swiss airbrush artist Philipp Klopfenstein sprayed a special design onto the body of the S33 on the exhibition stand (see above). STUDER has been manufacturing the S33 since 2003. Designed for the internal and external grinding of small to medium sized workpieces, the S33 has impressively low unit costs. Machines like the KC33, the favoritCNC and the ecoGrinder are also based on its platform. The S33 can be automated with the smartLoad handling system with double gripper, and is therefore also suitable for series production in toolmaking, for example. “The S33 perfectly fulfils the requirements of our customers in India. It is flexible and highly efficient”, explains Managing Director Fred W. Gaegauf. CONTACT michele.fahrni@studer.com

6

IN FEBRUARY 2013 Fritz Studer AG won the award at Intec Trade Fair in Leipzig for its StuderTechnology process optimization software (group photo). The software had also received an award at the PRODEX Swiss Machine Tools Trade Fair in November 2012. The software, developed by STUDER and partner company mcs ag, provides all relevant data for the respective grinding process. “We are delighted with these awards. They are confirmation of our future-oriented software development, which many customers are already using successfully. StuderTechnology facilitates grinding tasks and contributes to optimization of the machine investment”, says STUDER Managing Director Fred W. Gaegauf. The software is part of the control system on all machines which STUDER has delivered since 2011 and which are equipped with StuderWIN operating software. CONTACT michele.fahrni@studer.com

4.28

BILLION CHF

WAS THE TRADE VOLUME BETWEEN INDIA AND SWITZERLAND IN 2011 Source: Swiss Confederation, 2012

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DEMO DAYS 2013

TOGETHER TOWARD SUCCESS For the second time since 2010 Ewag AG invited its customers to the Demo Days in Etziken (Switzerland) between 18 – 22 March 2013. In addition to the current machine range, the INSERT LINE was presented in EWAG’s newly designed premises

Japanese customers in animated dialog during the Demo Days

DEMO DAYS AND TÜBINGEN TECHNOLOGY DAYS Every other year WALTER and EWAG invite their customers to information events. WALTER initiated the scientifically oriented Tübingen Technology Days. With speakers from research and science, they offer participants the opportunity to look beyond the boundaries of tool machining. At the Demo Days instigated by EWAG the focus is on actual machine technology, with its practical applications and the added value which WALTER and EWAG can offer their customers as a system and solution partner.

A TOTAL OF AROUND 100 CUSTOMERS took

the opportunity to find out about the latest grinding and measuring technologies from WALTER and EWAG at this year’s Demo Days. Special lectures by experts were devoted to actual grinding applications; practical grinding solutions demonstrated the potential of the machines. At the same time the participants also had plenty of opportunity for discussions with each other and the grinding specialists. EWAG presented an automatic pallet changer with integrated vision system for the INSERT LINE high-speed peripheral grinding machine for the first time at the Demo Days. This makes a significant contribution to further increasing productivity during high-precision grinding of hard metal indexable inserts. In the COMPACT LINE EWAG demonstrated the new clamping system for hard metal plunge plates, which ensures even higher tool precision with even shorter cycle times. In addition, the Demo Days par-

Christian Dilger, CSO of WALTER and EWAG, opens the Demo Days 2013

ticipants were able to convince themselves of the qualities of the superproductive EWAMATIC LINE for eroding and grinding PCD tools and the LASER LINE with its unique kinematic concept for the complete

machining of rotational tools in a single clamping. The demonstrated machines also included the HELICHECK Pro measuring machine from WALTER. WALTER measuring machines supplement tool grinding machines in production and resharpening, for example for quality control and logging of the machined workpieces. The entire event took place in EWAG’s newly designed premises. “In EWAG’s Factory 2 a generous demo room and a newly designed customer area now offer all the necessary facilities to inform our customers adequately and to provide even better machine demos with more comfort”, explains Christian Dilger, Director of Sales, Service and Marketing at WALTER and EWAG. CONTACT tanja.hautzinger@ewag.com

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INNOVATION

A NEW LEASE OF LIFE FOR GRINDING MACHINES How can the lifetime of grinding machines be extended? With an overhaul. The SCHLEIFRING Group offers a service, which is geared towards the same quality standards as the production of new machines Dies ist eine BU Dies ist eine BU Dies ist eine BU Dies ist eine BU Dies ist eine BU ae vent, exerorest essinul lautatiis eiciur rerum ad quo offic te aut voluptionse maximagnias rereris eatia vendipi cipsanditium

8

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Photo: Guy Jost

MÄGERLE

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INNOVATION

From head to toe: Stefan Christener works on a STUDER type S31, year of manufacture 2000. After 47 300 operating hours it’s time for a complete overhaul

the RFH cylindrical grinding machine, which stands in the entrance hall of Schaudt Mikrosa GmbH, Saarländer Straße, in Leipzig. It is pr oof of the tradition of the company, whose roots go back to the year 1887. It was delivered to the Otto Klein company in Stuttgart-Obertürkheim in 1932, subsequently taken over by the proprietor’s son-in-law. It faithfully provided its service here up until 1995 – so for 63 years. The last owner only gave it up in exchange for a r eplacement machine. “It’s rare for our machines to reach such an age nowadays,” smiles Maik Ebert, Manager of Customer Service at Schaudt Mikrosa GmbH. “But our customers are still used to a long working life from our products.” A machine which in principle has a long working life still has huge potential after any large repair or overhaul. This applies for all grinding machines, which are manufactured by the companies in the SCHLEIFRING Group. “On average the machines that come to us for an overhaul are about twelve years old. Depending on care and maintenance, such a measur e can come into consideration from around 30 000 operating hours”, explains Jürg von Känel, Manager of Overhauls at Fritz Studer AG in Swiss Thun. Similar considerations r egarding the operating years or hours are also usual with the other grinding machine manufacturers in the gr oup. Decisive factors for such a step ar e the state of wear of the machine, which depends on the intensity of use and the maintenance intervals, the customer’s satisfaction with the original machine and his confidence in the manufacturer’s service department or the company carrying out the overhaul.

OVERHAULS AT A GLANCE Grinding machine overhauls can be carried out on different scales: from a complete overhaul through to the overhaul of individual assemblies(assembly overhaul). As an additional service, modifications of the application (conversions) or the control system (control retrofit) can be performed.

Photos: Guy Jost

YEAR OF MANUFACTURE 1932 is recorded on the manufacturer’s plate of

Before and after: an assembly after an overhaul

THE FOCUS IS ON VALUE PRESERVATION In principle all SCHLEIFRING companies place the same quality r equirements on machine overhaul as on new machines. “Our overhaul service is aimed at value preservation”, says Benjamin Steck, Manager 10 Motion 01. 2013

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“OVERHAULS – OUR CUSTOMERS SIMPLY EXPECT US TO PROVIDE THIS SERVICE.” Maik Ebert, Customer Service Manager, Schaudt Mikrosa GmbH

Before and after: Holger Schroten installs new cables (left). Freshly overhauled, the HELITRONIC is then transported back to the customer (right)

of Overhauls at Blohm Jung GmbH in Göppingen. “The profitability of an investment is also ultimately measured by how long its productivity and quality are preserved.” At SCHAUDT and MIKROSA in Leipzig the decision has been made to continue involvement in the overhaul business. “On the one hand, we know our machines best”, explains Ebert, the Customer Service Manager. “On the other hand, our customers simply expect us to overhaul their machines.”

also comes to the point where a repair or complete overhaul is no longer worthwhile”, Maik Ebert points out. “The technology is so antiquated that buying a new machine is simply more efficient.” The basis of a competent overhaul is always an inspection of the machine by an experienced service technician. “The machine condition is documented and a selection of overhaul options is prepared for discussion with the customer”, Benjamin Steck outlines the pr ocedure. In addition to a cost-based overhaul, in which OVERHAUL IDEAL FOR TRADITIONAL GRINDING TASKS only the necessary work is carried out, and the complete over An overhaul is often a good solution, “if no new tools or tool geometries haul, in which the machine electrical and contr ol system r emain in have to be ground”, summarizes Andreas Ahlers, Manager of New Sertheir original condition but otherwise all assemblies ar e serviced vices and Overhauls at W alter Maschinenbau GmbH in T übingen. If and overhauled and the machine is almost always r epainted, there one compares an overhauled machine with the original machine, often is the so-called r etrofit, for which ther e is an incr easing demand. overhauled models are not inferior to the original in any way. This means that upcoming overhauls are often combined with conHowever, ten or fifteen years are a long time in machine tools, parversions, upgrades or modernizations. “At no other time than during a ticularly in respect of electronics. In view of the technical advancements complete overhaul, when the machine is completely dismantled, can during this time, the overhauled machine may not be able to keep up such measures be carried out mor e efficiently and cost-effectively”, with the latest trends in productivity or operability. “And eventually one says von Känel.

50 000

OPERATING HOURS ARE NOT UNUSUAL FOR MACHINES FROM THE SCHLEIFRING GROUP Jürg von Känel, Manager of Overhauls, Fritz Studer AG

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INNOVATION

IS THERE A REPLACEMENT? WHEN YOUR GRINDING MACHINE GOES FOR REJUVENATION Can customers work with a replacement machine during the overhaul? The managers in the SCHLEIFRING company provide information

We produce a very large proportion of workpiece-specific machines – standard machines are not produced in large quantities by either SCHAUDT or MIKROSA. In this sense our machines are unique products. Loan machines are not really possible, because virtually no machine can produce different workpieces without modifications. But we do everything to keep downtimes as small as possible.

MAIK EBERT, CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGER AT SCHAUDT MIKROSA GMBH

BENJAMIN STECK, MANAGER OF OVERHAULS AT BLOHM JUNG GMBH

CONTACT maik.ebert@schaudtmikrosa.com

Our replacement service, which we offer in the Retrofit Department, is very popular. Upon receipt of the order, a comparable stock machine is reconditioned. As soon as the overhauled machine is ready, this is delivered to the customer and the customer’s machine is taken back. The advantage of this approach is the very short downtime, as the customer does not have to give up his machine for the duration of the over haul. If the customer wants to have his own machine overhauled, we can provide a variety of models from the BLOHM or JUNG range as loan machines. CONTACT benjamin.steck@blohmjung.com

We cannot generally promise a loan machine for overhauls of CNC machines. This is to do with the universality of our tool grinding machines. We therefore have to check whether or not we can provide a loan machine in each individual case. The situation is different with manual machines, for example the WS 11. In this case we can pr ovide a loan machine during a complete overhaul.

RUDOLF STUCKI, CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGER AT EWAG AG

CONTACT rudolf.stucki@ewag.com

As we need around eight weeks for reconditioning small, conventional machines and up to 14 weeks for large CNC machines, we offer loan machines at a flat rate for the duration of the overhaul. CONTACT juerg.vonkaenel@studer.com

JÜRG VON KÄNEL, MANAGER OF OVERHAULS, FRITZ STUDER AG

Overhaul business has developed into an important service in machine tools. In view of this we offer our customers loan machines, so that they don’t have to put up with production stoppages for eight to twelve weeks. This is how long a complete overhaul takes. CONTACT andreas.ahlers@walter-machines.com

ANDREAS AHLERS, HEAD OF NEW SERVICES AND OVERHAULS AT WALTER MASCHINENBAU GMBH

MÄGERLE usually carries out machine overhauls at the customer’s premises, but in some cases also in the factory. We can always offer both options – which one is best depends on a variety of factors: the size of the system, its applications, costs and duration of the overhaul and, not least, whether or not a loan or replacement machine can be offered. These issues are discussed beforehand in an individual, detailed customer consultation.

WALTER WEBER CONTACT CUSTOMER SERVICE MANAGER AT MÄGERLE AG walter.weber@maegerle.com

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State-of-the-art: There is rapid progress in the area of electrics and electronics in particular, and the machines are upgraded accordingly during the overhaul in order to take advantage of these advancements

RETROFITS INCREASINGLY IN DEMAND “There is a trend towards retrofits with high-precision conventional mahines in particular. With the JUNG brand, for example, we achieved a high increase in 2011, and in 2012 this increased again”, explains Tino Weißbach, Manager of Customer Service at Blohm Jung GmbH in Göppingen. During a retrofit the machine is generally upgraded in line with the latest developments, particularly in respect of the electrics, through to the installation of new control cabinets, and the control technology. Finally the machine is rebuilt from scratch. Modernizations also make sense in view of the fact that technological changes in the area of electrics/electronics occur in ever shorter cycles. “A control system upgrade is often required because, for example, the software no longer harmonizes with the current machine control. Processors are becoming increasingly powerful at shorter intervals. In view of this development, ten years of a machine’s life are an eternity”, says Andreas Ahlers.

Photos: Guy Jost (2), privat (6)

PERFECT FULFILLMENT OF CUSTOMER REQUIREMENTS Maik Ebert and his team in Leipzig use a special tier system to ensur e perfect fulfillment of all customer requirements. The options range from small assembly overhauls thr ough control retrofits to complete over hauls. “The tier system allows us to adapt to customerequirements r and thus offer tailor-made solutions”, explains Ebert. The smallest overhaul consists of simple spindle replacement. Often this is sufficient for customers who have an excellent maintenance department of their own. For the complete overhaul, the list of replaced components is considerably longer: guide rails, spindle bearings, ball-type linear drives, dresser, axial guides and measuring systems are replaced. In addition, generally an ever higher productivity is required during operation of the machines and in many industries an adaptation to modern safety standards is also

necessary. “Our customers often combine an overhaul with modifications to the machine and retooling to new workpieces”, adds Ebert. In the automotive industry, for example, overhauls are also combined with subsequent transfer to another location. For many customers the time factor also plays an important r ole: while simple overhauls at the customer’s premises take around three to four weeks, the machines must go back to the manufacturer for around ten weeks in the case of a general overhaul or retrofit measures. The SCHLEIFRING companies offer solutions that enable the customer’s production to be continued during this time (see left-hand page).

EXPANSION OF OVERHAUL CAPACITIES The three-aisled production building at Schaudt Mikr osa GmbH in Leipzig covers around 8 000 square meters. Ebert and his service specialists are in the process of setting up a larger section for the incr eased machine overhaul activities. “Machine overhaul is one of our most important after-sales services”, explains Ebert. Plus the fact that, as in all other SCHLEIFRING companies, Leipzig also possesses the necessary know-how to offer customers tailor-made overhauls, thanks to its well trained employees. Or as Tino Weißbach puts it: “Our aim is to give the machines a new lease of life.” The grinding machines will then have a chance of at least coming close to the age of the RFH cylindrical grinding machine in the entrance hall on Saarländer Straße. KLAUS JOPP

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INDEPTH

FROM APPRENTICE TO WORLD SKILLS CHAMPION There are currently 116 apprentices in the SCHLEIFRING Group. They are trained in a dual system in the company and at vocational training college. STUDER apprentice Marco Hofer is representing his company at the “WorldSkills” championship and hopes to take a prize back to Thun for the third time after 1999 and 2007

MARCO HOFER HAS HIGH GOALS – the young man from Uetendorf near Thun (Switzerland) wants to be no less than world champion with his partner Luca Zoss. However, the 19-year old Swiss is not aspiring to reach the top in a sport - he prefers to play handball for relaxation. The competition in question is the “WorldSkills” championship which will take place in Leipzig in 2013 - the 42nd event of its kind. Every two years young people from 45 dif ferent professions compete at the world’ s largest education event. More than 1000 participants fr om 58 countries and regions will come together in the Saxon city at the beginning of June, to measure their mechanical and technical skills. Hofer and his partner will compete as “Swiss automation technicians” and will represent not only their country, but also their companies, STUDER and Gilgen Door Systems. The two hopefuls are apprenticed to these companies and are currently in their fourth year of training.

FOR A SECURE FUTURE 116 young people are currently in advanced training in the eight companies of the SCHLEIFRING Group. Wtih 75 apprentices, STUDER has by far the largest proportion. The focus - not surprisingly for machine tool companies - is on the technical professions of polymechanic, automation technician and design engineer, as well as mechatronic engineer, mechanic and information technician. Future commercial staff and logisticians are also prepared for their jobs. The training courses last between three and four years, depending on the country and profession, and are organized on a dual basis, i.e. they take place within the companies and at college. The machine tool industry is one of the leading sectors in Germany and Switzerland with a strong export share; the jobs currently over 970 000 in Germany – are considered secure and future-proof.

“We are giving Marco all the support we can, because apprentices are extremely valuable to our company ,” says Roger Leuenberger, Head of Vocational Training at STUDER. 75 young people are currently completing their apprenticeships here in seven dif ferent professions – the largest groups are polymechanics (29), design engineers (16) and automation technicians (12). From summer 2013 the company will establish an additional training opportunity - that of “maintenance expert”. The apprentices are supported by four full-time and five part-time vocational trainers as well as around 50 expert trainers in the company . STUDER is the only company in Switzerland to train its own grinding specialists and technologists. “This has been made possible by a change inegulations r

Photo: Guy Jost

75 APPRENTICES ARE BEING TRAINED IN SEVEN PROFESSIONS

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Technical complexities have interested Marco Hofer (r.) from an early age. The apprentice will represent STUDER at the “WorldSkills” competition

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INDEPTH

Marco Hofer (19) from Uetendorf is training to be an automation technician at STUDER

Leila Müller is completing a six-month internship at STUDER as a polymechanic

in the area of polymechanics, so that we can now also train young people in this extremely important discipline for us”, explains Leuenberger. Meanwhile Hofer is preparing intensively for his special world championship: Hofer and Zoss train two days a week, building systems with special modules in a pr edetermined time. STUDER provides not only the space, but also the necessary time. The elements come fr om the Festo company, a world leader in automation technology with a high level of expertise in technical education and training. “There are 14 different stations, which are around half the size of a desk and at which we set ourselves tasks of differing complexity. My partner develops the software for the control system, and I am responsible for the hardware and its assembly. The time for the solutions varies between 30 minutes and three hours”, reports Hofer. At the “WorldSkills” competition, which will run over six days in total, the preset tasks last six hours a day. “It will be a tough but exciting challenge”, says Hofer, already looking forward to the big event.

Apprentice training in Switzerland is organized as a dual system, i.e. hands-on training in the company is supplemented by vocational college. Like many other apprentices Marco Hofer is also studying for the vocational baccalaureate, a special type of vocational college course. College training generally takes place one day a week, and the appr entice is in the company on the other work days. “Successful completion of the vocational baccalaur eate entitles apprentices to enroll in a university of applied sciences without having to sit any further examinations”, explains Marc Baumgartner, full-time vocational trainer in the

The training naturally also includes handling everyday tools such as caliper gauges and technical drawing

Photos: Guy Jost

TRAINING BASED ON A DUAL SYSTEM

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MÄGERLE

BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

“THOSE WHO INVEST IN TRAINING PASS ON WELL-FOUNDED KNOWLEDGE – FROM WHICH THE CUSTOMER ULTIMATELY BENEFITS.” Roger Leuenberger, Head of Vocational Training, Fritz Studer AG

Vito De Paola (l.), a polymechanic in his fourth year, with supervisor Samuel Bieri in the programming office

Automation Technicians and Automation Assembly Engineers Division at STUDER in Thun, who supervises Hofer among others. The vocational college also takes the initiative in the W orld Skills Championships, encourages the young people, puts the teams together and facilitates the first training units.

SOFT SKILLS LIKE THE ABILITY TO WORK IN A TEAM ARE ALSO IMPORTANT

TABLE LAMP PROJECT

Important though pr ofessional expertise in training is, so-called soft skills such as the ability to work in a team, community spirit, motivation and self-responsibility also play a large part today. STUDER has therefore integrated various events into the training pr ogram, designed to enable the apprentices to get to know each other better and str engthen their skills. “The high point of the first year is the four-day training camp with a range of activities r elating to environmental protection, operational safety and company organization. A management representative also always attends these days, which shows the high valueplaced on training by the company management,” says Baumgartner. Ski weekends, barbecue evenings or a visit to Hamburg for all appr entices, by invitation of the Körber Foundation, have similar objectives. Apprentice projects also form a special component of the training. The budding design engineers develop a table lamp in their first year of training, for example, which they will subsequently also implement as “hardware” during their practical workshop training. The aim of the pr oject is to become familiar with the development process using the IPERKA method. IPERKA stands for the six steps: Information, Planning, Deciding, Realization, Control and Evaluation. The task is deliberately kept r elatively open, so that there is plenty of scope for development. The apprentices must create a specification, in which they define the technical r equirements, plan the project schedule, produce solution outlines and finally manufacture the lamp.

INTERESTED IN TECHNICAL COMPLEXITIES

From design plan through to manufacture: Apprentices design table lamps In their first year of training apprentices at STUDER develop a table lamp. They will also manufacture this later during their practical workshop training. “So far all of the lamps have worked,” says Head of Vocational Training Roger Leuenberger, laughing. “Even if we need a crane for one or two designs, to get them on the table.”

Marco Hofer is very satisfied with his training. He has brought his practical examination forward, so that he can fully concentrate on the ambitious goal of the world championship. He has also alr eady decided on his next big step: “After the apprenticeship at STUDER I would like to go on to a university of applied sciences and become an electrical engineer”, is how he sees his futur e. Since he was a child the young man has been interested in technical complexities and has worked on complex processes. This must run in the family , because his father is also an electrical engineer - so a dir ect role model. His successful tinkering could now make Marco world champion, the third at STUDER since 1999. One thing is certain: All appr entices and co-workers will have their fingers firmly crossed for him and his partner in June. KLAUS JOPP MORE INFORMATION www.berufsbildung.studer.com

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INSIDE

WHAT ARE YOU DOING NOW? Over 2000 people work for the SCHLEIFRING Group around the world. What exactly do they do? In each Motion edition we present four employees – like Martin Pleva from the Machine Acceptance Department in Ku im, in Czechia

Fehraltorf BERN

NAME: Peter Hiltbrunner POSITION: After-sales customer adviser at Mägerle AG Maschinenfabrik, Switzerland

Ku im

CONTACT: peter.hiltbrunner@maegerle.com

POSITION: Acceptance Support at Walter s.r.o., Ku im, Czech Republic CONTACT: info.wcz@walter-machines.com

“I MAKE SURE THE CUSTOMER “I PASS ON MY MANY YEARS OF EXPERTISE AND TRAIN SERVICE RECEIVES THE MACHINE IN PER- TECHNICIANS.” FECT CONDITION.”

“AT THE MOMENT I AM CLEANING a HELITRONIC tool grinding machine, which takes about an hour. My colleague will then make some minor corrections to the paint. Meanwhile I will connect the cooling unit and mist collector to the next machine, in preparation for the grinding tests. Before I fix the axes for transport, I rub protective wax into the machine. This prevents corrosion. I have been working in the Machine Acceptance Department for two years. I am er sponsible for the phases before and after the acceptance tests. The machines are then sent to the customer. At WALTER I have to work very precisely - almost perfectly. That suits me just fine. I have been collecting old cars, tractors and especially motorbikes for years; most of them were made before I was born. I now have 22 vintage cars. I’m just as meticulous and tenacious in their restoration as when I’m working in the factory. The technology and mechanics of machines fascinate me. I love dismantling them, restoring them and reviving them. I have already toured halfway round Europe on my motorbikes, from Czechia to Estonia, Italy and the Netherlands. It’s an indescribable feeling to ride a 46-year old CZ 250 and to know that I have fitted every bolt myself with my own hands.”

“THE PRECISION OF A PROFILE GRINDING MACHINE, measured in thousandths of a millimeter - this is what I had to estore. r For this purpose I have traveled to Denmark and visited a large customer whom I have known for decades. I rely on my many years of experience to correct the machine geometry. I have been with MÄGERLE for almost fifty years and look after customers at home and abroad. I began my apprenticeship as a machine fitter in 1963, was later trained as a service technician and was customer service manager for 25 years – and I did business studies along the way. I have been retired since last August, but still work in Customer Service on an hourly basis. Stopping altogether never occurred to me. MÄGERLE is like a big family for me. Indeed, as a young apprentice I would lie under the machine together with the company founder, Karl Mägerle. Now I pass on my knowledge and train service technicians. My current tasks also include repairing grinding machines, supporting in-house service and training customers during machine acceptances, also on site in the USA and China. A number of customers and employees in our sales and service agencies have become friends, as a result of our many years of collaboration. We play golf together when we can. As well as my holiday home in the mountains, that’s pure relaxation for me.”

Photos: Thinkstock (4); privat (4)

NAME: Martin Pleva

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MÄGERLE

BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

NAME: Dr. Jiani Wu

BERN

POSITION: Marketing Intelligence Manager at Körber Schleifring AG, Bern, Switzerland CONTACT: jiani.wu@schleifring.net

Hamburg BERLIN

Göppingen

NAME: Arturo Palmeiro

“I HELP TO ANALYZE MARKETS IN GREATER DEPTH.”

POSITION: Application technician at Blohm Jung GmbH, Göppingen and Hamburg, Germany CONTACT: arturo.palmeiro@blohmjung.com

“RIGHT NOW I HAVE ON MY DESK the market analyses for China and India. These will serve as models for further analyses, so that we can answer questions like: ‘Where are we?’ ‘How can we continue to develop?’ Creating an analysis pattern, interpreting figures – for me, that’s creative thinking. It’s what I like – as well as the freedom to be able to introduce my own ideas. With my work I support the Management of the SCHLEIFRING Group, so that business decisions are based on facts, market developments are detected at an early stage and customers, markets and competitors can be analyzed in more depth. I have been employed as Marketing Intelligence Manager in the Business Development and Marketing Department since August 2012. Previously I worked for Volkswagen in Wolfsburg. An exchange program between the Universities of Bayreuth and Shanghai brought me to the German-speaking regions. I gained my master’s degree and doctorate in Bavaria, and my bachelor’s degree in China, where I grew up. With my personal insights I may be able to promote my colleagues’ understanding of Asia and the Chinese market. I am discovering my new home on an aesthetic level above all, and enjoy visiting art exhibitions. I also like painting - with brush and ink, in the Chinese tradition.”

“I TRAIN CUSTOMERS’ EMPLOYEES ON THE MACHINES ON SITE.”

“I AM IN THE GÖPPINGEN SHOWROOM training a customer’s employees on a profile grinding machine for a week. A so-called CNC training course – the tool manufacturers know the technology, but the machine and therefore the control system and programs are new. And that’s what I love about my job: I have been working for JUNG since 1978, have accumulated a lot of technical know-how over the years, know many machines down to the last detail and yet there’s still always something new to learn. I spend 80 to 90 percent of my working time on business trips. I have already traveled to many countries in the world on business - only not Australia. Travel is stressful. Nevertheless, I also like traveling privately. But of course with more time to get to know the country and the people better. I provide colleagues and customers with advice and assistance in questions relating to technology and application technology. In addition to machine demonstrations in our showrooms and at trade fairs, training is the main constituent of my work. I work closely together with customers and employees on site. The fact that I’m a native Spaniar d definitely helps me. I can easily derive a number of languages om fr my native tongue, for example Italian and Portuguese. I can communicate in these.” Motion 01. 2013

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INTERVIEW

THE SECRET OF PRECISION What does precision mean? What value does it have in society? Elena Richter, archer, Dr.-Ing. Christian Wenzel, expert in precision machines at the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology, and Michael Horn, Chief Operation Officer (COO) of the SCHLEIFRING Group in conversation in the Motion interview

Meeting point Maritime Museum, Hamburg: Precision specialist Dr.-Ing. Christian Wenzel (l.), archer Elena Richter and Michael Horn, Chief Operation Officer at Kรถrber Schleifring AG

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BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

Photo: Alexander Babic

MÄGERLE

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INTERVIEW

Motion: Ms. Richter, can you describe the precision, which is crucial during archery, a little? Elena Richter: We shoot at a distance of 70 meters. The target is 122 centimeters wide and the gold center ring is 12.2 centimeters. The arrow has a diameter of ar ound five millimeters. In other words: You have to be precise. Can a machine do what Ms. Richter does ? Christian Wenzel: I believe that, thanks to the development of sensor technology, a machine could do this. It is extr emely challenging for a person to get the right angle. At the end of the day you are talking about angles, if you want to hit a small ar ea from a distance of 70 meters. But people have no organ for sensing or perceiving the angle. A length is much easier to estimate. Elena Richter: We have a sight to help us, which is roughly a meter away from the eye and is one square centimeter in size, with a small dot. An optical aiming device. If you compare our bows to a rear and front sight system, you will see that we have no rear sight. Rear and front sight are simply superimposed on each other dur -

“THE CUSTOMER’S REQUIREMENTS GO FAR BEYOND THE ISSUE OF PRECISION. THE CUSTOMER WANTS US TO UNDERSTAND THE PROCESS, AND TO ULTIMATELY ELIMINATE WASTEFULNESS WITHIN IT.” Michael Horn

ing sighting; we only have the front sight, but it doesn’t tell you how straight you are standing. In effect we do everything ourselves. Michael Horn: In the machine tool industry we use so-called pr ocess capability. What you have to achieve by means of ‘Practice makes perfect’, from shot to shot, we are able to do with the help of a stable process, sensor technology, a learning curve, through the identification of deviations and, finally, through error avoidance.. Is your recurve bow a precision instrument, Ms. Richter? Elena Richter: I would certainly say that. There is another type of bow, the compound bow – which is an even greater precision instrument. The attraction of the recurve bow is that the human factor is greater.

Christian Wenzel: In the world of machinery you can also see that people have very dif ferent ideas. The question is often: How precise is this machine? We then talk about so many micrometers. But what sort of statement is that? It’s not a precise statement. Precision is also of high value for the SCHLEIFRING Group. BLOHM, for instance, achieves precisions of under ten micrometers over a length of two meters during flat grinding with the PLANOMAT. WALTER guarantees tolerances of two micrometers with absolute repeatability on the HELITRONIC MICRO. At STUDER precision even goes into the nanometer range with the S12 Michael Horn: Basically our aim is to be the measure of all things when it comes to precision. But we don’t just consider the machine

IN CONVERSATION MICHAEL HORN

Michael Horn (41), who has worked for the SCHLEIFRING Group since 2007, has been responsible for the areas of Production and Supply Chain Management since 2010. Horn has been Chief Operation Officer since 2013 and in addition to the abovementioned divisions also manages all issues to do with Lean Excellence as well as Branch Procurement.

ELENA RICHTER

Elena Richter (23) is an archer in the Olympic discipline of recurve archery. The Berliner celebrated her greatest successes at the European Championships in 2011 (1st place, Individual) and 2012 (3rd place, Team). At the 2011 World Championships she came ninth with the team. At the 2012 Olympic Games she took 17th place. She loves the ‘crazy aesthetics’ of her sport.

Christian Wenzel (36) studied Mechanical Engineering and specialized in Production technology at RWTH Aachen. In July 2001 he began working as research associate in the Product Machines Department of the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Technology (IPT). Since July 2006 he has managed the Precision Machinery and Automation Technology Department at Fraunhofer IPT.

There are no technical aids for aiming. “We really do it all ourselves”, says Elena Richter

Photos: Alexander Babic

DR.-ING. CHRISTIAN WENZEL

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MÄGERLE

BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

Precision in the manufacture of grinding machines is not enough for the customer, according to Michael Horn. As manufacturer you have to think though the entire process in which the machine will be integrated

as an individual element, we try to see the complete process. This involves mor e than just a machine. It can include environmental influences, a raw material situation or an infrastructure, just as in archery. How important is precision as a competitive factor? Is there competition in terms of precision? Michael Horn: Customer requirements go far beyond precision. The customer wants us to understand his process, and ultimately eliminate wastefulness in the process. That is also the competition which our company must face. Grinding machines operate with a precision of just a few nanometers – so millionths of millimeters. What practical relevance does this have for the market? Christian Wenzel: Dimensional stability below one micrometer is required for machine tools, I would say. I come fr om the optical sector myself. In precision optics you have values of 0.1 or 0.2 micrometers on an area 20 – 30 millimeters in diameter. The question is always, at what cost. An interesting question for this discussion is: Pr ecision and available time. This puts a lot of things into perspective.

“WE SHOOT AT A DISTANCE OF 70 METERS. THE TARGET IS 122 CENTIMETERS WIDE AND THE GOLD CENTER RING IS 12.2 CENTIMETERS. THE ARROW HAS A DIAMETER OF AROUND FIVE MILLIMETERS. IN OTHER WORDS: YOU HAVE TO BE PRECISE.”

Nanometers, micrometers, millimeters, meters? How can we measure precision?

Elena Richter

Michael Horn: I also think that you have to see it from the viewpoint of the customer task. Let’ s take an example from the tool industry, where WALTER and EWAG are active. The customer gives us tasks like: “I need a complex cutting edge geometry, but please make it so that each of these tools always has the same wear behavior.” Here I have to produce the highest precision in a qualified process, but I also have to compare the cost to the benefit. Precision naturally has to be measurable. Can measuring technology follow into the nano range?

Michael Horn: In the machine industry we incorporate the development of measuring equipment into many machining methods and process solutions. A very large number of influencing variables ar e important in the machine development process. A measuring equipment manufacturer cannot guarantee process capability without knowing these setting parameters. Christian Wenzel: We produce surfaces for optical applications. These can generally still be measured. However, the measur ement of microstructures is by far the weakest link in the Motion 01. 2013

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

INTERVIEW

chain. It is not unusual for us to deliver components which have not or have only partially been measured. Measuring technology is always a neck-and-neck race, but often measuring technology is lagging behind. Ms. Richter, is there a trend in archery over the centuries towards a constant increase in precision and aiming accuracy? Elena Richter: Yes, I think so. If only because the material can be mor e precise. Otherwise nothing much will change in the equipment in our sport, because it’s fundamental that it is kept so simple and nevertheless high perfor mances are achieved. Michael Horn: Does the experience which you gain in competitions also influence your equipment? Do you tune your own arrows? Do you weigh them? Elena Richter: That’s exactly right. I tune my bow myself. Naturally I also have assistance. What would interest me is whether the manufacturers could be influenced more. The arrow is a carbon shaft with aluminium, but its inner

core is hollow. The tips are made of tungsten and are very inaccurate. We have put them on the precision scale and thrown up our hands in despair. They fluctuate from one arrow to another. At a unit price of 15 – 16 euros you expect quality. The question again is: Cost and benefit? In another interview you talked about the ‘crazy aesthetics’ of archery. Can you explain these aesthetics to us? Elena Richter: How do you explain aesthetics? I think this is something that you find or don’t find individually. What I like about archery is that it requires a lot of strength. Lots of people who

pick up a bow for the first time are surprised that it’s so heavy. The bow weight that I pull back is around 17 – 18 kilos. Yet people don’t see archery as being strenuous. Let’s take a brief look at the history of precision. In 1759 John Harrison perfected the first chronometer, which had the necessary precision to precisely determine longitude. Is there a tour de force from the present time, which stands for precision in the same way as the first chronograph in its time? Christian Wenzel: For my field I would say EUV lithography. The precision achieved here

“WE LOOK FOR EMPLOYEES WHO IDENTIFY WITH THE PRODUCT AND THE CUSTOMER, AND HELP THE CUSTOMER TO FIND WHAT HE NEEDS.” Michael Horn

Photos: Alexander Babic

In machine tools the development of measuring equipment often has to be integrated into machine development, says Michael Horn

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MÄGERLE

BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

“THE PRECISION OF THE PRODUCTION RESULTS IS SIGNIFICANTLY INFLUENCED BY THE MACHINE OPERATOR AND HIS ENTHUSIASM.” Christian Wenzel

is incredible. And in the consumer world: The iPhone was a revolution in my opinion. Michael Horn: We deal intensively with laser technology. This is a milestone for me, but primarily in combination with other machining methods. It has opened up new possibilities for us. Christian Wenzel, precision specialist at Fraunhofer IPT, firmly believes in the human factor in achieving precision

Is precision the only way of being successful, or are there others? Christian Wenzel: A great deal of time and money can be spent on the machine in pr ocess adjustment. The machine’s intelligence is an issue here. Have we succeeded in this so far? I would say: no. The car is an indication of how favorable sensor technology can equip a complete system with intelligence. You can have an infrared camera in your car and see the deer in the forest, which you wouldn’t see otherwise. If I compare the machine tool to the car, I have to say that it still has a huge amount of potential. The rationale for this is that these are very different markets. The automotive industry is driven by the end customer, who wants to have exciting new things every five years.

Precision instrument from the 18th century: a sextant in the Maritime Museum, Hamburg

Michael Horn: Precision goes a step further . When we have succeeded in networking machines and systems thr oughout the value creation process, so that they independently correct their operating states in the event of the smallest deviations and no wastefulness occurs at any point in the value flow, then we will have taken another big step in the dir ection of precision. How great is the human factor in the precision machine? Christian Wenzel: The precision of the production results is significantly influenced by the machine operator and his enthusiasm. The question we should ask ourselves is to what

extent is it possible to further r educe human involvement in pr oduction. The issue: Automation. Michael Horn: Precision and passion play a large role in the SCHLEIFRING Gr oup, because we are convinced that we can only focus on sustainability with employees who are passionate about their work. People r emain the crucial factor, because they bring their experience to new developments and improvements. It’s not just a matter of the machine operation, because this is pr ogrammed, but it’s also about the subsequent interpr etation of what has happened. In other wor ds, also about correction grinding and interpr etation, to make the whole system better. When I talk to our people, they often still know the numbers of the machines which they have delivered, and the precision of the parts machined by them. That is their driving force. They talk to the people who accept the machine in the final stage. How pr ecise was it? And if the precision was of a high level, then they have achieved their aim. This is what motivates them. In other words, we look for employees who identify with the product and the customer, and help the customer to find what he needs. Do you find enough young people who want to develop this attitude? Michael Horn: Above all, we have to pr esent the importance of the job in the right light. We have a very high training quota in our company, which is far above the industry average. As the apprenticeship job of grinder does not officially exist as such, for example, we run an extensive training program and train our experts ourselves. INTERVIEW: MICHAEL HOPP

CONTACT michael.horn@schleifring.net

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

A DAY WITH ...

7.50

After a 40-minute drive from home, Beat Oderbolz arrives in the office. His versatile, travel-intensive profession wouldn’t have been possible without the support of his wife and daughter. “My family’s acceptance was always there”, says Oderbolz.

A DAY WITH … BEAT ODERBOLZ “He’s a real allrounder,” colleagues say about the Head of Innovation and Product Management at Ewag AG in Etziken, Switzerland. We accompanied him on a normal working day

BEAT ODERBOLZ has a long working day. He starts just before his

Asian business partners shut down their computers and stops when the Americans drink their first coffee-to-go. Global work patterns have long determined the day of the skilled mechanical design engineer. For 18 years Oderbolz was worldwide sales manager for EWAG, and before that regional sales manager. Since the beginning of the year he has been the Head of Innovation and Product Management. With a team of eight specialists, Oderbolz is working on EWAG’s future success. A task which drives him out into the world. He travels to customers in England, France, Japan or in the USA. His current projects are LASER LINE and INSERT LINE. “These help us to work faster and produce better quality than our competitors”, says Oderbolz. A key function in his work involves the world’s largest tool manufacturer, the Swedish Sandvik group.

8.30

First discussions in the office with Marcel Gnägi, Head of Product Lifecycle Management. Beat Oderbolz and his team trim LASER LINE and INSERT LINE to market readiness.

CONTACT

beat.oderbolz@ewag.com

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MÄGERLE

BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

11.00

On the way to the customer. Fulfilling the trust which the customer places in EWAG is important to Beat Oderbolz. The technical discussions with customers and staff also appeal to him. Oderbolz has worked in the company for 35 years, and has been in contact with many customers for a long time. This creates a basis for trust in countless discussions.

12.00

A “specification presentation” to the customer. Oderbolz discusses the customer’s order with the heads of the Application, Development and Logistics departments. What are the specific application requirements?

15.00

Photos: Guy Jost

With Thomas Fischer, member of the Innovation team, at a LASER LINE. “A revolutionary technology,” comments Oderbolz. “The laser opens up new dimensions in the machining of extremely hard materials such as diamonds, for example.”

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

A DAY WITH ...

“IN ORDER TO MANUFACTURE INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS, YOU HAVE TO BE CLOSE TO THE CUSTOMER.” Beat Oderbolz, Head of Innovation Product Management, EWAG

16.30

Oderbolz and Thomas Fischer constantly communicate. The team has flat hierarchies. “We need our colleagues, each person has an important function here,” says Oderbolz.

19.00

18.00

Photos: Guy Jost

Another meeting: The focus is mid-term planning. When must which machines be delivered? Which big projects are coming up?

On the way home. In private Beat Oderbolz is a real family man. He is active, meets up with friends, and enjoys a variety of sports together with his wife and daughter. “My daughter has inherited my travel bug,” says Oderbolz. “She travels a lot.”

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MÄGERLE

BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY NEWS FROM THE SCHLEIFRING GROUP

CONTENTS 30

BLOHM GreenCap How a new encapsulation concept saves costs in the aircraft industry

32

MÄGERLE MGC-L-210.50.110 How one machine grinds different gear systems

33

WALTER HELICHECK How the new measuring machines work with extra-long workpieces

34

BLOHM PROKOS How a complete machining system minimizes machining times

34

BLOHM and JUNG RazorTec How a technological innovation optimizes dressing and cleaning

35

MIKROSA KRONOS L 550 How the grinding wheel diameter extends set-up intervals

Precise measurement of extra-long workpieces: The new WALTER HELICHECK PRO L and PLUS L measuring machines measure tools with lengths up to 730 mm free from natural oscillations, thanks to a new steady rest

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TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY

CLAMPING METHOD WITH ZIP FASTENER Blohm Jung GmbH in conjunction with a Swiss engineering company has developed the GreenCap clamping method - a patented encapsulation technique, which considerably reduces the machining costs of turbine blades, which require complex grinding

IN THE MANUFACTURE OF AVIATION TURBINES the

grinding of turbine blades is still an extr emely cost-intensive process step. One r eason for this is the complexity of grinding the r oot and shroud of the up to 300 mm long blades. In many applications it has previously been necessary to cast the turbine blades in metal blocks comprising low-melting alloys, which serve for clamping the blades. The pr oblem with this: The non-value adding process of casting and melting out, as well as the operation and maintenance of the melting fur nace, result in high costs. “Some of our customers try to eliminate the casting of the blades and therewith the associated costs, by clamping the parts in har d clamping devices without any further auxiliary aids”, explains Arne Hoffmann, project engineer in the T echnology team at Blohm Jung GmbH. However, the resulting clamping forces cause small, undesirable and unacceptable indentations at the contact points with the turbine blades. Effects in the surface zone of the partially very thin and long precision-cast components can also not be excluded.

OPTIMIZATION APPROACH The new and unique clamping method fr om BLOHM enables a basic approach to optimize the grinding of turbine blades. Instead of using metal as in the past, the turbine blades are sheathed in a plastic casing using a standar d

commercial plastic injection molding machine. The savings potential of this new technology is huge: the costs per blade can be r educed by half. This is primarily due to the drastically reduced energy requirement. The method also helps to rationalize the pr oduction process. The just a few millimeters thick plastic coating cools down so quickly, that the cycle time per blade is only 1.5 minutes.

BLOHM molds the turbine blades in a plastic casing using a standard commercial plastic injection molding machine

“THE COSTS PER BLADE ARE ONLY MAXIMUM The special feature of this method is the exter50 PERCENT OF THOSE FOR nal contour of the plastic casing. Its patented design ensures a positive connection with the THE METAL CASTING clamping device, which is shaped as the negative of the casing. In this way an even distribu- PROCESS.” PATENTED DESIGN

tion of the clamping for ces on the workpiece can be guaranteed. The GreenCap injection molding tool and clamping device ar e manufactured together, to match each other perfectly. Manufacturing is carried out in batches – around 200 blades are molded in the plastic casing and then ground.

Arne Hoffmann, Technology Team project engineer, Blohm Jung GmbH

The second highlight of the GreenCap method is the zip fastener , a br eak-out interface, by means of which the plastic casing can be r emoved from the turbine blade residue-free with a special tool. The plastic used has a high compressive and tensile str ength and can be r ecycled. “The material is shredded after removal

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BLOHM

JUNG

STUDER

SCHAUDT

MIKROSA

WALTER

EWAG

Positioning pins

Casting mold, upper part

Turbine blade

Casting mold, lower part

and reused, mixed with 20 percent fresh material”, explains Arne Hoffmann. “Our method can make a large contribution to rationalizing the grinding process, particularly with very filigree, pressure-sensitive components such as turbine blades made from titanium aluminide”, says Hoffmann. This new blade material is very light and is used increasingly in fuel-saving engines. But it is also heavier to cut and reacts more sensitively to pressure than the pr eviously used nickelbased alloys. BLOHM is currently developing the clamping method for series production in conjunction with a customer. CONTACT arne.hoffmann@blohmjung.com

BLOHM has patented the external contour of the plastic casing

THE ADVANTAGES AT A GLANCE Use of commercially available plastic injection molding machines resulting in substantially lower acquisition and energy costs In comparison with metal casting, only 50 percent of the costs are incurred per blade Very fast processing: the cycle time per blade is just 1.5 minutes The plastic casing prevents damage to the workpiece surface and is thinner, but stronger than the metal block “Zip fastening” for quick, residue-free separation of workpiece and casing After removal the workpiece casing is shredded and returned to the process Motion 01. 2013

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TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY

“THE FORM FITTING ACCURACY OF THE COUPLING IS CRUCIAL!” Gilbert Leutwiler, Area Sales Manager, Mägerle AG

GRINDING CURVIC AND HIRTH COUPLINGS With the MGC-L-210.50.110 all coupling systems and types can be flexibly ground for turbine rotor disks in power turbines. A crucial element in MÄGERLE’s new development is the combined, swiveling grinding head with integrated flushing nozzle system The diameter of the NC rotary table is 2500 mm and the through-hole is 1200 mm

IN POWER TURBINES Curvic and Hirth couplings guarantee the high-precision positioning and power transmission of the turbine rotor disks and shafts. The axial pr ecision of the complete rotor – which partially comprises mor e than 25 individual components with a total length of twelve meters – results from the tolerance sum of the individual tooth couplings, which connect the various components together. “Grinding Curvic couplings and Hirth couplings requires two different production methods”, explains Gilbert Leutwiler , Area Sales Manager at Mägerle AG in Fehraltorf, Switzerland. Hirth couplings ar e machined on a horizontal grinding machine with a profiled cylindrical grinding wheel. Curvic couplings, on the other hand, ar e machined on a vertical grinding machine, which is equipped with a cup-type grinding wheel.

ONE CONCEPT FOR ALL TOOTH COUPLINGS

all coupling systems and types, they must have ADVANTAGES AT A GLANCE Production of all gear systems and types a corresponding number of different grinding Implementation of different tooth geometries machines. This was too unpr oductive in the and contact patterns long run for one of these companies, which Short set-up times and manufacturing cycles was still using manual single-purpose grinding Reproducible quality no matter who is operating machines. One single machine was required the machine for the high-precision grinding of all coupling Efficient, stable, automated grinding process types. MÄGERLE consequently developed Automatic detection of the reference position the MGC-L-210.50.110. The new machine Reduced manufacturing costs concept is based on the MGC series and can TECHNICAL DATA grind both coupling types with highest pr ecision, as well as implementing a wide variety X-axis: 2100 mm of tooth geometries and contact patterns. The Y-axis: 1100 mm (vertical) new production system thus guarantees the Z-axis: 500 mm (horizontal) user an efficient, stable and automated grindWater-cooled spindle (30 kW) with integrated balancing system ing process. Positioning and determination of 2500 mm NC rotary table with 1200 mm the reference positions is performed automatithrough-hole cally via a retractable measuring probe directly Drive: torque motor with water cooling on the machine. The results are shorter set-up Speed: 100 rpm and manufacturing times as well as reproducRadial and axial runout: < 5 µm ible product quality irrespective of the machine Table loading: up to 15 t operator’s experience – and thus a consider Integrated measuring system for referencing able reduction in manufacturing costs. and IPC (“in process control”)

Grinding of the tooth coupling on the large rotor disks and shafts for steam and gas turbines CONTACT gilbert.leutwiler@maegerle.com is typically performed by specialized contract grinders. If they want to be able to flexibly grind

Positioning accuracy: < 2.5 angular seconds

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“THE PRECISION CHARACTERISTIC E1 FOR BOTH NEW MACHINES IN A PRODUCTION ENVIRONMENT IS AN EXTREMELY EFFICIENT (1.4+L/300) MICROMETER.” Oliver Wenke, Manager of the Measuring Technology Development Center at WALTER

MISSION “EXTRA-LONG”

ADVANTAGES AT A GLANCE New type of support

In February of this year they went into series production with the first delivery to customers: the two new measuring machines WALTER HELICHECK PRO L and WALTER HELICHECK PLUS L for measuring tools with a length up to 730 mm

No mechanical damage to the tool Practically no set-up time Any tool diameter Precise measurement of standard to extra-long tools (PRO L) or micro tools (PLUS L) Option to expand the range of products

TECHNICAL DATA X-axis: 260 mm Y-axis: 795 mm Z-axis: 250 mm A-axis: 360 degrees

THE HIGH DEMANDS in the metalworking industry – especially in automotive engineering – require increasingly complex and longer tools to increase productivity. For example, a modern solid carbide drill with internal cooling is six to ten times as powerful as the established single-fluted deep-hole drills. “The standard drilling depths possible with these tools are 30 x D (D = tool diameter). But extreme drilling depths of 70 x D have already been achieved”, says Oliver Wenke, Manager of the Measuring Technology Development Center at WALTER in Garbsen (Germany).

NEW STEADY REST These extra-long tools are extremely sensitive to natural oscillations and cannot be measured in the required precision in the conventional manner. An appropriate steady rest is essential. In addition, alignment or retooling to different diameters is very time-consuming. With the aim of being able to offer its customers efficient measuring technology for their complete range of tools, WALTER developed the new HELICHECK PRO L and PLUS L measuring machines with a new steady rest for extra-long tools, together with a key account customer . This solution eliminates natural oscillations, mechanical pinching of the tool out of the central position and thus the risk of damaging the tool in the machine. The new machines enable users of standar d to extra-long tools and, in the case of the HELICHECK PLUS L, even micro tools, to measure precisely. The precision characteristic E1 = (1.4+L/300) µm guarantees high efficiency and process reliability.

Repeatability: ≤ 1 µm Position resolution for linear axes X, Y, Z: 0,004 µm Position resolution for rotation axis A: 0.00036 degrees Max. tool diameter: 200 mm Max. tool length / weight: 730 mm/25 kg

The HELICHECK PLUS L from WALTER measures even micro tools precisely

CONTACT oliver.wenke@walter-machines.com

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TOOLS & TECHNOLOGY

“THIS MULTIPURPOSE MACHINE MEETS MUCH HIGHER REQUIREMENTS IN RESPECT OF PRECISION AND SURFACE QUALITY THAN CONVENTIONAL MACHINING CENTERS.” Peter Oppelt, Head of Technology, Blohm Jung GmbH PROKOS complete machining center for drilling, milling and speed stroke grinding in a single clamping

COMPLETELY COOLED

SUPER SHARP, SUPER CLEAN

The BLOHM PROKOS is now available as a complete machining center

BLOHM and JUNG can reduce grinding wheel wear by 30 percent with RazorTec PREVIOUSLY GRINDING WHEELS WERE kept “sharp” by means of continuous

THE FEWER CLAMPINGS, the lower the non-pro-

ductive times and error rates and the higher the obtained precision. True to this grinding wisdom, BLOHM has expanded its proven speed stroke grinding machine PROKOS to create a complete machining center for drilling, milling and grinding in a single clamping. Particularly when machining complex parts such as turbine blades, complete machining contributes to rationalization - without any loss of quality in geometry and metallurgy. The special challenge in upgrading the PROKOS lay in the coolant supply for the drilling and milling operations. The coolant is conveyed in a separate, connectable line through the spindle and chuck to the machining point with the respective drilling or cutting tool. Every PROKOS manufactured since 2011 can be expanded into a complete machining center. CONTACT peter.oppelt@blohmjung.com

dressing, in order to accelerate the grinding process. The problem with this: the higher grinding speed is purchased with a higher grinding wheel wear. A reduction in grinding wheel wear by reducing dressing would result in a blunt grinding wheel and er duced product quality. “We have now developed a method which allows the effectiveness of the entire grinding process to be considerably increased”, says Peter Oppelt, Head of Technology at BLOHM and JUNG in Hamburg. The RazorTec method combines continuous cleaning with aggressive dressing of the grinding wheel in process-dependent intervals. The core of the process is the newly developed nozzle positioner, which enables precise positioning of cleaning and coolant nozzle throughout the grinding process. BLOHM and JUNG have been offering RazorTec for all new production machines except the ORBIT since the end of 2012. CONTACT peter.oppelt@blohmjung.com

THE ADVANTAGES AT A GLANCE 30 percent lower grinding wheel wear 30 – 40 bar nozzle pressure Coolant consumption for cleaning: 1 l/min/mm Optional for production machines High energy efficiency

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The new KRONOS L 550 centerless grinding machine is available immediately

NEW ADDITION TO THE FAMILY MIKROSA is expanding its range of centerless grinding machines with the KRONOS L 550 THE KRONOS L 660 now has a little sister. The new KRONOS L 550, with its vibration-damping and thermally stable machine bed made of GRANITAN®, has the same basic structure and therefore possesses an equally high system rigidity and precision. In addition to the automotive industry, target groups for the new centerless grinding machine are manufacturers of roller bearings, hydraulics and white goods as well as general machine tools.

REDUCTION OF UNPRODUCTIVE AUXILIARY TIMES In contrast to the larger version, the grinding wheel widths on the KRONOS L 550 are slightly smaller. However, because of its diameter of maximum 660 millimeters the grinding wheel enables around 25 percent more wear than the smaller KRONOS M 400. As a result grinding wheel change intervals are extended and unproductive auxiliary times are reduced. There are also many additional advantages for the customer. He can grind more quickly and machine larger, heavier workpieces than on the smaller machines of the KRONOS-M series. The diameter range of the workpieces that can be ground on the new KRONOS L 550 is 5 to 250 millimeters. The maximum infeed length is 545 millimeters. The KRONOS L 550 allows straight infeed grinding in single or multiple production as well as throughfeed grinding. The customer therefore benefits from a correspondingly high flexibility and productivity of the machine. As the new member of the KRONOS family has a fixed grinding gap, the L 550 can also be automated simply and cost-effectively. And: It is available immediately! CONTACT karsten.otto@schaudtmikrosa.com

EN_35_Motion_01_2013 35

TYPICAL GRINDING APPLICATIONS Camshafts, gearshafts and crankshafts Steering racks and shock absorber piston rods Drive, spindle and selector shafts Brake pistons Cylinder liners Roller bearing rings Rolling elements

ADVANTAGES AT A GLANCE Large infeed length of 545 mm Large diameter range up to 250 mm Individual and multiple production Can be automated simply and cost-effectively Vibration-damping and thermally stable GRANITAN® machine bed High static and dynamic system rigidity

The grinding wheel supported on both sides, with maintenance-free permanent grease lubrication and a diameter of 660 mm

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INTERNATIONAL

PUTTING DOWN ROOTS IN CHINA

Photos: Jackson Lowen

Going to China to save costs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this is what companies did in the past. The SCHLEIFRING Group succeeds in the Asian growth market with proven quality and local service

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Installation engineer Gui Bin operates the suspension crane, for transporting the workpiece

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INTERNATIONAL

“THAT’S GOING BACK.” Jürgen Schock assesses a guide carriage, which has just arrived fr om a Chinese supplier . His gaze slides acr oss the smooth metal surface and comes to r est on a tiny hole: smaller than a grain of rice, barely visible to the naked eye. “Of course, a hole like this usually has no effect on the functioning of the part”, says Schock. “But even the smallest irr egularities are not permitted in our grinding machines.”

PRODUCTION DIRECTLY IN THE GROWTH MARKET Jürgen Schock is the Managing Dir ector of the Shanghai branch of the SCHLEIFRING Group. The company has manufactur ed precision grinding machines her e since 2008. Körber Schleifring Machinery Shanghai has its 16 000 square meter factory headquarters in Anting Industrial Zone, at the edge of the metr opolis with 20 million inhabitants. Here the factories of car manufacturers, machine manufacturers and tool producers are packed side by side for kilometers. Many of the companies in the vicinity have been customers of the SCHLEIFRING Group for years. “China is one of our most important gr owth markets”, says Jürgen Schock, as he leads the way thr ough the factory buildings. The hum of machines fills the air; around 50 employees work here in production on a daily basis. Schock has managed the Shanghai branch for the last two years. The 50-year old comes from Fritz Studer AG in Thun in Switzerland, where he was division manager for a number of years.

As in Europe, the SCHLEIFRING Group is also leading in China. The locally produced machines fulfil the requirements of the inter national SCHLEIFRING Quality Standards and set standards in respect of quality, cost-effectiveness and efficiency. “From a technical viewpoint we are still way ahead of our competition her e”, says Jürgen Schock. The quality difference is particularly noticeable in the dimensional accuracy and surface condition of the workpieces, which the customer machines on the grinding machines. “Surface roughness in mirror quality”, Schock calls it: “Where our machines can split a hair into 50 pieces, other machines can currently only manage five.” But the competition is catching up quickly. China is developing into a market with constantly increasing requirements on quality and cost effectiveness. Many Chinese companies are already investing in highprecision products in the area of grinding machines. “The Chinese will want to sell Chinese machines in futur e”, Schock is convinced. The times when Asian customers trusted pr oducts simply because they were presented by a European are gone. “It’s now no longer the norm for the Chinese to go specially to Switzerland to conclude a purchase agreement.” The SCHLEIFRING Group’s core strategy in China is therefore: local production, local support, local value cr eation for the customer. The challenge is to identify the market requirements of Chinese customers and to develop products, applications and services on this basis. In order to achieve this, we must speak the customer’ s language – i.e.

Photos: Jackson Lowen

Managing Director Jürgen Schock (top right) has managed the SCHLEIFRING Group’s branch in Shanghai for the last two years. Together with his Chinese colleagues he is responsible for a fundamental strategy of the group: local production in the market

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“WE SEE OURSELVES AS A LOCAL SOLUTION PROVIDER, WHO OFFERS INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SERVICES.” Jürgen Schock, Managing Director

possess market and cultural knowledge. And language skills: marketing, technical support, after-sales service and training - all of this takes place in Chinese. Almost all of the more than 200 employees are Chinese, including the development engineers. “We see ourselves as a local solution provider who offers not only machines, but also integrated production services”, says Schock. The customer benefits from this through short response times, requirement-oriented products and services, cultural understanding and local support and services.

FINDING GOOD EMPLOYEES IS IMPORTANT Quality also depends on the know-how of the workfor ce. And finding good employees is an important task. “W e have many products, but only manufacture small quantities. A wide variety of skills are needed for this”, says Works Manager Jürgen Schock. His people must also know exactly which production solution is suitable for which customer. The problem: “The workers come to us straight fr om school, and the engineers straight from university. The theoretical training is good, but there is no type of practical industrial training in China. They have to acquire certain basics first of all: how to tighten a scr ew or deburr a part.” In addition the workfor ce is very young: the average age is 33. “Only a very few have gained operating experience in the machine tool industry before their time with us”, says Schock. “We therefore train all of our employees ourselves.” This high-quality training, partly also in the European branches, fair wages as well as development opportunities and internal further training of management personnel make the SCHLEIFRING Group an attractive employer in China. The staf f turnover is also comparatively low: many employees have worked for the company for a long time.

QUALITY REQUIREMENTS ON SUPPLIERS TOO The search for the right suppliers also proved a challenge initially. “We have to examine all incoming goods thor oughly. When we order from a new supplier, we often send every third part back to start with”, says Schock. The guide carriage with the millimeter-sized hole is a more innocuous example. In the past it was often necessary to change supplier again. “But today we have established partners, who have now attained a high quality level in close cooperation with us.” And so the maxim also applies in China: If you see the name SCHLEIFRING Group on the outside, then you know there’s SCHLEIFRING quality on the inside. XIFAN YANG CONTACT juergen.schock@schleifring.cn

The employees learn every operation from scratch. Most employees in China come straight from school

SCHLEIFRING IN CHINA A success story: 1937 SCHLEIFRING company STUDER exports its first machine to China 1994 The SCHLEIFRING Group opens its first sales and service office in Peking 1995 Opening of a SCHLEIFRING office in Shanghai, 1997 in Chongqing 2004 The SCHLEIFRING Group opens its production plant in Taicang 2008 Move to Anting (Shanghai) Today more than 200 employees work at SCHLEIFRING in China Machines are produced for the tool, watch and aviation industries as well as for power plant manufacturers and medical technology Sales and service offices are operated in Peking, Chongqing, Guangzhou and Wuxi SCHLEIFRING relies on good relationships with universities and colleges

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IDEAS

Today Shanghai, tomorrow Prague: Modern entrepreneurs are at home all over the world

THE GLOBAL STAGE: AN INTERCULTURAL CHALLENGE FOR COMPANIES The Dutch social psychologist Geert Hofstede and his son Gert Jan have been studying the basic dispositions of the people of national cultures for decades. These differences are of huge importance for global companies

RAW MATERIALS, GOODS AND KNOW-HOW move freely around the world: Ma-

chines are designed in Switzerland, produced in China and equipped with user software in Germany. Although the integration of markets and companies is not a new phenomenon, pr ejudice and comprehension problems still result from the meeting of dif ferent cultures and values. Dutch social scientists Geert and Gert Jan Hofstede have been studying the specific characteristics of national cultures for years. In the process they have made discoveries that also provide valuable information for globally operating companies.

BUSINESS RELATIONSHIPS WITH … THE USA IIn the study national cultures are assigned different dimensions. Companies can also draw some of their own conclusions from these. Anyone who wants to do business in the USA, for example, should be pr epared for strongly pronounced individualism and a low power distance. This is particularly reflected in a self-confident and informal openness in relation to unknown business partners. Superiors and managers ely r

THE WORK OF HOFSTEDE FATHER AND SON “Each of us looks out into the world through the window of our cultural home”, write the Dutch social scientists in their book “Think Locally, Act Globally – Intercultural Cooperation and Global Management”. Father and son provoke an engagement with cultural differences. Geert Hofstede has analyzed the complexities of corporate organization and national cultures for five decades. From 1967 to 1972 he conducted the first worldwide survey in the IBM technology group, which was aimed at employees in more than 70 countries. From the results Hofstede developed so-called dimensions of national cultures as basic dispositions for human perception and behavior.

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“EACH OF US LOOKS OUT INTO THE WORLD THROUGH THE WINDOW OF OUR CULTURAL HOME.” From: “Think Locally, Act Globally – Intercultural Cooperation and Global Management” by Geert and Gert Jan Hofstede

Photos: Imagebroker/Strandperle

on their team’s expertise to a high degree. True to the motto “the winner takes it all”, the pursuit of excellence is deeplyooted r in society and viewed as a masculine tendency.

… CHINA AND RUSSIA

Entrepreneurs who negotiate with business partners in China could encounter a strongly hierarchical structure within the partner company. Chinese are for the most part familiar with ambivalent situations and … GERMANY AND JAPAN can adapt well to them. The endurance and frugality of the population Business relations with Germany ar e characterized by a dir ect apcontribute in every respect to China’s pronounced long-term orientaproach. A strong middle class and the decentralized structur e of sotion. People in the giant centralized state of Russia ar e characterized ciety contribute to a low power distance. Well thought-out structures by high power distance. The large dif ferences between the str onger are important, in order to guarantee a r eliable overview and to avoid and weaker members of society give status symbols great importance uncertainties. The masculine trait is visible above all in the fact that in both everyday life and in professional dealings. Russian business many people “live to work”. German companies often have a long-term people often prefer detailed plans and briefings, in order to avoid unorientation and are focused on futur e success. Japan is a distinctly certainties. masculine country with a high degree of uncertainty avoidance. EntreINTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION preneurs should therefore prepare for ambition and rivalry in business The dimensions of national cultures recorded by Geert Hofstede relationships. Feasibility studies and a list of risk factors ar e demanded are reflected in all business dealings. How do I negotiate? Which before carrying out a transaction and before making decisions, which conditions should be included in a contract? How do I talk to can impede change. Motion 01. 2013

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SCHLEIFRING GROUP

IDEAS

my counterpart? Such questions are just as important as general etiquette, such as greeting, eating and showing or hiding feelings. Education and training in intercultural communication as well as good preparation for foreign business are consequently becoming increasingly important. The concrete implementation of intercultural negotiations virtually requires diplomatic skill. The Hofstedes therefore argue for the use of so-called corporate diplomats.

THE RESEARCHERS GEERT AND GERT JAN HOFSTEDE

Geert Hofstede (*1928, photo on right) is professor emeritus of Organizational Anthropology and International Management at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, and his son Gert Jan (*1956) is Professor of Information Systems at Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

KRISTIN MENZEL

Geert Hofstede, Gert Jan Hofstede, Michael Minkov:Cultures and Organizations: Software of the Mind, 3rd edition, published by McGraw-Hill, 2010.

These values are statements about societies - not about individuals. Naturally there are also individualists in China and collectivists in America. Hofstede merely describes trends. The best example of deviations can actually be seen in him and his son Gert Jan. Because in individualistic Dutch society (4th place) it is not exactly considered “normal” for a son to follow in his father’s footsteps.

UNCERTAINTY AVOIDANCE

INDIVIDUALISM

MASCULINITY

1 2

USA Australia

1 2

Slovakia Japan

19 20 35 58

Germany Switzerland Japan China

11 11 14 19

China Germany Switzerland USA

75 76

Ecuador Guatemala

74 75

Latvia Norway

In individualistic societies the bonds between individuals are without constraint. It is expected that each individual will look after himself and his nuclear family. In collectivist societies, on the other hand, individuals and community are in a relationship of dependence with strong loyalty. POWER DISTANCE

IIn masculine cultures the focus of working life is on acknowledgement, income and promotions. In “feminine” societies the fulfillment of quality of life is a central feature. In relation to the professional world, good working relationships and a secure job are important.

LONG-TERM ORIENTATION

1 2

Greece Portugal

1 1

Malaysia Slovakia

1 2

South Korea Taiwan

43 46 64 70

Germany Switzerland USA China

12 54 59 65

China Switzerland USA Germany

4 11 15 69

China Germany Switzerland USA

75 76

Jamaica Singapore

75 76

Israel Austria

92 93

Ghana Puerto Rico

In cultures with weak uncertainty avoidance ambiguous situations are part of everyday life. There should be no more rules than necessary. In cultures with strong uncertainty avoidance ambivalent situations are perceived as a threat, and conflicts are avoided at all costs.

A high power distance indicates a society’s readiness to accept unequal power distribution. In companies, this is reflected in significant differences in salary and hierarchical structures. A low power distance is expressed in decentralization and participation of employees.

Societies with a long-term orientation are geared towards future success and progress. Adaptability, responsibility and self-discipline are expected in working life. Rapid results, stability, the status of the individual and performance are characteristics of short-term orientation.

We reproduce extracts of a ranking order of the countries for the cultural dimensions - the two highest, the two lowest and fou r selected from the middle. Hofstede allocates index values for the dimensions, with multiple allocation of a ranking in the case of identical index values. For the first four dimensions Switzerland was separated into German and French speaking parts, and for the fifth (long-term orientation) Germany was separated into FRG and GDR. W e have calculated average values.

Photos: Thinstock (5); Geert Hofstede

CULTURAL DIMENSIONS NATIONAL CHARACTERISTICS AND THEIR INFLUENCE ON CORPORATE CULTURE

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MOTION CALENDAR: THE MOST IMPORTANT DATES IN THE COMING MONTHS JULY 2013

AUGUST 2013

18.7. – 20.7.2013 CWIEME, CHENGDU, CHINA

2.8. – 5.8.2013 JNMTE, QINGDAO, CHINA Visitors find the latest products and technologies from the machine tool and foundry industries every year at the Qingdao International Machine Tools & Moulds Exhibition, JNMTE for short – as they have done for the past 16 years. www.jch-mj.com

This is one of the largest exhibitions for industrial equipment in China: the China West International Equipment Manufacturing Exposition (CWIEME). Twice a year – in spring and autumn – visitors can find out about the latest products from the around 5000 exhibitors. www.cwieme.com

AUGUST 2013 JULY 2013

DECEMBER 2013 4.12. – 7.12.2013 MANUFACTURING INDONESIA SERIES, JAKARTA, INDONESIA Manufacturing Indonesia, established in 1987, is one of the largest and most comprehensive events for machine and plant engineering. The international trade fair takes place each year as a combination of several trade fairs. . In 2013 Tools & Hardware Indonesia 2013, Industrial Automation & Logistics Indonesia 2013 and Machine Tool Indonesia 2013 will be presented. www.pamerindo.com/ events/1

18.7. – 20.7. CWIEME CHENGDU, CHINA

2.8. – 5.8. QINGDAO INTERNATIONAL MACHINE TOOLS & MOULDS (JNMTE), QINGDAO, CHINA

SEPTEMBER 2013 DECEMBER 2013 4.12. – 7.12. MANUFACTURING INDONESIA SERIES, JAKARTA, INDONESIA

NOVEMBER 2013 20.11. – 23.11. METALEX, BANGKOK, THAILAND

1.9. – 5.9. CHINA INTERNATIONAL EQUIPMENT MANUFACTURING EXPOSITION (CIEME), SHENYANG, CHINA 16.9. – 21.9. EMO, HANOVER, GERMANY

OCTOBER 2013 7.10. – 11.10. MSV, BRÜNN, CZECHIA

SEPTEMBER 2013

15.10. – 17.10. WESTEC, LOS ANGELES, USA

16.9. – 21.9.2013 EMO, HANOVER, GERMANY

SAVE THE DATE

World’s leading trade fair for machine tools and metal-working www.emo-hannover.de

GRAND OPENING: 16 SEPTEMBER, 12 PM HALL 11, STAND B46

NOVEMBER 2013 20.11. – 23.11.2013 METALEX THAILAND, BANGKOK, THAILAND METALEX is the largest international trade fair for machine tools and metal-working machines in the ASEAN states. Every year around 2700 exhibitors from 50 countries travel there to present the latest technologies and machines to visitors.The motto of the 27th METALEX: The Pride of ASEAN. www.metalex.co.th

OCTOBER 2013 7.10. – 11.10.2013 MSV, BRÜNN, CZECHIA The International Machine Tools Trade Fair (MSV) is the biggest technology trade fair in Central Europe. As well as the latest products in measuring, control, automation and instrumentation technology, the around 75 000 visitors can also expect conferences, seminars and workshops. www.bvv.cz/de/msv

You can find further trade fairs at:www.schleifring.net Motion 02 . 2012

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72dpi en motion 01 2013  

Motion 1/2013 English

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