ELLE Decoration Canada - Fall 2021

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ATHENA CALDERONE

THE GODDESS OF GASTRONOMY

Retro and Restrained

WARM, WELCOMING HOMES THE ART OF

TIDYING UP

CLEAN SWEEP THINKING WITHIN

THE BOX AND OTHER DESIGN IDEAS


Mah Jong. Modular sofa with elements, designed by Hans Hopfer. , Constellation collection. Upholstered in Stained wooden bases, Alezan finish. TORONTO - BROSSARD - LAVAL - MONTRÉAL In-store interior design & 3D modeling services.1 Quick Ship program available.2

This year, Roche Bobois is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Mah Jong sofa, designed in 1971 by Hans Hopfer. To celebrate this milestone, the Mah Jong is dressed in new designer fabrics and set on elegant platforms that enhance its silhouette and comfort. True to the Mah Jong’s original identity, this new design makes the piece more modern than ever.


Fabrics by

French Art de Vivre Photos by Michel Gibert and Baptiste Le Quiniou, for advertising purposes only. Zulma Editions. 1Conditions apply, contact store for details. 2Program available on select items, subject to availability.



KITCHEN PERFECTION

TORONTO Coming 2022

www.fisherpaykel.ca


No 2 Fall-Winter 2021

on the cover 60

Turning Dreams into Reality This soon-to-be-real Ontario residence provides inspiration as well as insights into the future of design

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Publisher’s Note A foreword by Sophie Banford

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Brief Everything that’s current, cool and covetable

expertise 22

Space: The Final Frontier Danielle Carignan shares insights on organizing household items and tidying up

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Beauty and Labelle Designer Montana Labelle’s Toronto store is a lesson in modernity and nostalgia

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Old vs. New Want to turn a single-car garage into a multifunctional home office? Anya Moryoussef tells us how

design 30

Keeping It Simple A conversation with Quebec native Philippe Malouin, who reveals his mindset, ambitions and award-winning repertoire

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Birth of an Icon Tracing the design journey of Kastella’s C401 stool, which is bound to achieve iconic status

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In Barrie, Ontario, Toronto-based architect Nicholas Ancerl envisioned an opulent yet discreet three-storey abode, crowned by a glass cube, that will be in perfect harmony with its natural setting. Beauty, warmth and comfort come together in an everso-slightly retro atmosphere.


5101 Empira Black

Dark Collection

caesarstone.ca

Bring the magic of the earth’s raw minerals into your home

A deep, dark stone with touches of fine white veining flowing freely across it, blending into a one-of-a-kind surface.


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A young family has created a unique haven in a downtown Montreal loft

Daily Joe Discover how a cup of coffee inspired a 1,000-day challenge

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The Accidental Barista

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We Got the Heat Our top picks of patio heaters to keep you warm and toasty

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Find your perfect spot in nature to make hay while the sun shines

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Bright Ideas

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Perspective A glimpse of an urban sanctuary in British Columbia

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Family Time

The pendant lamp-style Ener-G+ patio heater produces zero carbon monoxide emissions. ($160–$240, energplus.com)

Queen of the Kitchen

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Flight of Fancy

Now You See Me Both private and inconspicuous, this sauna blends in with its lakeside location—what’s not to love?

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Part of Dutch Lab’s Gold Edition series of coffee tools is Big Ben, an adaptation of the iconic London monument’s Gothic Revival style. ($2,200, dutch-lab.com)

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Add this colourful design destination in Iran to your bucket list

The multi-faceted Athena Calderone shares her favourite fall recipes and styling hacks

Nicholas Ancerl’s creativity knows no bounds in this soon-to-becompleted residence in Barrie, Ontario

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The Hormuz Oasis

inspiration

Minimalist and magnificent, this Quebec abode conceptualized by Alain Carle promises to be a winter wonderland 60

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This Vancouver residence by BattersbyHowat is a snug sanctuary for a family of four

Get Out!

homes

The Bronze Age Theresa Casey imbues a Toronto condo with easygoing elegance and dazzling features

Crema it up with these versatile coffee machines 40

Future Simple

This mini version of Kastella’s C401 stool, from the Filé Doux collection, comes without a footrest and doubles as a side table. ($775, kastella.ca)

32 Shadow and light play off the warm earth tones of this home office, perched in a glass cube in a residence designed by Nicholas Ancerl. (ancerlstudio.com)


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ELLE DECO PUBLISHER’S NOTE

In the background is Augure, Nicolas Baier (2012), Inkjet printing, acrylic, aluminum, at Blouin Division Gallery (blouin-division.com)

BEAUTY BREAK the world is bound to be even more delicious if we find it pretty. And inviting, even sumptuous. Beauty helps us savour life to the fullest. Personally, I’ve always felt that being surrounded by things we find visually attractive is the key to being at peace in one’s own home. Sure, it’s essential to have a roof over your head and a cozy bed so that you can get a good night’s sleep, but choosing objects that we enjoy looking at and integrating them into our decor has a direct impact on our mood—at least on mine, in any case. For inspiration, I fill my Pinterest boards with things that really catch my eye—from professional designs to DIY projects—and I comb through my favourite decor magazines. On Instagram, just one photo of a Danish apartment, a mountain villa or a Brooklyn brownstone can instantly bring me to a happy place, energize my mind and reduce stress. For me, this is even more effective than meditating! So let’s surround ourselves with beauty. In life, in our decor, even in our virtual world. It certainly works for me. And in this issue, we hope to bring you a moment of aesthetic pleasure that refreshes and inspires. Your turn now to take a break and enjoy!

Sophie Banford , publisher

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@sophiebanford

PHOTO: MICKAËL A. BANDASSAK, REPRÉSENTÉ PAR VISUALDPT.CO

THEY SAY WE EAT NOT JUST WITH OUR MOUTHS, but with our eyes too. The most exquisite dish in


AD Beatrice Rossetti - Photo Federico Cedrone


PUBLISHER SOPHIE BANFORD EDITOR-IN-CHIEF CÉLINE TREMBLAY ART DIRECTOR ISABEL BEAUDRY ASSOCIATE EDITOR ANAMIKA BUTALIA DIGITAL DIRECTOR CYNTHIA QUELLET DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER CAMILLE CARDIN-GOYER DIGITAL CONTENT ASSISTANT ALEX GONTHIER GRAPHIC DESIGNERS LAURENCE FONTAINE, MARIE-ÈVE DUBOIS CONTRIBUTORS ELYETTE CURVALLE, SOPHIE DONELSON, MÉLANIE DUBÉ, MURIEL FRANÇOISE, CHRISTOPHER KORCHIN, MAUDE LABELLE, CLAUDE LAFRAMBOISE, KARINE MONIÉ, CAROLYNE PARENT, ELIZABETH MARION POITRAS, ZARYA RUBIN TO REACH EDITORIAL elledecoration@ko-media.ca

ADVERTISING SALES SENIOR DIRECTOR, STRATEGY, GROWTH AND PARTNERSHIPS MÉLISSA GARNIER, 514 914-3605 DIRECTOR, CONTENT & STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIPS KARINE MARQUIS, 514 941-4067 NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR (TORONTO) SANDRINE DAHAN, 514 449-7438 NATIONAL DIRECTOR, DIGITAL EXPERTISE (MONTREAL) PAULA CEBALLOS, 514 791-8296 NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR (TORONTO) MARCELLE WALLACE, 647 404-4035 SALES DIRECTOR (TORONTO) MARNI ARMOUR, 416 508-8784 MULTI-PLATFORM PROJECT MANAGER VANESSA RISCH PRODUCTION COORDINATOR LINDA DESJARDINS
 KO MEDIA INC. PRESIDENT LOUIS MORISSETTE
 GENERAL DIRECTOR SOPHIE BANFORD
 FINANCE DIRECTOR SEAN REES MARKETING AND CIRCULATION DIRECTOR MARIE-ANDRÉE PICOTTE MARKETING AND CIRCULATION PROJECT MANAGER GABY BEAUDOIN ACCOUNTANT GENTA CIKA

ELLE DECORATION ® IS USED UNDER LICENCE FROM THE TRADEMARK OWNER, HACHETTE FILIPACCHI PRESSE, A SUBSIDIARY OF LAGARDÈRE SCA CEO CONSTANCE BENQUÉ CEO ELLE INTERNATIONAL LICENSES FRANÇOIS CORUZZI SVP/INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF ELLE & ELLE DECORATION VALÉRIA BESSOLO LLOPIZ CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF ELLE DECORATION LINDA BERGMARK MARKETING DIRECTOR OF ELLE DECORATION MORGANE ROHÉE SYNDICATION DIRECTOR MARION MAGIS — SYNDICATION COORDINATOR JOHANNA JEGOU COPYRIGHTS MANAGER SÉVERINE LAPORTE PIXELLE DATABASE MANAGER PASCAL IACONO

Registered user: KO Media Inc., 651 Notre-Dame St. West, Suite 100, Montreal, Quebec H3C 1H9. Contents copyright © 2021 by KO Media Inc. ELLE Decoration Canada is published 2 times per year. Digital editions are available on Zinio, Apple News, Press Reader and Ebsco. Printing: TC Transcontinental Printing, 1603 de MontarvilleBlvd., Boucherville, Quebec, J4B 5Y2. Distributed by Coast to Coast Newsstand Services Ltd. ISSN 2563-9080

Address all correspondence to 651 Notre-Dame St. West, Suite 100, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 1H9.

Printed on certified FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) paper from well-managed forests and other responsibly managed sources.


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ELLE DECO BRIEF OBSCURE OBJECTS OF

DESIRE

We searched, we found, we marvelled. Gaston Bachelard said, “Man is a creation of desire, not a creation of need.” We agree.

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By Anamika Butalia, Céline Tremblay and Sophie Donelson Adapted by Zarya Rubin

HANG ONTO A DREAM

Remember that iconic image of Marilyn Monroe trying to keep her pleated skirt down, fighting off the draft from the subway grate? That’s what we’re reminded of when we look at the Prairie Pendant by Torontobased HUEY lighting studio. The nostalgic aesthetic (for more reasons than one!) of the pleated matte porcelain shade is heightened by the use of a hand-turned walnut fob detail, both manufactured locally. The shade comes in four tints: Air, Cloud, Storm and Midnight—colours that are plucked from the memory of founder Bret Williams, as she remembers experiencing them on an idyllic day at her childhood home on the southern end of Georgian Bay.

PHOTOS:

($480, hueylightshop.com)

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HERMOSA HOME DECOR

Ayres, whose products are carried by Vancouver-based lifestyle brand OBAKKI, is a design collective based in Mexico City. An industrial designer from Yucatán in Mexico, a textile designer from Caracas in Venezuela and Mexican artisans have collaborated to create this series of 100 percent handmade tabletop pieces, using natural materials like lava rock, marble and wood. (From $165—$995, obakki.com)

GAGA OVER GHANA While there’s no denying the design and manufacturing prowess of Europe and North America, we haven’t lost sight of authentic handicrafts originating from other parts of the world. One of our most recent finds is BABA TREE’S Pakurigo basket on GOODEE , the e-commerce venture launched by Montreal-based designers and entrepreneurs Byron and Dexter Peart to provide sustainable, artisanal products that have a positive social or environmental impact. The multicoloured receptacle features patterns and wave-like silhouettes made by Ghanaian women using expert weaving techniques and vetiver grass that’s found in abundance in the country. ($200, babatree.com, goodeeworld.com)

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ELLE DECO BRIEF

PAINT THE TOWN BEIGE

Toronto-based sisters and party planners Sarah Pecaut and Amy Burstyn Fritz are absolutely right: Beige is not boring! Through their tableware brand MISETTE, the siblings are breaking every conceivable notion associated with neutral hues. In their Natural Collection, they bring together shades of tan, cream and bone. It includes dinnerware, flatware, glassware and even linens and candles—all of which take cues from organic materials such as marble, soft textures and stony, sandy hues. Party time. (misettetable.com)

Oh My!

“Don’t aim for the extraordinary; instead, reveal what is beautiful and moving in the ordinary.” Designer Christophe Pillet’s approach is in perfect harmony with that of Italian furniture giant FLEXFORM . “Detail is the essence, in fact it’s the whole point,” he adds. We were touched to hear a star like Pillet explain in very down-to-earth terms that he is privileged to be able to craft elegant, unshowy designs in a world where objects are often far too “talkative.” He has enormous respect for the company’s most famed collaborator, Antonio Citterio (the ABC chair, Magister sofas and the magnificent Groundpiece), and since joining the family-run business last year, the French creator has graced us with a series of wonderfully timeless concepts. We’re head-over-heels for the Mate magazine caddy, made of woven cowhide on a metal frame. ($1495, flexform.it)

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JACK

OF ALL TRADES

The original knew how to measure, weigh, whisk, caramelize, brown, chop, sauté, boil, mix and knead. With the new TM6 version, the THERMOMIX now offers simmering, cooking at high temperatures and the ability to cook sous-vide and ferment. It’s insane: 24 different functions and techniques all in one small, but mighty, digital device featuring more than 60,000 vetted recipes with step-bystep instructions via the screen on its base. For those new to the workhorse, the appliance—which by itself replaces nearly all the tools currently cluttering your kitchen counter—also adjusts cooking time, temperature and speed at each stage. The icing on the cake: It’s self-cleaning! Well, not quite… ($2,100, thermomix.ca)

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF MISETTE (TABLEWARE)

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READY, SET, GO!

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Montreal is now home to e-store KELLI ’s first physical showroom, a one-stop destination for high-end furniture, lighting and accessories. Co-founder Kelli Richards has carefully curated covetable European brands (several of them Scandinavian) to showcase at the 3,000-square-foot outpost. So, if you’re looking for exclusive collections of Gubi, & Tradition, Wendelbo, 101 CPH, Editions Milano and Pianca, among others, this is the place. (kelli.shop)

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ELLE DECO BRIEF

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BRUTE STRENGTH

Jean-Michel Gadoua and Guillaume Ménard have turned back time with their collaborative design of the Endless Concrete Bench. Executed by Atelier B, this modular bench boasts an infinite length and pays tribute to brutalist architecture. It was created for Gadoua’s ÉDITIONS 8888, which develops objets by Quebec creatives. Interestingly, it is categorized under the trademarked portmanteau Brutaluxe, which breaks away from the banality of mass production and instead celebrates imperfection, with spontaneous creations and use of raw materials. Among this series is Pitcher “66” by ceramicist Élyse Leclerc, which is a reissue of her mentor Koen de Winter’s set that finds pride of place in the permanent collections of MoMA and MNBAQ. (Price on request, editions8888.com)

1. Genghis (1991)

2. The PackBot (1998)

3. The Roomba robot vacuum (2002)

4 Seaglider (2010)

5. Roomba s9+

WHO KNEW? You know the drill: You do a little research on something that seems fairly mundane—in this case, the robot vacuum—and you find yourself “sucked” into a vortex of unexpected information. If you’re surprised to learn that there are more than 30 million iROBOTS devices roaming the world, you are sure to be blown away by the journey of its inventors (robotics experts from Massachusetts). The invention of the robotic vacuum cleaner evolved from space exploration machines like the Genghis (1) and the PackBot (2), an agile robot with heavy treaded wheels (it can climb stairs) that searched the World Trade Center site after the 9/11 attacks. There’s also the Seaglider (4), an unmanned, deep-diving vehicle that was deployed in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 to collect data during the oil spill. The iRobot’s cousins have inspired ​​ NASA, unlocked the mysteries of the Great Pyramid of Giza and saved countless lives by clearing mines in conflict zones. Today, the S9+ is the top-performing, most accurate and most reliable robot vacuum on the market. You have to see it in action to believe it; with its Imprint Smart Mapping technology, it learns the layout of your home and picks up where it left off. It’s worth its weight in gold, both in clean space and time. ($1,400, irobot.ca)

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Golden Jubilee Back in 1971, when Philippe Roche, co-founder of furniture retailer ROCHE BOBOIS, and designer Hans Hopfer designed MAH JONG, they couldn’t have imagined what a grand success it would be. This year, the avant-garde creation celebrates its 50th anniversary with a makeover, as it should. Although, initially, this low seater was offered in drab grey and brown upholstery, over the years it has been covered in colour. The likes of Jean Paul Gaultier, Missoni Home and the late Kenzo Takada have all created fabrics in a spectrum of shades, specifically to “dress” it up. To commemorate this milestone year, the design team is reimagining an innovative base that takes the shape of the cushions and lifts the sofa slightly off the floor. We are big fans of the new cushions that are eco-designs from Roche Bobois itself. (Price on request, roche-bobois.com)

NO QUALMS ABOUT QUARTZ While marble is certainly beautiful, it is also porous and requires diligent upkeep, otherwise you’ll be practically welcoming bacteria, stains and scratches. Quartz, on the other hand, proves more durable. Elizabeth Margles, VP of marketing at Caesarstone, says: “A quartz countertop is made up of 97 percent of a mineral material that’s found in nature [Quebec is home to Canada’s only quartz quarries]. The substance is extracted, pulverized, combined with miniscule amounts of polymers and dyes, then baked to make it hyper-resistant.” In particular, check out the company’s Statuario Maximus, a non-porous technological marvel that imitates nature with incredible finesse. (Price on request, caesarstone.ca)

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ELLE DECO BRIEF

A GETAWAY IN ITSELF

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SHOW YOUR TRUE COLOURS

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The new HOME SOCIÉTÉ store in Ottawa is complete with a gourmet café—and why not? Shoppers will definitely need nourishment after tackling the sprawling 80,000-square-foot emporium. This second outpost of the multi-brand retailer is every bit as ambitious as its premier shop in Toronto. You’ll find brands such as MUST, Maison Corbeil and Jardin de Ville (all Quebec exporters with many made-in-Canada designs) alongside Ligne Roset, Flou and other premium European brands. New for the capital city is Maison Corbeil’s Lodge collection, designed specifically for modern cottages, and La Bottega Nicastro, the family-owned Italian food purveyor beloved by Ottawa locals. In addition to offering something for every decor need, the store also provides “a multi-sensory experience to help cultivate your unique design self-expression,” says Éric Corbeil, co-president of Home Société. “You can see plenty online, but we believe people will visit to browse, get inspired, learn something and simply have a good time.” (homesociete.ca)

In Greek, meraki means bringing passion to what you’re doing. So, in keeping with the brand’s moniker, Meraki’s six new collections of over 100 wallpapers are all about creativity, love and soul. Conceptualized by Lévis, Quebec-based Pigment Design and printed locally on demand (some are also sold at Simons), the self-adhesive wall coverings are thick, opaque, textured like a canvas and can be repositioned during installation. “The more time passes, the more the wallpaper adheres. But even after a decade, you can remove it without tearing off the undercoat,” says Meraki owner Fanie Giguère-Robitaille. We love the whimsical patterns by artist Marish Papaya. ($115 per 28" x 96" roll, simons.ca, meraki.pigmentdesign.ca)

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HOW TO TAME A

DRAGON

Wondering what you’re looking at? This Asian armchair with dragons carved out of the black-painted wood and sporting a padded cushion is one of a wide array of tableware, decorations and vintage furniture that’s getting a second lease of life—all thanks to fashion icon DENIS GAGNON and his long-time associate GUILLAUME DELISLE , who have surrendered to their love of all things vintage and antique and forayed into home decor. The duo began to source items from second-hand dealers, and even owners, before restoring and modernizing the designs, which were otherwise intended for garbage or oblivion. ($1,500, denisgagnon.ca)

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ELLE DECO BRIEF

Decorative ART

Whether on the wall or the dining table, art beautifies everyday life. By Muriel Françoise Adapted by Zarya Rubin

Emily Carr, Above the Trees, c. 1939, oil on paper, Collection of the Vancouver Art Gallery, Emily Carr Trust

EARTH TONES

PHOTOS, NINTH EDITIONS; CELESTE (PANGÉE PROJECT); HEATH COLLECTION; ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN ARCHIVES, UC BERKELEY (FROM THE EARTH)

What do EDITH HEATH and EMILY CARR have in common? Clay! Californian ceramicist Edith (who’s spent several summers in Vancouver) uses it in her tableware, while Emily employed it in her bold paintings of West Coast landscapes. The exhibition From the Earth, on view until March 13, 2022, at the Vancouver Art Gallery, pays homage to these extraordinary women who influenced the course of modernism in Canada. (vanartgallery.bc.ca)

AU NATUREL With much of the design world turning to Latin America for inspiration, the Pangée Project is hosting Tepetlapa, an exhibition by Mexican duo CELESTE in the former Czech consulate in Montreal, from September 16 to October 23, 2021. Previously inspired by the sky and its mysteries, María Fernanda Camarena and Gabriel Rosas Alemán now explore the arcana of our planet in tapestries and ceramics painted with natural pigments. (projetpangee.com)

MODERN CLASSIC In her abstract watercolours, young Torontonian JULIA BALFOUR superimposes colour blocks in style. Thanks to the online gallery Ninth Editions, her paintings are now accessible to collectors from all walks of life. Launched by curator Ashley Mulvihill, the site allows art enthusiasts to search by budget, genre, palette and size, from a selection of emerging Canadian artists. Win-win. (nintheditions.com) e l l e d e c o r at i o n c a n a d a

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ELLE DECO EXPERTISE

Danielle Carignan

SPACE THE FINAL FRONTIER

Before Marie Kondo took the world by storm, shining a light on the realm of personal organizing, Quebecer danielle carignan was laying down the law of order. Here are some of her top tips.

PHOTOS: ANNIE LACHAPELLE (HOME), SYLVIE LI (D. CARIGNAN AND STORAGE)

By Claude Laframboise Adapted by Zarya Rubin

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THE BENEFITS “It’s not so much about storage as it is about decluttering and organization. This is something most people are surprised by. When you classify each item by category and give it a designated place, the storage takes care of itself.”

hang out! You have to create a bubble, and sometimes all you need is a work table and a few pretty accessories. A small, easily transportable cart on wheels, with drawers for storing office supplies and paperwork, can be a lifesaver.” THE CONSUMPTION “I

THE MOTIVATION “Our

EVER SINCE SHE WAS A LITTLE GIRL, Danielle Carignan

has been putting things in boxes. In her youth, becoming a “personal organizer” wasn’t really a career option. So after a stint in graphic design and cabinetmaking, where she created a line of furniture—featuring drawers, drawers and more drawers—she invented her profession. According to Carignan, “the things we do to organize, tidy up and declutter don’t just transform a space, they also shape us. They aren’t just techniques, they lead to a way of life. Once the process starts, we no longer think and act the same way, and we consume differently. In addition to saving time, we free ourselves from unwanted distractions.” Convinced that we still have a lot to learn, we collected some top tips from this lover of order, who is particularly skilled at lightening our load.

“WITH TOO MUCH, YOU LOSE YOURSELF; WITH MUCH LESS, YOU FIND YOURSELF.” — Tchouang-tseu

closets are often full of items that could be used by others. Recycle—give new life to objects by donating them to charitable organizations. Plan a clothing-swap soirée with friends! And let’s not forget that borrowing and renting are ways to save money and store fewer items.”

won’t teach you this stuff: You really have to reduce waste and packaging to a minimum (I do my grocery shopping at BocoBoco, a zero-waste emporium), make lists to avoid impulse buys, go for less quantity but more quality, and repair whenever possible.” THE OFFSPRING “Children

THE TOOLS “You don’t need

a lot of storage, but you need the right kind. There is nothing better than a clearly labelled, clear plastic (recyclable) box to find what you’re looking for at a glance. Above all, you need to set aside plenty of time to get the job done right, because it takes real commitment to achieve meaningful decluttering. Hence the title of my book: Oui, je le veux!” THE PLANNING “After

having accumulated stuff for years, you have to give yourself time to release the emotional bonds that you may have with objects. This is particularly true for memories linked to a loved one who has passed away. You can put these items in a box until you are ready to part with them. It becomes easier once you start to see the benefits of decluttering.”

are great imitators. If they learn early on not to overconsume, to respect their things, tidying up as they go, recycling and composting, they will develop good habits for the rest of their lives.” THE MYTH TO BE DEBUNKED “We mistakenly

believe that organized people have a neat house, but it’s not true! If each object has a designated storage space, we can let ourselves go a bit, but the cleanup is super-quick. Conversely, you can tidy up everything as you go and still not be organized.” (daniellecarignan.ca)

THE OFFICE “When you

don’t have a room dedicated to work, it’s important to choose a space where there are no visual distractions—so, not the kitchen table facing the counter where the dishes

Released this spring by KO Éditions, the 200-page book by Danielle Carignan contains all the secrets to creating and maintaining a serene indoor space.

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ELLE DECO EXPERTISE

BEAUTY and labelle

montana labelle has recently opened a space in the heart of Toronto that embodies her spirit. Proof that modernity and nostalgia can be combined and that minimalism can live in harmony alongside treasures from the past. By Elyette Curvalle

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Adapted by Zarya Rubin

ONTANA Labelle grew up in the world of fashion and design. She was destined for the former, but her mother, stylist Karen Kwinter, advised her to choose the latter. She went on to study at the prestigious Parsons School of Design and the New School in New York, and spending formative summers at the Gluckstein Design studio in Toronto. She entered the design world at a tender age. Shortly thereafter, in 2013, she opened her namesake studio, Montana Labelle Design, and worked on exclusive residential and commercial projects in Canada and the United States. In 2019, her online store, Montana Labelle Lifestyle, took off, offering customers and interior design lovers carefully curated pieces, vintage furniture and unique decor. These coveted objets

Photographs by Lauren Miller

can now be found in her new space, Lifestyle Studio, on Dupont Street in Toronto. From her very first 700-square-foot bachelorette loft (where she blended style, imagination, fantasy, thrift-store finds and elegance) to her penultimate home (where a black and white palette is anchored by a monumental marble table), Montana’s style has asserted itself. Indeed, it has evolved while remaining true to who she is as well as her desire to create timeless and intimate living spaces unique to those who live in them. “It took me a few years to refine my vision of decor that is modern in appearance, yet warm and comfortable in feel,” says Montana. “We often think that modernity and minimalism equals a cold and sterile ambience. But we can create intimacy, a feeling of comfort and relaxation, by selecting unique pieces—


Below: Labelle is pictured in her new showroom, where Venetian plaster, wood and earth make up the walls. Nearby are Corbi chairs by Klaus Uredat and Sand Suede Peg Work by Bradley Duncan. The outlet exudes elegance and fantasy, with leather pieces weathered by time. Also seen (far right) is the incredible De Sede sofa by Ueli Berger (1970s).

“MINIMALIST DECOR IS BY DEFINITION COLD AND ANTISEPTIC? TOTALLY FALSE!” — Montana Labelle

objects that have meaning, tell a story and that reflect the personality and lifestyle of the people who live there.” A beautiful setting, she says, doesn’t have to be filled with very expensive things. You have to know not to skimp on what matters: the kitchen and bathroom and some high-value pieces. She herself has often found hidden gems on sale. “The objects you choose must have some meaning or anecdote.” A necessary condition for this heart-centred approach, which results in a design that isn’t cookie-cutter and does not appear to come straight out of a store or a catalogue. What inspires her? The relaxed, open and vibrant side of California that she loves to instill in her East Coast settings. She has also used her successive living spaces to experiment, discover, evolve and master very different environments. Montana is excited about the idea of ​​finishing her latest project: her new house in Dutch colonial style, mixed with a little country—a radical departure from her last home, which was very urban. She’s also getting her dream bathroom with a large marble tub, Roman-bath style.

SIX TIPS FOR COMBINING SIMPLICITY AND ELEGANCE, WITHOUT LOSING YOUR SOUL NO. 1 Start with a neutral palette: beige, ivory, sand, terracotta. Save pops of colour for a painting, cushions and accessories that you can change depending on your mood. NO. 2 Spice up the decor with texture. NO. 3 Don’t hesitate to incorporate a vintage piece of furniture, a family heirloom or an old painting with modern decor. NO. 4 Give priority to lifestyle over style. NO. 5 Take into account the space and its characteristics. NO. 6 Add your own personal touch.

(montanalabelle.com)

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The main garage door opens into what Anya identifies as the “reading room.” It is enveloped in plywood—on the floors, walls, ceilings and even the shelving unit.

OLD VS. NEW

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ELLE DECO EXPERTISE

Toronto-based architect anya moryoussef turned to the traditional

studiolo concept from Italy to transform a single-car garage into a modern workplace. She sheds light on four critical factors that came in handy during this major makeover. By Anamika Butalia

Photographs by Scott Norsworthy

THE CONCEPT “Embrace the paradox! It’s as important to understand the existing site as it is to get some distance from it to envision something strange and new without disconnecting from the original. This project, for example, is done for a trained architect, screenwriter, producer and art director. So, I had to ensure that it serves multiple purposes. The client and I had visited Italy as part of our architectural education, and turned to the studiolo from Palazzo Ducale di Gubbio for inspiration. It is a series of rooms within rooms, some actual, some illusions, which served as the central idea for this garage turned home office. I conceptualized interconnected spaces—for reading, writing, storage and entrance— with deep thresholds between them, like a delicately crafted stage within the pre-existing concrete block shell.”

Above: A “before” photo of the garage reveals its single-car size as well as its age. Left: Inax porcelain mosaic tiles from Stonetile (stone-tile. com) and a sanded concrete block from Brampton Brick (bramptonbrick.com)

make up the exterior of this garage turned home office. Its roof is made with Duro-Last (duro-last. com) mechanically fastened single-ply membrane.

Seen from this vantage point are three zones that Anya identifies as the writing room (foreground), with an 18-foot floating wooden desk, reading room (right) with the shelving unit, and the entrance (background, far left) that’s demarcated using natural cut coco-mat floors. The lights are from Artemide. (artemide.com)


ELLE DECO EXPERTISE

“THE CUBBIES IN THE STUDIOLIO DESK ARE WHAT’S CALLED A TORSION BOX STRUCTURE.” — Anya Moryoussef.

The workplace offers storage space for bicycles and room for the client’s scripts and collected art, among other items.


Near the Straight Chair by George Nakashima for Knoll (knoll.com), Ollie the golden retriever sleeps comfortably under the Velux (veluxusa.com) skylight that illuminates the surfaces in Benjamin Moore paints (benjaminmoore.com).

THE FEATURES “Although it’s important to understand one’s spatial habits, it’s vital to remember that we typically adapt to the spaces we live in. When I started out, the brief was to allow enough room for the owner to read and write scripts, sketch and think. Other factors included comfortably accommodating his golden retriever, Ollie, as well as a storage area for scripts, bicycles and a collection of modern art, antiquarian books and nautical models—all done with the help of custom and fully demountable cabinets.”

a sense of an ‘infinitely unfolding space’ inspired by the woodinlay trompe l’oeil walls of the Renaissance studiolo from the Italian palace—especially the 18-foot floating desk that houses many mini-zones for storing tomes and scripts.” (amarch.ca)

THE PALETTE “Wood is a timeless material, which, depending

on its species, offers variations in colour, texture, cut, quality and grain. I primarily employed poplar and Baltic birch plywood. The latter is a low-fi, durable, readily available and renewable material. Its subtle grain and natural luminosity allows light to bounce off it and lends a sense of minimalist luxury to the space. I’ve also worked with a contrast of raw and cultured exterior materials—concrete block and porcelain tile—to give the exterior a more robust, industrial vernacular.” THE RESULT “Intelligent design is invaluable. It takes time and

skill, and while it costs money up front, it pays for itself over and over again. So, it’s critical to get an expert on board, one who follows plans but is unafraid to tweak them during the building process. On completion, this home office was realized as a well-insulated, airtight envelope with natural lighting and cross and stack ventilation thanks to operable skylights. Additionally, each zone is at the scale of one person, with varying proportions, levels of finish and quality of light. By purposely misaligning the partial-height walls and exaggerated beams, there’s always

“DESIGNING THE PASSAGE OF LIGHT THROUGH THE SPACE WAS THE CHIEF PLEASURE OF THIS PROJECT.” — Anya Moryoussef

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ELLE DECO DÉCO XXX XXX

CORE — 2017 Composed of a single moulded unit, repeated six times, the Core pavilion bench is produced in Italy. The first was installed in Sweden. Several can be found across the United States and France.

HANGER — 2008 Turning point: The folding chair was the first commercially available Malouin creation. ($250, remodelista.com)

KEEPING IT simple

MOLLO — 2014 A pivotal design in Malouin’s trajectory. The inspiration for this concept came when he unpacked an IKEA mattress and folded it in half. (establishedandsons.com)

In 2018, Quebec native philippe malouin was named Designer of the Year by Wallpaper magazine. His competition: Jaime Hayon, Antonio Citterio and Cecilie Manz. And Jasper Morrison was one of the judges. Three years later, we set up a virtual meeting with the Boy from Valleyfield, who has become a force to be reckoned with in a very small world of giants. By Céline Tremblay

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Adapted by Zarya Rubin


ELLE DECO DESIGN ACE — 2015 Stackable stools created for Ace Hotel. ($295, philippemalouin.com)

CAST — 2019 Fibreglass and clean resins fuse to create this statement pendant lamp for Resident, available in a round or oblong version. (From $11,250, resident.co.nz)

F

OURTEEN YEARS have passed since the launch of his

PHOTOS: JEZZICA SUNMO (CORE), PETER GUENZEL (MOLLO), JASON YATES (ACE), ERNEST WINCZYK (CAST)

Hanger chair, a hybrid folding chair with a coat hook, now sold by the Toronto firm Umbra Shift. At the tender age of 26, Philippe Malouin was too consumed by his passion to dare to dream that, 10 years later, he would be named Designer of the Year by ELLE Décoration France and included on the list of 100 top designers in the world by Architectural Digest. This latest distinction has granted the designer a level of notoriety that, to date, no other Canadian can claim. He admitted to being particularly honoured to appear in the “Keeping it simple” category with his design heroes: the Bouroullec brothers and Konstantin Grcic. Modest and understated (Malouin doesn’t use a lot of personal pronouns), the transplanted Londoner is busy editing, simplifying and enduring, staying away from the “trendy.” We spoke with him about his current reality, the evolution of his signature style, his hopes and projects.

ON WORKING WITH THE BIG BOYS I don’t feel I’m on the same level as these people, but we hang out. They inspire me and lead me to find solutions. I’ve joined their ranks, let’s say. Ronan Bouroullec has become a friend—we’ve given talks together, we both worked for the Finnish firm Iittala. Having our work recognized has allowed us to ask for things, state our preferences and sometimes even say no. Now that we have the respect of people we admire, who listen to us and trust us, more avenues have opened up. And because we are less willing to compromise when it comes to work we believe in, our recent projects are truer to who we are. THE PHILIPPE MALOUIN SIGNATURE My team and I have developed an aesthetic that is represented in a multitude of projects, split into two groups. We create relatively accessible mass-produced items for furniture suppliers, and we develop more experimental works that are exhibited in specialized galleries. Salon 94 represents me in New York. ACCESSIBILITY Some of our creations are very accessible. In Europe, you can buy them for about $60. And all our products can be shipped to Canada. THE MATERIAL We choose all of our materials based on their function, not because they will look pretty, and we don’t combine them. We are currently working on stainless steel for an outdoor chair, and metal taken from a scrapyard that we are reconfiguring without giving it a recycled look. AN OVERUSED MATERIAL Plastic, of course. AN UNDERUSED MATERIAL Wood, especially in commercial construction.

AN OBJECT YOU WISH YOU HAD INVENTED The clothes pin. A LANDMARK CREATIVE PERIOD The 1980s. AN ARTISTICALLY INSPIRING COUNTRY Italy, past and present. THE WORST INVENTION The cellphone. LONDON AND YOU I owe everything I have accomplished to London. Sadly, I could never have done all of this while living in Canada. THE DOLLAR SIGNS I can now make a living doing what I love, but it took 14 years. My rise has not been meteoric, but it is rewarding. Even though I’m well-known, I earn about as much as a university professor. A FLAGSHIP DESIGNER Jasper Morrison. He is the God of timeless products, the most important living designer in the world. ONE TO WATCH Soft Baroque. CREATIVITY: 10 PERCENT INSPIRATION, 90 PERCENT PERSPIRATION. TRUE OR FALSE? Absolutely true. A SOURCE OF PRIDE Having exhibited

my copper rug with Donald Judd, one of my favourite artists since I was 16. YOU KNOW YOU HAVE SUCCEEDED WHEN... You can’t put a date on a piece. Honestly, going trendy in 2021 is a crime. THE DESIGN OF THE FUTURE Probably one that repairs. PROJECTS We are currently working with a large lighting company and with Nike. We do special furniture projects for them. We collaborate a lot with the Swedes, the Americans and the Italians. UPCOMING EVENTS An exhibition in an Athens gallery in September, and another in November in New York at Salon 94. YOUR GREATEST WISH To last. (philippemalouin.com)

KURU — 2020 Malouin’s reinterpretation of a storage compartment for Iittala. ($60, finnishdesignshop.com)

BOOKMATCH — 2016 Laminated table in oak or walnut distinguished by the symmetry of its surfaces. ($3,335, hem.com)

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birth of an

PHOTO: ADRIEN WILLIAMS

ICON

The C401 comes in various versions: white oak (natural or blackened), maple and black walnut, with a lacquer or oil-based finish.


ELLE DECO DESIGN

Its creators dreamed of a solid, durable shape with near-impossible levels of finesse. The C401 stool transforms that dream into stunning reality. Check out the Filé Doux collection from Kastella. By Céline Tremblay

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

PHOTO: ADAM STEIN

PERFECTION. Strictly speaking, the C401 stool is perfect. Despite the astonishing delicacy of its structure, it remains solid and durable; reflected in the purity and fluidity of its lines are precision craftsmanship and luxe materials—it’s eye-catching in the extreme. When it comes to seating options, we’ve had enough of the pink elephants and overwrought gadgets that currently saturate the market. So, in the presence of this “object,” it’s easy to be at a loss for words.

I’ve noticed that when we see something so obviously well made, we often have an unfortunate, knee-jerk reaction: We assume it came from somewhere else—from Japan, or from Denmark. But think again: The C401 (C for chair, 4 for the stools category and 01 because it is the first of its kind) is the creation of Jason Burhop, founder of Montreal furniture maker Kastella, in association with Étienne Dugal. The original plan was to design a small piece of furniture and submit it to the ninth edition of the Grands Prix du Design in 2016. Mission accomplished, and rewarded. “We wanted a clean shape,” recalls Burhop, “but complex enough to be difficult to reproduce. We had no plans to market it at all—the production demands meant a profit margin that was just too negligible. So we designed the stool according to our own desires and values, without thinking about commercial appeal.” The values that Burhop refers to ​​are the four pillars that Kastella is still based on today: to support the local economy while having the smallest possible environmental footprint (the company

The Kastella workshop, where the C401 stools come to life

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ELLE DECO DESIGN

“REFLECTED IN THE DETAILS, EVERY ASPECT OF THE C401 STOOL IS A TESTAMENT TO WHO WE ARE.” — Jason Burhop

sources its raw materials from FSC forests in nearby regions in the Northeast and the American Midwest, as well as in Canada), work with high-quality wood, evolve a contemporary aesthetic and never compromise on production quality. “In 2003, in the studio shop, there was my newly retired mom and me,” Burhop laughs. The company now occupies a 15,000-square-foot space bordering Gorilla Park in Montreal’s Mile-Ex neighbourhood, and has 23 employees.

existing, as functional as they are aesthetic, down to the rounding of the legs, which ensures they don’t damage flooring. But is the C401 as comfortable as it is attractive? Throughout history, the stool has always been a transient device—a basic barn tool for milking cows, a folksy fixture in living rooms for music practice, spinning its way through bars and diners. These days, it’s a must-have around the kitchen island. Burhop’s response: “It’s quite surprising. The way the circular plate of the seat is engineered, along with the fluidity of its edges, allows you to move on it without any restrictions. So much so that its devotees represent a broad spectrum in terms of ages and backgrounds.” Still, it has no backrest, armrests or padded cover. Hey, beauty comes at a price! We could always recline on a comfy Le Corbusier couch while pondering the question. But Burhop, who in addition to wielding handsaws and mallets also holds a degree in psychology, understands the intrinsic value of something like the C401 that fills its purpose…perfectly. (kastella.ca) The walnut version of the C401, seen in a residential makeover by architectural firm MXMA.

FROM FOREST TO FLOOR

Kastella founder Jason Burhop.

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PHOTOS: ANNIE FAFARD (KITCHEN), ADAM STEIN (JASON BURHOP)

It is said that in striving for perfection, we achieve excellence. It took a number of prototypes for the C401 to reach the precision of its current proportions. The diameter of the seat has been amplified and its legs have become more refined. Depending on the type of wood used, the piece ranges from about 4.5 to seven kilograms, an appropriate weight that prevents it from tipping too easily. Under the curved disc, if it weren’t for the junction of the base that reveals a break in the grain of the wood, you might think the stool was carved from a single plank. As for the footrest, available in brass or stainless steel and featuring the recent introduction of a flat section, it punctuates the design with material contrast. Finally, each curve and each measurement have their reason for


style

ELLE DECO

SLOW DOWN, REST UP

PHOTO: DANIELLE CARIGNAN

AND BASK IN THE SUN.

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daily

JOE

A challenge launched on the fly becomes a thousandfold commitment. By Céline Tremblay

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

Photographs by Danielle Carignan


ELLE DECO STYLE

“THE CAFÉ IS THE PEOPLE’S PARLIAMENT.” — Honoré de Balzac

A

CUP OF COFFEE AND A PHOTO. Every day for a year. This became

Danielle Carignan’s project in 2013 (learn more about her other endeavour on page 22). The idea started off simply, requiring few resources: a smartphone and a trusty macchinetta, the iconic Italian coffee maker by Bialetti. Even that was optional, because some of the final photos were taken in coffee shops. “My first images were a bit awkward,” admits Danielle. “Little by little, I began to vary my mugs, to discover things hiding in the reflections, to blur the lines by overlaying texture. The photos have become richer, more complex over time. And then I got into the game of avoiding repetition for my fans who were virtually sharing their coffee with me. Sometimes I would take 30 shots in the space of an afternoon and keep just one, or run out and buy an ‘I love NY’ mug to prove my dedication, no matter where I was. Even after my father died, I didn’t take a break. That day, I drew on some of my archives. “On the day of the 365th coffee, a friend begged me not to stop. Just as I was thinking that my Bialetti had reached the end of its creative potential, this friend and her partner gifted me a shiny Saeco espresso machine, a little automatic marvel that opened up new horizons. “The subject is inexhaustible, especially today with the newer phone lenses that offer better definition and allow varying depth of field. So...to express my gratitude, I took on a new challenge: 1,000 coffees. The gauntlet has been thrown down.”


ELLE DECO STYLE

On Bay Street, in the heart of Yorkville in Toronto, a pilot project led by RC Coffee and design studio Mjölk spawned the Dark Horse robotic espresso bar. You can order directly via the touchscreen or use a mobile app to select the coffee of your choice. (darkhorseespresso.com)

LEGENDARY The Pavoni Europiccola is the iconic Italian design used by Roger Moore as James Bond in Live and Let Die in 1973. Quality never goes out of style.

THE BARISTA’S QUEST FOR THE HOLY GRAIL: that perfect, creamy foam essential to a properly made espresso. The crrrrema. Some

purists say only a manually operated machine can produce high-quality espresso. If any step is missing that magic touch, little or no crema results. To obtain the real deal, you have to control the coarseness of the grind, which must be somewhere between that of flour and sugar. If the grains are too big, water will pass through too quickly—goodbye flavour and crema. Too fine, and the flow of water will be slowed and the taste of the coffee will be altered faster than the time it takes to brew it. The grind should be precisely measured into the filter and packed evenly, with 14 kg (30 lb) of pressure. When screwing the filter into the head, it should not offer more resistance than when it’s empty. Are you forcing it? That means the filter is too full. Now, before pouring, make sure the filter holder is hot. If your fingers can touch it for more than five seconds, keep waiting. If, after all that, you’re still not satisfied, hmmm, maybe it’s time to switch machines? Or try another type of coffee? 38

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PHOTO: NORR STUDIO (DARK HORSE / MJÖLK)

(From $875, lapavoni.com, faemacanada.com)


MINIMALIST No pods, no pumps! It’s the ROK manual coffee maker: Just add coffee, hot water and elbow grease for an espresso shot pulled by your own muscle power. Surprisingly efficient, with minimal environmental impact. ($260, cafune.ca)

PUNCTUAL A barista by your bedside? The Barisieur coffee maker/alarm clock delivers the perfect wake-up call. Assembled by hand, it houses a mini-fridge in its base to keep milk fresh. ($690, rahlux.ca)

THE ACCIDENTAL

BARISTA Remember when coffee was just a shot of adrenalin to make mornings more palatable? Today, it’s at the heart of any self-respecting social activity, and for those who attempt to brew it, a thorny, never-ending challenge. By Céline Tremblay

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

PURE No espresso required: Gina produces satisfying, smartenabled filter coffee. The Slovenian-designed device offers three preparation techniques: pour-over, immersion or cold drip. ($295, goat-story.com,

S

OP C

NADA

($110, wacaco.com)

H

A

PHOTO: NORR STUDIO (MJÖLK).

urbanoutfitters.com)

SURPRISING The Nanopresso featherweight coffee maker (336 g) achieves a stable pressure of 261 psi during the extraction process, producing a crema that will be the envy of all.

NOMADIC The ritual in its simplest form: The Canadiano lets you brew coffee without a paper filter, one cup at a time. Highly portable. ($84, canadiano.co, simons.ca)

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ELLE DECO STYLE ARCHED

The Eclipse Smart-Heat electric portable heater’s unique crescent shape is achieved using corrosion-resistant, doublecoated steel, which is connected to a stable base with wheels. The circular heating element includes dimmable LED lighting, and spreads warmth evenly across an approximate area of 144 square feet. ($4,080, bromic.com)

WE GOT THE HEAT Some like them lean, some prefer curvy, while others simply want to get hot… So, we’ve curated a list of patio heaters in a variety of shapes and sizes. By Anamika Butalia

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T-JUNCTION MEETS TRIPOD

($310, brizacomfort.com)

ANAD

S

HOP

C

A

Christened Briza Hot, this versatile, weatherproof and energyefficient unit warms up 800 to 1,000 square feet indoors and up to a 100-square-foot area outdoors. It uses radiant-heat infrared technology, offers two heat settings (750W and 1,500W) and comes with a remote control and mounting brackets as well as a tripod stand.

CURVY

A perfect addition to patios and gazebos is the easy-to-use and eco-efficient Ener-G+ outdoor electric patio heater. The pendant lamp-style unit is protected against rain and dust. We love that it promises zero carbon monoxide emissions and low operating cost (less than $0.25 per hour anywhere in Canada). ($160–$240, energplus.com)

LINEAR

That it looks linear from one angle and contoured from another makes the Dimplex DSH heater a neat addition for outdoor entertaining. Not only is it compatible with wall, ceiling and stand mounts, it also reaches maximum heat in less than three seconds. ($725, dimplex.com)

($2,400, irenergy.ca, chadwicksandhacks.com)

($4,140, italkero.com, frontgate.com)

C

ANAD

A

Choose the permanent-mount version of evenGlo to enjoy a commercial-grade infrared heating solution on crisp autumnal days. It’s available in marine-grade stainless steel, bronze and black, making it ideal for rugged outdoor use.

Lightfire-Dolcevita by Italkero gets its moniker from its functionality—the stylish creation is both a patio heater and a lamp. Its polished stainlesssteel structure is fitted with an LED kit and rechargeable batteries in the lower half to create an intimate ambience when switched on. Meanwhile, a long glass tube runs upward to create a flickering fire effect and provide heat evenly thanks to its windproof, ionizationcontrol flame. The best part? Its infrared heat spreads across an area of up to 450 square feet.

HOP

CYLINDRICAL

PEAR-SHAPED

S

HOP

S

ANAD

A

C

PYRAMIDAL

Equipped with a variable gas control valve, the Quartz Propane Tower Heater is a classic choice for year-round use. Roll it out when entertaining under the stars, then stow it away in the garage to make the most of this durable design. ($1,300, hauserstores.com)

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ELLE DECO DÉCO STYLE STYLE

GET OUT!

PHOTOS:

It’s still warm enough to head outdoors and stroll through a golden hayfield or simply bask in the glorious sun. Just grab a jacket and enjoy.

By Anamika Butalia Photographs by Carlfried Verwaayen Styling by Lisa van der Klok with Emilia Kim te Plate and Sammie Musters


Walk on Sunshine

Indulge in some quiet time with a loved one over the weekend, but make it playful by taking turns on the Atlante daybed and Tessa chair from Flexform. ($8,280 for the daybed, $4,760 for the chair, flexform.it)


In Full Swing Make the most of the last warm summer days by giving in to the childlike pleasure of gliding gently through the air with the Allaperto Nautic swing, made of weaved rope and natural teak, by Matteo Thun and Antonio Rodriguez for Ethimo. ($3,960, ethimo.com, casalivingdesign.ca)


Morning Glory Savour the first meal of the day in exquisite comfort with the Fynn armchair and Block side table, both from Minotti. ($5,340 for the armchair, $2,840 for the side table, minotti.com)


ELLE DÉCO STYLE

Bask in the Sun Dip your toes in cool waters and sunbathe on the Darma teak lounger from Casa ($250, casashops.com). It’s draped with Marquetry, an outdoor fabric from Sunbrella ($160, sunbrella.com). In the background are the Niek chair by Piet Boon ($3,410, pietboon.com, avenue-road.com) and Paletti seater from Fatboy ($1,100, fatboy.com, lumens.com).



Kick Back

Curl up with your favourite book, with the sun as your reading lamp, on the BM5565 lounge chair from Carl Hansen & Son. ($1,400, carlhansen.com)


Go with the Flow Swim or sink into the comfortable Frida lounge chair by Vincent Sheppard ($1,170, vincentsheppard. com). Its clean, linear design cozily complements the Fat-Fat small table by Patricia Urquiola for B&B Italia ($1,190, bebitalia.com) and the Ambient Ray lamp by Gloster. ($1,720, gloster.com)


ELLE DÉCO STYLE

Everything under the Sun Set the stage in the great outdoors with essentials such as the Gloster carpet ($2,580, gloster.com) and Calix side table from Baxter ($2,790, baxter.it). As sunset approaches, we recommend mood lighting with the help of the Carrie brass and leather lamp by Norm Architects from Menu ($280, menuspace.com), Balad Bamboo H38 Fermob lamp from Extra Vert ($270, extravert.nl) or Gloster’s Pebble lamp ($880, gloster.com).


homes ELLE DECO

DREAM A LITTLE DESIGNER DREAM

PHOTO: SYLVIE LI ARCHITECTURE: ALAIN CARLE

IN THE CITY, THE SUBURBS OR EVEN THE COUNTRYSIDE.

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Maison Corbeil’s Luscious linen modular sofa, along with EQ3’s Vero taupe cushions and Slub wood rug (eq3.com) and a Zara Home stool (zarahome.com) create a dedicated relaxation retreat. On the waxed concrete table made by Venilux Quebec (veniluxquebec.ca), we see ceramic pieces from Ema (emaceramics.com, soukmtl.com) and a cup by Mie Kim (miekimstudio.com). A fabric pendant light adds a sculptural element to the room. Opposite page: The pristine decor of the house is the perfect backdrop for the still lifes that Alexandra likes to create for her work as a lifestyle photographer. Seen here are ceramic vases and candle holder by Korean-born Montreal artist Mie Kim (miekimstudio.com, soukmtl.com).

Alexandra and Mathieu Ambroise


ELLE DECO HOMES

BRIGHT

IDEAS

In suburban Montreal, a family decided to transform a prefabricated house to bring in more light and accommodate their lifestyle. Now all in white and focused on the essentials, it invites us to reconsider the true meaning of the art of living. Text and styling by Muriel Françoise

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

Photographs by Sylvie Li

Assistant photographer Carla Oliveira


The house has very little in the way of furniture, aside from tables and waxed concrete benches with organic lines designed by Alain Carle. Pierre Jeanneret-inspired chairs (eternitymodern.ca) add elegance to the large living room that opens out to the garden. Tabletop accessories include Philodendron carafe and bowls in Sévigny sandstone (maisonsevigny.com) and a vintage dish (shoppe.amberinteriordesign.com). Opposite page: The open-plan kitchen is subtle with soft, curving lines. Large doors, painted in Marrakech from Pure and Original (ramacierisoligo.com), conceal storage spaces and appliances. Furnishings include a vintage farmhouse stool (etsy.com), Bernini Sévigny vase (maisonsevigny.com) and Mie Kim ceramic stand (miekimstudio.com).


ELLE DECO HOMES

“YOU EXPERIENCE THIS BUILDING A BIT AS YOU WOULD A SCULPTURE, AN OBJECT THAT EVOLVES OVER THE COURSE OF THE DAY.” — Alain Carle



ELLE DECO HOMES

W

HEN THEY MET BACK IN 2015, at a mutual friend’s

party in a downtown Montreal penthouse designed by Alain Carle, the architect had no idea that he would one day design Alexandra and Mathieu Ambroise’s home. The young couple had moved back from Toronto, and as soon as they found the place where they wanted to settle with their son, Joshua—in a leafy enclave of suburban homes and manicured lawns in Baie-d’Urfé, Quebec— they turned to Carle for guidance. The bungalow, which dates to the 1960s, was in need of major renovation. The living areas, streetside and facing north, lacked the light that graced the garage at the rear. The winding layout of the streets that traverse the neighbourhood also exposed each facade of the building to the gaze of passersby.

The architect took this particular context into account as he reconfigured and enlarged the interior by transforming the garage into a large open area, almost 20 feet high, that serves to unite the kitchen, dining room and living room. The room is bordered by a long bay window opening onto the garden, which is sheltered from view by a low wall. An interior courtyard was also created in the basement, where Mathieu’s office is located. And the windows were placed so as to frame little corners of greenery and sky as if they were paintings. “This makes the space a landscape to be observed, a place that changes with the hours and the seasons,” notes Carle. “When the sun or the moon passes in front of a window and lights up everything inside, it’s magical. These sorts of things are not strictly necessary, but part of what architecture should do is evoke emotions.” A majestic staircase placed below a central skylight helps diffuse precious light throughout the house.

Above, left: Near Alexandra’s custom-made waxed concrete desk and shelves is a Pierre Jeanneret-inspired chair (eternitymodern.ca). The shelves hold the Forth pencil holder, Draft letter holder from EQ3 (eq3.com) as well as sculptures by Cana Dai (instagram.com/canadaiceramics) and Ema (emaceramics.com, soukmtl.com). Right: A built-in bunk bed allows plenty of room for little Joshua to play. A concealed storage area accessible from the bottom bunk keeps clothes, books and toys within easy reach. Pictured are the Dioscuri wall lamp by Michele De Lucchi for Artemide (homierluminaire.ca, artemide.com), Maileg linen rhinoceros (coeurdartichaut.ca) and Comme des enfants wooden blocks (commedesenfants.com). Opposite page: A large, palm leaf wall hanging (coeurdartichaut.ca) adds warmth to the guest room. The room features a walnut nightstand by Quebec cabinetmaker Guy Lemyre (lemyre.art) along with Alexandra and Mathieu, another Dioscuri lamp and Gabrielle Paris linen bedroom set (coeurdartichaut.ca).

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“THROUGH A PLAY OF TEXTURES, THE SURFACES SERVE AS A CENTRAL DECORATIVE ELEMENT.” — Alain Carle

Wood and textile provide a welcome contrast to the all-white interior of Alexandra and Mathieu’s bedroom, which opens with the help of Guy Lemyre door handles (lemyre.art). The space is furnished with a vintage African fabric stretched over the wall-mounted wooden frame, a stool brought back from Mexico, vase from Cana Dai (instagram.com/ canadaiceramics), Gabrielle Paris linen bedroom set (coeurdartichaut.ca) and bedside Atmos lamps by Brick in the Wall (brickinthewall.com)

A sculptural work in its own right, the residence is now decked out in white. For her work as a fashion designer and lifestyle photographer, Alexandra requested a clean canvas. Six months in Mexico made her fall in love with bright interiors with a roughhewn finish. White waxed concrete covers the walls, floors and ceilings, as well as built-in furniture. The side and dining room tables are made of the same material. The furniture was chosen to be versatile—to meet needs rather than follow trends. Textiles and wooden details, like handcrafted chairs or custom door handles, bring an element of warmth to the minimalist decor. The Japanese philosophy of wabi-sabi, which infuses Alexandra’s first loungewear collection, Étant, is reflected throughout the house in decorative touches such as delicate tree branches in ceramic vases, a large wall hanging made from dried foliage and pieces worn by the passage of time. “On a white background, each object acquires a sculptural quality. Pieces must enter into a slow dialogue with each other,” says Carle. The effect is a bit like being in an art gallery or museum, which is the first image that comes to mind when you enter this house, whose ambience shifts with the natural play of light and shade. (alaincarle.ca)


Natural light streams in through the skylight and illuminates the couple’s bathroom, its waxed concrete sink and shower, Slik bathtub and Palazzani taps (ramacierisoligo.com), Zara Home stool (zarahome.com), another Dioscuri lamp by Michele De Lucchi for Artemide (homierluminaire.ca, artemide.com), Etsy mirror (etsy.com), Cana Dai pottery (instagram.com/canadaiceramics) and Meraki soap (coeurdartichaut.ca)


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FLIGHT OF

FANCY

nicholas ancerl has imagined a private haven with natural elements, tactile textures and sustainable features in Barrie, Ontario. The kicker? It isn’t real…yet. By Anamika Butalia

Renders by JORG – jorgcc.com

Expansive and outward-looking, the living room is planned with a Flexform (flexform.it) sectional, chairs from Avenue Road (avenue-road.com) and Artnet (artnet.com) as well as tables from 1stDibs (1stdibs.com), Salvatori e l l e d and é c o rMinotti at i o n q uébec 61. (salvatoriofficial.com) (minotti.com)


Right: In this open-plan design, the living area extends to the kitchen and breakfast room, which properly reveal themselves once the sliding doors are moved. Seen here are lights from Baxter (baxter.it), counter stools from Arteriors (arteriorshome.com), faucet from CEA Design (ceadesign.it) and Gaggenau appliances (gaggenau.com). Below: A Japanese maple tree will be strategically planted to create this aweinspiring view from the dining area. The 14-seat table from Brougham Interiors (broughaminteriors.com) is paired with chairs from Drechsel Studio (drechselstudio.com). Accessories include benches, resin stools and black wood sculptures by Martha Sturdy from Hollace Cluny (hollacecluny.ca), Lucio Fontana artworks from Artsy (artsy.net), light from Commute Design Studio (commutedesign.com), candle holders from By the Modern (bythemodern.com) and Elte low bowls (elte.com).


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Crestwood’s street-side facade features a sophisticated design to ensure privacy. Three horizontal strips will be built, each differing in material, size and functionality. On the main floor, vertical wooden slats will disguise the main entrance and garage door. The second and largest level will be cantilevered and clad in handcrafted Kolumba bricks from Denmark. Finally, the glass cube on top will be set back, with the exposed lower roof area covered in feather reed grass.

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E ALL KNOW WHAT OUR DREAM HOME will look like—the view from the bedroom, the colour scheme and material palette, a fireplace, a patio to enjoy warm days, perhaps even a kitchen garden. While building it may still be a distant dream, we realize it’s no longer difficult to visualize the entire space. When we chanced upon Crestwood, a property designed by Nicholas Ancerl and his multidisciplinary atelier, Ancerl Studio, we were agape at the expansive home, the sheer volume of its living room and the luxuriant decor scheme. Then, when we realized that we were looking at photo-realistic renders, our jaws hit the floor! We were immediately intrigued. What we found was that this residence is yet to be built. It’ll be completed only next year, but we couldn’t resist a virtual tour of this soon-tobe-real house. Crestwood will be situated atop a hill, backed onto greenery. Its location near the marina has led Ancerl to conceptualize it as a glass box nestled in the lap of nature, “to create a dramatic home among the treetops.” He adds, “From the rear, the angular house will be made using concrete and glazing. Meanwhile, a subtle yet sophisticated structure will be created for the front.” The main entrance and garage door will be concealed behind vertical wooden slats. Above it will be a cantilevered level, the largest of all three storeys, clad in handcrafted Kolumba bricks from Denmark. Finally, the topmost floor will be a glass cube that’ll be set back.

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A play of light and shadow offsets the bold colour palette of the home office, which is also perched in the uppermost glass cube.


SETTING GREAT EXPECTATIONS? According to David Jorgensen, founder of JORG, it took 480 hours over a period of four months for him and his team at JORG (jorgcc.com) to create 23 renders for this home. Jorgensen has looked into every detail. “The first step was to survey the topography and represent the surrounding terrain,” he says. “Site photographs of the woods were referenced during modelling. Every tree visible in the renderings was placed individually to project light through them to create diffused and dappled lighting effects within the interior scenes. Doing this makes the renders accurate and natural. Materials were applied and refined on all surfaces, and furniture was placed as specified. Then, we explored the space like a photographer to project natural light in. When renderings get close to being photo-realistic, people start to look past the fact that the physical space doesn’t exist. Instead, they focus on the design and their interpretation of it. This means that the detail within the design, such as the lived-in appeal of these renders, becomes increasingly important.” With a result as stunning as this, we’re wondering if as an architect, Nicholas Ancerl feels any trepidation about replicating the render into reality. “Of course,” he says, laughing, “we have to ensure that everything lives up to the homeowners’ expectations. But we also have to make room for human error, as well as engineering or even budget changes.” So, are homeowners given disclaimers? “You see, these are artistic renderings based on the finalized floor plans, and since it’s a stand-alone structure (unlike a restrictive space like a condo), it is actually very simple to realize every detail,” he responds. When asked if it would be better if the renders were a little less than perfect so as to not wow the homeowners, Ancerl exclaims, “No, we want to put our best foot forward even if it’s a render, because it gives us a goal to achieve! And, honestly, nothing can take away from the experience of actually stepping into a real space.”



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The minimalist primary bedroom will prove to be a haven for nature lovers. Pendant lights from South Hill Home (southhillhome.com) are seen near the wall panels, tables and bed, all of which are custom made by Ancerl Studio. Left page, above: Both runs of stairs are illuminated by a 30-foot-high opening from which light streams in. Below: Just behind the sleeping space in the primary bedroom is the expansive wardrobe area, with an organizer in walnutveneer finish. The space is softened through the use of an ottoman custom made by Ancerl Studio.

“THE CONTEMPORARY INTERIORS WILL HAVE A RUSTIC TOUCH AND A NEUTRAL COLOUR PALETTE, AS WE WANT THE COLOURS OF NATURE, SEEN THROUGH THE EXPANSIVE WINDOWS, TO DOMINATE THE INTERIORS.” — Nicholas Ancerl

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Two pristine bathrooms are planned, with a Hamaca tub from Splinterworks (splinterworks.com) and bathware from Vola (vola.com).

The reigning theme across the home is to bring the outdoors in. This is apparent from the first step inside, where visitors will be drawn to the rear view of the woodlands. It’s also seen in the plan of the 14-seater dining room, which will look out on the picturesque conservation area, where a Japanese maple has been planted as a focal point. That’s not all. The 20-foot glazed wall of the voluminous living room slides open to bring nature inside. (A custom firebox promises to keep the space toasty.) Indeed, the blurring of the indoor-outdoor lines continues to the uppermost glass cube. It will offer 270-degree views of the surrounding feather reed grass and of the lake in the cooler months. Ancerl points out that the home will stay true to the elements. “We’re tying the elements of outside to the inside by employing natural stones, woods, concrete, etc. This is not a home where the furniture needs to be wrapped in plastic—it’s all about comfort. “I’m a firm believer that a home should maximize living experiences (rather than square footage), along with expansive views. Which is why this one will boast floor-toceiling windows, corner-to-corner in some cases,” he says, giving us one more detail to add to our dream home. And one more reason to look forward to 2022. (ancerlstudio.com)


Like the rest of the loft, the dining ensemble is black in colour with clean, spare lines. The Future Simple Studio oak table is surrounded by wood and leather Nord chairs from Montreal brand Atelier Vaste (ateliervaste.com). Also seen are a Semi chrome pendant lamp by Claus Bonderup and Torsten Thorup, reissued by Gubi (shop.gubi.com, kelli.shop), a Karastan rug (lipmancarpetmontreal.com), Wave Tableware vase and cups (wavetableware.com), EQ3 wooden plates, coasters and tray (eq3.com), Santiago utensils by David Chipperfield for Alessi (alessi.com), napkins by La Douzaine (ladouzaine.com). On the wall is Inhabited Fragments, a paper artwork by Montreal artist Nadège Roscoe-Rumjahn (nadegerr.com).

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FUTURE SIMPLE

When this young couple decided to return to Montreal after a sojourn in New York, they chose a loft in a former printing plant near the Old Port. Inspired by the subtle interplay of their surroundings, they have succeeded in bringing nature indoors. Text and styling by Muriel Françoise

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

Photographs by Sylvie Li

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“WE LIVED IN THE LOFT FOR SIX MONTHS BEFORE RENOVATING IT SO THAT WE COULD SEE WHAT OUR NEEDS WOULD BE AND HOW LIGHT MOVED THROUGH THE SPACE.” — Christine Djerrahian

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D  Above: At the entrance to the loft, mirrored kitchen cabinets enlarge the space and capture the light. Two burgundy Simon Legald Form bar chairs for Normann Copenhagen (normann-copenhagen.com, neverassez.com) surround a white brick kitchen island with a Céragrès granite countertop (ceragres.ca). Accessories include a vase by Montreal artist Pascale Girardin (atelier.pascalegirardin.com) with a rustic bouquet by Floralia (shop.floralia.ca) and Mile pendant light by Guillaume Sasseville and Lambert et Fils (lambertetfils.com). A Woman Thinking poster by Frédéric Forest (grammatical-paris.com) brings a sense of lightness to the room. Right: Coffee enthusiasts, Christine and Nick saved a spot in the kitchen for a gleaming Breville Barista Express (breville.com) right next to a polished steel Liconi centrepiece by Pierfrancesco Cravel for Alessi (alessi.com). On the shelf above are Teema cups by Kaj Franck for Iittala (finnishdesignshop.com), Wave Tableware bowls (wavetableware.com) and IKEA glasses and carafe (ikea.com)

ESPITE THE RAIN, light floods into the living room of this loft, just a stone’s throw from the Old Port of Montreal. Huge industrial windows that open onto the garden of a Gothic basilica offer a private view of the treetops. While passersby bustle along in the street below, three-year-old Milo plays quietly to a jazz tune. “We have always wanted to live in the city centre. When we came back to Montreal after spending eight years in New York for work, it was important for us to be in an urban setting. I love this area because there’s a nice mix of families, offices and restaurants, as well as amazing architectural diversity,” explains architect Christine Djerrahian, owner and founder of Future Simple Studio, who is completing her first project here. In order to truly explore the possibilities of this 1,850-squarefoot space located in a former printing plant, Christine, her husband Nick and Milo, a baby at the time, camped out here for six months in 2018. The couple observed the play of light and shadow, and reflected on their future needs. Determined not to block any windows with walls, the architect got rid of the existing drywall partitions and imagined two large, framed containers of wood and glass for the bedrooms on either side of the loft. These units help to structure the space, and allowed for the creation of an office alongside the main bedroom and a meditation or painting studio next to their child’s bedroom. The glass surfaces of these modern alcoves are fitted with two types of blinds to provide everyone with the amount of privacy they desire.

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The space along the outside of Christine and Nick’s bedroom is transformed into an office, with the help of Future Simple Studio walnut plywood furniture manufactured by F&Y. On one end of the table is Verner Panton’s Mini Panthella lamp for Louis Poulsen (montreallighting.com, louispoulsen.com) and on the other is an old typewriter, a gift from Nick for Christine’s 30th birthday.


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Architect Christine Djerrahian, her husband Nick D’Urbano and their son Milo like to listen to jazz in the naturally lit living room, where an eco-friendly Karastan carpet (lipmancarpetmontreal. com) blends in with the concrete floor. Seen behind them is a hi-fi cabinet by Future Simple Studio (futuresimple. studio), manufactured by STIL Design (stildesign.ca), a turntable (project-audio.com) received as a wedding gift, capped by a Sonos soundbar (sonos.com), Gigi gradient lamp by d’Armes (darmes.ca) and Verre d’Onge (verredonge.com) as well as a black clay fibre pot by EQ3 (eq3.com).

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Right: The alcove between Milo’s bedroom and the living room window is furnished with a vintage black metal Jarpen armchair by Niels Gammelgaard for IKEA, Key coffee table by GamFratesi for Hem (ca.hem.com) and Ripple smoked glass by Sophie Lou Jacobsen (sophieloujacobsen.com). The CUE mirror from emerging Montreal brand Found (shop-found.com) is one of the architect’s tricks for blurring the lines between interior and exterior. Below: The living room is kept open to make room for family life. Two Cove chairs from Atelier Vaste (ateliervaste.com) sit alongside a Dive modular sofa from Quebec brand Élément de Base (elementdebase.com) with an EQ3 linen throw (eq3.com). In the absence of a coffee table, a chest and a vintage mirrored column both reflect light and provide a space to set down your glass or display a decorative piece like this pottery by Pascale Girardin (atelier.pascalegirardin.com). Greenery in an alabaster-coloured Radius pot from West Elm (westelm.com) brings an element of the outdoors into the loft.

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Christine and Nick’s bedroom is housed in a glass and walnut plywood container, the rich colour imparting a sense of warmth. Christine planned removable headboards with the help of F&Y (fny-mtl.com). The furnishings include STOENSE rug and PAX wardrobe in walnut veneer from IKEA (ikea.com) as well as charcoal-grey cotton and bamboo bed linens from Simons (simons.ca).


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The connection to the surrounding natural areas, an essential part of the project, works thanks to the reflection of the leaves from the trees in the garden on the glass walls of the rooms. It is also achieved through the use of mirrors, especially on the long kitchen wall, creating a trompe-l’oeil window effect and visually enlarging the room. The selection of raw materials for the interior (wood, stone, brick and concrete) reinforces the natural vibe, adding warmth to the space. Earth tones were chosen for the decor, along with plants like ivy, which adorns the walls of the rooms. “Wherever you sit, there is always a connection to the outside world,” says Christine, whose forced sedentary lifestyle in recent months has been eased by this habitat that lends a sense of living in a treehouse.

The minimalist furnishings allow life to unfold freely, reflecting the values of the couple. Alongside Christine’s creations— including a desk and a bed with removable hollow headboards for extra storage—there are pieces by Quebec designers. “Montreal is changing a lot. Today, it has so many amazing design studios. We wanted to be part of the city’s rebirth,” she emphasizes. The family has chosen to surround themselves with objects made locally, such as an organically shaped Sévigny ceramic vase for the bathroom. The only closed room in the loft, inspired by In Praise of Shadows by Japanese writer Jun’ichirō Tanizaki, it nestles in the shadow of a daily existence filled with light. (futuresimple.studio)

Left: From his bedroom, Milo can see into the living room. Two types of blinds allow the light to be filtered or blocked out. Near the made-in-Quebec Cupcake bed and chest of drawers by Dutailier (dutailier.com) are the EcoBirdy Charlie chair made from recycled toys (goodeeworld.com), ELVARLI shelf, IKEA’s VINDUM rug (ikea.com), Spot EQ3 hooks (eq3.com) and Blackamoors V-Carve #1 by Damien Davis (artsy.net). Right: Christine envisioned the cave-like bathroom to be a primal retreat. Large Azuma tiles from Italy (imolaceramica.com) have been combined to create a mosaic shower-bath. The vanity with its concrete sink was designed by Future Simple Studio with STIL Design (stildesign.ca) and Ballux (balux.ca). A vase from young Montreal ceramist Edith Sevigny-Martel Les Moires collection (maisonsevigny.com) evokes nature in perpetual transformation. Bath accessories include pumice stone and sesame scrub soap by Meraki (coeurdartichaut.ca). IKEA towels and Haeckels hand soap (haeckels.co.uk).

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THE

BRONZE AGE

Designer theresa casey welcomes a couple, who decided to leave a big old house for a modern condo in downtown Toronto, with big and bright rooms, easygoing elegance and a few dazzling moments to ease the transition. By Sophie Donelson

Photographs by Donna Griffith


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The TV room of this grand apartment in downtown Toronto was clad in fabric for noise reduction. Designer Theresa Casey paired the clients’ existing Poltrona Frau dining chairs with a new pair from B&B Italia for a little contrast; both are from Kiosk Toronto (kioskdesign.ca). The work by Tobias Møhl—blown glass exhibited in a light box—is from Sandra Ainsley Gallery (sandraainsleygallery.com).


Casey says she was “gobsmacked” when her client bought a piece by South African artist William Kentridge, whom she adores. Lekkerbreek is a linocut printed on dictionary pages. The custom-made bronze screens between the kitchen and entertaining spaces call on Art Deco references. The mahogany console was custom built for the space.


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E TEND TO romanticize a profession in the arts, imagining a bout of divine inspiration for a writer and the midnight rush of getting the idea on paper; or a designer spending a morning mood-boarding, latte in hand, until the composition of textiles, surfaces and paint colours harmonizes just right. But, for Theresa Casey, it’s simply a puzzle. “It starts with spatial planning,” she explains. “How do you shift things around to get the most bang for your buck, to get good sight lines and to not waste any space? That’s the negotiation.” Casey trained as an artist and left a thriving studio career catering to interior designers to work as one herself. Today, the Calgary native says her arts background serves to strengthen her creative tool box. That’s easily seen in a Yorkville condo that her firm, Casey Design, recently completed. The homeowners were long-time clients—this is the third primary residence Casey has created for them—but the style of living was a radical departure from their moody Tudor out on the Kingsway. “They wanted light!” says Casey. And so the couple solicited her blessing to purchase a spacious unit in the luxurious modern conversion of a 1928 school in Yorkville. The change in mood worked just fine for

the designer. “I don’t have a formula,” she explains. “People hire me to interpret who they are, what their lifestyle is and what’s going to excite them at home.” Their directive was clear: bright, modern and serene. Rooms for hosting fellow professionals and friends. Rooms for downtime. Room for their art. The 5,000-square-foot apartment is a mix of older rooms and heritage windows, plus the bold modern additions. Casey’s team envisioned an architecture-driven space that was “clean but not so clean it disappeared.” So a thoughtful collection of art and a trove of vintage lighting (“I love them all, they’re like my children!”) punctuates the rooms with personality. A dressing room even has a custom mural by Toronto artist Kari Serrao. Says Casey: “I wanted whimsy, so I started with wallpaper ideas—zebras. And one of the homeowners said, you know, I do love monkeys! So I got in touch with Kari right away.” But for a handsome build with formidable scale, Casey found the home’s entry, a featureless hallway, uninspired. What she wanted for the space was the grandeur, warmth and livability of old “apartment houses” like the Dakota, the storied Manhattan residence that counted Lauren Bacall and John Lennon among its tenants. Now, upon entering, you can choose to walk through a pair of bronze-framed doors to an inviting sitting room or the terrace beyond, or down a few steps to the dramatic double-height dining room,

“WE MADE A CONSCIOUS EFFORT TO CREATE PUBLIC AND PRIVATE ZONES. A HOME NEEDS SPACES THAT REFLECT OPENNESS AND INTIMACY TO TRULY BE SATISFYING.” — Theresa Casey

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The kitchen—in the older part of the home (note the smaller windows)—has open shelves. “Some clients would run screaming at the thought of having to arrange them daily. You have to be realistic about what you can handle.” The surfaces are Silestone by Cosentino (cosentino.com).


“SPATIAL PLANNING IS THE GROUNDING OF ANY PROJECT. IT’S THE SUPPORT UPON WHICH EVERYTHING ELSE DEVELOPS.” — Theresa Casey

Left: The firm added white-oak-and-brass open shelves to the cabinetry work by Marana Kitchens (maranakitchens.com). “I like the warmth of wood in contrast to the gloss,” says Casey. The appliances, which came with the condo, are from Sub-Zero (ca.subzero-wolf.com) and Miele (miele.ca). Above: Visitors are greeted with this view: bronzeframed doors leading to a sitting room. A mixedmedia work by Steven Nederveen from the Toronto Bau-Xi Gallery (bau-xi.com) hangs near a Minotti (minotti.com) sofa. The marble is Pietra Grey.

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A piece by Bruno Kurz from Toronto’s Odon Wagner Gallery (odonwagnergallery.com) hangs in the distance. The designer bought the vintage chair for the homeowners’ previous house—it fits beautifully here alongside a Cassina side table from Italinteriors (italinteriors.ca). The bed and bench are both Minotti and the rug is from Elte (elte.com).


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Above: The primary ensuite bathroom is a symphony of marble—even the mirror and door casings are framed in the material and trimmed in brass. The floor is Silver Light, walls are Bardiglio and the counter is honed Noisette Grigio. The tub and fixtures are Waterworks (waterworks.com) and the pair of pendants is vintage. Right: The expansive dressing room is adorned with a vintage light and a mural by Toronto artist Kari Serrao (kariserrao.com), designed to add a note of whimsy to the home. Monkeys are a favourite of one of the homeowners.

living room and kitchen. “If I didn’t replan this space, you’d feel it. You might not be able to articulate what’s wrong with the space, but you’d know,” says Casey. “Now you come off the elevator with the feeling, we’ve arrived,” she says. The bronze that greets you is just a wink at the main event, which is a pair of oversized bronze fretwork folding screens between the kitchen and dining room. With a nod to history— the pattern is undeniably influenced by Art Deco—the panels disguise a working kitchen when closed, and appear as a pair of elegant filigree art pieces when folded open.

It took many, many iterations to get the design right. The first panel design was floor-to-ceiling bronze and egregiously expensive. Casey added acrylic panels to solve this, but had to redraw the fretwork pattern after noting that one could see into the kitchen too clearly. “It’s a push and pull,” says Casey. “I’m always negotiating with the space, saying, ‘Okay, can I get this out of you?’” The homeowners, now downtown-living modern dwellers, are getting exactly what they needed from the space too. (caseydesignplan.com)

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The front yard features two Solair chairs (shop.vanspecial.com) and a sculptural, spherical wood deck ringed with a thin steel edge detail.


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FAMILY

TIME

An architectural firm ingeniously used every nook and cranny of a tiny piece of land to create a home for a young family brimming with joie de vivre. By Karine Monié

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

Photographs by Ema Peter

I

N THE NOW TRENDY Vancouver neighbourhood of Mount Pleasant that they call home, Alana and Alan live with their two children aged four and seven. Natives to the area, the couple decided to embark on a major project after finding a small piece of land in the perfect location, just a few miles from downtown and the verdant Stanley Park, which stretches across more than 400 hectares. It’s not surprising that this ideal spot inspired the family to build their dream house in a unique architectural style. In contrast to the more traditional houses in the area, the couple opted for modernity by calling on BattersbyHowat Architects, founded by David Battersby and Heather Howat. The clean lines of the structure and the black facade topped with a light-blue roof that blends seamlessly with the sky definitely turn a few heads.

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The young family of four gathers in the outdoor area, where a Solair chair (shop.vanspecial.com) is seen near a Gloster Grid collection chaise, Cane Line Time-out table by Strand+Hvass and Gloster Ray wooden lantern (all from broughaminteriors.com). Also seen are Marimekko graphic toss cushions (marimekkovancouver.com).

While they are known for larger-scale projects, the designers were challenged to create a modest-sized townhouse that would bring together all the spaces the family required. “Our philosophy is to create modern homes that are affordable,” says Howat. “We maximize the spatial diversity inside, so that the homeowners can fully realize their life experience.” The three-level home comprises as many bedrooms and two bathrooms, with the entrance on the main level along with the living room, dining room, kitchen and powder room, and an office area tucked away on one side and ingeniously embedded in one of the walls. On the storey above, Alana uses a large open area facing the sunken garden to teach yoga. Nearby is a sauna, wine cellar and play area-cum-TV room. The topmost floor is entirely dedicated to private spaces. A separate structure has also been created to accommodate an office/library for Alan, who is an entrepreneur, along with a small kitchen and a bathroom, while a covered area can accommodate a car. Lovers of mid-century design, as evidenced by the presence of Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair for Knoll and AJ wall lamps by Louis Poulsen, Alana and Alan did not want their home to be limited to purely modern influences. To accommodate this, the architects introduced white oak and colourful touches; the lighting fixtures, the tiles, several doors and certain parts of the walls provide playful contrasts. “The interior has a certain fluidity, and the back patio is a true extension of the house,” says Howat. Everything has been genuinely thought out with the homeowners in mind, and it shows: The welcoming and laid-back personality of this young family is reflected in the informal organization of the spaces, and the design is intentionally adapted to their lifestyle, right down to the smallest nooks and crannies. Winning. (battersbyhowat.com) 90

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In this living room corner, Eero Saarinen’s Womb chair and ottoman (edited by Knoll) (livingspace.com) shares space with the small Lampadina table lamp by Achille Castiglioni for Flos (lightformshop.com) and the textured Salsa Swing rug by Salari Carpets (salari.com).


BATTERSBYHOWAT ARCHITECTS COMBINED MID-CENTURY DESIGN AND CONTEMPORARY STYLE IN THIS HOME CREATED FOR A YOUNG FAMILY WHO WHO WANTED BOTH TRANQUILITY AND PROXIMITY TO THE CITY OF VANCOUVER.

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ELLE DECO HOMES

Left: Near the kitchen, a small office space—with an Eames chair (eq3.com) and a Gordon Smith artwork—is cleverly created to maximize the nook. Below: The Pangen pendant by FontanaArte (lightformshop. com) hangs over the Radii dining table by Bensen (bensen.com), where three blue glass Hoop vases by Stelton (providehome.com) are placed. Opposite page: View of the glass facade of the living room


The built-in bed and side tables in the main bedroom were custom designed by BattersbyHowat Architects. The AJ wall sconces are from Louis Poulsen (lightformshop.com), the Koppa white dish with leather strap on the nightstand is by Marimekko (marimekkovancouver.com) and the white vase is by EQ3 (eq3.com).


ELLE DECO HOMES

Left: The back terrace is an extension of the house between the dining room and the laneway house/home office. A Gloster Grid collection chair and Gloster Ray wooden lantern (both from broughaminteriors.com) are seen near the blue West Elm planter (westelm.ca). Right: A screen provides privacy and filtered views to the street.

BOTH INSIDE AND OUTSIDE, PURE LINES PREVAIL, REFLECTING AN AESTHETIC THAT FOCUSES ON SIMPLICITY AND FUNCTIONALITY, WHILE INTRODUCING REFINED TOUCHES.

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ELLE DECO PROMOTION

ELLE DECO

EXTRA

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inspiration ELLE DECO

RETHINK. RESET. REVEL. AND DEFINITELY...

PHOTO: JOHNNY MILLER

REFLECT! e l l e d e c o r at i o n c a n a d a

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ELLE DECO INSPIRATION

QUEEN OF THE KITCHEN

athena calderone is the new food expert in town, and she’s taking the culinary world by storm. Here, she takes us on an autumnal affair, complete with recipes using seasonal ingredients and tips on putting together the ultimate table settings this fall. By Anamika Butalia Photographs by Johnny Miller

F

OR A LONG TIME NOW, nutritionists and chefs from

across the globe have been emphasizing the importance of eating seasonal fruits and vegetables. If you’re not the kind to keep tabs on what’s in and when, worry not. Athena Calderone to the rescue! The multi-faceted creative (founder of EyeSwoon and author of Cook Beautiful) has documented her favourite recipes for each season to make the task much simpler. With the onset of autumn just around the corner, we spoke to Athena about her love of food, her choicest recipes and her advice on how to create the most dramatic dining settings with ease. What about food excites you so? As the title of my book suggests, I love to cook beautiful! That means my eyes guide me in the kitchen as much as my taste buds—after all, we eat with our eyes first. While taste and smell are obviously paramount to how we perceive a meal, visual cues are just as important. Before a single bite passes our lips, our brains are wondering, ‘Does this look good to me?‘ You’ve been a model, actor, interior designer and now chef and author. Tell us, how did it all happen? In my early life, I wasn’t sure which direction to take. I tried out different creative paths, but nothing seemed to stick. After my son Jivan was born, everything seemed to fall into place. My curiosity led me to the kitchen, where my need for perfection took me from discovery to creativity. However, finding my voice through food took time, effort and a lot of trial and error. I eventually launched EyeSwoon to offer design inspiration as well as tips on culinary and entertaining.

What does autumn bring to mind? Autumn is my favourite season. As the air teeters from warm to crisp, all the familiar autumnal cravings come flooding back and suddenly I’m craving soul-warming soups and roasted everything—from pork shoulder and chicken breasts to squash and cauliflower. Autumn makes me feel like a sorceress in the kitchen, simmering and stirring as I layer textures and try out new flavour profiles. From the golden colours of the changing leaves to the orange of butternut squash, I let the season’s tones, textures and tastes guide me. I bring that warmth to the table with branches in fall’s golden hues brimming from vintage vases, add earthy linen napkins that mimic the outside, and handmade earthenware dishes that are a nod to nature’s imperfect, rustic beauty. You don’t just cook up a feast, you also dress it up… It’s no secret that I love entertaining: right from the prep, the planning, the cooking, the chopping—everything. When I’m approaching a table setting, I think about every granular detail, from the shopping list to the menu right down to the decor and even the palette of the linens. Everything should feel cohesive and tell a story. So, I think about curating an experience that transports my guests into another world for a brief moment in time—one that is guided by sight, taste, sound, smell and touch. I typically set up a private Pinterest board and pin striking visuals that fit within my desired theme to plan the dinner menu, beverages, florals, lighting, tablescape decor elements and any printed assets, like name cards or menus. (eye-swoon.com)

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UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL MY BOOK COOK BEAUTIFUL … helps readers capture the wholly undeniable magic and emotional power that an appealing plate of food promises.

MY MOTHER… taught me how to trust my eye, my gut, my intuition.

MY ADVICE TO AMATEUR COOKS… I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve developed recipes that didn’t work out, only to see where I went wrong and use that as fuel to take me to the next step.

INGREDIENTS I LOVE… Lemon, chili and fresh herbs are my kitchen’s holy trinity, and Mediterranean influences dominate.

STYLING TIPS WITH HOUSEHOLD ITEMS… Embrace imperfection—don’t be afraid to mix things up and create an artful mess. Set the table with the season’s verdant veggies, beautiful branches and fancy flowers.

MY GO-TO AUTUMNAL DISH…

PHOTOS:

The Creamy Cauliflower Soup. It combines sweet roasted florets with buttery Yukon Gold potatoes and an aromatic trifecta of leeks, garlic and thyme. The key, when puréeing, is to add liquid just a little at a time.

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ELLE DECO INSPIRATION CREAMY CAULIFLOWER SOUP WITH DUKKAH AND WATERCRESS PESTO

METHOD FOR THE DUKKAH

1. In a small skillet, over medium-high heat, toast the pistachios for two minutes, until warm. 2. Add sesame seeds, coriander seeds and cumin seeds. Continue to toast for two to four minutes, or until the seeds are fragrant. 3. Transfer the mixture to a mini food processor, along with the peppercorns and salt. Pulse until the pistachios are coarsely chopped. 4. Keep handy for immediate use, or store the mix in an airtight container in a cool place for a week.

SERVES FOUR

FOR THE DUKKAH MAKES 3/4 CUP [95 G] • • • • • •

3⁄4 cup (95 g) unsalted pistachios 1⁄4 cup (40 g) sesame seeds 2 tbsp coriander seeds 2 tbsp cumin seeds 1 tsp whole black peppercorns 1 tsp kosher salt

FOR THE WATERCRESS-PISTACHIO PESTO

1. In a food processor, pulse the pistachios, watercress and parsley until coarsely chopped, about 10 pulses. 2. Add oil and lemon juice and process until a smooth, loose paste forms, about three 10-second pulses. 3. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, stir in the lemon zest and season with salt. 4. Keep covered in the refrigerator with a layer of olive oil on top to ensure the pesto lasts three to four days.

FOR THE WATERCRESSPISTACHIO PESTO MAKES 2 CUPS [480 ML]

1⁄3 cup (45 g) unsalted pistachios, toasted, plus more for garnish 1 1/2 cups (60 g) packed watercress 3/4 cup (45 g) packed fresh parsley 2⁄3 cup (165 mL) extra-virgin olive oil 1⁄3 cup (75 mL) lemon juice (about two lemons) Zest of one lemon Kosher salt •

• • • •

FOR THE SOUP

1. Preheat the oven to 425°F (220°C). 2. Spread the cauliflower florets on a baking sheet. Drizzle them generously with oil, season with salt and toss to coat. Roast for 15 minutes, tossing the cauliflower halfway through. Continue to roast until golden brown, about 15 minutes more. 3. While the cauliflower is roasting, chop the leeks crosswise into slices of roughly a quarter inch (6 mm). In a medium saucepan, heat the oil and thyme over medium heat and sauté the leeks until they are slightly softened, about two minutes. Add the garlic and cook until soft and fragrant, about two minutes more. 4. Add the potatoes, stock, cream, 2 cups (480 mL) of water and the roasted cauliflower to the pot. Bring the mixture to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat and cover, cooking until the potatoes are fork tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Once the potatoes are tender, remove the thyme stems from the mixture (the leaves should have fallen off during cooking). 5. Transfer the mixture to a blender and cover the hole of the blender top with a towel. Blend until the mixture is very smooth. Stir in the lemon juice and season with two teaspoons salt and some pepper. Divide the soup among four bowls and top it with lemon zest, a swirl of the watercress pesto and a sprinkle of dukkah.

• •

FOR THE SOUP 1 large head cauliflower (approx. 2 lb, or 910 g), cored and cut into bite-size florets 1⁄4 cup (60 mL) extra-virgin olive oil, plus extra for drizzling Kosher salt 2 leeks, white and light-green parts only, cut in half lengthwise and rinsed clean 3 sprigs fresh thyme 2 cloves garlic, minced 8 oz (225 g) Yukon Gold potatoes (about three), peeled and quartered 3 cups (720 mL) chicken stock 2⁄3 cup (185 mL) heavy cream 2 lemons, zested and juiced Freshly cracked pepper •

• •

• • •

• • • •

-

PRO

TIP-

PURÉED SOUP CAN LOOK—AND TASTE—BORINGLY BASIC WITHOUT A GARNISH OR TWO TO LIVEN IT UP. JUST GENTLY SWIRL IN A MINIMAL AMOUNT OF PESTO WITH A TEASPOON, MIXING ONLY THE SURFACE OF THE SOUP IN A LOOSE CIRCULAR MOTION TO ACHIEVE RESTAURANT-QUALITY APPEAL.

This recipe is taken from the book Cuisiner en beauté by Athena Calderone, KO Editions, $45.

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Reclaimed cedar clads the amorphous-shaped interiors, which mirror the lake’s waves and undulating shoreline.


ELLE DECO INSPIRATION

NOW YOU A Platonic cube, whose sharp edges conceal a curvaceous creation within, rises inconspicuously out of the rocks along the waters of Lake Huron in Ontario. By Anamika Butalia Photographs courtesy PARTISANS

ISN’T IT RATHER EASY to imagine spending a crisp evening inside this sauna, soaking

up the uninterrupted lake view while basking in the luxurious warmth of the woodwork? (Yes, and yes.) But it can be rather challenging to create a structure that so closely mimics the natural environs…as Jonathan Friedman, Pooya Baktash and Alex Josephson of architecture firm PARTISANS have done. The creative trio turned to an Italian grotto for inspiration for the 800-square-foot interior of this lakeside sauna, while the exterior pays homage to the northern Canadian landscape. “Its design is inspired by the idea of a Platonic cube rising out of the rock,” they explain. “Its edges draw a profile of the stone, which is some of the oldest Canadian Shield granite exposed on earth and whose soft forms influence the sculpted interiors.” Cedar that’s treated using shou sugi ban, the traditional Japanese method of charring timber for a weathered appeal, makes up the structure. This helps the cube blend into the rocky shoreline and remain inconspicuous on the undulating rock surface that gives the Georgian Bay island’s edge its unique beauty. Meanwhile, reclaimed cedar is used extensively within the amorphous-shaped interiors, which emulate the lake’s waves and shoreline.

SEE

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TO MINIMIZE THE IMPACT OF CONSTRUCTION ON THE ENVIRONMENT, A 3D SCAN OF THE LANDSCAPE WAS USED TO DEVELOP A METICULOUSLY ACCURATE BLUEPRINT AND ESTABLISH THE STRUCTURE’S EXACT POSITION IN THE ROCK SO THAT IT WOULD PROVIDE OPTIMAL VIEWS OF GEORGIAN BAY’S CAPTIVATING SUNSETS.

In an ever-changing display, light is sculpted as it streams through the window apertures. Opposite page: Cedar is treated using the Japanese shou sugi ban method to achieve a weathered appeal and camouflage the grotto’s cuboid exterior.

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ELLE DECO INSPIRATION

“One of the most spectacular aspects of the project are the window apertures that illuminate the timber-clad sauna,” say the creatives. The natural light illustrates just how ambitious the architecture is, considering the remote and ecologically sensitive region it is located in. So, to reduce the impact of construction, the Toronto-based practice prefabricated several components in the city, used reclaimed wood from local forests, employed organically derived or non-emitting building products and—our favourite— ensured that the sauna’s faucet is fed by lake water. (partisans.com)

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ELLE DECO INSPIRATION

Majara Residence, or Presence in Hormuz 2, is an award-winning project by Tehran-based ZAV Architects. 108 e l l e d e c o r at i o n c a n a d a


THE

HORMUZ OASIS

Off the southern coast of Iran, on the island of Hormuz, Majara Residence is rewriting the rules of architecture while creating a new way of life that harks back to ancient times. By Carolyne Parent

Adapted by Zarya Rubin

Photographs by Tahmineh Monzavi, Soroush Majidi, Payman Barkhordari

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ELLE DECO INSPIRATION

H

ORMUZ… For some, it’s the name of a famous strait, a busy waterway frequented by oil tankers from all over the world. For others, notably Iranians and a handful of international tourists, it is also the name of a small volcanic island anchored in the Persian Gulf, brimming with unusual charms. Its appeal comes from mineral-rich soils that drape rock formations in blazing red, yellow and orange, garnering the island destination the nickname “Rainbow Island.” For architects Mohamadreza Ghodousi, Fatemeh Rezaie, Golnaz Bahrami and Soroush Majidi, of ZAV Architects, based in Tehran, the inspiration for Majara Residence, a spectacular hotel that blends in seamlessly with its surroundings, was everywhere they looked. “Our role is to push back on the limits of architecture. We let ourselves be guided by the topography and the colours of the island to revolutionize a traditional form, the dome, which is so familiar to local islanders,” says Ghodousi, the studio’s founder. They are grouped into clusters of 17 suites each, completed with one or two bedrooms along with dressing, living and bathrooms. Common areas such as a restaurant, café, spa and

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prayer room are also configured in some clusters. The entire construction uses the superadobe technique, which minimizes the need for air conditioning even in these often scorching climes, and is made with imported sand to preserve the precious local soils. Majara Residence is the second phase of a large urbanrevitalization project—Presence in Hormuz—initiated by ZAV Architects and aimed at empowering islanders through tourism. Near the port of the island, the construction of a superadobe meeting place where visitors can come to hear locals strum their guitars in the evenings served to train the local workers who later built Majara. The third phase includes a training centre for the tourism industry. “Our dream was to include the local inhabitants, tourists and the environment in this project so that it’s beneficial to everyone as well as to the island itself,” says Ghodousi. “For us, the notion of sustainability is not just about nature: It also involves humans.”

(zavarchitects.com,

majara.hormoz, itto.org)


DÉCO STYLE

“PRESENCE IN HORMUZ COMPRISES A SERIES OF PROJECTS BASED ON A GROUND-UP APPROACH BASED ON OBSERVATIONS OF THE LANDSCAPE. OUR AIM IS TO REVITALIZE THE LOCAL ECONOMY AND ENABLE PEOPLE TO MAKE A BETTER LIVING FROM TOURISM.” – Mohamadreza Ghodousi

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LAND ART ON THE ISLAND HORMUZ GAINED WORLDWIDE RENOWN THANKS TO AN ENVIRONMENTAL ART INITIATIVE THAT BEGAN 10 YEARS AGO, INVOLVING THE CREATION OF AN IMMENSE “CARPET” ENTIRELY MADE UP OF THE MULTICOLOURED SANDS FOUND ON THE ISLAND. IN ADDITION TO THE REGION’S GEOLOGICAL SPLENDOURS, GOLDEN BEACHES AND HISTORIC RUINS IS THE MUSEUM AND GALLERY OF DR. AHMAD NADALIAN, A PROMINENT LOCAL ENVIRONMENTAL ARTIST. (nadalian.com)

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PHOTO: EMA PETER (EMAPETER.COM)

ELLE DECO PERSPECTIVE

VANCOUVER | MARCH 21, 2021 | 10:40 P.M.


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