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TOP KNOX 2016 What are you waiting for? Vote local!

AUG. 18, 2016 KNOXMERCURY.COM

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How to Survive a8 MASS SHOOTING

And other lessons learned as people prepare for the worst kind of disaster • BY CLAY DUDA

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9 8 7 NEWS

A West Knoxville Pond Pits City Council Members Against Each Other

JACK NEELY

The Sudden End of an Unhappy Marriage, in Market Square

ART

An Underground Skyline Towers Below Knoxville in a New Mural

CATHERINE LANDIS

Making Our Community Better, One Cup of Coffee at a Time


Delivering Fine Journalism Since 2015

EDITORIAL EDITOR Coury Turczyn coury@knoxmercury.com SENIOR EDITOR Matthew Everett matthew@knoxmercury.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Jack Neely jack@knoxhistoryproject.org STAFF WRITERS S. Heather Duncan heather@knoxmercury.com Clay Duda clay@knoxmercury.com CONTRIBUTORS

Chris Barrett Ian Blackburn Brian Canever Patrice Cole Eric Dawson George Dodds Lee Gardner Mike Gibson Carey Hodges Nick Huinker Donna Johnson

Rose Kennedy Catherine Landis Dennis Perkins Stephanie Piper Ryan Reed Eleanor Scott Alan Sherrod April Snellings Joe Sullivan Kim Trevathan Chris Wohlwend

INTERN Josh Witt

DESIGN ART DIRECTOR Tricia Bateman tricia@knoxmercury.com GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Charlie Finch

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

David Luttrell Shawn Poynter Justin Fee Tyler Oxendine CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS

Ben Adams Matthew Foltz-Gray

ADVERTISING PUBLISHER & DIRECTOR OF SALES Charlie Vogel charlie@knoxmercury.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Scott Hamstead scott@knoxmercury.com Stacey Pastor stacey@knoxmercury.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Michael Tremoulis michael@knoxmercury.com

BUSINESS BUSINESS MANAGER Scott Dickey scott.dickey@knoxmercury.com

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 618 South Gay St., Suite L2, Knoxville, TN 37902 knoxmercury.com • 865-313-2059 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR & PRESS RELEASES editor@knoxmercury.com CALENDAR SUBMISSIONS calendar@knoxmercury.com SALES QUERIES sales@knoxmercury.com DISTRIBUTION distribution@knoxmercury.com

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Terry Hummel Joe Sullivan Jack Neely Coury Turczyn Charlie Vogel The Knoxville Mercury is an independent weekly news magazine devoted to informing and connecting Knoxville’s many different communities. It is a taxable, not-for-profit company governed by the Knoxville History Project, a non-profit organization devoted to exploring, disseminating, and celebrating Knoxville’s unique cultural heritage. It publishes 25,000 copies per week, available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. © 2016 The Knoxville Mercury

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


August 18, 2016 Volume 02 / Issue 32 knoxmercury.com

CONTENTS

“Have no fear of perfection—you’ll never reach it.” —Salvador Dali

12 How to Survive a Mass Shooting COVER STORY

A dozen people gathered at the Pigeon Forge Community Center this month to learn more about mass shootings— more specifically, how to live through them. This is active-shooter survival training, a recurring (and free) hour-and-a-half class led by an off-duty police officer that covers a range of topics in sharp contrast to community center’s seemingly benign surroundings. Has mass murder become so frequent today that ordinary people need to prepare themselves? Clay Duda gets a feel for our societal worries over active shooter incidents.

In what order of actions should you respond to a mass shooting? See our story for answers!

NEWS

10 Water Lines

FIGHT RUN HIDE

In one of the more manicured sections of West Knoxville, a pond at a busy intersection has residents either thrilled or angry in an aesthetic dispute that pits Knoxville City Council members against each other. S. Heather Duncan reports on how a new wetland is upsetting the neighbors.

Top Knox 2016 Ballot It’s back: the best-of survey you can trust to give you the real skinny on what’s worthwhile in Knoxville. Take a look at the categories starting on page 23 and vote at topknox.knoxmercury.com

DEPARTMENTS

OPINION

A&E

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Howdy Start Here: By the Numbers, Public Affairs, Quote Factory PLUS: “Photo Recollection: Knoxville Streets,” a photo series by Holly Rainey. ’Bye Finish There: Restless Native by Chris Wohlwend, Crooked Street Crossword by Ian Blackburn and Jack Neely, Spirit of the Staircase by Matthew Foltz-Gray

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Scruffy Citizen Jack Neely takes us to the scene of a crime at Market Square. Much Ado Catherine Landis hails the business—and community— philosophy behind Three Bears Coffee.

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CALENDAR Program Notes: The Disc Exchange winds things down, and a new city mural takes shape underground. Inside the Vault: Eric Dawson tells of the rediscovery of director Clarence Brown’s Smouldering Fires.

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Spotlights: Birdcloud, TEKNOX v. 28: How to Kill Records Showcase, East Tennessee History Fair and Emory Place Black Party, Knoxville Children’s Theatre: The Three Musketeers

Music: Garret K. Woodward introduces us to some Hard Working Americans. Movies: April Snellings can’t help but to think over Don’t Think Twice.

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 3


thinkstock

HOWDY

BY THE NUMBERS

Drug Deaths Double

170

people or more have died from drug-related deaths in Knox County in 2015, nearly double the number of drug deaths in 2010.

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percent of drug-related deaths last year stemmed from prescription medications. The most common killer was Oxycodone, an opiate painkiller.

Alvin with his lawn mower. PHOTO RECOLLECTION: KNOXVILLE STREETS by Holly Rainey (loveh865.com)

QUOTE FACTORY “ Are we as a county seriously willing to send a girl home and deprive her of her education simply because her shorts are ‘too short’?” —Hollie Sikes, a student at Farragut High School, in her petition at change.org to revise Knox County Schools’ new dress code that “shorts must be beyond fingertip length.” Sikes argues that stores do not sell many shorts of that configuration, forcing girls “to wear long pants and jeans in 90-100 degree weather simply to avoid suspension.” Almost 2,600 have signed the petition as of Tuesday.

PUBLIC AFFAIRS

8/18 PECHA KUCHA KNOXVILLE 20 THURSDAY

7:20 p.m., Relix Variety Theatre (1208 N. Central St.). Free. The 20th edition of this short-format presentation series features Wes Breitenbach, Burke Brewer, Jessica Dean, Angela Grant, Shane Murphy, Marshall Stair, Zack Roskop, Holly Briggs, and Laura Baisden. Info: pechakucha.org.

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year olds account for the most drug-related deaths.

more deaths in Knox County when compared to the national average in 2014 (the most recent year comparisons can be made). In Knox, there were 34 deaths per 100,000 people that year, versus a national average of 15 deaths per 100,000 people.

37918

zip code with most drug-related deaths in 2015, followed by 37920, 37917, and 37912. —Clay Duda

Source: Drug Related Death Report 2010-2015 for Knox and Anderson Counties, Knox County Regional Forensic Center

8/20 EMORY PLACE BLOCK PARTY SATURDAY

2-9 p.m., Emory Place. Free. The historic mini-square where N. Gay Street terminates is an intriguing block of businesses—from Crafty Bastard Brewery to Sanders Pace Architecture. It’s also the perfect setting for a block party featuring live local bands. Info: emoryplaceblockparty2016.com.

8/23  MEETING: SOUTHWEST COUNTY SECTOR PLAN TUESDAY

5-8 p.m., Northshore Elementary School (1889 Thunderhead Rd.). Free. Rather than being a formal presentation like previous meetings on the Southwest County Sector Plan, this is a more casual drop-in event for one-on-one conversations with MPC officials. To see the plan’s current draft and its recommendations, go to: knoxmpc.org/southwestcounty.

8/25 MEETING: PARKING ORDINANCE THURSDAY

5:30 p.m., City County Building (400 Main Ave.). Free. More MPC action this week as it gathers public feedback on proposed revisions to the city’s parking ordinance. The updated ordinance includes things like requiring bicycle parking and expanding the requirements for landscaping of parking areas. Info: knoxmpc.org/zoning/proposed-zoning-ordinance-changes.


Our History Fair The East Tennessee Historical Society’s annual East Tennessee History Fair offers something for everybody, whether you think you’re interested in local history or not. Starting at 10 a.m. on Saturday the 20th, in the vicinity of the East Tennessee History Center at Gay and Clinch, is a family-style history party, with lots of re-enactors from 250 years’ worth of wars, live music on WDVX, as well as vendors, book signings, kids’ activities, a checkers competition, and a small antique fair. The Historic Gaming Club of Knoxville will feature scenarios from the French and Indian War. And there’s the ever-popular “History Hound” dog costume contest, hosted and judged by local celebrities. For more, see easttnhistory.org/historyfair.

At 4:00 p.m., Jack Neely, who has been at work on a book about the Old City and associated neighborhoods Irish Town and Cripple Creek, will offer a walking tour of those areas, though little remains of the latter two. Irish Town was home to Knoxville’s Irish-immigrant community in the period from about 1865 to 1910; Cripple Creek was a predominantly black ghetto, with some industry and from 1900 to 1915, a little-known red-light district called “Friendly Town.” Although most of the original architecture is gone, Neely will show what’s there now.

One of the reasons the History Fair is always held this week of August is that Aug. 17 is the birthday of humorist, congressman, soldier, and folk hero Davy Crockett. He would be 230 years old on Wednesday. As always, he gets a birthday cake.

A warning: this is a long urban hike, more strenuous than most downtown walking tours. Portable water is recommended.

A few things are different this year. The And this Sunday, the Knoxville Holstons the Tennessee Theatre will be hosting tours of the Emmett Machinists, our two vintage 1860s-rules 1928 “motion-picture palace,” as usual. But this “base ball” teams are hosting two teams from “Doggy Parton,” a previous year’s winner in the East year, at 11:30 a.m., the old theater is offering a that rival city downriver, Chattanooga, for a double Tennessee History Fair’s History Hound Dog Costume rare public showing of the early Clarence Brown header. Held behind 1797 Ramsey House, in the Contest. The ostensible honoree was singer, songwriter, and film, Smouldering Fires. One of Hollywood’s busiest Forks of the River area, the first game is at noon, entrepreneur Dolly Parton, who was just a girl when she directors for about 30 years, Brown grew up in the pitting the Holstons against the Lightfoot Club of began her broadcasting career on Gay Street in the 1950s. North Knoxville area known as Happy Holler, and Chattanooga. At 2:30, Chattanooga’s Mountain City Image courtesy of East Tennessee Historical Society graduated in engineering from the University of battles Knoxville’s Emmett Machinists. For more, www.easttnhistory.org Tennessee. He is more famous for his later sound see tennessesvintagebaseball.com. films like National Velvet and Intruder in the Dust, and for his several films starring Greta Garbo. But You can drive there, but for a unique historical his fellow Knoxvillian James Agee, a movie critic who was not always kind to experience, try the Three Rivers Rambler’s steam train, which leaves University Brown’s work in the 1940s, considered these early silents to be his best work, Commons at 10:30 a.m. The trip offers a view of countryside, including the head and singled out Smouldering Fires (1925) as one of Brown’s best. Considered a of the Tennessee River (See threeriversrambler.com.) well-shot soap opera, the plot turns on a female business executive (played by Pauline Frederick) who has an affair with a younger man who works for her. That’s all partly courtesy of the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound. At 2:30, they’ll be hosting a “Silent Stomp,” a celebration of music recorded at the St. James Hotel in 1929 and 1930, recently released as the box set, The Knoxville Sessions. Saturday’s event will feature local silent film of that period with accompaniment by musician and WUOT announcer Todd Steed. Also featured will be bus tours featuring Knoxville’s historic homes, and a civil-rights walking tour of downtown.

For those who aren’t up for outdoor sports on a summer day, that same Sunday the 21st, at 2:30, is the third of Jack Neely’s four lectures on different aspects of Knoxville’s cultural history, hosted by Church Street Methodist Church. Featured this week is a narrative of surprising stories concerning Knoxville’s often-overlooked immigrant heritage, especially concerning German, Swiss, Irish, Italian, Jewish, and Greek newcomers. The final lecture, on Aug. 28, is about the history of music in Knoxville.

Sources: East Tennessee Historical Society, Calvin M. McClung Historical Collection

The Knoxville History Project, a new nonprofit organization devoted to the promotion of and education about the history of Knoxville, presents this page each week to raise awareness of the themes, personalities, and stories of our unique city. Learn more on www.facebook.com/knoxvillehistoryproject • email jack@knoxhistoryproject.org August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 5


SCRUFFY CITIZEN

It Had to Be Done The sudden end of an unhappy marriage BY JACK NEELY

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lyde Shultz was a slim, clean-cut, earnest-looking fellow. He had ambitions, but nothing ever worked out for him, not for long, anyway. He grew up on a farm in Concord, and moved to California, during the era the Okies were headed that way, and stayed for a few years. When his mother died, he found enough money to come back home and open a small cafe on Wall Avenue, near Market Square. At 32, he’d been married and divorced twice. At the beginning of the year, he dated a woman named Juanita, who was only 20. Then he encountered a beautiful, high-spirited brunette unlike any other he’d met. She was Juanita’s younger sister. Louise was 16. Their single mother had been trying her best to raise her daughters since their father had walked out on them, eight years earlier. Clyde was a smooth, persuasive fellow, “slick,” as they said in 1940. Louise liked something about him. They dated for about five months, then got married. After just 10 days, they were having problems. Word was that Clyde thought Louise was stepping out on him, seeing younger men, or boys. Of particular concern to Clyde was a kid called “Peanut.” Louise walked out on Clyde and got a room for herself at the Stratford, the old residential hotel on Wall overlooking Market Square.

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A strong believer in his personal rights, Clyde carried a .32-20 handgun. You never know when you’ll need it. On a Friday afternoon in mid-August, the temperature was up to 91. Some hope for rain that weekend, but not yet. Newsboy Johnny Davis, 10 years old, was on Market Square shouting the headlines, about the Blitz. Bombs were falling on London. By 5, thousands of people were getting off work, from TVA or Miller’s or Hamilton Bank, going home on the streetcar, finding a game of pool, doing a little shopping, or thinking about seeing a movie. There was the lighthearted new gangster flick, Brother Orchid, with Edward G. Robinson and Humphrey Bogart, at the Riviera—or the new Technicolor film Maryland, at the Tennessee. Some claimed it was the new Gone With the Wind. Hi-Yo, Silver was at the Strand. Some hot days, just a cold beer was enough. Clyde had already had a couple of beers himself. He dropped in at the Gold Sun, the Caracostis family’s famous cafe on the northwest corner of Market Square, and met his sister. “Cafe for Ladies and Gentlemen,” the sign said. Popular with everybody from Republican politicians to overseas refugees, the Gold Sun was always open, 24 hours a day. Cafe proprietors rarely patronize the place almost next door, but Clyde went into the Gold Sun and ordered a

beer. He and his sister sat at a table. At some point Louise showed up. Clyde hadn’t seen her in a while, and had something to say to her. When she saw Clyde’s gun, Louise ran out the door into Market Square. Clyde chased her, shouting, “God damn it, I told you I’d kill you!” As she ran south, by the Texas Market, the new grocery at number 35, he shot her. She fell. A bystander heard her say, “Lord have mercy.” As she fell, Clyde kept shooting. In all, five bullets passed through the teenaged Mrs. Shultz. She was not very big. When the bullets left her body, they still had enough velocity to ricochet and hit other people. A 14-year-old girl named June Burnett was shopping for tomatoes with her mother. She got bullets in both legs. Her mother got hit, too. Lee Boruff, 20 years old, had been in the Crystal Theater, the Brichettos’ little cinema at 31 Market Square, watching the new Hopalong Cassidy Western, Hidden Gold, which ends with a big gunfight. He stepped out into the bright August day and got a bullet in his ankle. A farmer from Neubert Springs got hit in the leg. A 72-year-old garden-supply salesman got hit in the foot. In all, five bystanders were wounded. None of them understood what was happening. Lying on the pavement, Louise Shultz was quiet. Her dress was soaked in blood. When his sister caught up with him, Shultz was overheard to explain. “I’m sorry,” he said, “but it had to happen.” Charles Phillips, an unemployed former deputy who lived at the Stratford, grabbed Shultz from behind, and held him until the police arrived. Officer George Repaz

arrested him for felonious assault. The wounded waited for ambulances. While they waited, 14-year-old June Burnett asked him, “What did you shoot me for?” Elderly huckster G.N. Fox, of Riverside Drive, was observed to hobble over to a curb. He pulled off his right shoe, and without comment, pulled a bullet out of his foot. Another witness had some perspective. Newspaper dealer Joe Daniels had a scar on his right eye. “I got that back in 1918,” he told a reporter. “So I’ve been up against bullets before. But it was still plenty bad.” An ambulance rushed Louise to Fort Sanders Hospital, but doctors affirmed there wasn’t much hope. Transfusions kept her alive for almost two days. Clyde went to jail. He made a statement and then refused to sign it. He assessed his 17-day marriage to an unpredictable teenager. “I tried to make a go of it,” he said. “I tried hard.” Shootings weren’t that common on Market Square. But the Shultz incident reminded some people of another day, three years earlier, when state Rep. Arthur Cockrell had a problem with an evangelist and his guitar-playing young daughters blocking his business, the Stratford Hotel. He threatened them with a shotgun. As a policeman confronted him, it went off. Eleven people, none of them intended targets, were wounded. Clyde Shultz asked to go to his wife’s funeral, but they wouldn’t let him. His lawyers advised him to say nothing to the press. But he couldn’t help trying to make sense of it. He seemed sure folks could understand. “A thing like this creeps up on you,” he said. ◆

A 14-year-old girl named June Burnett was shopping for tomatoes with her mother. She got bullets in both legs. Her mother got hit, too.


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History of Knoxville Sundays, August 21 and 28 Church Tours 1-2:30 p.m. Lectures 2:30-3:30 p.m.

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY 7


MUCH ADO

Living as a Political Act Making our community better, one cup of coffee at a time BY CATHERINE LANDIS

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or great coffee, try Three Bears. Owner Jeff Scheafnocker sells it out of a bright blue wagon at the Market Square Farmer’s Market, at his Three Bears Coffee Company store in South Knoxville where he roasts it, and at a few local restaurants and grocery stores. People who love his coffee have urged him to expand, offering marketing deals and advice on how he can grow his business, and while Jeff appreciates the support, he doesn’t want to expand. In today’s world, he says, that makes him feel odd. “The entrepreneurship that’s in vogue now,” he says, “is this sort of exponential growth curve: If you could do this and make X amount of money, could you do twice that and make twice as much? Then, of course, wouldn’t you want to franchise and wouldn’t you want to do this and do that? None of that is my ambition.” Jeff’s ambition starts with his insistence on purchasing coffee beans strictly from farmer-owned cooperatives; as he explains, “I buy coffee from people who are steering their own ships.” Refusing to take unfair advantage of farmers drives his company. He roasts the beans himself, a process he clearly enjoys as much as personally selling it to his customers: nurturing relationships, building a community around what he

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calls “the real human touch.” To expand, Jeff would have to give up some part of this enterprise, undermining the reason he’s in business in the first place. “It’s not broken,” he adds, “so I’m not trying to fix it.” Talking to Jeff, I remembered something I’d heard said by another Jeff, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, who was extolling the virtue of frictionless buying. Friction, I thought. That means people. “Frictionless” is the exact opposite of the real human touch. Choosing to resist growth and the lure of more money for the cumbersome, messy, enriching, and invaluable process of honoring your values and engaging with other human beings is not just a business philosophy. It’s a political act. As is going out of my way to buy Three Bears Coffee. As is shopping at Union Ave Books instead of Amazon. As is writing for this newspaper. It’s the act of imagining what sort of community you want to live in and then doing something about it. The community I want to live in looks uniquely like Knoxville and nowhere else, but for local shops, local food, and a local newspaper to thrive, I have to support them. This is not to say you should. Economics and time constraints dictate how and where most people shop, and having choices is a privi-

lege, but building intentional communities doesn’t have to mean shopping. For some, it might mean buying less, or planting trees, or sending a thank-you note to a teacher. To me, politics is bigger than who you vote for or what party you’re in. It’s about people. Who are your neighbors? What do they need to live in dignity? How much space are you willing to allow them? How much space are you taking up? If they differ from you, how hard is it to be kind? To listen? To take turns? To avoid making generalizations. The community I want affords dignity to all people regardless of the myriad ways we devise to divide us. It provides access to a living wage, health care, childcare, a decent education, affordable housing, clean water, clean air, healthy forests, and green spaces. It recognizes and values a common good. It never favors ideology over people. It understands the connectivity we all have to each other and the planet. I’m not singing a song about holding hands and giving peace a chance here, because a whole lot of people would reject my version of community. Pick any of the above: them’s fighting words. The community I want is one I have to fight for. In June, as I watched protesters at the Knoxville Pride parade on Gay Street yell hateful things at people celebrating love and honoring the slain in Orlando, I thought: Can anyone imagine walking into their church to demand they have gay sex? No. It would be rude, cruel, and pointless. Perhaps the protesters yearn for a community where everyone is exactly like them. Frictionless. I can feel sorry for them, but I cannot tolerate the ugliness that allows one group to trample on the humanity of other people. So I show up at the

parade to lend my support. Showing up is a political act. So is speaking up. So, sometimes, is shutting up and listening. I’ve lived in Tennessee most of my life, but these days it’s easy to feel odd. Easy to feel overwhelmed when the seeds of discrimination are so well tended. Easy to get discouraged when so few people bother to vote in local elections, when the people you vote for don’t win, and when the winners put the Americans for Prosperity agenda over the needs of real people. It’s easy to think, why bother. It’s hard to keep trying. Jeff Scheafnocker keeps Three Bears Coffee small because that’s the scale that allows him to stay true to his mission: not treating the market as an ocean to catch fish in, but being a part of the ecosystem. He aims to make a living while fostering a community. And while he might change his mind about expanding, it won’t be at the expense of farmers or customers. A colleague once countered Jeff’s bigger-is-not-always-better philosophy by saying, “Yeah, but you’re talking about this big-picture thing.” To which Jeff replied, “Right. Because that’s all there is.” We can’t all be Jeff Scheafnocker, but each one of us can do something, even one thing, to steer our community toward a healthier and more compassionate future. When I get discouraged, I remember Jeff and people like him, working to make our community better one cup of coffee at a time. ◆ With Much Ado, Catherine Landis examines how political decisions and social trends affect the lives of the people around her. A former newspaper reporter, she has published two novels, Some Days There’s Pie (St. Martin’s Press) and Harvest (Thomas Dunne Books/ St. Martin’s Press).

The community I want to live in looks uniquely like Knoxville and nowhere else, but for local shops, local food, and a local newspaper to thrive, I have to support them.


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KNOXVILLE MERCURY 9


City Council member Mark Campen proposed an interesting solution to fixing a pond infested by an invasive water plant at the Grove at Deane Hill Apartments: turn it into a wetland. After three years of labor, some residents don’t like its appearance.

Photo by Clay Duda

Water Lines A West Knox pond stirs debate about the nature of beauty—and the beauty of nature BY S. HEATHER DUNCAN

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n one of the more manicured sections of West Knoxville, a pond at a busy intersection has residents either thrilled or angry in an aesthetic dispute that pits Knoxville City Council members against each other. City Council member Mark Campen works in the pond at the corner of Deane Hill Drive and Morrell Road every week. Sweating profusely under a wide hat and squelching through ankle-deep water, he edges past the big blue berry clusters of silky dogwood, the flames of red cardinal flowers, and wispy short stalks adorned with purple monkey flowers—which seem unfairly named, since they resemble tiny irises. He doesn’t spot the green

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heron hiding on the other side of the swamp grass. A loud squeak followed by a big slap indicates he has startled a bullfrog, which leapt into the water, but its smaller brethren dot the surface with their heads. Dragonflies skim over the greenish water surface, which is stirred by occasional bubbles from the bluegill below. “The biggest bullfrog I’ve ever seen was in here,” Campen says. “It was every bit of a foot long.” Created many decades ago to irrigate the Deane Hill golf course, the pond later became a highly-groomed water feature with a fountain in front of the Grove at Deane Hill Apartments. About 15

years go, it became infested with an invasive water plant that leads to smelly algae. The Grove’s owner, the real estate investment firm Worthington Hyde Partners (formerly SWH Properties), has contracted for a decade with the Tennessee Izaak Walton League, a conservation group, to keep the invasive weed under control. Campen, the league’s director, eventually proposed a new solution: Instead of the expensive and difficult process of raking the weeds constantly, make the pond into a wetland. Native species could compete with the weeds while providing wildlife habitat. After a challenging three-year process, his agency has accomplished

that goal. But not everyone is happy with the new look. Some other City Council and neighborhood association members complain that the wetland is too wild, too overgrown. “It’s an eyesore,” says Juanita Davis-Braswell, president of the Deane Hill Alliance neighborhood group. “It looks so busy, it looks like a swamp.” [Ed. Note: It is.] “It originally had an aerator and a spray, and it was very pretty.” But others have loaded Campen’s Facebook page with encouragement and appreciation. “I think anything that is natural and affords wildlife space among such sprawl is a lovely thing,” wrote Jan Knight. Several suggested Campen hold a meeting at the community center across the street from the pond to explain its wildlife benefits and how the wetland filters polluted runoff from roads and multiple apartment complexes built on steep hills above. Those on both sides of the debate acknowledge that it comes down to different perceptions of beauty: wild and wonderful, or conquered and controlled? A wildflower meadow, or an English garden?

A SHORT HISTORY OF A POND

Campen, who remembers fishing for bass in the pond 25 years ago, says he understands it was created in the 1930s or 1940s by damming a small spring-fed stream that still flows from it. The stream is now entirely piped underneath Deane Hill Drive and the ball fields of Deane Hill Recreation Center, eventually connecting with Fourth Creek, Campen says. When the golf course was sold, apartments were built, including the recent Wellsley Park development shored up by towering walls. During a heavy rain, a literal waterfall of storm water gushes down, leaving the pond orange with eroded soil. Campen says the pond’s infestation with Brazilian elodea, a species sold in pet stores, probably began when someone dumped their aquarium into the pond. (He and his crew found one near the banks.) The water soon became choked with the deep-rooted weeds.


Here’s what the pond looked like before being remade into a wetland, covered with smelly algae from Brazilian elodea. While the pond sits on private property, it is also a flowing waterway, so it’s against the law to use chemicals to tame its weeds.

Photo courtesy of Mark Campen.

Campen says he understands the owners of the Grove or its management company tried to get rid of the problem using chemicals sometime around 2003, perhaps killing fish. (An isolated pond can be maintained with chemicals, but that’s against the law for flowing waterways.) It’s hard to determine what happened back then because the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation water protection program only keeps records for five years, so it has no record of any orders or violations involving the pond from that period, says TDEC spokesman Eric Ward. Although owners’ representatives at the Grove expressed willingness to discuss the pond, they did not make themselves available for an interview. Around a decade ago, Grove managers contacted the Isaak Walton League for help controlling the weed. The league is focused on improving water quality and water conservation in the Knoxville area, and it took the job as an extra source of income, Campen says. The league was paid around $10,000 a year for the work. (It used to do a similar job for the Development Corporation of Knox County at a pond near CenterPoint Business Park.) The league’s most prominent effort is maintaining the Turkey Creek Wetland, but it also maintains pet waste dispensers throughout Knoxville in addition to the occasional artificial pond. “Ultimately, you can relate it right back to water quality in Knoxville,” Campen says. “It’s not a sexy job, but somebody’s got to do it.” The Grove pond work became way more than occasional. “We built an apparatus to go on front of the boat— with teeth—and we’d drive it around like a pond mower,” Campen says. But abandoning that approach to create a wetland proved laborious, too. The pond was drained and filled in to make it shallower, but earth movers got bogged down in mud. Workers had to basically move (literal) tons of dirt one wheelbarrow at a time, Campen says. It took about three years. “When we were doing the project, there were a lot of upset people in the community. It did look terrible,” Campen says. “No one wanted it done more than we did.” The League ate about half the cost because the $100,000 price tag totaled twice the original estimates.

“Wetlands can be attractive, or they can be wild and natural. I just prefer them to be attractive” BRENDA PALMER, 3rd District City Council member

But the changes cut maintenance costs in half while providing habitat for water birds like great blue herons, Virginia rails, turtles, and plants such as cardinal flower, iron weed and cat tails.

‘MORE THAN TREES AND FLOWERS’

But some neighbors still aren’t sold on the outcome, and Campen says the property’s management company, RAM Partners, still isn’t satisfied either. He hopes they’ll stick it out but is philosophical that, ultimately, the fate of the pond is up to the owner. “I’m hopeful their commitment to green infrastructure and the environment is a good sign,” he says. On the other hand, 3rd District City Council member Brenda Palmer

says she hears complaints from people who drive by the pond every day, and has talked to Campen and city officials about it. “I personally think it’s extremely unattractive and looks like it’s been badly neglected,” she says. “The people who are working on it say it’s supposed to look wild, and it does…. Every time I go by there I think, ‘Something really needs to be done about this.’” Davis-Braswell says she has approached her City Council member, Duane Grieve, as well as the city engineering department, trying to get them to intervene. When told they couldn’t because it’s on private property and is not breaking any laws or codes, she argued that City Council

should pass a new code to address it. Davis-Braswell says she has sought help for four years to no avail. She’d like to see the pond return to its former form with a fountain, and argued that chemicals should be used to kill the plants and algae. (Again, that’s not permitted under state law because of the stream.) “The Grove has planted trees and flowers, but it’s going to take more than trees and flowers,” Davis-Braswell says. Palmer, too, says she’d like to see it more groomed and managed. “Wetlands can be attractive, or they can be wild and natural. I just prefer them to be attractive,” she says. Campen argues that’s a false dichotomy: A wetland can be all three. “I think it comes down to the ultimate ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder,’” Campen says. “Some people really like a manicured lawn that is like a golf course, and every edge is tight. You come over and see my land, and it’s a native wild land, because I like it that way.” But Campen says he has stepped up mowing around the edge and plans to prune select species to act as manicured anchors to the landscape. On Sunday he was lopping off lower limbs from a black willow and hacking the invasive weeds that were mixing with the tall, white flowers of swamp rose mallow he had transplanted there. The mallow seed pods are like tiny green balloons. “Now they’re volunteering all over the place,” he says. “They’re going to continue to thrive, and that means we’ll get more blooms.” Campen says he’ll probably start manually removing some of the slime that still spreads across the pond, and he is hoping to add a display board explaining the reasons for the project and the wildlife that can be seen there. “I think it’s beautiful,” says Patricia Dalton, who lived a short distance from the pond for a dozen years. “It’s like an oasis in the urban sprawl of West Knoxville…. A lot of people would disagree with me and call it ugly because it’s not a manicured lawn, to me that’s people staying stuck and not evolving.” ◆ August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 11


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How to Survive a MASS SHOOTING8

And other lessons learned as people prepare for the worst kind of disaster • BY CLAY DUDA

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Illustration by Tricia Bateman


Photos by Clay Duda

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t starts with gunfire—rapid bursts blasted over the loudspeaker. This time it’s just to get people’s attention, but what if those shots fired were real? What if the sound was coming

from just outside the classroom, or from down the hall? How would you react? Or better yet, how should you react? That’s exactly what these dozen people gathered at the Pigeon Forge Community Center have come to learn more about. They’re seated orderly in a classroom decorated for summer camp, beneath a rainbow of multicolored balloons dangling from the ceiling. Colored paper cutouts shaped like hands are pasted to one wall, forming a tree. On another, a handcrafted sign reads “Chalked full of fun!” Sounds of children’s laughter seep in from the next room. A bag of rubber balls and kangaroo sacks sit in the corner. This is active-shooter survival training, a free hour-and-a-half class led by an off-duty police officer that covers a range of topics in sharp contrast to the seemingly benign surroundings. It’s places like this—gun-free, with a large number of people gathered in one spot—that make an easy target for a would-be shooter, instructor Aaron Clark says. As children splash in the pool and count numbers in Spanish one room over, the mood in survival class is serious. These folks are hoping to learn enough to protect themselves and those around them should someone ever open fire, to preserve a way of life they feel is threatened, and to shield the innocence that can be felt reverberating all around them.

Anything could happen, but statistics show that you’re unlikely to be caught in a mass shooting like the one at Columbine High School in 1999 or at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla., in June. But the number of mass shootings—which, as defined by the FBI, are indiscriminate shootings with four or more victims— in the U.S. has increased in recent years, and 24-hour news coverage has made them seem more common and widespread than they are. “In society right now, it’s a shame you have to do this,” says Dewight Farragut, who showed up for the class with two friends. Wearing a Vols hat and an old T-shirt that says Bike Week across the front, Farragut rubs the scruff of his chin as Clark walks through his presentation. “When we were kids, we took guns out for fun—to shoot bottles and cans and stuff. But now you have to carry them for safety. We never did that when I was young.” Farragut describes himself as a law-abiding citizen just looking to stay safe. He doesn’t live in fear of such an attack—he doesn’t fear much of anything, he says—but if it does happen, he’d like to be prepared. Farragut’s friend Leroy Stahly agrees. So does Leroy’s wife, Radonda. Leroy Stahly says he avoids places that won’t allow him to legally carry

his handgun, such as some movie theaters and other locations with posted “no guns allowed” signs. But tonight he’s made a concession, unholstering to come in the community center to study up on posturing for self defense. The first slide of the night promises to meet that need: “Threategic: Reality based training preparing you to BE the THREAT!”

Dewight Farragut, at left in gray, listens intently to instructor Aaron Clark, pictured at right, during a presentation on how to survive an active shooter. Farragut attended the free meeting at the Pigeon Forge Community Center with friends Leroy and Radonda Stahly, also pictured.

OPTION 1: RUN

that. I didn’t understand

The United States leads the world in mass shootings: With just 5 percent of the world’s population, the U.S. was home to 31 percent of all mass shootings from 1966-2012, according to a recent FBI study. But statistics are on your side, and the chance you’ll be a victim of a mass shooting remains slim. Still, it could happen. Karl Kreis was in church, in Knoxville, on July 27, 2008, when Jim David Adkisson burst in and opened fire during a children’s play. Kreis’ daughter was onstage performing in a production of Annie Jr. “It’s a surreal thing to live through something like that,” Kreis says. “I didn’t understand when the first gunshot went off. All I really remember seeing is just fire coming out. What I saw was gunfire, but your mind wants to see the best in a situation like that. Nobody around me had any idea what to do.” Adkisson walked into the Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church on Kingston Pike that morning with a shotgun concealed in a guitar case. He opened fire in the

“It’s a surreal thing to live through something like when the first gunshot went off. All I really remember seeing is just fire coming out.” —KARL KREIS, recounting the 2008 shooting at the Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church in Knoxville

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 13


“I really believe our best option living in a free country is if people are willing to carry [a weapon] and be responsible citizens.” —AARON CLARK

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Photo by Clay Duda

Courtesy of Dept. of Homeland Security

A presentation compiled by Department of Homeland Security, at left, helped lay out standards for how to respond during mass shootings. There are three pillars: Run. Hide. Fight. At right, a powerpoint slide from Aaron Clark’s class shows some possibilties for fashioning weapons from everyday objects.

sanctuary, where 200 had gathered to watch the play. Greg McKendry was killed when he stepped in front of the shooter in an attempt to shield others from gunfire. Seven other adults were wounded, including Linda Kraeger, a visitor to the church who later died of her wounds. All Kreis could think about, he says, was getting to his daughter and making sure she was okay. He ducked behind a pew as his brain tried to make fast sense of what was happening. He was scared and in shock, no doubt, but the urge to protect his family forced him into action. He stirred from his impromptu hiding spot and made his way towards the stage. As he did, he heard a scuffle. Five churchgoers tackled and subdued Adkisson. Kreis saw the struggle and rushed to help, playing a part in detaining the man and securing the shotgun before police arrived. The emotional and psychological scars still remain for Kreis. He knows from experience how such a horrific event can shape a person’s perspective on life, and he hopes that, by sharing his story, he can help others cope with similar feelings. For two years after the church shooting, he says he was “hypersensitive” to his surroundings, afraid to sit with his back to a crowd and skittish at any crack of noise. Even today he keeps an eye on his surroundings. “I still always think about an exit strategy. I kind of always sit with my back against the wall,” he says. “People reacted a whole array of

different ways. I know several people who don’t have memories of it at all, but they’ve had to go to therapy for it.” Very few such shootings are stopped by bystanders. The majority of mass shooting in the U.S. since 2000 have ended in suicide—about 70 percent, according to the FBI. But law-enforcement officials and researchers have increasingly urged people to take matters into their own hands as a last resort. There have been enough mass-casualty shootings in the U.S. over the past couple of decades that experts have been able to develop a data-backed approach to survival. There are three pillars: Run. Hide. Fight.

OPTION 2: HIDE

“If you hear gunfire, get up and leave immediately,” Clark tells the class during what he calls a “common sense” survival seminar. If you can’t get out, hide out of sight, ideally behind something that offers some protection. “But if someone brings violence to you, that’s the time to be violent. You be the threat.” A lot of the tips and pointers Clark offers do seem like common sense. But if you don’t prepare for those scenarios, he says—if you don’t train your mind and your body how to react, if you don’t have an escape plan—you’ll likely falter in the few seconds after someone starts shooting. “I really believe our best option living in a free country is if people are willing to carry [a weapon] and be a responsible citizen,” he says. “That

will help eliminate a threat. But just owning a gun isn’t enough. Before getting into law enforcement, I got a handgun permit, but I had no training. In my mind, I had this vision that I would rise to the occasion. I know now that that’s just not true. “You’re accountable for everything you do with that handgun. If you’re going to take on that responsibility, you owe it to yourself and everyone around you to be trained on how to use it.” If you don’t have a gun, any makeshift weapon may be better than no weapon at all. Clark shows a PowerPoint slide with “Attack!” scrawled across the top in bold red letters. Beneath it are pictures of scissors, a hymnal book, a fire extinguisher, and a flag pole with a pointy end—all potential weapons in the circumstances he trains people for. But the core of what Clark and others teach in these sorts of classes is based on less confrontational principles: situational awareness, having an exit plan, and thinking about how you would respond if a situation sours. Always scout out your nearest exit. If your family is with you, tell them the plan and where to go. “I’ll usually tell my wife and son that if something happens, this is where we’ll exit. We make a game out of it,” Clark tells the class. “I don’t want you to be overly paranoid, but you need to think about these things.” Pay attention to people around you, and watch out for signs that someone might be up to no good. Those include subtle hints like sweating heavily, acting nervous, or patting or touching the area where a weapon might be concealed. But potential shooters can be impossible to identify before an incident starts. Many gunmen in mass shootings are men—about 94 percent of them, according to an FBI report. But otherwise they have few characteristics in common. The shooter at TVUUC in Knoxville told police he targeted the church because of its liberal teachings, and his belief that Democrats were running the country into the ground with the “aid of major media outlets,” according to an affidavit following his arrest. Other shooters have had varying motivations: racial hatred, religious beliefs, and mental-health issues. Many such tragedies


OPTION 3: FIGHT

Mass shootings may still be uncommon, but it’s clear that they have been on the rise. The FBI pegs 2008 as a tipping point, though officials can’t say why. That year, the number of mass shootings more than double from an average of 5 yearly 2000-2007 to 16 each year 2008-2012. Think about that. Hardly a month passes without some sort of senseless, indiscriminate shooting popping off. These events have happened with such frequency, and get so much media attention, that they almost seem routine. That’s why thousands of people across the country—law-abiding, everyday folks—have sought out training or more information about how to respond if they find themselves in such dire circumstances. A sort of cottage industry has also emerged, with companies led by civic-minded people like Aaron Clark offering survival-training seminars, business-security evaluations, and gun-safety and crisis-management training. Clark has both a personal interest and sense of duty in helping people prepare for the worst, or for making smart decisions under pressure should they need to. He’s not looking to get rich. He offers classes on surviving an active shooter and basic handgun safety classes for free because, he says, everyone should have access to that information. Since the beginning of 2015, more than 22,000 people are estimated to have taken part in active-shooter survival classes offered by Texas State University’s ALERRT Center, the Wall Street Journal reports. Research into how these events may be shaping the American perspective is scant at best, though interviews with people in some communities where mass shootings have occurred showed the incidents had shaped many people’s world view. A number of interviewees said they felt their community was less safe, according to a 2007 report in PTSD Research Quarterly. Librarian Amy Beth Kear attended Clark’s survival class with her daughter, Rachel. With a laid-back attitude and a happy-go-lucky smile, Kear doesn’t seem like the sort of person who would formally prepare for a mass attack. But she worries that just such an incident is

possible, though it doesn’t shape her daily life, she says. “Living here in East Tennessee, you think that this could never happen here, but you never know,” she says. “There’s so much you don’t think about. You think to hide first, but really you should try to run and get out, moving in different directions. I never really thought about looking where an exit is in a room, but I’ll probably start.” The ongoing rash of mass shootings has also shaped how law enforcement responds. Since the Columbine shooting in 1999, police have shifted away from relying on SWAT teams, which take time to assemble and get to the scene of a shooting. In an effort to save lives, officers now don’t wait around, even alone. They’ll enter a building in hopes of stopping a shooter as soon as possible and saving more lives. According to the FBI, 49 percent of mass shootings are over before police arrive. The Knoxville Police Department is no exception. Sgt. Sammy Shaffer says officers train regularly for these types of incidents, working with federal agencies like the Department of Homeland Security and other local law-enforcement departments to coordinate a response, when or if it should happen here again. He declined to discuss many details, citing security concerns. KPD also regularly conducts business security assessments and holds trainings for corporate and government agencies that request it. They rarely hold public meetings like the one Clark hosted in Pigeon Forge, but both KPD and Threategic’s talking points are modeled after industry standards. “It’s unfortunate that we’re seeing an increase in these sorts of incidents. People should know that it could happen, and they should be prepared,” Shaffer says. “When it does happen we don’t want people to be surprised. It’s really just a matter of taking a few steps to practice, to say, ‘What are we going to do when this happens?’” ◆

Active Shooter Events by Year 20

number of events

end when the gunman or gunmen commit suicide, and their motivations may never be fully known.

15 10 5 0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Location of Attacks Other 12%

School 29%

Outdoors 19% Business 40% Source: Acitive Shooter Events from 2000 to 2012, FBI

“Living here in East Tennessee, you think that this could never happen here, but you never know.” —AMY BETH KEAR

Clark is planning another active shooting survival class for 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 29 at the Pigeon Forge Community Center. It is free and open to the public. More information is available online at threategic.com. Questions or training inquiries can be made to the Knoxville Police Department by calling 865-215-7000 and asking to speak with Sgt. Shaffer. August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 15


A&E

P rogram Notes

Underground Art

Last Store Standing As the Disc Exchange winds down after 25 years, shoppers suddenly remember the fun of buying music in person

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ast weekend, the Disc Exchange in South Knoxville experienced a time warp to 1995: The parking lot was full of cars each day, music lovers browsed the aisles, and lines formed as shoppers carried their treasures to the counter. But the transformation was fleeting and the mood wasn’t altogether celebratory. Many of the customers were actually paying their final respects to the last locally owned record store to offer new releases on CD, while others were taking advantage of its sudden 40-percent-off liquidation sale. After nearly 30 years of slinging silver discs—the last 25 at their Chapman Highway storefront—owners Allan Miller and Jennie Ingram announced on Friday that they were shutting down the blazing yellow store that has been an integral part of Knoxville’s music scene. The news burned through social media circles,

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Inside the Vault: Smouldering Fires

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

particularly those of its former employees, many of them local musicians who relied on the Disc Exchange for their income, record sales, and show promotion. The resulting crowds were a bittersweet reminder of the days when physical media was the only game in town and consumers would buy their music in the real world—sometimes even conversing with other humans in the process. But there was one huge difference between then and now: In ’95, the Disc Exchange employed 42 clerks between two stores; in 2016, the store was down to five. On Friday evening, the two sales people on duty seemed not a little frazzled by the sudden influx of shoppers. “It used to be like this every weekend—people lined up at the counter,” says Ingram with a rueful chuckle. “We forgot what it’s like to have to actually whittle the line down

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real fast. It’s been sad this week, but it’s been fun.” Ingram says she and Miller had been mulling the decision for a long time. The reason why is no secret— digital downloads and streaming have upturned a once reliable retail industry. Further affecting the Disc Exchange’s declining sales was the two-year shutdown of Henley Bridge, the main conduit to South Knoxville, while it was being rebuilt. Even after the bridge reopened in 2013, customers still weren’t making the trek southward, having found other ways to get their music, Ingram says. But since the announcement, at least, droves of shoppers have remembered their once-favorite music outlet. “It’s interesting—people are coming in and buying stuff now since it’s all on sale, and they say, ‘I think I might be part of the reason y’all are going out of business. I love this place, but I haven’t been here in years. I’ve just been buying digital, and I’m sorry!’” Ingram says. “They knew we were here, but buying online is so easy and so tempting, I don’t blame them at all.” Ingram says there’s no set timeline for the Disc Exchange’s shutdown—it mostly depends on how fast they sell their inventory. “Maybe by the end of September, maybe even mid-September. We just don’t know– it’s a mystery,” she says. Until then, music buyers can relive their memories of shopping in a new-music store, one last time. (Coury Turczyn)

Music: Hard Working Americans

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The silhouettes of buildings in downtown Knoxville and the city’s mountainous skyline are suggested in bright geometric shapes and faux-photographs in a new mural buried under Gay Street. Painted last week by two California artists on one wall of the underground 100 block of Gay, it’s visible only through the bank of glass windows in the basement level of the Emporium Center. The mural now belongs to the city, which still owns this underground street, and the artwork’s $10,000 bill was split between Visit Knoxville and the Arts & Culture Alliance of Greater Knoxville, which also owns the Emporium gallery. The winning firm, LC Studio Tutto, is an art and design team composed of Sofia Lacin and Hennessy Christophel, who have collaborated on more than 70 murals and specialize in large-scale public art. The non-profit arts alliance has a focus on showcasing and supporting the Knoxville-area art community, and Zenni says it generally favors local entries, just as 90 percent of its Emporium shows feature local artists. While the designs submitted from Knoxville artists were lovely, however, “they kind of didn’t seem to add another layer to the city’s existing collection of public art,” Zenni says. Zenni says the Alliance doesn’t want local artists “to be so cosseted that they aren’t exposed to that competition” from the larger art world, “so we decided to take the heat” over selecting artists from California for the local project. “Do I know in my heart that there was disappointment?” Zenni says. “Absolutely. It was not something that we did without a great deal of thought, concern and love for our local artists.” Celebrate the mural’s opening on Friday, Sept. 2, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (S. Heather Duncan)

Movies: Don’t Think Twice


Inside the Vault

Restoration Melodrama Reed Massengill and the rediscovery of Clarence Brown’s Smouldering Fires BY ERIC DAWSON

B

y 1959, former Knoxvillian Clarence Brown had been retired for seven years. At the time, there wasn’t a whole lot of interest in past masters of the cinema, especially those who started out in the silent era. But there were some pioneers who recognized the importance of early cinema. Kevin Brownlow, in England, was chief among them. That year, Brownlow discovered Brown’s 1925 film The Goose Woman. He mentioned his find to a friend at the British Film Institute, who surprised Brownlow with a discovery of his own: a print of Brown’s 1925 film Smouldering Fires, which had recently turned up on an ostrich farm outside of Johannesburg, South Africa. It, too, impressed Brownlow, but it remains a mostly forgotten work in Brown’s filmography. Reed Massengill is hoping to correct the oversight. Massengill, a writer and photographer, was working on an upcoming book about Brown, to be published by University of Tennessee Press, when he came across a remarkable find on eBay: a 16mm print of Smouldering Fires. He already had a bootleg DVD of the film, but it was sourced from a shabby print. This weekend, the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound will host a screening of Massengill’s newly acquired print as part of the East Tennessee Historical Society’s East Tennessee History Fair. “Given that most films of this era were left at the end of the line when they’d run their course, or were

cannibalized for their silver content, or otherwise just deteriorated to dust in the can, it’s remarkable that the print I have survived,” Massengill says. “It was a 1950s- or 1960s-era school-rental print, which I believe wasn’t often rented or screened. I wouldn’t have bought the print if I didn’t think it was exceedingly rare in any format, and my print is certainly in better condition than the print used to make the DVD bootleg that circulates.” The only known 35mm copy resides in the vaults of George Eastman Museum, and it is incomplete, with Italian titles. Even 16mm prints in good condition are exceedingly scarce; a review of a screening in London last year, presented by Brownlow himself, noted, “It was very hard to project and the Cinema’s projectionist in addition to spending days restoring the stock also had to proceed very cautiously during the screening with the odd stop and start.” Massengill’s print displays few scratches—it ran through the Tennessee Theatre’s projector without a hitch. Smouldering Fires is an old-fashioned melodrama with modern touches. Pauline Frederick plays Jane Vale, a 40-year-old factory owner who falls in love with a younger employee, who in turns falls in love with Vale’s even younger sister. “I believe there are several things make Smouldering Fires unique and special,” Massengill says. “First, it went into production in August 1924, which means that women in the U.S.

A&E

had only earned the right to vote four years earlier. Some may think Brown used a heavy hand in shaping his lead female character, but his depiction of a middle-aged woman leading a factory workforce creates quite a different character from the then-typical depiction of women on the silent screen, who were generally virgins— think Lillian Gish or Mary Pickford— or vamps—think Pola Negri or Gloria Swanson. “I think Brown was progressive and ahead of his time. I think he took what could have been a little, forgotten film and made it something great.” Smouldering Fires will screen at the Tennessee Theatre on Saturday, Aug. 20, at 11:30 a.m., with live musical accompaniment on the Mighty Wurlitzer by Freddie Brabson. At 2:30 p.m., TAMIS will screen Silent Stomp, a compilation of home movies of downtown Knoxville in the 1920s and ’30s, with live musical accompaniment by Todd Steed. ◆ Inside the Vault searches the archives of the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound for nuggets of lost Knoxville music and film history.

WHAT

Summer Silents, part of the East Tennessee History Fair

WHERE

Tennessee Theatre (604 S. Gay St.)

WHEN

Saturday, Aug. 20, from 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

HOW MUCH Free

INFO

easttnhistory.org

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 17


A&E

Music

Photo by Stacie Huckeba

Organized Chaos The Hard Working Americans keep the blue-collar spirit of rock alive BY GARRET K. WOODWARD

S

ometimes a new album seems like just the right record at just the right time. The Hard Working Americans’ Rest in Chaos, arriving during a season of political frustration and outspoken populism, might be one of those. “There is definitely mischief in this record, and with the band, because we’re a mischievous bunch of people—we’ve been around a while,” says guitarist Neal Casal. “Whatever the case is, just playing it safe and going straight up the middle is not the way to go, particularly now with the continued homogenization of our entire world.” The Hard Working Americans are a minor roots-rock supergroup, formed in 2013 by Casal (who also plays in the Chris Robinson Brotherhood and was in Ryan Adams’ backing band, the Cardinals, in the ’00s), Nashville singer/songwriter Todd Snider, Widespread Panic bassist Dave

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Schools, drummer Duane Trucks (the younger brother of guitarist Derek Trucks), and Great American Taxi’s Chad Staehly on keyboards. On Rest in Chaos, the band’s second album, the Americans get contributions from Elizabeth Cook, who adds vocals to

“Massacre,” and the late Guy Clark, who plays guitar on a rendition of his song “The High Price of Inspiration.” Clark died just a few days after the album was released. “You can’t have an acoustic guitar and be writing songs and not know who Guy Clark is,” Casal says. “When I saw him in the studio, he was an old man, not that young songwriter on the cover his album Old No. 1. There’s a full circle kind of thing that happens to old songwriters like that, a sadness and a heaviness. Those writers laid down their lives in their words, and when you see them at that old age, they’ve become their songs. They are their own stories, these forgotten characters, salty and drifting.” Rest in Chaos is a soaring piece of modern rock, one that taps into a deep vein of American music spanning the Grateful Dead, the Black Crowes, perhaps even a dash of Steely Dan. Those inspirations are reflected in the guitar work of Casal, who might be the most underrated guitarist in 21st-century rock ’n’ roll. Snider’s rough-around-the-edges fusion of Louisiana blues rocker Papa Mali and Mark Knopfler adds devil-may-care attitude to “Something Else” and “Acid.” Altogether, it’s a mesmerizing album, and one that feels vital to the current Americana and rock scenes. “It perfectly defines what the band is, and the age that we live in, just to scrap for whatever you can get now,” Casal says of Rest in Chaos. “In terms of musicians like us, who even

knows what passes for music anymore? What are people into? What do they even remember? It’s about those core values representing what rock ’n’ roll should be about. For many, rock ’n’ roll doesn’t matter anymore. There are kids growing up now not knowing what it is.” Casal points out that the band is made up of longtime touring musicians who have spent decades on the road, playing dive bars and vast stages around the world, and then some. They remind listeners that, no matter what the radio dial may indicate, rock ’n’ roll is still around and will be for a while. They reflect the values of the demographic they named themselves after. “We’re the people under the radar, the people not at the top of the food chain,” Casal says. “We’re talking musicians, starving artists, weed growers—true creative people that aren’t getting the typical breaks. Those are the people that really keep this country running on that level. … “We’re all huge music fans with big record collections, where we push our boundaries into other areas, like jazz and psychedelic. It’s that common approach to whatever we do, which is just be open to whatever it is.” ◆

WHO

Hard Working Americans with the Congress

WHERE

Bijou Theatre (803 S. Gay St.)

We’re the people under the radar, the people not at the top of the food chain. We’re talking musicians, starving artists, weed growers—true creative people that aren’t getting the typical breaks. —Hard Working Americans guitarist Neal Casal on his band and their fans

WHEN

Sunday, Aug. 21, at 8 p.m.

HOW MUCH

$27/$30 the day of the show

INFO

knoxbijou.com thehardworkingamericans.com


Movies

Comedy Central Mike Birbiglia explores the hard knocks of the comedy business in Don’t Think Twice BY APRIL SNELLINGS

C

omedy is a grueling business, as a barrage of recent television shows ranging from 30 Rock to Louie has worked to remind us. Neither as funny as the former nor as sardonic as the latter, Mike Birbiglia’s Don’t Think Twice, about a troupe of improv performers striving for their big break in New York City’s comedy scene, occupies a niche of its own. It’s a simultaneously gentle and unsparing fi lm that uses the art and commerce of improvisational comedy as a window to something far more universal. In spite of its ensemble cast of comedians and comic actors, it’s an uncomfortably relatable and sometimes stinging experience for anyone slogging away in the trenches of a creative endeavor. Birbiglia’s second film expands the focus of his first, 2012’s Sleepwalk with Me, which was essentially an adaptation of his popular one-man show. This time he widens the scope to include a company of six struggling improv comics who are collectively known as the Commune. When they’re on stage, as an opening primer explains, it’s all about the group— they’ve been performing together for

years, and they live for those moments in front of an audience when an on-the-fly joke turns into something at once fleeting and memorable. In their equally intertwined private lives, though, it’s their flaws that define them: Group mentor Miles (Birbiglia) has grown tired of watching his mentees land televisions gigs while he’s still teaching improv; Jack (Keegan-Michael Key) is all too quick to break improv’s cardinal no-showboating rule; Jack’s fellow troupe member and live-in girlfriend, Sam (Gillian Jacobs), has an aversion to growing up and a tendency toward self-sabotage; shy Allison (Kate Micucci) is a talented cartoonist who’s spent nine years on an as-yet-unfinished graphic novel; doormat Bill (Chris Gerthard) is terrified his father will die thinking he’s a failure; and Lindsay (Tami Sagher), the only one of the bunch whose affluent family shields her from the realities of the starving-artist game, has trouble going for broke when she’s anything but. They’re a weirdly codependent group, but all that begins to unravel when two of them get a shot at improv’s golden fleece: a cast slot on Saturday

A&E

Night Live. (Here it’s called Weekend Live, but only the name has changed.) One of them eventually gets the coveted television gig, sending the other five into paroxysms of jealousy, desperation, and gloomy self-evaluation. Each character is deftly written and performed, but Don’t Think Twice is ultimately less democratic than its ensemble cast might indicate. The focus narrows on three characters— Miles, Jack, and Sam—as they each respond to the pressures of their intensely competitive world. Unfortunately, this means Micucci, Sagher, and Gerthard—all gifted actors and comedians—are sidelined, but maybe that’s inevitable in a movie whose central premise is that not everyone gets their moment in the spotlight, no matter how much they deserve it. At its furthest edges, Don’t Think Twice is about the things a performer inevitably sacrifices for job security or even stardom. Really, though, it’s more concerned with the ones who don’t make it—as one troupe member’s star rises, he becomes less and less of a presence, both in the fi lm and in the lives of his one-time improv partners. It’s a bittersweet, often melancholy look at a struggle that’s familiar to anyone who’s watched a friend’s career kick into high gear. Sure, you’re happy for them and you know they’ve earned their success, but it’s hard to silence that petty, niggling inner voice that says it should have been you instead. It’s that part that Birbiglia excavates and anatomizes with remarkable insight, sometimes in ways that are uniquely uncomfortable. (An awkward encounter with Ben Stiller, who plays himself, is a highlight of the film, and one of the most cringe-inducing scenes of the year.) And yet, to the writer-director’s immense credit, Don’t Think Twice treats its characters kindly. These might be the kind of people many of us would pointedly avoid at a party, but Birbiglia and his cast render them with such empathy and dignity that it’s a pleasure to spend 90 minutes in their presence. It might be one of the most melancholy comedies you’ll see this year, but it’s also one of the most revelatory and compassionate ones. ◆

ARAM

The

from ERA:BetheThere Beginning! CLASSICAL TICKETS start at just $15!

SEPT. 2016

RUSSIAN PASSION: RACHMANINOFF & TCHAIKOVSKY Thursday, Sept. 15 • 7:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 16 • 7:30 p.m. TENNESSEE THEATRE Aram Demirjian, conductor Orion Weiss, piano RACHMANINOFF: Piano Concerto No. 3 TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony No. 5 Sponsored by Twin City Dealerships

NOV. 2016

APPALACHIAN SPRING Nov. 17 & 18 • 7:30 p.m.

TENNESSEE THEATRE Aram Demirjian, conductor Sponsored by Circle of Friends

A CLASSICAL CHRISTMAS Nov. 27 • 2:30 p.m. BIJOU THEATRE Aram Demirjian, conductor Pellissippi State Variations choir Sponsored by Asbury Place Continuing Care Retirement Communities Presented with support from the Aslan Foundation

CALL: (865) 291-3310 CLICK: knoxvillesymphony.com VISIT: Monday-Friday, 9-5 August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 19


Come see what’s new! Play. Learn. Discover.

Great Food, Great Service, & Great Value!

Pete’s Breakfast Special $5.79

Ye Olde Steak House

Serving a full line-up of pizzas, calzones, sandwiches, salads, and wings!

Since 1968

Food fit for a King.

Dine in, carryout and delivery (within 5 miles)

ALLY PIE PIZZA

WORLD’S FAIR SANDWICH

1/2 Off ys* Tuesda

Voted Knoxville’s Best Steak 21 years in a row RESERVATIONS:

865-577-9328 •

CARRY OUT:

865-250-3724

HOURS: Sun-Thurs 4-9, Fri-Sat 4-9:30

Please call for special hours for UT home games 6838 CHAPMAN HIGHWAY (HIGHWAY 441) 5 miles south of the Henley Street bridge

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

POP-EYE PIZZA

*Any 14” pizza, dine in only! Carryout or delivery, buy one 14” pizza get a second 14" pizza half off.

$2.50 BEER SATURDAYS ALL DAY!

DOWNLOAD OUR APP!

Bearden: 4618 Kingston Pike (865) 247-0380 Cedar Bluff: 179 N. Seven Oaks* (865) 454-886 (*Next to the discount movie theater)

www.sergeantpepperonis.com


A MODERN BAR & RESTAURANT

Home to Knoxville’s best handcrafted cocktails

MUSIC & SOUND & LESSONS 1505 Downtown West Blvd.

JBL • Marshall • Behringer • Roland • Breedlove • Shure

riksmusiconline.com (865) 691-9590

us ! r fo

ail s t k oc C To p p B ar To

e Vo t

O ver 10 Years o f Spiri ted Nigh tl i f e

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 21


HANDMADE ITALIAN

“Quintessential Southern Food, Elevated” – Allan Benton

16 MARKET SQUARE, KNOXVILLE, TN 37902 865.313.2472 • emiliaknox.com

131 S GAY ST, KNOXVILLE, TN 37902 865.544.2004 • knoxmason.com

Make Lunch the BEST Part of Your Day!

$9 LUNCH COMBOS Includes Miso Soup, Choice of Salad, and a Nama Signature Sushi Roll

JOIN OUR LUNCH CLUB & BE REWARDED! ASK SERVER FOR DETAILS.

$ 5 every monday

“Happy Hour”

Food and drink specials starting at $2.50 3 - 6pm daily, Wed. 3pm – close & all day Sunday

sushi bar VOTED BEST SUSHI! 506 S. Gay St. next to Regal Riviera 8 – 865-633-8539 Bearden – 5130 Kingston Pike – 865-588-9811 • namasushibar.com mon–sat 11am- close • sun 12pm - close 22

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


VOTE LOCAL! WELCOME TO THE KNOXVILLE MERCURY’S READERS’ POLL! The ultimate survey of everything Knoxvillians love most about Knoxville Top Knox celebrates only local and regional businesses and institutions.

NO NATIONAL CHAINS. NOT EVER. It’s the one true guide to Knoxville’s best, by the smartest, savviest consumers in town: YOU!

Results will be published in the Oct. 20 edition of the Mercury.

2016 READER’S POLL

VOTING IS ONLINE ONLY: topknox.knoxmercury.com VOTING BEGINS: Thursday, Aug. 4 at 12:01 a.m. VOTING ENDS: Thursday, Sept. 5 at Midnight

SPONSORED BY

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 23


TOP KNOX 2016 BALLOT

Community

the rules YOU CAN’T VOTE FOR NATIONAL CHAINS.

Sorry. Top Knox is all about the things that make our area unique—so vote for local and regionally owned businesses only.

YOU MUST FILL OUT AT LEAST 20 OF THE CATEGORIES.

You can manage that, right? Otherwise, your ballot won’t be counted. Show us you’re serious about this!

YOU CAN ONLY FILL OUT ONE BALLOT.

Voting is online only. (The print ballot is just for your information.) You will need to create a login for the ballot with your email address. You are only allowed to send in one electronic ballot for tabulation. Which brings us to…

YOU ARE NOT ALLOWED TO STUFF THE BALLOT BOX.

No! Don’t bother even trying to game the system—we’ll figure it out. We reserve the right to make final judgments in any categories where there appear to be voting irregularities. Any businesses involved in ballot stuffing risk being disqualified.

ALSO: VOTE FOR BUSINESSES THAT ARE STILL IN BUSINESS.

We may hold departed businesses dear in our hearts, but Top Knox is a celebration of the places we can enjoy now.

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Top Knoxvillian Top Neighborhood Association Top New Thing In Knoxville Top Nonprofit Community Group Top Secret About Knoxville

Food Top Appetizers Top Asian Top Bakery Top BBQ Top Breakfast Top Brunch Top Chef Top Coffeehouse Top Comfort Food Top Deli/Sandwich/Sub Shop Top Desserts Top Food Truck Top French Top Hamburger Top Hot Dog Top Ice Cream/Frozen Treats Top Indian Top Italian Top Juice / Smoothie Joint Top Lunch Spot Top Meal That’s A Steal Top Mexican/South American Top Middle-Eastern Top New Restaurant

Top Outdoor Dining Top Pizza Top Ribs Top Romantic Dining Top Salads Top Seafood Top Steaks Top Sushi Top Taco Top Vegetarian/Vegan Menu Top Waterfront Restaurant Top Wings

Drink Top Bar Top Beer Selection (Restaurant) Top Beer Market/Taproom Top Cocktails Top Dive Bar Top Happy Hour Top Craft Brewery Top Liquor Store Top Moonshine/Distillery Top Sports Bar Top Wine Bar Top Wine List (Restaurant) Top Wine Store


Music & Nightlife

Services

Home & Garden

Recreation & Fun

Top Americana Band Top Blues Band Top Club DJ Top Comedian Top Cover Band Top Dance Club Top Hip-Hop/R&B Group Top Jazz Band Top Karaoke Top LGBT Club Top Live Comedy Venue Top Performance Venue Top Rock Band Top Rock Club

Top Auto Service Top Bank/Credit Union Top Catering Service Top Dry Cleaner Top Florist Top Framery Top Insurance Agent Top Lawyer Top Pet Service Top Professional Photographer Top Realtor Top Tattoo Studio Top Special-Event Venue Top Veterinarian

Top Apartment Complex Top Electrician Top Flooring/Tile Store Top Garden Store/Nursery Top HVAC Company Top Interior Design Services Top Kitchen And Bath Design Top Landscaping Service Top Plumber Top Renovations/ Remodeling Company

Top Attraction Top Bike Trail Top Free Stuff To Do Top Dog Park Top Festival Top Historic Landmark Top Place To Take The Kids Top Walking Trail Top Waterway To Paddle

Shopping Top Antiques Store Top Auto Dealer Top Bike Shop Top Bookstore Top Eyewear Shop Top International-Foods Grocery Top Furniture Store Top Gift Shop Top In-Store Pet Top Jewelry Store Top Local Foods Grocery Top Men’s Clothing Store Top Motorcycle Dealer Top Musical Instruments Store Top New Business Top Outdoor Sports Store Top Pet Supply Store Top Record Store Top RV Dealer Top Shopping District Top Resale Clothing Shop Top Resale Furniture/ Household Goods Shop Top Women’s Clothing

Arts & Culture Top Actor Top Art Gallery Top Artist Top Craftsperson/Artisan Top Dance Company Top First Friday Venue Top Movie Theater Top Museum Top Novelist Top Poet Top Theater Group

Education & Media Top Cosmetology School Top Dance School Top Music School Top Private School (K-12) Top Radio Personality Top Radio Station Top Small College Or University Top TV Personality Top TV Station

Health & Beauty Top Barber Shop Top Chiropractor Top Dental Care Top Eye Care Top Fitness Center Top Hair Salon Top Holistic Health Center Top Licensed Massage Therapy Center/Spa Top Martial Arts Gym Top Nail Salon Top Personal Trainer Top Physical Therapy Top Skin Care Top Walk-In/Urgent-Care Clinic Top Women’s Health Center Top Yoga Studio

Knoxville Online Top Blog Top Facebook Page/Group Top Instagram Feed Top Podcast Top Twitter Feed

VOTE NOW!

VOTING IS ONLINE ONLY: topknox.knoxmercury.com VOTING BEGINS: Thursday, Aug. 4 at 12:01 a.m. VOTING ENDS: Thursday, Sept. 5 at Midnight

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 25


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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


Visit us at Ijam’s the Hummi Fest ngbird Sat., Aiuval this c o m e b g. 20., or plants t y t o g e t hummihat make ngb happy! irds

Thousands of blooming plants grown on site, plus gift certificates, garden art and accessories, and more!

Stanley’s Greenhouse 3029 Davenport Road | 865.573.9591 M-F 8-6 pm | Sat 9-5 pm Closed on Sundays until Sept. 11 www.stanleysgreenhouse.com

Sales • Service Gear & Accessories 24-Hour Repair Greenway Bike Shop next to Earth Fare on the Third Creek Greenway

BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! Kali Protective helmets. (Sale ends August 7th)

VOTE FOR US! Open 7 days a week • M-F 10-6pm | Sat 10-5pm | Sun 12-5pm 126 N. FOREST PARK BLVD. KNOXVILLE, TN 37919 • 865.200.8710 • BeardenBikeandTrail.com August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 27


ORANGE & WHITE

Shopping Guide

D

B

E

C

A

A

SOUTHERN MARKET

Go Greek! Go Vols! Be game-day ready with an approved, clear stadium bag in Greek sorority or UT insignias! Shop our stylish selection of Greek and Vols merchandise: gifts, fashion, and home decor. Save the Date: Tailgate Party, Saturday, Aug. 27 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.!

Southern Market • 5400 Homberg Drive 865-588-0274 • southernmarketshops.com

D

M.S. McCLELLAN

Lasting Style

B

NOTHING TOO FANCY

Orange-Inspired Apparel Get ready for the big game with softest vintage-inspired guys’ and girls’ T-shirts around. Working with local artists who are inspired by Knoxville’s varied culture, Nothing Too Fancy offers a wide variety of screen printed items, salvaged treasures, jewelry, and one-of-a-kind items you won’t find anywhere else—koozies, socks, magnets, decals, and more. Nothing Too Fancy has something for everyone! Open Mon.-Fri. 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

Nothing Too Fancy • 435 Union Ave. 865-951-2916 • nothingtoofancy.com

C

SALLY’S ALLEY

Keeping It Funky Show your team spirit on game day and all season long with unique, fun and funky outfits for all Vol ladies— from lacy little dresses to crocheted and embroidered tunics plus handmade jewelry, hats, jeans, scarves and more. Everything you need for the perfect look, with styles and brands galore—from Umgee to Entro and more—Sally’s Alley is your one-stop shop for true Vol fashion. Open Mon-Fri 10:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.

Sally’s Alley • 8203 Chapman Hwy. 865-609-0480 • Follow on Facebook

Show your Tennessee or SEC pride with these needlepoint belts from Smathers & Branson! There is no better way to get your game day on than with these hand-sewn belts that get better with age, available exclusively at M. S. McClellan. $165. Open Mon.-Wed. & Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m., Thu.: 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat.: 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. (summer hours through Sept. 3).

M. S. McClellan • 5614 Kingston Pike, Melrose Place 865-584-3492 • msmcclellan.com E

FOLLY BOUTIQUE

Orange Chic How much orange can you squeeze into one little shop? A lot. Whatever your style, Folly Boutique in Fountain City has you covered. Tops, dresses, accessories, Junior, Curvy, boho, preppy: It’s there. New deliveries weekly! Open Tues.-Sat. 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun. 1 p.m.-5 p.m.

Folly Boutique • 104 Hotel Rd. 865-742-0906 • Follow on Facebook 28

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


Craft Beer

local, regional and international craft beers available, including nitro taps. F

Untappd Verified Venue!

G

Happy Hour 3-5pm Daily Join us football fans! Every Saturday & Sunday.

BREAKFAST Starts on the 100 Block at 135 S. Gay St!

F

BLISS

Fashionable Staples Visit Bliss for all of your game-day needs! Bliss has new arrivals of orange and white dresses and accessories, like this lightweight scarf! Boasting a bright color and chic infi nity design, this scarf is the ultimate staple for the UT football season. Prices start at $18.95. Open Mon.-Thu. 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun 11 a.m.-7 p.m.

BLISS • 24 Market Square 865-329-8868 • shopinbliss.com G

LUNCH & DINNER Enjoy delicious & unique selections daily with one of our fine craft beers or desserts.

Live Music, Team Trivia, and Nightly Events Check out our facebook page for upcoming events and specials.

UT PRESS

True Vol Courage In The Final Season: The Perseverance of Pat Summitt, Maria M. Cornelius tells the story of her fi nal coaching season through the eyes of those who know her best, from players to support staff to Summitt’s closest friends and advisors. Available Oct. 1, $29.95. To pre-order call 800-621-2736.

University of Tennessee Press • utpress.org

Always made fresh. Always made from scratch.

135 S. Gay St. Knoxville, TN (865) 333-5773 sugarmamasknox.com @SugarMamasKnox August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 29


CALENDAR MUSIC

Thursday, Aug. 18 GRIZZLY GOAT WITH ERISA REI • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE TED NUGENT • The Shed at Smoky Mountain Harley-Davidson (Maryville) • 6PM • The hard-rock loudmouth of the reactionary right might have made some good music a long time ago—”Stranglehold,” “Cat Scratch Fever,” “Journey to the Center of the Mind”—but his abominable politics and even worse personality have made the Motor City Madman hard to stomach these days. • $30 THE MARK BOLING TRIO • Scruffy City Hall • 6PM • Part of Wayne Bledsoe’s 6 O’Clock Swerve series, broadcast live on WDVX. • FREE MAE BETH HARRIS WITH THE BLUE JAYS • New Harvest Park • 6:30PM • Part of Knox County’s Third Thursday concert series. • FREE HOT SUMMER NIGHTS CONCERT SERIES • Blount County Public Library • 7PM • Thursdays in August, sponsored by the Blount County Friends of the Library. The performers will be Nashville vocal family band Spencer’s Own (Aug. 18); Nashville country duo the Young Fables (Aug. 25); and Knoxville Opera’s preview of the 2016-17 season (Sept. 1). • FREE THE GOOD BAD KIDS • Sugarlands Distilling Co. (Gatlinburg) • 7PM • FREE THE GREG HORNE BAND • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria (Maryville) • 8PM • Horne is a first-class player, a versatile stringman who can pick up a fiddle or a mandolin or even a ukulele without thinking twice, or who can craft the kind of guitar solo—marked by facile chops and impeccable taste—that only a truly mature, accomplished player can deliver.  VALLIE NOLES WITH STEVEN SWICEGOOD • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • Vallie Noles is a singer/ songwriter from Knoxville. All ages. • $8-$10 TALL PAUL • Wild Wing Cafe • 8:30PM • FREE PIGEONS PLAYING PING PONG • The Concourse • 9PM • Funk, rock, electric energy: These four Pigeons bring it every night. Their evolving arrangement of original compositions, psychedelic improvisational jams, and contagious smiles have the Flock– their self-identifying fanbase that stretches from coast-to-coast. 18 and up. • $10-$12 OUTLAW RITUAL • Preservation Pub • 10PM • 21 and up. • $3 THE BROADCAST • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM •  BILL WHITACRE • Edgewood Park • 7PM • FREE FIN’AMOR WITH HERCYN AND DUST AND DECAY • Pilot Light • 9PM • Doom and gloom atmospheric metal. 18 and up. • $7 Friday, Aug. 19 KYLE NACHTIGAL WITH CHRIS STALCUP AND THE RANGE • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE MONTU • Preservation Pub • 6PM • Montu is an electronic jam band that blends a multitude of influences into an unforgettable live experience full of high energy and

33 30

Spotlight: Teknox V.28

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

good times. 21 and up.  MELLIFLUX • Wild Wing Cafe • 6PM • FREE AMYTHYST KIAH • Sugarlands Distilling Co. (Gatlinburg) • 7PM • Amythyst Kiah is a Southern Gothic, alt-country blues singer/songwriter based out of Johnson City. • FREE LARRY GOODWIN • Jimmy’s Place • 7PM • FREE CALEB MILLER • Vienna Coffee House (Maryville) • 7PM • FREE UMPHREY’S MCGEE • Tennessee Theatre • 8PM • Their brand-new studio album, The London Session, was a dream come true for the members having been recorded at the legendary Studio Two at historic Abbey Road. • $30-$35 FROG AND TOAD’S DIXIE QUARTET • The Crown and Goose • 8PM • Live jazz featuring a mix of original music, early jazz and more. • FREE KITTY WAMPUS • AC Band • 8PM • Classic rock, blues, and R&B.  SUPER BOB WITH BRIDGE TO GRACE, SOMETHING WICKED, HELLAPHANT, AND TRANSPARENT SOUL • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • Super Bob’s live show is more than overblown hype; it’s a fun, energetic, captivating, physical expression of music. • $8-$12 CHRIS ELLIS AND THE WEEKENDERS • Two Doors Down (Maryville) • 9PM  MIKE BAGGETTA • The Bistro at the Bijou • 9PM • New York avant-garde jazz guitarist Mike Baggetta and his colleagues mix hallucinatory soundscapes with intricate improvisational workouts. • FREE THE STEEL CITY JUG SLAMMERS • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria (Maryville) • 9PM  JOSHUA POWELL AND THE GREAT TRAIN ROBBERY • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 10PM • FREE WAVY TRAIN • Preservation Pub • 10PM • 21 and up. • $5 THE BURNIN’ HERMANS • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM  GLASS • Pilot Light • 10PM • 18 and up. • $5 TRIAL BY FIRE • Wild Wing Cafe • 10PM • A tribute to Journey. • FREE KEVIN COSTNER AND MODERN WEST • Cotton Eyed Joe • 9PM • Yes, that Kevin Costner—he’s leading his country band into Far West Knoxville for a boot-scootin’ good time. • $25 KUKULY AND THE GYPSY FUEGO • Casual Pint (Fountain City) • 7PM • • FREE QUEUE THE TAPE VIDEO RELEASE PARTY • The Square Room • 8PM • The Good Guy Collective is hosting a video release party for J-Bush’s debut single, “Queue the Tape.” With performances by J-Bush, Black Atticus, One Hour Photo, Samday, Mista, the Verns, Erybody Jones, Mr. Ill, Benj iii, and more. • $12-$15 LEFTFOOT DAVE AND THE MAGIC HATS • Brackins Blues Club • 9PM  THREE STAR REVIVAL WITH JOSIAH AND THE GREATER GOOD • Star of Knoxville Riverboat • 9:30PM • Jazzy, jammy, funky Americana band Three Star Revival headlines this back-to-school bash/Umphrey’s McGhee after party on the Tennessee River.  BACKUP PLANET WITH ROSSDAFAREYE • Scruffy City Hall • 10PM  Saturday, Aug. 20 8TH ANNUAL SMOKIN’ DAY FESTIVAL • Sweet P’s Barbecue and Soul House • 2PM • Sweet P’s Barbeque & Soul House is hosting its 8th annual Smokin’ Day Festival, a free day

37

Spotlight: The Three Musketeers

of live music at its South Knoxville location. Throughout the day, regional blues, folks and soul musicians will play inside and outside the restaurant. A FEW MILES ON WITH THE WEST KING STRING BAND • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE WHISKEY MYERS • The Shed at Smoky Mountain Harley-Davidson (Maryville) • 6PM • Texas rockers Whiskey Myers recalls the swagger of Lynyrd Skynyrd and Black Sabbath-style riffage, buoyed by flourishes of shivering gospel organ, exuberant brass, and fiery fiddles. • $20

THE STEEL CITY JUG SLAMMERS • Sugarlands Distilling Co. (Gatlinburg) • 7PM • FREE SAMANTHA GRAY AND THE SOUL PROVIDERS • Jimmy’s Place • 7PM • FREE BRYAN PIXA • Vienna Coffee House (Maryville) • 7PM • FREE THE STEELDRIVERS • Bijou Theatre • 8PM • Gary Nichols and the SteelDrivers speak in their own accent, one that charms and sears and beguiles. This is a band like no other, by inclination but not by calculation. • $27 TIM HALPERIN • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • Stylistically blending an infectious mix of pop and rock with a hint of jazz, Halperin’s trademark catchy melodies, pure vocal tonality and rhythmic piano style have struck

BIRDCLOUD Pilot Light (106 E. Jackson Ave.) • Saturday, Aug. 20 • 10 p.m. • $8 • 18 and up • thepilotlight.com

It’s been a good year for traditional country music: Chris Stapleton, Sturgill Simpson, and Margo Price have emerged as big-name standard-bearers for the kind of earnest, heartfelt, down-to-earth, back-to-basics classic-style country that Nashville nostalgists clamor for every few years. Don’t count on the Nashville duo Birdcloud to join in the campaign to save country music; Jasmin Kaset and Makenzie Green, who perform as Birdcloud, are set on destroying it from the inside. Since 2011, the two have released four albums of adorably profane and barely produced ramshackle acoustic country folk, the kind of sweet-sounding, foul-mouthed pop ditties that would make the Moldy Peaches blush. Most of Birdcloud’s songs are about sex or booze; sometimes they also sing about drugs, religion, race relations, or politics. They’re refreshingly raunchy—pro-sex millennial feminists claiming David Allan Coe’s X-rated songs from the ’70s as their rightful legacy. But only the best songs, like “Vodkasodaburg,” from last year’s Tetnis, hold up to repeat listens, and even then, the effect can be numbing after a while. Still, the duo’s been admirably committed to the credo they established on their very first album: “I do what I want, dammit/ Whatever I want to, dammit.” (Matthew Everett)

38

Spotlight: East Tennessee History Fair and Emory Place Block Party


CALENDAR a chord with audiences from coast to coast.• $10-$15 CHALAXY WITH SATURN VALLEY AND PIANO • Scruffy City Hall • 8PM THE JAILHOUSE REVIEW • Two Doors Down (Maryville) • 9PM HAROLD NAGGE AND ALAN WYATT • The Bistro at the Bijou • 9PM • Live jazz. • FREE TENN PAN ALLEY • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria (Maryville) • 9PM DEMON WAFFLE • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM • Ska-Rock w/ flavors of funk, punk, and hip-hop. • FREE BIRDCLOUD • Pilot Light • 10PM • Birdcloud is Jasmin Kaset and Makenzie Green, a pair who met in a place called Murfreesboro and who, since 2009, have used things like booze and sacrilege to make very modern country music. • $8 • See Spotlight on page 30. THE ANDALYN LEWIS BAND • Wild Wing Cafe • 10PM • FREE HOUSE MOUNTAIN HOEDOWN • House Mountain State Natural Alrea • 1PM • Y’all come on to the third annual House Mountain Hoedown Music Festival featuring Phil Leadbetter and the Leadbetters, Leah Gardner, Dixieghost, Knox County Jug Stompers, J.J. Easy and the Survivor, and Sarah Kate Morgan plus a good old square dance to end the night. Visit housemountainhoedown.com. • $10 THE WEEKS WITH HUMMING HOUSE, ALANNA ROYALE, AND THREE STAR REVIVAL • Sunset on Central • 3PM • FREE SHADY BANKS • Brackins Blues Club (Maryville) • 9PM TOMMY INFANTE AND HIS SALSA BAND • Cocoa Moon • 9PM • Renowned 94-year-old salsa bandleader Tommy Infante and his group of international salsa all stars hit Market Square. Salsa lessons will be conducted throughout the night. • $10 ELLIS DYSON AND THE SHAMBLES • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 10PM • FREE

six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE SIX MILE EXPRESS • Wild Wing Cafe • 5:30PM • FREE MARBLE CITY 5 • Market Square • 8PM • Live jazz every Tuesday from May 3-Aug. 30. • FREE KEITH HARKIN WITH CINDI ALEXANDER • The Square Room • 8PM • $35-$55 SWEET YEARS WITH YEESH AND THE CRUMBSNATCHERS • Pilot Light • 9:30PM • 18 and up. • $5 THE 9TH STREET STOMPERS • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM • FREE CULLEN WADE AND THE WATERS • Preservation Pub • 10PM • 21 and up. • $3 Wednesday, Aug. 24 NELLIE CLAY WITH BANJO NICKARU • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE FROG AND TOAD’S DIXIE QUARTET • The Crown and Goose • 6:30PM • Live jazz featuring a mix of original music, early jazz and more. • FREE MITCHELL, COKER, AND DEACON • The Bistro at the Bijou • 7PM • Live jazz. • FREE TENNESSEE SHINES: BAREFOOT SANCTUARY • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 7PM • Fiddler Evie Andrus brings her band to play traditional fiddle tunes from her debut record. Plus, special guest Jamie Cook will play some of his solo tunes. • $10 MIKE SNODGRASS • Wild Wing Cafe • 8:30PM • FREE XUEKATRE WITH ALL HELL AND ENTHEAN • Pilot Light • 9:30PM • A night of underground metal. 18 and up. • $7 TOMAS GORRIO • Preservation Pub • 10PM • 21 and up. • $3

Monday, Aug. 22 DK AND THE JOY MACHINE • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE CARPE CAPARE • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM • FREE THE DAWN DRAPES WITH UNDERDOG AND WITHERWARD • Preservation Pub • 10PM • 21 and up. • $3 BEN SHUSTER • Wild Wing Cafe • 10PM • FREE

Thursday, Aug. 25 THE WILLOWWACKS • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE EXIT 65 • Scruffy City Hall • 6PM • Part of Wayne Bledsoe’s 6 O’Clock Swerve series, broadcast live on WDVX. • FREE HOT SUMMER NIGHTS CONCERT SERIES • Blount County Public Library • 7PM • Thursdays in August, sponsored by the Blount County Friends of the Library. The performers will be Nashville vocal family band Spencer’s Own (Aug. 18); Nashville country duo the Young Fables (Aug. 25); and Knoxville Opera’s preview of the 2016-17 season (Sept. 1). • FREE THE AMERICANA ALL STARS • Sugarlands Distilling Co. (Gatlinburg) • 7PM • FREE THE CRAWL SPACE TRIO • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria (Maryville) • 8PM THE HOTSHOT FREIGHT TRAIN WITH SPACEFACE, SWEAR TAPES, AND PALE ROOT • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • All ages. • $5 K-TOWN DUO • Wild Wing Cafe • 8:30PM • FREE THE 200S • Scruffy City Hall • 9PM THE HOOD INTERNET WITH SHOWYOUSUCK AND EARL GRAE • The Concourse • 9PM • 18 and up. • $8 BRENDON JAMES WRIGHT AND THE WRONGS • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM • FREE STEPPIN’ STONES • Preservation Pub • 10PM • 21 and up. • $3

Tuesday, Aug. 23 JANE FALLON WITH MA CROW AND THE LADY SLIPPERS • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a

Friday, Aug. 26 BLANKFEST • Market Square • A three-day fest of local and regional music, hosted by Blank Newspaper.

Sunday, Aug. 21 SHIFFLETT’S JAZZ BENEDICT • The Bistro at the Bijou • 12PM • Live jazz. • FREE SUNDAY JAZZ BRUNCH • Downtown Grill and Brewery • 12:45PM • Knoxville’s coolest jazz artists perform every Sunday. • FREE A FEW MILES ON • Star of Knoxville Riverboat • 4PM • Visit smokymountainblues.org. • $16-$20 J. LUKE • Wild Wing Cafe • 6PM • FREE HARD WORKING AMERICANS • Bijou Theatre • 8PM • $27-$30 • See Music story on page 18. ARC AND STONES WITH VINYL THIEF AND SHILOH HILL • Preservation Pub • 8PM • 21 and up. • $3 THE JON WHITLOCK TRIO • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 8PM HUNGRYTOWN • Royal Oaks Event Center (Maryville) • 4PM • Rebecca Hall and Ken Anderson have earned a reputation for the quality and authenticity of their songwriting. • $15

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 31


CALENDAR Featuring Perpetual Groove, R.B. Morris. Electric Darling, Trae Pierce and the T-Stones, Andrew Leahey and the Homestead, Baby Baby, Bark, the Barstool Romeos, Cody Brooks, CrumbSnatchers, the Deadbeat Scoundrels, Floralorix, Gillian, Guy Marshall, Grandpa’s Stash, Handsome and the Humbles, Heiskell, Hellaphant, Hudson k, Josiah and the Greater Good, Magmablood, Magnolia Motel, Marble City Shooters, Mendingwall, Meob, the Monday Movement, Nox Yorc, Peak Physique, the Pinklets, Senryu, Skinned Knees, Southern Cities, Thrift Store Cowboys, Time Sawyer, Tree Tops, Yung Life, and the Wild Jays. Aug. 26-28.  MINOR MOON WITH KRISTY COX • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE STEVE RUTLEDGE • Wild Wing Cafe • 6PM • FREE PATRICK SWEANY • Sugarlands Distilling Co. (Gatlinburg) • 7PM • FREE KIRK FLETA • Jimmy’s Place • 7PM • FREE SAMUEL COX • Vienna Coffee House (Maryville) • 7PM • FREE FROG AND TOAD’S DIXIE QUARTET • The Crown and Goose • 8PM • Live jazz featuring a mix of original music, early jazz and more. • FREE THE NEW SCHEMATICS WITH STONE BROKE SAINTS AND HAZEL • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • $8 BILLY BOB THORNTON AND THE BOXMASTERS • Cotton Eyed Joe • 9PM • The Boxmasters are made up of Bud Thornton (vocals and drums), J.D. Andrew (guitar, bass and vocals), Brad Davis (guitar) and Teddy Andreadis (keyboards). 18

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

and up. • $10 KINCAID • Two Doors Down (Maryville) • 9PM  SPECTRUM • The Bistro at the Bijou • 9PM • Live jazz. • FREE THE HARAKIRIS WITH EL ESCAPADO, FIRE AT THE MARQUEE, AND HEAVY SLEEPERS • Pilot Light • 9PM • 18 and up. • $5 THE JOHN SUTTON BAND • Brackins Blues Club (Maryville) • 9PM  SHILOH HILL • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria (Maryville) • 10PM  JOE THE SHOW • Wild Wing Cafe • 10PM • FREE CARPE CAPARE • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 10PM • FREE STYLES AND COMPLETE WITH ED GEE, FRESHCUTT, AND KWIKFLIP • 18 and up. • $15 Saturday, Aug. 27 BLANKFEST • Market Square • A three-day fest of local and regional music, hosted by Blank Newspaper. Aug. 26-28.  MOJOFLOW WITH THE GOOD BAD KIDS • WDVX • 12PM • Part of WDVX’s Blue Plate Special, a six-days-a-week lunchtime concert series featuring local, regional, and national Americana, folk, pop, rock, and everything else. • FREE PAUL THORN • The Shed at Smoky Mountain Harley-Davidson (Maryville) • 6PM • $20 DWIGHT YOAKAM • Back Porch on the Creek • 7PM • Yoakam’s distinctive, supple vocals, accented with his Kentucky croon, sound as strong today as they did on his debut, 1985’s Guitars, Cadillacs, Etc. Etc. Yoakam has continued to passionately sing, write, and play music

brimming with hard country and rock & roll. • $40-$60 HANDSOME AND THE HUMBLES • Jimmy’s Place • 7PM • FREE CLASSIC Q BAND • Vienna Coffee House (Maryville) • 7PM • FREE THE CERNY BROTHERS • Sugarlands Distilling Co. (Gatlinburg) • 7PM • FREE THREE DOG NIGHT • Niswonger Performing Arts Center (Greeneville) • 7:30PM • $40-$50 COREY SMITH • Tennessee Theatre • 8PM • $28 INDIE LAGONE WITH INWARD OF EDEN, AMONG THE BEASTS, AND SANG SARAH • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • All ages. • FREE SOUTHBOUND • Two Doors Down (Maryville) • 9PM  MARK BOLING • The Bistro at the Bijou • 9PM • FREE Y’UNS JUG BAND • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria (Maryville) • 9PM  SUNSHINE STATION • Brackins Blues Club (Maryville) • 9PM  THE NICK MOSS BAND • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 10PM  THE GOOD BAD KIDS • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 10PM • FREE THE DEAD RINGERS • Wild Wing Cafe • 10PM • FREE ED SCHRADER’S MUSIC BEAT • Pilot Light • 10PM • 18 and up. • $6 Sunday, Aug. 28 BLANKFEST • Market Square • A three-day fest of local and regional music, hosted by Blank Newspaper. Aug. 26-28.  SHIFFLETT’S JAZZ BENEDICT • The Bistro at the Bijou •

12PM • Live jazz. • FREE SUNDAY JAZZ BRUNCH • Downtown Grill and Brewery • 12:45PM • Knoxville’s coolest jazz artists perform every Sunday. • FREE J. LUKE • Wild Wing Cafe • 6PM • FREE

OPEN MIC AND SONGWRITER NIGHTS

Thursday, Aug. 18 IRISH MUSIC SESSION • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 7:15PM • Held on the first and third Thursdays of each month. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 20 OLD-TIME SLOW JAM • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 4PM • A monthly old-time music session, held on the third Saturday of each month. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 21 FAMILY FRIENDLY DRUM CIRCLE • Ijams Nature Center • 3:30PM • Drumming for kids of all ages on the third Sunday of the month. Bring a drum or share one of ours. Bring a blanket or chair. Open to drummers of all ages and levels. Free and fun. • FREE Tuesday, Aug. 23 PRESERVATION PUB SINGER/SONGWRITER NIGHT • Preservation Pub • 7PM  OLD-TIME JAM SESSION • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 7:15PM • Hosted by Sarah Pirkle. • FREE

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32

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

Wednesday, Aug. 24 TIME WARP TEA ROOM OLD-TIME JAM • Time Warp Tea Room • 7PM • Regular speed old-time/fiddle jam every Wednesday. All instruments and skill levels welcome. SCHULZ BRÄU OPEN MIC NIGHT • Schulz Bräu Brewing Company • 8PM • Every Wednesday. • FREE BRACKINS BLUES JAM • Brackins Blues Club (Maryville) • 9PM • A weekly open session hosted by Tommie John. • FREE Thursday, Aug. 25 SCOTTISH MUSIC SESSION • Boyd’s Jig and Reel • 7:15PM • Held on the second and fourth Thursdays of each month. • FREE Friday, Aug. 26 TIME WARP TEA ROOM OPEN SONGWRITER NIGHT • Time Warp Tea Room • 7PM • Songwriter Night at Time Warp Tea Room runs on the second and fourth Friday of every month. Show up around 7 p.m. with your instrument in tow and sign up to share a couple of original songs with a community of friends down in Happy Holler. • FREE

CALENDAR

LILY AFSHAR • Episcopal Church of the Good Samaritan • 7PM • Acclaimed as “one of the world’s foremost classical guitarists” according to Public Radio International, Lily Afshar is a virtuosa who brings passion to her performance. Her unique life story finds expression in her art. The Washington Post has described her onstage performance as “remarkable, impeccable.” She is the only classical guitarist in the world who blends excellent formal training in the United States and Europe with the rich cultural heritage of Persia to bring audiences an extraordinary musical experience. Visit knoxvilleguitar.org. • $20 Thursday, Aug. 25 SCRUFFY CITY ORCHESTRA • First Baptist Church • 7PM • A

new venue for musicians from the greater Knoxville metropolitan area. Scruffy City Orchestra kicks off with regular rehearsals on Thursdays beginning Aug. 25. Conductors are Mat Wilkinson and Ace Edewards. Prospective members, especially string players, are encouraged to contact Alicia Meryweather at ScruffyCityOrchestra@gmail.com for more information. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 27 TENNESSEE WIND SYMPHONY • Knoxville Museum of Art • 3PM • The Tennessee Wind Symphony will play a free program of classical, jazz and just-for-fun works. The audience is invited to enjoy works by Turrin, Giroux, King, von Suppe, and Galante, featuring soloists Tim Michaels

Saturday, Aug. 27 NARROW RIDGE OPEN MUSIC JAM • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 7PM • For more information call 865-497-2753 or email community@narrowridge. • FREE

DJ AND DANCE NIGHTS

Friday, Aug. 19 DJ AND DANCE NIGHTS • August 19 • TEKNOX v. 28 • The Birdhouse • 10PM • The monthly local techno and house dance night celebrates Detroit sludge, a new breed of Motor City electronic music defined by its thick, heavy production and slowed-down tempos. • FREE • See Spotlight on page 33. Saturday, Aug. 20 TEMPLE DANCE NIGHT • The Concourse • 9PM • Knoxville’s long-running alternative once night. 18 and up. • $5 CLEAN UP THE QUARRY PARTY • Fort Dickerson Park Greenway • 12PM • The Headroom crew and extended Knoxville Burner family is bringing a party into Fort Dickerson Quarry to give back a bit and help clean up one of the best swimming holes in Knoxville. If you haven’t been before, the quarry is an amazing secluded spot just a few minutes from downtown off of Chapman Hwy. It’s popularity as a summer destination unfortunately means that there is a lot of trash (mostly beer cans and cigarette butts). Let’s party with a purpose—come swim, jump, float, dance and pick up the park with all your friends. Daytime beats provided by Greg Tarrants, J-mo, and Cuddlefish. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 28 LAYOVER SUNDAY BRUNCH • The Concourse • 12PM • Enjoy good eats, refreshing libations, and the most appropriate afternoon tunes in the company of this city’s most dedicated loafers. We’ll be serving our normal brunch in all it’s glory, courtesy of Localmotive. Musical accompaniment by the likes of Slow Nasty, Psychonaut, and a rotating list of special guests. All ages. • FREE

CLASSICAL MUSIC

TEKNOX V. 28: HOW TO KILL RECORDS SHOWCASE The Birdhouse (800 N. Fourth Ave.) • Friday, Aug. 19 • 10 p.m. • Free • 21 and up

In the early 1980s, a group of teenagers in Detroit—Juan Atkins, Derrick May, and a handful of their friends—started making electronic music in their bedrooms and basements. What they invented was techno, which has been the foundation for much of the dance music that’s been created since. Atkins, May, and their friends were inspired equally by Parliament-Funkadelic, hip-hop, Kraftwerk, and Giorgio Moroder; the music they made combined heavy beats with newly available computer and synthesizer technology. It sounded like the future that Detroit had represented during its postwar economic boom times. Thirty years later, a new group of DJs and producers in Detroit are making their own brand of dance music, inspired by the city’s techno pioneers but also reflecting its decades-long urban decline. Detroit sludge artists like Marshall Applewhite (he takes his name from the leader of the Heaven’s Gate suicide cult) and Konstantin Papatheodoropoulos have turned techno upside down and slathered it in motor oil; the forward momentum and optimism of early techno has given way to a dark, psychedelic dance music for the end times. Applewhite, aka Joel Dunn, and his compatriots Papatheodoropoulos and Shady P, who all record for the How to Kill record label in Detroit, will bring Detroit sludge to the monthly underground dance party TEKNOX this weekend. (Matthew Everett)

Saturday, Aug. 20

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 33


CALENDAR on trumpet and Sam Chen on trombone, before touring the museum. • FREE

THEATER AND DANCE

Friday, Aug. 19 KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 7PM • To fulfill his dream of becoming a soldier, young d’Artagnan heads for Paris and into romance, intrigue and adventure. On the way, he meets a secret agent, confronts a mysterious swordsman, rescues the beautiful Constance, and ultimately joins The Three Musketeers in their fight against an evil Cardinal. Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 • See Spotlight on page 37. Saturday, Aug. 20 KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 1PM and 5PM • Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 Sunday, Aug. 21 KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 3PM • Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 Thursday, Aug. 25 KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 7PM • Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 Friday, Aug. 26

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 7PM • Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 Saturday, Aug. 27 KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 1PM and 5PM • Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 OAK RIDGE PLAYHOUSE: ‘TALE OF THE RED RIDING HOOD’ • Oak Ridge Playhouse • 1PM • When a young girl fails to heed her mother’s advice, she must face the consequences of straying from the wooded path as she travels to her beloved grandmother’s house. Along the way she encounters a stealthy huntsman whose watchful eye may be just what she needs for protection from the sly and cunning wolf. True to the classic tale, this adaptation offers a fresh approach to a well-known children’s story. Aug. 27-28. Visit orplayhouse.com. Sunday, Aug. 28 KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: ‘THE THREE MUSKETEERS’ • Knoxville Children’s Theatre • 3PM • Aug. 19-Sept. 4. Visit knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com. • $12 OAK RIDGE PLAYHOUSE: ‘TALE OF THE RED RIDING HOOD’ • Oak Ridge Playhouse • 2PM • Aug. 27-28. Visit orplayhouse.com.

COMEDY AND SPOKEN WORD

Thursday, Aug. 18 THIRD THURSDAY COMEDY OPEN MIC • Big Fatty’s Catering Kitchen • 7:30PM • We will showcase local and touring talent in a curated open mic of 6 to 8 comics. The event starts at 7:30, and there is no charge for admission. The kitchen will be open as well as their full bar. • FREE Friday, Aug. 19 THE FIFTH WOMAN POETRY SLAM • The Birdhouse • 6:30PM • The 5th Woman Poetry slam is place where all poets can come and share their words of love, respect, passion, and expression. It is not dedicated solely women but is a place where women poets are celebrated and honored. Check out our Facebook pages for the challenge of the month and focus for our poetry every month. Saturday, Aug. 20 MARBLE CITY PERFORMANCE COMPANY: BOYS VS. GIRLS VARIETÉ SHOWCASE • The Bowery • 9:30PM • Only $10 for a night of entertainment that is just a bit outside of the norm, brought to you by Marble City Performance Company of Knoxville. Visit MarbleCityPerformers.com. • $10 Sunday, Aug. 21 UPSTAIRS UNDERGROUND COMEDY • Preservation Pub • 8PM • A weekly comedy open mic. Monday, Aug. 22 ON THE MIC WITH MIKE • Scruffy City Hall • 7PM • Bee Valley Productions and Scruffy City Hall are proud to present an attention-deficit, topsy turvy take on the

late-night talk show format. Mike Bartlett created the show as a way of marrying his passion for music and comedy; the purpose is to showcase the abundance of talented artists in the Knoxville music scene. Each episode features unique interviews and performances from Knoxville’s best artists, as well as sketches, segments, games, and more. Upcoming guests include Kukuly and the Gypsy Fuego (June 27), Maps Need Reading (July 11), Blond Bones (July 25), Rossdafareye (Aug. 8), and Electric Darling (Aug. 22). Visit beevalleyproductions.com/comedy/onthemicwithmike. Tuesday, Aug. 23 EINSTEIN SIMPLIFIED • Scruffy City Hall • 8PM • Einstein Simplified Comedy performs live comedy improv at Scruffy City Hall. It’s just like Whose Line Is It Anyway, but you get to make the suggestions. Show starts at 8:15, get there early for the best seats. No cover. • FREE OPEN MIC STAND-UP COMEDY • Longbranch Saloon • 8PM • Come laugh until you cry at the Longbranch every Tuesday night. Doors open at 8:30, first comic at 9. No cover charge, all are welcome. Aspiring or experienced comics interested in joining in the fun can email us at longbranch.info@gmail.com to learn more, or simply come to the show a few minutes early. • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 FULL DISCLOSURE COMEDY • Open Chord Brewhouse and Stage • 8PM • Full Disclosure Comedy is Knoxville’s long-form improvisational troupe, bringing together community members for laughs and overall general merriment.

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34

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

Thursday, Aug. 25 SUGAR HIGH! COMEDY SHOW • Sugar Mama’s • 8PM • A new comedy showcase at the brand new home of Sugar Mama’s on the 100 block. No cover. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 28 UPSTAIRS UNDERGROUND COMEDY • Preservation Pub • 8PM • A weekly comedy open mic. Visit scruffycity.com.

FESTIVALS

Saturday, Aug. 20 CENTRAL BAPTIST CHURCH OF BEARDEN PASTA AND BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL • Central Baptist Church Bearden • 5PM • Central Baptist Church of Bearden will host the annual community Pasta and Bluegrass Festival benefiting Family Promise of Knoxville. Family Promise is a shelter program for homeless families with children. At the Pasta and Bluegrass Festival, you will have the opportunity to sample specialty pasta creations, including vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options, and vote for your favorite. EAST TENNESSEE HISTORY FAIR • Downtown Knoxville • 10AM • The 2016 East Tennessee History Fair will celebrate the region’s history with reenactments, activities, and tours. Presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society, along with dozens of businesses, historical organizations, museums, musicians, and individuals from across the region, the East Tennessee History Fair features fun and educational activities highlighting the people, places, stories, and events that comprise the shared history of our 35-county region. The event is free and open to the public. For more information on the History Fair, please visit easttnhistory.org/ historyfair or call 865-215-8824. • FREE • See Spotlight on page 38. EMORY PLACE BLOCK PARTY • Emory Place • 2PM • The second annual Emory Place Block Party has been organized to help bring attention to the historic Emory Place area. The goal of the block party is to create an opportunity for locals to get out and meet one another while experiencing what the area has to offer. The event is free to the public and everyone is welcome to join in the fun. The 2016 Emory Place Block Party will have a more music centered focus with multiple acts preforming at various venues around Emory Place. All of the acts are Knoxville locals and the music is sure to please with a range including reggae, folk, indie-rock, jazz and more. A full line up, including performances by local dance groups, will be released in the coming weeks. • FREE • See Spotlight on page 38. 8TH ANNUAL SMOKIN’ DAY FESTIVAL • Sweet P’s Barbecue and Soul House • 2PM • Sweet P’s Barbeque & Soul House is hosting its 8th annual Smokin’ Day Festival, a free day of live music at its South Knoxville location. Throughout the day, regional blues, folks and soul musicians will play inside and outside the restaurant. THE WONDER OF HUMMINGBIRDS FESTIVAL • Ijams Nature Center • 9AM • A celebration of hummingbirds, with speakers, classes, and other presentations. Visit ijams. org/hummingbird-festival/. • $3-$20 HOUSE MOUNTAIN HOEDOWN • House Mountain State Natural Alrea • 1PM • Y’all come on to the third annual House Mountain Hoedown Music Festival featuring Phil Leadbetter and the Leadbetters, Leah Gardner, Dixieghost, Knox County Jug Stompers, J.J. Easy and the Survivor, and Sarah Kate Morgan plus a good old square dance to end the night. Visit housemountainhoedown.com. • $10

CALENDAR

Friday, Aug. 26 KNOXVILLE FILM FESTIVAL • Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 • 12:15PM • The largest and most complete film festival promises to be an exciting weekend filled with great films, networking opportunities, and fun-filled social activities. Visit knoxvillefilmfestival.com. • $10-$75 Saturday, Aug. 27 BIRDHOUSEAROO MUSIC FESTIVAL • The Birdhouse • 3PM • A fundraiser and 10-year anniversary celebration for the Birdhouse Community Center, featuring a diverse range of music including acoustic, folk, hip-hop, spoken word/ poetry, rock ‘n’ roll, and more. Ten-plus bands, daytime kids activities, donation-based drinks and cookout. See Birdhousearoo on Facebook for more information about artists and schedule. • $5 TCWN DRAGON BOAT RACE FESTIVAL • Volunteer Landing • Teams of 20 paddlers, a drummer and a steersperson race in authentic Hong Kong-style 46-foot-long dragon boats. All ages, skill levels and abilities can participate. All proceeds from the event go to support TCWN’s mission of protecting the state’s lakes, rivers and streams, which serve as the main source of drinking water for millions of Tennesseans. Visit tcwn.org. ON THE WING BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL • Stanley’s Greenhouse • 12PM • A five-minute habitat walk from Stanley’s Greenhouse to the spring-fed pond on the Stanley-Davenport Farm for a release of 50 monarch butterflies. A free event for children of all ages. Bring your camera. • FREE FIRST LUTHERAN CHURCH GERMANFEST • First Lutheran Church • 11AM • Join First Lutheran Church for a celebration of German culture, with authentic German food, local craft beer, and traditional German music, games, and art. • $2 PESTO FESTO • Ironwood Studios • 5:30PM • Pesto Festo celebrates local food, local flavors, and local talent. This year’s Pesto Festo meal will be prepared by Chef Jeffrey DeAlejandro, of Olibea, who will be roasting a whole, goat-stuffed hog for this year’s meal. Proceeds from the silent auction will go towards Slow Food’s initiative to host field trips for inner city students to local farms and farmers’ markets. You can order tickets online at pestofesto.brownpapertickets.com or by calling 865-322-9395. Members, please email us at info@ slowfoodtnvalley.com for the code to purchase discounted tickets. • $50 KNOXVILLE FILM FESTIVAL • Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 • 9AM • The largest and most complete film festival promises to be an exciting weekend filled with great films, networking opportunities, and fun-filled social activities. Visit knoxvillefilmfestival.com. • $10-$75 Sunday, Aug. 28 KNOXVILLE FILM FESTIVAL • Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 • 12:15PM • The largest and most complete film festival promises to be an exciting weekend filled with great films, networking opportunities, and fun-filled social activities. Visit knoxvillefilmfestival.com.com. • $10-$75

FILM SCREENINGS

Thursday, Aug. 18 SCHULZ BRÄU FILMNACHT • Schulz Bräu Brewing Company • 9PM • A free weekly movie screening—check social media for the week’s entry. 21 and up. • FREE Monday, Aug. 22 THE BIRDHOUSE WALK-IN THEATER • The Birdhouse •

8:15PM • A weekly free movie screening. • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 NOKNO CINEMATHEQUE: KISS KISS BANG BANG • Central Collective • 7:30PM • A murder mystery brings together a private eye, a struggling actress, and a thief masquerading as an actor in this 2005 thriller starring Val Kilmer and Robert Downey Jr. • FREE Thursday, Aug. 25 SCHULZ BRÄU FILMNACHT • Schulz Bräu Brewing Company • 9PM • A free weekly movie screening—check social media for the week’s entry. 21 and up. • FREE Friday, Aug. 26 KNOXVILLE FILM FESTIVAL • Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 • 12:15PM • The largest and most complete film festival promises to be an exciting weekend filled with great films, networking opportunities, and fun-filled social activities. Visit knoxvillefilmfestival.com. • $10-$75 Saturday, Aug. 27 KNOXVILLE FILM FESTIVAL • Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 • 9AM • The largest and most complete film festival promises to be an exciting weekend filled with great films, networking opportunities, and fun-filled social activities. Visit knoxvillefilmfestival.com. • $10-$75 NARROW RIDGE FILM NIGHT: ‘MAKING NORTH AMERICA’ • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 7PM • Making North America: Life focuses on how life emerged and developed in North America. For more information call 865-497-2753 or email community@narrowridge.org. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 28 KNOXVILLE FILM FESTIVAL • Regal Downtown West Cinema 8 • 12:15PM • The largest and most complete film festival promises to be an exciting weekend filled with great films, networking opportunities, and fun-filled social activities. Visit knoxvillefilmfestival.com.com. • $10-$75 THE PUBLIC CINEMA: RIGHT NOW, WRONG THEN • University of Tennessee • 7PM • Quite by accident, a film director arrives in town a day early. With time to kill before his lecture the next day, he stops by a restored, old palace and meets a fledgling artist. More conversation follows, and drinks. Then, quite unexpectedly, we begin again, but now things appear somewhat different. In the University of Tennessee Art and Architecture Building. Visit publiccinema.org. • FREE

SPORTS AND RECREATION

Thursday, Aug. 18 CYCOLOGY BICYCLES THURSDAY MORNING RIDE • Cycology Bicycles • 10AM • cycologybicycles.com. • FREE CLIMBING AT IJAMS CRAG • Ijams Nature Center • 5PM • You can register online or by calling 865-673-4687. riversportsoutfitters.com/events/. • $10 BILLY LUSH BOARD SHOP SUP AND SUDS • Billy Lush Board Shop • 5:30PM • Join us for your choice of a group paddle or SUP yoga class followed by cold beer from our taps at the shop. • $19-$25 NORTH KNOXVILLE BEER RUNNERS • Central Flats and Taps • 6PM • Meet us at Central Flats and Taps every Thursday night for a fun and easy run leading us right through Saw Works for a midway beer. • FREE FLEET FEET GROUP RUN/WALK • Fleet Feet Sports Knoxville

Knoxville’s BEST live music venue 6 nights a week!

Happy Hour 4pm - 8pm | mon - fri Huge selection of Craft, Import & Local beer Locally roasted coffee

wed aug. 17 • 8pm

burn halo w/ Belfast 6 Pack, American evil, & more $8 ADv. | $10 day of All Ages ( rock )

thurs aug. 18 • 8pm

vallie noles w/ Steven Swicegood $8 ADv. | $10 day of All Ages ( singer / songwriter )

fri Aug. 19 • 8pm

Super bob w/ Bridge To Grace, Something Wicked, Hellaphant, Transparent Soul $10 ADv. | $12 day of All Ages ( rock )

sat aug. 20 • 8pm

Tim Halperin W/ Sam Hatmaker $10 ADV | $15 Day of all ages ( singer / songwriter ) "Coolest venue in town! Not too big, not too small. Great sound system and audio engineers. Lights show, good food, cold beer and a music store in the back. Oh, and they give lessons, too. Seriously? I still can't believe this place is real." -Austin Hall of Sam Killed The Bear

Knoxville’s Best Musical Instrument Store

8502 KINGSTON PIKE • (865) 281-5874 openchordmusic.com

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 35


CALENDAR • 6PM • fleetfeetknoxville.com. • FREE BEARDEN BIKE AND TRAIL LAPS ON CHEROKEE BOULEVARD • Bearden Bike and Trail • 6PM • JVisit beardenbikeandtrail.com. • FREE FOUNTAIN CITY PEDALER THIRSTY THURSDAY ROAD RIDE • Fountain City Pedaler • 6PM • Visit facebook.com/ Fountain-City-Pedaler-Bike-Shop. • FREE CEDAR BLUFF CYCLES BEGINNER ROAD RIDE • Sequoyah Park • 6:20PM • Visit cedarbluffcycles.net. • FREE CEDAR BLUFF CYCLES THURSDAY NIGHT RIDE • Cedar Bluff Cycles • 6:20PM • Visit cedarbluffcycles.net. • FREE

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

of the valley to the premier summit of Thunderhead Mountain known as Rocky Top. We will begin at the Lead Cove Trail off Laurel Creek Road and work our way up to the Bote Mountain Trail and on to the AT. This 13-mile RT hike is rated DIFFICULT with an elevation gain of 3,665 ft. Meet at Alcoa Food City, 121 North Hall Road, at 7:30 AM. Leader: Cindy Spangler, spangler@utk.edu. • FREE BIKE ZOO SATURDAY MORNING RIDE • The Bike Zoo • 9AM • Visit bikezoo.com. • FREE ARCADIAN WRESTLING ASSOCIATION: WAR OF GODS • The International • 7PM • The old-school wrestling company makes its Knoxville debut. All ages. • $10-$50

Friday, Aug. 19 RIVER SPORTS FRIDAY NIGHT GREENWAY RUN • River Sports Outfitters • 6PM • Greenway run from the store every Friday evening. Work up a thirst then join us for $2 pints in the store afterwards. riversportsoutfitters.com. • FREE YMCA SOCIAL RUN • Lindsay Young Downtown YMCA • 6:30PM • Weekly social run meeting in the lobby of the downtown YMCA. We will be running through downtown and greenways, ending at Sugar Mama’s with $2 off of the first craft beer for runners. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 20 KTC CADES COVE RUN AND POTLUCK BRUNCH • Unnamed Venue • 7AM • We’ll start at 7 a.m., meeting at the bicycle rental area. Run any of the loops—4, 7, or 11 miles. Potluck brunch in the picnic area to follow. Dates are May 21, June 25, July 23, and Aug. 20. • FREE SMOKY MOUNTAIN HIKING CLUB: ROCKY TOP • 7:30AM • This challenging hike will take us from the summer heat

Sunday, Aug. 21 SMOKY MOUNTAIN HIKING CLUB: GRAYSVILLE MOUNTAIN • 8AM • The Graysville Mountain segment of the Cumberland Trail has recently been extended and offers several nice views of the valley below the Walden Ridge escarpment. Hike: about 10 miles total with 900 ft. elevation gain, rated moderate. Meet at ORNL Credit Union in Kingston at 8:00 am. Leader: Tim Bigelow, bigelowt2@ mindspring.com. • FREE TENNESSEE ASSOCIATION OF VINTAGE BASE BALL • Historic Ramsey House • 12PM • As revived iterations of Tennessee’s historic base ball teams, TAOVBB member clubs combine living history with sport, organizing barehanded, Civil War-era base ball games to educate and entertain their communities. • FREE Monday, Aug. 22 CLIMBING AT IJAMS CRAG • Ijams Nature Center • 5PM • You can register online or by calling 865-673-4687.

Historic Ramsey House (presents)

riversportsoutfitters.com/events/. • $10 KTC GROUP RUN • Mellow Mushroom • 6PM • Visit ktc.org. • FREE TVB MONDAY NIGHT ROAD RIDE • Tennessee Valley Bikes • 6PM • FREE BEARDEN BEER MARKET FUN RUN • Bearden Beer Market • 6:30PM • Visit beardenbeermarket.com. • FREE Tuesday, Aug. 23 CYCOLOGY BICYCLES TUESDAY MORNING RIDE • Cycology Bicycles • 10:30AM • Visit cycologybicycles.com. • FREE HARD KNOX TUESDAY FUN RUN • Hard Knox Pizzeria • 6:30PM • FREE CEDAR BLUFF CYCLES TUESDAY GREENWAY RIDE • Cedar Bluff Cycles • 6:30PM • cedarbluffcycles.net. • FREE SMOKY MOUNTAIN HIKING CLUB: RUSSELL FIELD • 8AM • This hike will follow the Anthony Creek and Russell Field trails to the Russell Field Shelter and return. Hike: 10.2 miles, rated moderate. Meet at Alcoa Food City, 121 North Hall Road, at 8:00 am. Leader: Ron Brandenburg, ronb86@ comcast.net. • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 KTC GROUP RUN • Runner’s Market • 5:30PM • Visit ktc.org. • FREE TVB EASY RIDER MOUNTAIN BIKE RIDE • Ijams Nature Center • 6PM • Check out our Facebook page or give us a call at 865-540-9979 for more info. We meet near Mead’s Quarry. • FREE Thursday, Aug. 25 CYCOLOGY BICYCLES THURSDAY MORNING RIDE • Cycology

Bicycles • 10AM • cycologybicycles.com. • FREE CLIMBING AT IJAMS CRAG • Ijams Nature Center • 5PM • Come top rope with us at Ijams Crag. Monday and Thursday evenings from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Cost is $10 per person. You can register online or by calling 865-6734687. riversportsoutfitters.com/events/. • $10 BILLY LUSH BOARD SHOP SUP AND SUDS • Billy Lush Board Shop • 5:30PM • We will launch from the dock for a one-hour group paddle or yoga class then meet back in the shop for suds. Rentals are $19 for the group paddle and $25 for the yoga class and includes a complimentary beer. • $19-$25 NORTH KNOXVILLE BEER RUNNERS • Central Flats and Taps • 6PM • FREE FLEET FEET GROUP RUN/WALK • Fleet Feet Sports Knoxville • 6PM •. fleetfeetknoxville.com. • FREE BEARDEN BIKE AND TRAIL LAPS ON CHEROKEE BOULEVARD • Bearden Bike and Trail • 6PM • Visit beardenbikeandtrail.com. • FREE FOUNTAIN CITY PEDALER THIRSTY THURSDAY ROAD RIDE • Fountain City Pedaler • 6PM • Visit facebook.com/ Fountain-City-Pedaler-Bike-Shop. • FREE CEDAR BLUFF CYCLES BEGINNER ROAD RIDE • Sequoyah Park • 6:20PM • Visit cedarbluffcycles.net. • FREE CEDAR BLUFF CYCLES THURSDAY NIGHT RIDE • Cedar Bluff Cycles • 6:20PM • Visit cedarbluffcycles.net. • FREE Friday, Aug. 26 RIVER SPORTS FRIDAY NIGHT GREENWAY RUN • River Sports Outfitters • 6PM • riversportsoutfitters.com. • FREE YMCA SOCIAL RUN • Lindsay Young Downtown YMCA •

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Saturday September 3, 2016 10am - 6pm Admission: $10 Members • $15 Non-Members (Children 12 & under free) Great Music performances by:

Liza Jane Alexander & Fiddlin' Cyrley Cottrell Good Thyme Ceilidh Band • The Grass Roots Gringos Sigean • Knox County Jug Stompers • Fire in the Kitchen The Traveling Caudells • Four Leaf Peat Also great food and period demonstrations.

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36

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

6:30PM • Weekly social run meeting in the lobby of the downtown YMCA. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 27 BIKE ZOO SATURDAY MORNING RIDE • The Bike Zoo • 9AM • Visit bikezoo.com. • FREE PADDLE THE RIVER • Riverside Landing Park • 9:30AM • Come paddle with us every fourth Saturday of the month. Visit riversportsoutfitters.com. TENNESSEE ASSOCIATION OF VINTAGE BASE BALL • Historic Ramsey House • 12PM • As revived iterations of Tennessee’s historic base ball teams, TAOVBB member clubs combine living history with sport, organizing barehanded, Civil War-era base ball games to educate and entertain their communities. • FREE

ART

CALENDAR

Melinda Adams and woodcarvings by Marjorie Holbert; A Gathering of Goddesses, mixed-media artwork by Sheryl Sallie; and Glasslike Surfaces, glass art by Yvonne Hosey. Ewing Gallery 1715 Volunteer Boulevard JULY 15-AUG. 28: Encore, an exhibit of artwork by 11 University of Tennessee graduates living in Nashville. Gallery 1010 113 S. Gay St. AUG. 19: University of Tennessee MFA Exhibition. Knoxville Arts and Fine Crafts Center 1127B Broadway

AUG. 1-OCT. 31: Whimsical Creatures, paintings and photographs by Lela E. Buis. A reception will be held on Friday, Aug. 19, from 5:30-8 p.m. Knoxville Museum of Art 1050 World’s Fair Park Drive AUG. 7-SEPT. 4: Artwork by the Knoxville Watercolor Society. AUG. 26-NOV. 6: Romantic Spirits: 19th-Century Paintings of the South From the Johnson Collection. ONGOING: Higher Ground: A Century of the Visual Arts in Tennessee; Currents: Recent Art From East Tennessee and Beyond; and Facets of Modern and Contemporary Glass. McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture 1327 Circle Park Drive

A1 Lab Arts23 Emory Place FRIDAY, AUG. 20: Intersection Art Competition Exhibition. Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts 556 Parkway (Gatlinburg) MAY 21-AUG. 20: Arrowmont’s annual instructor exhibit. AUG. 15-OCT. 5: A retrospective exhibition featuring artwork by Bill Griffith, former Arrowmont program director. Art Market Gallery 422 S. Gay St. AUG. 2-28: Paintings by Kate McCullough, glass art by Johnny Glass, and Who, What, Where, a member exhibit focused on East Tennessee people and places. Broadway Studios and Gallery 1127 N. Broadway AUG. 5-27: Mixed-media artwork by Renee Suich. Central Collective 923 N. Central St. THROUGH AUGUST: Double Take, a collection of Instagram images by Jason Brown. The District Gallery 5113 Kingston Pike AUG. 19-SEPT. 10: Terra Madre: Women in Clay, an exhibit of work by Knoxville-area ceramic artists. An opening reception will be held on Friday, Aug. 19, from 5-8 p.m. Downtown Gallery 106 S. Gay St. JUNE 3-AUG. 19: Through the Lens of Ed Westcott, an exhibition of photos taken by the official photographer for the Manhattan Project in Oak Ridge. AUG. 19: University of Tennessee MFA Exhibition. East Tennessee History Center 601 S. Gay St. APRIL 16-OCT. 30: Come to Make Records, a selection of artifacts, audio and video recordings, and photographs celebrating Knoxville’s music heritage and the 1929-30 St. James Hotel recording sessions. Emporium Center for Arts and Culture 100 S. Gay St. AUG. 5-26: A Plen Air Show, featuring paintings made outdoors by the Tuesday Painters group; Expressions, abstract paintings and urban landscapes by Terina Gilette; The Wonder of Birds, featuring photos by

KNOXVILLE CHILDREN’S THEATRE: THE THREE MUSKETEERS Knoxville Children’s Theatre (109 E. Churchwell Ave.) • Saturday, Aug. 19-Sunday, Sept. 4 • $10-$12 • knoxvillechildrenstheatre.com

The exploits of Athos, Porthos, Aramis, and d’Artagnan get a youthful update in an adaptation by Knoxville Children’s Theatre. The company’s production of Alexandre Dumas’ classic adventure tale The Three Musketeers debuts this weekend, kicking off a three-week run. The production is staffed and acted by a cast and crew of youthful performers, all ages 12-16. But like most KCT events, don’t be surprised if there are a few twists or unexpected additions. The spirit from these young stage stars keeps things interesting and brings an unexpected exuberance to most performances—some of the actors are veterans who rival many grownups in town. Clare Carter, a junior at West High School, is making her directorial debut. (Clay Duda)

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 37


CALENDAR

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

JUNE 4-AUG. 28: Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas. JULY 12-OCT. 19: Land, Sea, and Spirit: Alaska Native Art From the 19th and 20th Centuries. ONGOING: The Flora and Fauna of Catesby, Mason, and Audubon and Life on the Roman Frontier. Westminster Presbyterian Church 6500 Northshore Drive JULY 1-AUG. 31: An exhibit of contemporary quilts by Melissa Everett.

FAMILY AND KIDS’ EVENTS

Thursday, Aug. 18 LITTLE LEARNERS • Blount County Public Library • 10:30AM • FREE CHESS AT THE LIBRARY • Blount County Public Library • 1PM • Visit blountlibrary.org. • FREE LEGO CLUB • Blount County Public Library • 4PM • FREE Friday, Aug. 19 S.T.E.A.M. KIDS • Blount County Public Library • 4PM • FREE

EAST TENNESSEE HISTORY FAIR

Downtown • 10 a.m.-5 p.m. • Free • easttnhistory.org/historyfair

EMORY PLACE BLOCK PARTY

Emory Place • 2-9 p.m. • Free • emoryplaceblockparty2016.com

Pick from a host of free entertainment focused on reveling in the community’s past and future on Saturday, with the East Tennessee History Festival and the Emory Place Block Party offering ever-expanding lineups of music, crafts, food, and more. Take a bus tour of historic homes, visit with historical re-enactors from Civil War-era baseball players to suffragettes, learn to spin wool or make raku pottery, and listen to old-time and bluegrass music at the East Tennessee History Festival, which runs all day at a variety of venues downtown. Bring your pooch to Krutch Park to demo his historic costume or East Tennessee spirit in the History Hound Dog Costume Contest. Eat a slice of Davy Crockett’s birthday cake at the East Tennessee History Center (where admission will be free all day) and check out an interactive display of miniature French and Indian War soldiers and weapons by the Historic Gaming Club of Knoxville. Mast General Store will hold an old-fashioned checkers tournament, and the Tennessee Theater will provide tours and movie showings from the Tennessee Archive of Moving Image and Sound. (See Inside the Vault on page 17.) New this year is an antiques fair on Market Street behind the East Tennessee History Center. And don’t miss the 4 p.m. walking tour with the Mercury’s own local history expert Jack Neely. (Reservations are suggested; call 865-215-8824.) To get to know the more modern-day face of a revitalized part of Knoxville, stroll a few blocks to Emory Place, which is holding its second annual block party, 2-9 p.m., with music, crafts, food trucks, and art at five venues (including two outdoors). It’s a chance for residents to get to know each other and check out the businesses that have made Emory Place home. Quaff a draft at Crafty Bastard Brewery or check out the Intersection art exhibition, put together just for the party by A1 Lab Arts. Jam with more than a dozen music performers, including Jubal, Paperwork, Adeem, Kukuly and the Gypsy Fuego, and Sunshine Station. (S. Heather Duncan)

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Saturday, Aug. 20 CHESS AT THE LIBRARY • Blount County Public Library • 10AM • For middle and high school students, with coach Tom Jobe. Visit blountlibrary.org. • FREE BLOUNT COUNTY NERD GROUP • Blount County Public Library • 3PM • By participating in the newly-formed Blount County Nerd Group, students seventh grade and up can learn skills such as making simple games, developing professional websites and creating mobile apps. • FREE EAST TENNESSEE HISTORY FAIR • Downtown Knoxville • 10AM • The 2016 East Tennessee History Fair will celebrate the region’s history with reenactments, activities, and tours. Presented by the East Tennessee Historical Society, along with dozens of businesses, historical organizations, museums, musicians, and individuals from across the region, the East Tennessee History Fair features fun and educational activities highlighting the people, places, stories, and events that comprise the shared history of our 35-county region. The event is free and open to the public. For more information on the History Fair, please visit easttnhistory.org/ historyfair or call 865-215-8824. • FREE Tuesday, Aug. 23 LITTLE LEARNERS • Blount County Public Library • 10:30AM • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 BABY AND ME • Blount County Public Library • 10:30AM • FREE Thursday, Aug. 25 LITTLE LEARNERS • Blount County Public Library • 10:30AM • FREE CHESS AT THE LIBRARY • Blount County Public Library • 1PM • Visit blountlibrary.org. • FREE LEGO CLUB • Blount County Public Library • 4PM • FREE Friday, Aug. 26 S.T.E.A.M. KIDS • Blount County Public Library • 4PM • FREE Saturday, Aug. 27 FAMILY SAFETY AND PREPAREDNESS FAIR • World’s Fair

Park • 9AM • Educational and informative booths, classes, Kids Zone, food trucks and more will be open to the public. Learn how to best prepare your home, family, and workplace for emergency or disaster. Talk to emergency professionals. Children will have a chance to view and tour a wide variety of emergency vehicles. • FREE CHESS AT THE LIBRARY • Blount County Public Library • 10AM • Visit blountlibrary.org. • FREE MCCLUNG MUSEUM FAMILY FUN DAY: SAILING ALONG THE NILE • McClung Museum of Natural History and Culture • 1PM • Join us for free a free Family Fun Day featuring activities, crafts, tours, and more. We’ll gather in our Ancient Egypt gallery for “Sailing Along the Nile.” All materials will be provided. The program is free and open to the public. Reservations are not necessary. • FREE BLOUNT COUNTY NERD GROUP • Blount County Public Library • 3PM • FREE

LECTURES, READINGS, AND BOOK SIGNINGS 

Thursday, Aug. 18 EAST TENNESSEE WRITERS HALL OF FAME • Lighthouse Knoxville • 11:30AM • During the event, Friends of Literacy will induct five local writers into the East Tennessee Writers Hall of Fame in five categories. This year’s honorees are: Lifetime Achievement: Leslie Garrett , Fiction: Pamela Schoenewaldt, Non-fiction: Margaret Lazarus Dean, Poetry: Earl S. Braggs and Social Media: Randall Brown. Individual tickets are $100 and can be purchased on our website or by calling us at 865-549-7007. • $100 PECHA KUCHA KNOXVILLE 20 • Relix Variety Theatre • 7:20PM • The 20th edition of this short-format presentation series features Wes Breitenbach, Burke Brewer, Jessica Dean, Angela Grant, Shane Murphy, Marshall Stair, Zack Roskop, Holly Briggs, and Laura Baisden. Visit pechakucha.org. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 20 KNOXVILLE COLLEGE FUNDRAISING EVENTS • Barnes & Noble • 9:30AM • Barnes & Noble Knoxville and Knoxville College have partnered together to celebrate Knoxville College past, present, and future. Starting off at 9:30 am we will be hosting Breakfast with the Mayor. Mayor Madeline Rogero will be on hand to enjoy a delicious scone or muffin and to discuss the importance of Knoxville College on our community. At 11 am Knoxville College will host a special storytime reading of The Bot That Scott Built and Mira Forecasts the Future followed by an activity. At noon Knoxville College invites you to grab lunch from our cafe and join in a discussion led by Beck Center Director, Renee Kesler. Lastly at 2pm the talented historian Bob Booker will present the history of Knoxville College through the lens of his book And Then There Was Light! 120 Year History of Knoxville College, Knoxville Tennessee 1875-1995 as well as other alumni titles. In addition to the day of activities a portion of every purchase made in name of Knoxville College will be donated back to the school. These funds will be used for the improvement and continuation of classes which are hoped to start back in 2016. • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 BOOKS SANDWICHED IN • East Tennessee History Center • 12PM • The Friends of the Knox County Public Library’s monthly reading series this summer and fall includes Mike Cohen of Cohen Communications Group discussing


Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

Lawrence Lessig’s Republic, Lost: The Corruption of Equality and the Steps to End It (Aug. 24); Knoxville attorney Tammy Kaousias on Give Us the Ballot: The Modern Struggle for Voting Rights in America, by Ari Berman (Sept. 28); Vrondelia Chandler of Project Grad and Jackie Clay of the Save Our Sons initiative on Rac(e)ing to Class: Confronting Poverty and Race in Schools and Classrooms, by H. Richard Milner IV and Tyrone Howard (Oct. 26); and UT journalism professor Stuart Brotman on Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World, by Timothy Garton Ash (Nov. 16). • FREE Sunday, Aug. 28 SHANE SIMMONS AND ROBERT SORRELL • Union Ave Books • 2PM • Book signings with regional authors Shane Simmons and Robert Sorrell, discussing their new books, Legends & Lore of East Tennessee and Historic Homes of Northeast Tennessee. • FREE BIRDHOUSE SUNDAY DINNER POTLUCK AND PRESENTATION • The Birdhouse • 6PM • Join us for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. and a presentation at 7. Every month, the Birdhouse hosts a Sunday dinner program. It begins with a potluck dinner, followed by a speaker and presentation on a wide range of timely topics. Sunday dinner is always free and open to the public. Please bring a dish to share—but if you are for some reason unable to contribute food, please just bring yourself, and share in our feast. Children are especially welcome here. • FREE

CLASSES AND

WORKSHOPS

Thursday, Aug. 18 AARP SMART DRIVER DRIVER SAFETY CLASS • East Tennessee Medical Group • 8AM • Call 382-5822. GENTLE YOGA AND MEDITATION • Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church • 12PM • Call 865-577-2021 or email yogaway249@gmail.com. Donations accepted. PORTRAIT AND LIFE DRAWING SESSIONS • Historic Candoro Marble Company • 12:30PM • Portrait and life drawing practice at Candoro Art and Heritage Center. $10. Call Brad Selph for more information (865-573-0709). • $10 CANCER SUPPORT COMMUNITY: KNIT YOUR WAY TO WELLNESS • Cancer Support Community • 1PM • Whether you are a novice knitter or an old pro, you are invited to bring your own project or join others in learning a new one. Special attention will be provided to beginners interested in learning how to knit and experience the meditative quality of knitting. Supplies provided. Call 865-546-4661. All Cancer Support Community programs are offered at no cost to individuals affected by cancer. KNOXVILLE CAPOEIRA CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 6PM • Visit knoxvillecapoeira.org. • $10 SIX-WEEK STRENGTH AND BALANCE WORKSHOP • Ijams Nature Center • 6PM • Join Erik Andelman and Stephanie Leyland, certified Onnit instructors with South Knox Healing Arts, for a six-week course featuring bodyweight workouts combining yoga, calisthenics, flexibility training and traditional exercise forms from around the world. • $20-$100

CALENDAR

THIRSTY (FOR KNOWLEDGE) THURSDAY • Old City Wine Bar • 6:30PM • Join our sommelier, Matt Burke, every Thursday in the cellar of the Old City Wine Bar for our ongoing wine education series. Free to listen and only $20-$25 to partake in the libations. • $20-$25 BELLY DANCE LEVELS 1 AND 2 • Knox Dance Worx • 8PM • Call (865) 898-2126 or email alexia@alexia-dance.com. • $12 STANDUP PADDLEBOARDING 101 • Sequoyah Park • 6PM • Visit riversportsoutfitters.com. • $35 SUP YOGA • Concord Park • 6PM • Register at barrebelleyoga.com/class-schedule. • $25 SUP YOGA • Ijams Nature Center • 6PM • Register at barrebelleyoga.com/class-schedule. • $25 KNOX HERITAGE PRESERVATION EASEMENT WORKSHOP • Knox Heritage • 12PM • Knox Heritage invites the public to a free workshop on the benefits of preservation easements and how they can be a financially beneficial tool for owners of historic properties. Reservations are required and can be made by calling the Knox Heritage office at (865) 523-8008 or sending an email to hcook@ knoxheritage.org. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 20 YOGA AT NARROW RIDGE • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 9:30AM • For information call 865-497-2753 or email community@narrowridge.org. • FREE IMPROV COMEDY CLASS • The Birdhouse • 10:30AM • A weekly improv comedy class. • FREE CAITLIN HAMILTON SUMMIE: “MARKETING FOR SMALL PRESS AND SELF-PUBLISHED AUTHORS” • Central United

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Naturally, our agents possess an intimate

Methodist Church • 1PM • Publishing marketer Caitlin Hamilton Summie will speak to writers about the basics of creating a marketing plan for their works. Other topics will include assessing resources, developing an elevator pitch, considering sales and distribution issues, and more. Cost of the workshop is $50, with Knoxville Writers’ Guild members receiving a 40 percent discount and student members a 50 percent discount. You can join the nonprofit KWG at the time of registration for discounts on this and future workshops. To register, visit knoxvillewritersguild.org or send a check to KWG Workshops, P.O. Box 10326, Knoxville, TN, 37939-0326. • $50 SUP YOGA • Ijams Nature Center • 9AM • Register at barrebelleyoga.com/class-schedule. • $25 SUP 101 • Outdoor Knoxville Adventure Center • 10AM • We cover all the basics of standup paddleboarding in this introductory class. • $45 Sunday, Aug. 21 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE BALLET BARRE CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 1PM • Visit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE OPEN LEVEL MODERN TECHNIQUE CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 2PM • Visit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE IMPROVISATION CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 3:30PM • Visit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 BEGINNING BRIDGE LESSONS • Knoxville Bridge Center • 1:30PM • The Knoxville Association of Bridge Clubs is offering an in-depth, 17-week course on duplicate bridge,

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4534 Old Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37919 (865) 584-3341 • asheswines.com

Each office is independently owned and operated

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M-Th: 9AM - 9:30PM | Fr-Sat: 9AM-10PM Sunday: Closed email: thad@asheswines.com

August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 39


CALENDAR with a focus on learning the modern two over one bridge system. Contact Jo Anne Newby at (865} 539-4150 or email KnoxvilleBridge@gmail.com. • $5 Monday, Aug. 22 SUNRISE YOGA • Central Collective • 7AM • Join Leslie of Yogini is a Dancer for another rooftop breakfast yoga. Get your workout it and the most important meal of the day all at once. Leslie will lead us in a traditional flow yoga practice on the roof as the sun rises then you will leave with a juice from the Juicery. • $20 GENTLE YOGA AND MEDITATION • Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church • 5:30PM • Call 865-5772021 or email yogaway249@gmail.com. Donations accepted. Tuesday, Aug. 23 KNOX COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS: LAWN IS A FOUR-LETTER WORD • Karns Senior Center • 11AM • Join Master Gardener Ron Pearman for a discussion of proper summer lawn care and the typical problems experienced during the hot and humid summer months of East Tennessee. Call 865-951-2653. • FREE GENTLE YOGA AND MEDITATION • Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church • 12PM • Call 865-577-2021 or email yogaway249@gmail.com. Donations accepted. KNOXVILLE CAPOEIRA CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 6PM • Visit capoeiraknoxville.org. • $10 ACROYOGA • Dragonfly Aerial Arts Studio • 6PM • • $15 COOKING CLASS AT IJAMS NATURE CENTER • Ijams Nature Center • 6PM • Join Chef Michael to learn to make ricotta cheese, homemade pasta and authentic pasta sauce and

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

turn them into lasagna. Bring an apron and an appetite. Call 865-577-4717 ext.110 to register. • $25 BEGINNING BRIDGE LESSONS • Knoxville Bridge Center • 6PM • The Knoxville Association of Bridge Clubs is offering an in-depth, 17-week course on duplicate bridge, with a focus on learning the modern two over one bridge system. Contact Jo Anne Newby at (865} 539-4150 or email KnoxvilleBridge@gmail.com. • $5 Wednesday, Aug. 24 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE INTERMEDIATE/ADVANCED MODERN TECHNIQUE CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 6PM • A Visit circlemoderndance.com. KNIVES, AXES, AND SAWS: SELECTING AND CARING FOR YOUR TOOLS • REI • 7PM • Find out the basics for selecting, using, and maintaining cutting tools commonly used for outdoor recreation. Knives, multi-tools, saws and axes will all be covered by our in-house specialist. • FREE CIRCLE MODERN DANCE OPEN LEVEL BALLET CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 7:30PM • Visit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 CLIMBING FUNDAMENTALS • River Sports Outfitters • 6PM • Come learn the basics of climbing every second and fourth Wednesday of the month. Space is limited so call 865-673-4687 to reserve your spot now. Class fee $20. Visit riversportsoutfitters.com/events. • $20 Thursday, Aug. 25 GENTLE YOGA AND MEDITATION • Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church • 12PM • Call 865-577-2021 or email yogaway249@gmail.com. Donations accepted. AARP SMART DRIVER DRIVER SAFETY CLASS • Halls Senior

! S T E K C I T N I W at. Sept. 3) 1 pair of opening night tickets (S Violet To the musical production ofseum 5:30-7pm

at McClung Mu To include: preshow celebration at Clarence Brown Theatre n tio ep rec w plus a post sho ANSWER TO WIN

Center • 12PM • Call 382-5822. AARP SMART DRIVER DRIVER SAFETY CLASS • Carter Senior Center • 12PM • Call 382-5822. PORTRAIT AND LIFE DRAWING SESSIONS • Historic Candoro Marble Company • 12:30PM • Portrait and life drawing practice at Candoro Art and Heritage Center. $10. Call Brad Selph for more information (865-573-0709). • $10 CANCER SUPPORT COMMUNITY: HEALING THROUGH ART • Cancer Support Community • 1PM • No experience necessary. RSVP. Call 865-546-4661 for more info. All Cancer Support Community programs are offered at no cost to individuals affected by cancer. KNOXVILLE CAPOEIRA CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 6PM • Visit knoxvillecapoeira.org. • $10 SIX-WEEK STRENGTH AND BALANCE WORKSHOP • Ijams Nature Center • 6PM • Join Erik Andelman and Stephanie Leyland, certified Onnit instructors with South Knox Healing Arts, for a six-week course featuring bodyweight workouts combining yoga, calisthenics, flexibility training and traditional exercise forms from around the world. • $20-$100 THIRSTY (FOR KNOWLEDGE) THURSDAY • Old City Wine Bar • 6:30PM • Join our sommelier, Matt Burke, every Thursday in the cellar of the Old City Wine Bar for our ongoing wine education series. Free to listen and only $20-$25 to partake in the libations. • $20-$25 BIKE MAINTENANCE LEVEL 1 • REI • 7PM • Routine bike maintenance keeps you riding smoothly and prolongs the life of your bike. Join us for this introductory class to help you take care of your bike. • FREE BELLY DANCE LEVELS 1 AND 2 • Knox Dance Worx • 8PM •

Purple Heart Tattoo

Name the short story the musical is based upon?

com contests@knoxmercury.nt. to er sw an the g din sen Enter by tacted prior to eve 2016. Winner will be con 29, Drawing will be August

will be notified in advance. ry from weekly submissions. Winnersreside nt, 18 years of age or older, n at random by the Knoxville Mercuwhere prohibited. Must be a legal U.S. r has 24 hours to respond. *Disclaimer: Winners will be chosePURC Void Y. SSAR NECE HASE winne (1 pair of tickets per winner.) NO yee, family member, or household member of a sponsor. Once notified, Suite 404, Knoxville, TN 37902. and not be a sponsor or an emplo er of entries received. Sponsor: Knoxville Mercury, 706 Walnut Ave., Odds of winning depend on numb

40

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

Voted one of the TOP! in 2015-Come see why 1723 N. Central St.

Call (865) 898-2126 or email alexia@alexia-dance.com. • $12 SUP YOGA • Concord Park • 6PM • Register at barrebelleyoga.com/class-schedule. • $25 SUP YOGA • Ijams Nature Center • 6PM • Register at barrebelleyoga.com/class-schedule. • $25 Friday, Aug. 26 AARP SMART DRIVER DRIVER SAFETY CLASS • Halls Senior Center • 12PM • Call 382-5822. AARP SMART DRIVER DRIVER SAFETY CLASS • Carter Senior Center • 12PM • Call 382-5822. Saturday, Aug. 27 YOGA AT NARROW RIDGE • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 9:30AM • For information call 865-497-2753 or email community@narrowridge.org. • FREE CANCER SUPPORT COMMUNITY: MINDFULNESS IN EVERYDAY LIFE • Cancer Support Community • 10AM • Life is full of challenges. What can we do when our lives feel out of control? A practice of mindfulness can help. RSVP. Call 865-546-4661 for more info. All Cancer Support Community programs are offered at no cost to individuals affected by cancer. IMPROV COMEDY CLASS • The Birdhouse • 10:30AM • A weekly improv comedy class. • FREE KNOX COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS: MAKE MORE OF WHAT YOU ALREADY HAVE • Cedar Bluff Branch Library • 10:30AM • Join Master Gardener Lisa Churnetski to learn some propagation techniques for perennials, including cuttings, layering and division as ways to make more of what you already have and love. Call 865-470-7033. • FREE


Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

MARBLE SPRINGS STARGAZING WORKSHOP • Marble Springs State Historic Site • 9:30PM • Venus and Jupiter are two of the brightest planets visible in the night sky. Marble springs will be hosting a Stargazing Workshop to view the conjunction of these two bright planets. For more information email info@marblesprings.net or call (865)573-5508. • $1 SUP YOGA • Ijams Nature Center • 9AM • Register at barrebelleyoga.com/class-schedule. • $25 SUP 101 • Outdoor Knoxville Adventure Center • 10AM • We cover all the basics of standup paddleboarding in this introductory class. • $45 WEST BICYCLES MONTHLY BIKE CLINIC • West Bicycles • 11AM • Free monthly bicycle service clinic, including flat tire repair, gear and brake adjustment, pre-ride check list, and custom emergency tool/convenience kit recommendations. Every fourth Saturday of the month through August. Call (865) 671-7591 or visit westbikes.com. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 28 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE BALLET BARRE CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 1PM • TVisit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE OPEN LEVEL MODERN TECHNIQUE CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 2PM • Visit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 CIRCLE MODERN DANCE IMPROVISATION CLASS • Emporium Center for Arts and Culture • 3:30PM • Visit circlemoderndance.com. • $10 BEGINNING BRIDGE LESSONS • Knoxville Bridge Center • 1:30PM • The Knoxville Association of Bridge Clubs is

offering an in-depth, 17-week course on duplicate bridge, with a focus on learning the modern two over one bridge system. Contact Jo Anne Newby at (865} 539-4150 or email KnoxvilleBridge@gmail.com. • $5

MEETINGS 

Thursday, Aug. 18 CANCER SUPPORT COMMUNITY FAMILY BEREAVEMENT GROUP • Cancer Support Community • 4:30PM • CSC is committed to providing bereavement services to those who have lost a loved one to cancer. Please contact our clinical staff before attending. Call 865-546-4661 for more info. All Cancer Support Community programs are offered at no cost to individuals affected by cancer.  ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS • The Birdhouse • 6PM • A meeting group for adults who grew up in alcoholic or dysfunctional homes. The group aims to bring emotional healing to those who have been or who are in these situations and have experienced any level of trauma or abuse as a result. Led by Laura Moll, the class is free to attend. • FREE TRANSGENDER DISCUSSION GROUP • Maryville College • 6:30PM • Join us for fellowship and conversation and help guide a new dialog within the LGBT community of Blount County by sharing your story with friends and allies. This group will meet biweekly June 23-Aug. 18 at the Clayton Center lobby at Maryville College. • FREE Saturday, Aug. 20 100 BLACK MEN OF GREATER KNOXVILLE • Beck Cultural

CALENDAR

Exchange Center • 10AM • The 100 Black Men of Greater Knoxville’s purpose is to serve as a catalyst to empower African-American and other minority youth to individually and collectively reach their full potential through maximizing their resources that foster and enhance achievement in education and community and economic development. To accomplish this objective, we partner with primary and secondary schools and community organizations engaged in similar activities.  AL-ANON • Faith Lutheran Church • 11AM • Al-Anon’s purpose is to help families and friends of alcoholics recover from the effects of living with the problem drinking of a relative or friend. Visit our local website at farragutalanon.org or email us at FindHope@ Farragutalanon.org. • FREE NARROW RIDGE SILENT MEDITATION GATHERING • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 11AM • For information call 865-497-2753 or email community@narrowridge.org. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 21 RATIONALISTS OF EAST TENNESSEE • Pellissippi State Community College • 10:30AM • The Rationalists of East Tennessee focus on the real or natural universe. The group exists so that we can benefit emotionally and intellectually through meeting together to expand our awareness and understanding through shared experience, knowledge, and ideas as well as enrich our lives and the lives of others. Visit rationalists.org. • FREE THREE RIVERS! EARTH FIRST! • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 7PM • Three Rivers! Earth First! is the local dirt

Monday, Aug. 22 GAY MEN’S DISCUSSION GROUP • Tennessee Valley Unitarian Universalist Church • 7:30PM • We hold facilitated discussions on topics and issues relevant to local gay men in a safe and open environment. Visit gaygroupknoxville.org.  APPALACHIAN MOUNTAIN BIKE CLUB • Central Flats and Taps • 7PM • Interested in getting involved with the mountain biking community here in Knoxville? The Appalachian Mountain Bike Club meets the fourth Monday of each month. Visit ambc-sorba.org. • FREE Tuesday, Aug. 23 EAST TENNESSEE CIVIL RIGHTS WORKING GROUP • Beck Cultural Exchange Center • 3:30PM • ETCRWG is an informal networking group of community leaders, civil rights advocates, area law enforcement agency representatives, and concerned citizens. It was founded on the principle that unity is our greatest asset in ensuring the

Please vote

UT PARALEGAL PROGRAM Our paralegal certificate program is an intensive, comprehensive, skills-based 17-week program. Attorneyinstructors will train you in the aspects of paralegalism most in demand.

worshiping, tree hugging, anarchist collective that meets every Sunday night on the second floor of Barley’s in the back room (when its available) to organize against strip mining, counter protest the KKK and Nazis, to clean up Third Creek and to fight evil corporations in general. Open meeting, rotating facilitation, collective model. Y’all come. Call (865) 257-4029 for more information. • FREE REFUGE RECOVERY • Losel Shedrup Ling • 8:30PM • A peerled weekly group gathering to supplement your dedicated practice (AA, NA, Smart Recovery, etc.) for recovery from addictions of all kinds. Contact David at 865-306-0279 for any further questions. • FREE

LEARN MORE

Knnville’s TT

You’re invited to attend a free information session at the UT Conference Center in downtown Knoxville. Please call 865-974-0150, e-mail utnoncredit@utk.edu, or go online to make your reservation. Tuesday, August 23 6-7:30 p.m. Course # 16FAP300R-1

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706 Walnut St, Knoxville, TN August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 41


CALENDAR civil rights of all persons in East Tennessee. • FREE ATHEISTS SOCIETY OF KNOXVILLE • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 5:30PM • Weekly atheists meetup and happy hour. Come join us for food, drink and great conversation. Everyone welcome. • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 KNOXVILLE WRITERS’ GROUP • Naples Italian Restaurant • 11AM • Guest speakers read from and discuss their work. All-inclusive lunch is $12.00. RSVP to 865-983-3740. Thursday, Aug. 25 NARROW RIDGE COMMUNITY POTLUCK • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 6:30PM • This fourth Thursday event is an opportunity to introduce folks to the Narrow Ridge community as well as for friends and neighbors to come together to share good food and conversation. Guests are invited to bring a dish to share. For information, call 865-497-2753 or email community@ narrowridge.org. • FREE ADULT CHILDREN OF ALCOHOLICS • The Birdhouse • 6PM • FREE Saturday, Aug. 27 AL-ANON • Faith Lutheran Church • 11AM • Visit our local website at farragutalanon.org or email us at FindHope@ Farragutalanon.org. • FREE NARROW RIDGE SILENT MEDITATION GATHERING • Narrow Ridge Earth Literacy Center • 11AM • For information call 865-497-2753 or email community@narrowridge.org. • FREE Sunday, Aug. 28

Thursday, Aug. 18 - Sunday, Aug. 28

SUNDAY ASSEMBLY • The Concourse • 10:30AM • Sunday Assembly is a secular congregation without deity, dogma, or doctrine. Our motto: Live Better, Help Often, Wonder More. Our monthly celebrations feature a different theme every month, with inspiring speakers and lively sing-alongs. To find out more, visit our web page (http:// knoxville-tn.sundayassembly.com) or email saknoxville. info@gmail.com. • FREE THREE RIVERS! EARTH FIRST! • Barley’s Taproom and Pizzeria • 7PM • Call (865) 257-4029 for more information. • FREE REFUGE RECOVERY • Losel Shedrup Ling • 8:30PM • Contact David at 865-306-0279 for any further questions. • FREE

ETC.

Thursday, Aug. 18 MARBLE SPRINGS SHOPPING AT THE FARM FARMER’S MARKET • Marble Springs State Historic Site • 3PM • FREE Friday, Aug. 19 LAKESHORE PARK FARMERS MARKET • Lakeshore Park • 3PM • FREE Saturday, Aug. 20 SEYMOUR FARMERS MARKET • First Baptist Church Seymour • 8AM • FREE OAK RIDGE FARMERS MARKET • Historic Jackson Square • 8AM • FREE MARKET SQUARE FARMERS’ MARKET • Market Square •

9AM • The MSFM, a project of Nourish Knoxville, is an open-air farmers’ market located on historic Market Square in the heart of downtown Knoxville. Visit marketsquarefarmersmarket.org. • FREE KNOXVILLE CELEBRITY CHEF DIABETES EXPO • Holiday Inn (World’s Fair Park) • 8:30AM • The first-ever Knoxville Celebrity Chef Diabetes Expo will be organized and sponsored by South College’s American Pharmacists Association Academy of Student Pharmacists (APhA-ASP), the American Diabetes Association, Novo Nordisk and Kroger Pharmacy. At noon, Curtis Aikens, a celebrity chef for the Food Network, will demonstrate how to make a low-carb, full-flavor dish and will share some of his favorite healthy recipes. The event is free. Pre-registration is encouraged. To reserve your space for the event, visit www.diabetes.org or contact Wendi Mullins at wmullins@diabetes.org or 865-524-7868, ext. 3343, for more information. • FREE Tuesday, Aug. 23 EBENEZER ROAD FARMERS MARKET • Ebenezer United Methodist Church • 3PM • FREE Wednesday, Aug. 24 MARKET SQUARE FARMERS’ MARKET • Market Square • 11AM • The MSFM, a project of Nourish Knoxville, is an open-air farmers’ market located on historic Market Square in the heart of downtown Knoxville. Visit marketsquarefarmersmarket.org. • FREE OAK RIDGE FARMERS MARKET • Historic Jackson Square • 3PM • FREE UT FARMERS MARKET • University of Tennessee • 4PM •

For more information about the UT Farmers’ Market you can visit the market website: vegetables.tennessee.edu/ utfm.html or find it on Facebook. • FREE Thursday, Aug. 25 COMMUNITY PARTNERS PINTS FOR A PURPOSE • Little River Trading Co. (Maryville) • 5PM • Join us for a monthly beer event to benefit local nonprofits and try out local and regional breweries. This month’s Pints With a Purpose, sponsored by Little River Trading Company, the Blount Partnership, and Outdoor Research, features Black Abbey Brewing; proceeds benefit the Blount County Habitat for Humanity. Visit littlerivertradingco.com. • FREE MARBLE SPRINGS SHOPPING AT THE FARM FARMER’S MARKET • Marble Springs State Historic Site • 3PM • FREE Friday, Aug. 26 LAKESHORE PARK FARMERS MARKET • Lakeshore Park • 3PM • FREE GOOD SPORTS NIGHT • Central Collective • 6:30PM • You purchase a ticket to a mystery event. Show up to The Central Collective at the specified date and time, and be ready for anything. Visit thecentralcollective.com. • $20

Send your events to calendar@knoxmercury.com

historic buildings, including one of the South’s oldest libraries on fresh local dishes and classic British favorites for antiques, art, and crafts from Appalachian artisans trails that lead into a national park and state natural area In vintage accommodations dating back to the 1880s in one of the most stunningly beautiful places in Tennessee

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75 minutes from Knoxville. For special events and offers visit our website or Facebook

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 43


’BYE

R estless Nat ive

Country Club Memories Surviving seven weeks of summer at Camp Pellissippi BY CHRIS WOHLWEND

M

y first real job involved my being away from home for seven weeks, spending most of the summer with an unruly collection of teenage boys, most of them about my age. It was the early 1960s and I had spent a year in high school when I somehow got hired to work at the Boy Scouts’ Camp Pellissippi on Norris Lake. I referred to myself as a camp counselor, but in reality I was one of the camp’s two dishwashers. Though the job did not carry the noble-sounding “counselor” title, it did pay $20 a week—the counselors only got a couple of dollars credit at the camp trading post. Of course, room and board were included. For the dishwashers, “room” meant a primitive space underneath the mess hall with three cots and no door. It had been dubbed the Country Club by previous residents. The other dishwasher, Jim, was a camp veteran about my age; his older brother was the mess-hall director. Jim occupied one of the bunks in the Country Club. The third resident was Rick, a counselor friend of his (they were schoolmates at Karns High School). Later we made room for a fourth,

an East High friend of mine who usually went by his surname, Jenks. He was hired when it was decided that we needed a pot-washer since the pots were too large to fit into the industrial dishwasher that Jim and I used. Occasionally, always in the middle of the night, the Country Club would host a visitor. The first time he showed up, he scared the bejeebers out of me. I was suddenly awakened by something licking my hand. My scream woke up the rest of the occupants. We caught a glimpse of a dog high-tailing it out. The pooch, a beagle, got used to us (and the handouts we started providing) and became a nighttime regular. The mess hall, perched on top of a ridge overlooking the lake, was the center of camp—it was the only covered space large enough to house all the campers at once. Plus, it was one of the few camp facilities that was wired for electricity. So it was there where the bugler blew Reveille (7 a.m.) and Taps (11 p.m.) The bugler, domiciled nearby in a large tent (most everything in camp was U.S. Army surplus) covering a wooden platform, kept his bugle on a shelf in the mess hall kitchen. And one night,

BY MATTHEW FOLTZ-GRAY

44

KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016

www.thespiritofthestaircase.com

during a break in one of our marathon games of Hearts, someone noticed the bugle’s proximity to the freezer. The next morning as the bugler searched for his instrument, Jenks found it for him—in the freezer. Already behind schedule, he had to blow Reveille immediately. It was a decidedly sloppy version. With warm water, we helped him remove the mouthpiece from his lips. From then on, he slept with his horn. The Hearts games would usually start after Taps and often continue until 3 or 4 a.m., usually with five or six participants, including the Country Club residents, Steve, who ran the Trading Post, and sometimes others. Thanks to his important position as the source of chocolate bars and soft drinks, Steve was known to all the campers. And, until one of the directors put a stop to it, he demanded respect at meal time, requiring the campers assigned to his dining table to stand until he sat down and to make sure that he was served first. Another late-night dining-hall visitor was Hugh, one of the waterfront staffers and Jenks’ rival for Camp Jester. Hugh was in his third or fourth year working at Pellissippi, and was renowned for his meal-preparation pantomime. He would place himself at the kitchen’s prep counter and act like he was making meatloaf, kneading and shaping an imaginary concoction. He would moo as he assembled the ingredients, then whack the offending part. Or he would sneeze into the

“mixture,” then, after furtively looking around, begin remixing. Or he would accidentally “cut off” one of his fingers and then include it in the mixture. Another late-night diversion was the food fight, which generally came on the nights when dessert was pudding, the leftovers providing ammo. Jim and I usually dominated because we had access to the industrial spray gun attached to the dishwasher, which had a reach of about 30 feet. It would then be used to clean the pudding off the walls. The battles would include lots of shouting and name-calling. Since there was no adult supervision after Taps, and since there were no females present, the name-calling involved a lot of cursing, sometimes with creative combinations. “FartBreath” was popular until one of the directors overheard its use during a meal. It was an entertaining seven weeks. And I did learn a few things. I now know how to operate a commercial dishwasher. I enjoyed a period of being adept at Hearts. And I certainly expanded my vocabulary. The latter skill caused trouble after camp had ended and I had not yet adjusted to life in mixed company. At Sunday dinner, when my brother was taking his time in passing the food around the table, I used a decidedly unappetizing term for the mashed potatoes in an attempt to speed him up. So I did without, banished to my room for the rest of the day. ◆


CLASSIFIEDS

Place your ad at store.knoxmercury.com

Support the Knoxville Mercury and sell your stuff by purchasing an ad in our classifieds section.

Join us to celebrate those who selflessly serve the East Tennessee Hispanic community.

SATURDAY AUGUST 27

FOR SALE

SERVICES

COMMUNITY

1996 MUSTANG CONVRT. V8 GT, Like New, All Power Candy Red, Black Leather Interior Only 75K miles California Car Clean Carfax CRUISE in STYLE Pvt party $9000 Call 714-471-6010.

DANE KRISTOF, The popular Nashville psychic and clairvoyant that the tabloids call,” the Seer of Music Row,” is accepting appts. for when he is in Knoxville this month. One Nashville paper said, “This guy’s the real deal. He starts by telling you little known things that only you could know not to impress you but to add validation to the reading.” Call (615)4294053 for a Knoxville appt. – www.DaneKristof.com.

GIBBS - is a 4 year old Mastiff/Mix! He’s a gentle giant who loves to sleep. Any adopter needs to take in the costs of taking care of this large breed. Visit Young-Williams Animal Center / call 865-215-6599 for more information.

5:30 PM KNOXVILLE CONVENTION CENTER The Latino Awards ceremony is a formal evening with dinner, drinks and dancing to the music of Latin band Candelaria. 2016 Latino Award Winners

Dr. Coral Getino

Rosendo Lozano

Fran Ansley

Spanish Language Solutions

Tennessee Immigrant & Refugee Rights Coalition (TIIRC) & Comite Popular de Knoxville

Allies of Knoxville's Immigrant Neighbors (AKIN)

TEACHER/STUDENT Classroom Clocks & 2 Colorful 3 drawer Carts on Wheels.$65.00 Call 714-471-6010. PLACE YOUR AD AT STORE.KNOXMERCURY.COM

SINGER/ENTERTAINER WITH OVER 20 YEARS EXPERIENCE, covering songs from Sinatra and Diamond to Garth is looking for venues to play in East Tennessee. Also hosts the finest Karaoke shows around. Contact George @ traxoftime5455@gmail. com OR 865-255-3447. Please leave a message..

GRACE - is a 3 year old snuggle bug looking to lay in the arms of a new pet parent. Visit Young-Williams Animal Center / call 865-215-6599 for more information.

LILY & COWBOY - are best friends and MUST go home together. Often times it adds more stress and creates anxiety for pets who have to be separated after growing up together. Cowboy 8 – year old, black Labrador retriever / mix and Lilly 7-year–old, German Shepherd / mix are ready for someone who can give them the attention, love and care they deserve. Their favorite things: long walk outdoors, treats, snuggling and squeaky chew toys! Visit Young -Williams Animal Center or call 865-2156599 for more information.

! S T E K C I T N I W Spirit of Inspiration

Spirit of Transformation

Espiritu Latino

GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY— THE EVENT SOLD OUT LAST YEAR!

Ticket sales go to support Centro Hispano de East Tennessee, a vibrant community center and 501(c)3 charitable organization dedicated to empowering Knoxville's Hispanic community through education, information and social services.

FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT CENTROHISPANOTN.ORG OR CALL 865-522-0052. Sponsored by:

August 26-28, 2016 Knoxvill

eFilmFestival.com

ENTER TO WIN

Drawing Aug. 22nd

ercury.com hone to contests@knoxm Enter by sending name/p y. Winners will be contacted prior to event. be given Three pairs of passes to

awa

will be notified in advance. ry from weekly submissions. Winnersreside nt, 18 years of age or older, n at random by the Knoxville Mercuwhere prohibited. Must be a legal U.S. r has 24 hours to respond. *Disclaimer: Winners will be chosePURC Void Y. SSAR NECE HASE winne (1 pair of tickets per winner.) NO yee, family member, or household member of a sponsor. Once notified, Suite 404, Knoxville, TN 37902. and not be a sponsor or an emplo er of entries received. Sponsor: Knoxville Mercury, 706 Walnut Ave., numb on d depen g winnin of Odds

In loving memory of Bill Duncan who believed in the American Dream for all. August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 45


’BYE BY IAN BLACKBURN AND JACK NEELY

IS YOUR LOCATION OUT OF THE KNOXVILLE MERCURY?

We’ve got a map for that! We’re in the process of adding more locations, so if the distribution point closest to you is all out, check our map for another place nearby. If you’ve got location suggestions, let us know. knoxmercury.com/find-us

www.TennesseeTheatre.com

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KNOXVILLE MERCURY August 18, 2016


August 18, 2016

KNOXVILLE MERCURY 47


Vol. 2, Issue 32 - Aug. 18, 2016  
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