Page 1

INSIDE: Endeavor Summit Returning pg. 60 + Monthly Economic Indicators pg. 62


MEMBERSHIP MATTERS NEW MEMBERS & NEW PREMIER PARTNERS THE KNOXVILLE CHAMBER’S MONTHLY NEWSLETTER

Finworx (865) 243-8000 www.Finworx.com Financial Services Lowe’s Home Improvement (2239) (865) 609-3641 www.lowes.com Residential Services: Interior Design Building Materials: Hardware Construction & Contractors: Specialty Services Shopping: Flooring

Gateway Grocery Delivery (865) 964-3843 www.mygatewaygrocery.com Shopping: Grocery

SERVPRO of North Knoxville (865) 947-9992 www.servpro.com Residential Services

Greatness Fitness (865) 671-6073 www.greatnessfitness.com Personal Services: Fitness & Wellbeing

Southern Shopper & More (865) 919-5505 www.southernshopperandmore. com Personal Services

Henshaw’s Heating and Air Conditioning, Inc. (865) 525-8389 www.henshawsheatingandac.com Building & Grounds Maintenance: HVAC and Climate Control

Susan Calabrese, Realtor, CSP.Realty Executives (865) 591-9204 www.susancalabreserealtor.com Real Estate: Residential

Holos House, LLC-Business Coaching/Education/Leadership Training (865) 207-6418 www.holoshouse.com Business & Professional Services: Business Advisors & Consultants

R & S Logistics (865) 988-7557 http://rslogistics.com Distribution/Warehousing/Logistics

KFC/East Tennesee Foods, LLC. (901) 849-6153 Restaurants

Southland Companies (865) 694-6161 www.Southlandrealtors.com Real Estate

Knoxville’s Stone Interiors (865) 971-5800 www.knoxstoneinteriors.com Construction & Contractors: Specialty Services

19 Square Bar and Asian Kitchen (865) 521-3888 www.19squaretn.com Restaurants A-Pro Home Inspections (865) 591-8100 www.aproknoxville.com Real Estate

Main Event Knoxville (865) 351-5000 www.mainevent.com Entertainment Organically (865) 274-1735 www.discoverorganically.com Business & Professional Services: Marketing

Automation Systems, Inc. (865) 579-2562 www.asiinc.us Manufacturing

Premier Eyecare (865) 966-0100 www.premier-eyecare.net Healthcare Providers & Services: Optometrists

Big Slate Media (865) 291-0005 www.bigslatemedia.com Business & Professional Services: Advertising Agencies

Realty Executives - Nikitia Thompson Realty (865) 382-3540 Real Estate

Cliff Barber Shop (865) 882-3418 www.cliffbarbershop.com Personal Services: Salons & Spas

See Why Marketing (865) 219-3773 www.askseewhy.com Business & Professional Services: Advertising Agencies

The Upbeat K9 - Knoxville (865) 320-9076 https://theupbeatk9.com/uslocations/knoxville-tennessee/ Personal Services TradeMark Advertising (865) 966-1690 www.trademarkads.com Business & Professional Services: Advertising Agencies Two Men and a Truck (865) 225-6350 www.twomenandatruck.com/ movers/tn/knoxville/ Residential Services: Moving/ Relocation Which Wich Superior Sandwiches - Fountain City (865) 898-5326 www.whichwich.com Restaurants

TOP ACHIEVERS Top Achievers are recognized for their countless volunteer hours and dedication to the Ambassador Program’s mission of serving as an active volunteer extension of the Knoxville Chamber to cultivate, promote, and maintain positive relationships between the Knoxville Chamber, its members, and the community.

1ST PLACE

BRONZE PREMIER PARTNERS

Shiny Bottoms Hull Cleaning (865) 257-9848 www.shiny-bottoms.com Sports & Recreation: Watersports

BEN MOSER MOSER VISUALS

EDITOR LYNSEY WILSON ASSISTANT EDITOR JESSICA KARSTEN DESIGN LADDY FIELDS CONTACT THE KNOXVILLE CHAMBER (865) 637-4550 www.knoxvillechamber.com PRESIDENT & CEO MICHAEL EDWARDS EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT RHONDA RICE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DOUG LAWYER FINANCE & OPERATIONS LARRY JOHNSON

2ND PLACE

Elo (844) 356-3548 www.elotouch.com Computer & IT Services: Hardware Medical Supplies, Sales & Services: Restaurant Supplies & Services

First Choice Lending Services, LLC (865) 392-4141 www.fcls.com Real Estate: Mortgage Banking

LORENA HUBBARD LAWHORN ENTERPRISE GROUP

MEMBERSHIP MARK FIELD PUBLIC POLICY AMY NOLAN CENTRAL BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT (865) 246-2654 mhummel@downtownknoxville.org THE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION (865) 546-5887

3RD PLACE

GOLD PREMIER PARTNERS

TOM O’BRIAN CORE BENEFITS & INVESTMENTS

TENNESSEE SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT CENTER (865) 246-2663 LEADERSHIP KNOXVILLE (865) 523-9137 U.S. DEPT. OF COMMERCE EXPORT ASSISTANCE CENTER (865) 545-4637

WRJZ and WETR (865) 525-0620 www.wrjz.com Broadcast Media: Radio

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Q&A with BOB THOMAS KNOX COUNTY SCHOOLS SUPERINTENDENT

After a unanimous vote by the Knox County Board of Education in March, Bob Thomas was selected to serve as superintendent for Knox County Schools. Thomas has served Knox County Schools for his entire career. He began as a teacher in 1973 and, before his current appointment, had been serving as assistant superintendent since 1990. The Knoxville Chamber spoke with Superintendent Thomas to discuss his top priorities for Knox County Schools and dive into some of the issues surrounding local education.

CHAMBER: What are your top priorities for Knox County Schools as Superintendent? THOMAS: My top priorities for Knox County Schools are the three that I have been talking about since I was appointed superintendent. Those are increasing student achievement, creating a positive culture, and eliminating disparities of any kind. Parents send us their best every day, and every one of those students is entitled to the best education we can provide.

CHAMBER: How do you plan to effectively communicate your priorities to teachers and staff to get them on board? THOMAS: Since I started in April, I have been sharing with teachers, principals, and staff my top priorities and discussing how we can tie our strategies into each of those priorities. As schools starts, we will continue to have those conversations and communicate our progress to all of our stakeholders through various messaging efforts.

CHAMBER: How will you ensure Knox County students continue to improve academically, particularly in regard to reading proficiency? THOMAS: We have to be very intentional in everything we do. We have been evaluating our programs to see which ones are working and which ones we might need to adjust in order to get better academic results. With regard to reading, we are already doing work to expand our literacy program. I think there is opportunity to equip all teachers to teach reading. We will be integrating the program into more subject areas including social studies and science and continuing to expand it to middle and high school. Our work won’t be done until all students are reading on grade level. We have also purchased new textbooks for math and social studies that are more aligned with state standards, and we are implementing several new ACT and after-school tutoring programs to help our students be more prepared. Additional professional development opportunities will be available to our teachers and staff as well.

CHAMBER: A top concern in schools right now is eliminating disparities in discipline and restorative justice practices. How do you plan to address this in Knox County Schools? THOMAS: Eliminating disparities in discipline and academics is among my top priorities, and we must take an honest look at our approaches in these areas and how they impact all students. The Board of Education, along with our administrative staff, has been looking really hard at our discipline policies. I like the idea of restorative practices. When students struggle to read, we work

“Thomas” continued on pg. 58

57


“Thomas” continued from pg. 57 with them on reading, but when they struggle to behave, we fuss at them — so I think we are moving in the right direction by reinforcing positive behaviors. That’s not to say a student will never receive disciplinary action, but when we focus on making the school environment a positive one, students feel cared for and supported. When that happens, studies show, they do better. We are also implementing several curriculum strategies and engagement opportunities to help increase understanding among our English Language Learners (ELL) and their families and make them feel more welcome.

CHAMBER: What are your thoughts on Career and Technical Education (CTE), and how do you see it benefitting local employers and the economy? THOMAS: I think Knox County Schools has done a good job of providing multiple pathways to our students, but I think we can do more. More than 12.5 million high school and college students are enrolled in CTE courses across the nation, and the number keeps growing. Just last month, the Education Commissioner and Board of Education approved increasing our CTE class size across the district because we have more students wanting to take CTE classes than we could serve due to state limitations. The foundation to succeeding in this area, though, is rigorous program standards that provide hands-on context to academic material and prepare students for the world of work. The more educational opportunities and industry certifications

Thomas plans to maintain continuous discussions with educators regarding his three top priorities: increasing student achievement, creating a positive culture, and eliminating disparities of any kind.

we can provide to our students, the more students will be able to do what their diploma says they can do.

CHAMBER: How can Knox County business leaders support quality local education?

Thomas (center) points to rigorous program standards that provide hands-on context to academic material as critical to preparing students for the professional world through Knox County School’s CTE classes.

THOMAS: We have to do a better job of reaching out to our business community and educating them on what we do and why it matters as far as improving quality of life, enhancing our community, and developing a skilled workforce. We plan to do more outreach in the coming year, but there are programs in place already that provide insight and opportunities for support. Our Business Partnerships program, for instance, helps our schools establish a working relationship with community organizations and businesses, which includes our successful coupon book sales, Teacher of the Year, the Teacher Supply Depot, and the PTA Clothing Center. We are also incredibly fortunate to have the support of a community board called Partners in Education which oversees Dine Out for Education and Career Day as well as the distribution of the Barney Thompson Scholarship. Businesses who participate in or support any of these programs directly impact the lives of our students and teachers and enrich the experience they have in classrooms every day.

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CTE Externships Give Knox County Educators Relevant Industry Experience BY: LYDIA BAILEY

During the week of July 10 - 14, the Knoxville Chamber partnered with Knox County Schools (KCS) Career and Technical Education (CTE) to pair teachers with local businesses relative to their fields of instruction. Throughout the week, 30 KCS educators participated in career externships, including two days of job-shadowing and an additional day of planning for the classroom. While on the job, the teachers were given the opportunity to accompany an employee, assist with tasks, and learn more about present demands, challenges, and opportunities in their respective industries. To close out the program, participating educators spent a full day incorporating their industry experience into classroom practices by creating new lesson plans and activities. “It was important for the Knoxville Chamber to partner with KCS in helping place CTE teachers with our business partners for two-day externships,” said Doug Lawyer, vice president of economic development for the chamber. “Every company we communicate with, both existing industries and new economic development recruits, are asking about workforce quality.” He explained, “Getting our educators in front of and familiar with technologies is imperative to our economic success as a region.” CTE provides students of all ages with the academic and technical skills, knowledge, and training necessary to succeed in future careers and to become lifelong learners. It is committed to providing both students and teachers with quality, hands-on experiences in order to bring real-life expectations and inspirations to the classroom. “If educators don’t stay grounded in what’s going on in the industry, they can be teaching skill-sets that are out of date,” said Don Lawson, career and technical education director for Knox County Schools. “Having the opportunity to spend time in the workforce keeps them grounded in not only the technologies being used today, but also in anticipating the skill-sets employers are going to require in the future.” CTE also prepares learners for the working world by introducing them to workplace competencies and making academic content accessible to students through hands-on learning. Currently there are about 12.5 million high school and college students enrolled in CTE across the nation. The high school graduation

rate for CTE concentrators is about 90 percent, which is 15 percentage points higher than the national average. Josh Warrick, driver’s education instructor at L&N Stem Academy, said when “you’re in the same environment every day, it may feel like you don’t have a grasp on what’s going on outside the classroom.” He explained, “It’s important if you’re teaching a specific subject, to try to get involved in the field that you’re teaching and see how the workforce is developing.” He said this will enable you to “implement what you learn in the classroom to prepare kids for good working relationships once they’re out of high school.”

PARTICIPATING COMPANIES: Cirrus Insight • Designsensory • East Tennessee Children’s Hospital Harper Collision Repair • Jewelry Television • Messer Construction Michael Brady, Inc. • Penny Kleinschmidt State Farm Tindell’s Building Materials • UT Early Learning Center • WBIR-TV

PARTICIPATING EDUCATORS: Arthur Baham, Gibbs High School, Structural – Carpentry Amanda Brown, Hardin Valley Academy, Web Design Kelly-Ann Buckley, Bearden High School, Health Science Sandi Campbell, Fulton High School, Digital Arts and Design Misty Crowley, Karns High School, Health Science Josh Garland, Lincoln Park Technology and Trade Center, Inventory Systems Holly German, Gibbs High School, Health Science Libby Helle, West High School, Early Childhood Education Glenda Inman, Bearden High School, Health Science Clint Lafollette, L&N Stem Academy, Digital Arts and Design Charles Lewis, Austin-East Magnet High School, Audio/Visual Rod McMahan, South Doyle High School, Collision Repair Amy Mitchell, Gibbs High School, Architectural Engineering & Design Josh Orrick, L&N Stem Academy, Driver’s Education Nicki Roach, Bearden High School, Health Science Vivian West, Hardin Valley Academy, Computer Programming

Knox County Schools CTE teachers at Lincoln Park Technology Center for a full day of externship debriefs and classroom planning.

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Annual Endeavor Summit Returning to Old City, Empowers Knoxville’s Emerging Leaders BY: KAYLA SMITH

The annual Endeavor Summit returns on Sept. 15 to occupy three major venues along Depot Avenue in the Old City. Planned by a committee of young professional volunteers, the one-day experience is produced by the Knoxville Chamber and empowers the region’s emerging leaders to evolve their personal brand and elevate the community through collective development opportunities. Two compelling keynote speakers headline the morning and afternoon sessions at Endeavor 2017: Hallerin Hilton Hill, talk radio host on Newstalk 98.7 WOKI and television talk show host of “Anything is Possible” on WBIR-TV; and Chris “Bash” Bashinelli, host of “Bridge the Gap” featured on PBS and the National Geographic Channel. Three breakout sessions will happen throughout the day with topics focusing on Launching Something New, Growing What You Got, and Why Knoxville is No. 1. Attendees can choose from multiple breakout session options, allowing for the creation of a custom schedule tailored to their individual goals. The day wraps with a networking happy hour featuring local music, craft brews, and food. “I am excited to help bring this unique experience to our community’s upand-coming leaders,” said Rhonda Rice Clayton, the Chamber’s executive vice president. “The great thing about Endeavor is that it is fully planned and executed by young professionals. We have a team of young staff members at the Chamber working to make this event a reality, and they have brought together committees of young professionals to partner with them in the planning. They are working hard to make sure it is once again an inspiring, mustattend event.” Each attendee also has the chance to participate in activities designed to inspire growth, engagement, and excitement. These include contributing to an on-site, service-to-go project; observing the work of a local muralist; connecting with over 600 peers and community leaders; utilizing a hacker lounge; and exploring non-profit and sponsor exhibits. Lunch features local restaurants and food trucks for an outdoor picnic, and DJs amplify the experience with music and entertainment. “We are now in year two of Endeavor and there is so much energy, coming from all areas of our city, behind this event,” said Courtney Hutchins, steering committee member for the Endeavor Summit. “The Summit has quickly become an invaluable experience for the community because it is connecting and energizing our future leaders to come together and make Knoxville the best it can be, a place to call home where you can grow personally and professionally.” Individual tickets and special group rates are now available. Registration includes access to all keynote and breakout sessions, activities, breakfast, lunch, networking opportunities, and the Endeavor Networking + Happy Hour. To learn more and register for the Endeavor Summit, visit www.EndeavorSummit.com.

3 33 520

600+

D O W N T O W N

V E N U E S

A T T E N D E E S

The Mill & Mine, The Southern Station, & Regas Building

I N S P I R I N G S P E A K E R S

S E R V I C E P R O J E C T S

T O

G O

M A D E

Keynote Speakers: Jay Rogers, Local Motors; Amy Lynch, Generational Edge

ABOUT THE AUDIENCE Networking for Business = Extremely Important Free or Discounted Ticket = Not At All Important NET PROMOTER SCORE: 57+ 62% own their home & 64% live with a spouse or partner 96% held at least a bachelor’s degree 31% have lived in Knoxville less than 5 years

57

VOLUNTEERS

WHAT THEY WANT IN AN EMPLOYER

GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES

WORK/LIFE BALANCE

ABILITY TO MAKE AN IMPACT

SOCIAL MEDIA OF CHOICE

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Knoxville Chamber Hosts Williamson, Inc. to Share Best Practices BY: JESSICA KARSTEN

The Knoxville Chamber hosted Williamson County’s chamber of commerce and economic development organization, Williamson, Inc., in June for mind-share sessions and best practice presentations. Each organization walked away with new ideas, fresh perspectives, and immediate action items to facilitate growth in their staff, chamber, and community. “The Knoxville Chamber is known throughout Tennessee and the Southeast as a leader in organizational excellence,” said Matt Largen, president and CEO of Williamson, Inc. “We came to Knoxville to learn from one of the best chambers in the country, and the entire team lived up to their very well-deserved and well-earned reputation. We had a great visit and have already started to implement changes based on what we learned, especially as it relates to diversity and inclusion.” He continued, “I am thankful for the kindness showed by the entire team and their spirit of cooperation. I love this profession and Tennessee is very lucky to have the Knoxville Chamber working everyday to make their community a better place for business and for families.”

Staff members from the Knoxville Chamber and Williamson, Inc. meet at the Chamber’s downtown office on June 22.

RIBBON CUTTINGS

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The Parlor at Maple Hall celebrated its grand opening on June 27 at the one year “Bowliversary” of Maple Hall, a boutique 11-lane bowling alley located in the historic J.C. Penney building in the heart of downtown Knoxville. Enjoy The Parlor at Maple Hall with black and white movies, a full service bar, small plates, and cozy lounge areas at 414 S. Gay Street.

R

Bank of Tennessee celebrated the groundbreaking of its first Knoxville location on July 11. The new location will be at 224 Brookview Centre Way. The temporary branch location is fully operational and located at 1111 Northshore Drive, Suite P-295.

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AM

Interested in scheduling a ribbon cutting for your business? Contact your account executive for more information.


MONTHLY ECONOMIC INDICATORS

(June 2017)

NOTES – Knoxville MSA includes: Anderson, Blount, Campbell, Grainger, Knox, Loudon, Morgan, Roane & Union Counties.

WORKFORCE* Resident Labor Force Knox Co. Knoxville MSA Tennessee U.S.

HOUSING MARKET % Change May ’16May ‘17

May 2017

Apr. 2017

May 2016

% Change Apr. ’17May ‘17

233,150 411,100 3,152,400 159,979,000

232,870 411,280 3,164,500 159,817,000

235,610 416,650 3,131,500 158,800,000

0.1 0.0 -0.4 0.1

-1.0 -1.3 0.7 0.7

395,800 3,024,200

393,400 3,020,300

393,500 2,963,200

0.6 0.1

0.6 2.1

5,750 11,130 91,300

7,340 14,330 116,300

7,520 14,740 119,100

-21.7 -22.3 -21.5

-23.5 -24.5 -23.3

2.5 2.7 2.9 4.1

3.2 3.5 3.7 4.1

3.2 3.5 3.8 4.5

-0.7 -0.8 -0.8 0.0

-0.7 -0.8 -0.9 -0.4

Non-Ag Employment Knoxville MSA Tennessee

Residential Closings Residential Inventory Median Residential Price

June 2017 1,981 7,212 $179,900

Unemployment Rates Knox Co. Knoxville MSA Tennessee U.S.

Sources: Tennessee Dept. of Labor & Workforce Development/U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

INFLATION RATES -

*Southeast Region Avg. U.S. Avg. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

% Change June. ’15June ‘17 0.9 0.6

June ’16-‘17

May ’16-‘17

June ’15-‘16

1.5 1.6

1.7 1.9

0.6 1.0

-0.2 -0.3

% Change May ’16May ‘17

Knoxville (City)

Total Single-Family Multi-Family

May 2017* 245 21 224

May 2016 111 21 90

% Change May ’16May ‘17 120.7 0.0 148.9

Knox Co.

Total Single-Family Multi-Family

373 149 224

224 134 90

66.5 11.2 148.9

Knoxville MSA

Total Single-Family Multi-Family

514 278 236

345 238 107

49.0 16.8 120.6

Tennessee

Total Single-Family Multi-Family

3,009 2,178 831

2,328 1,726 602

29.3 26.2 38.0

Knox Co. Knoxville MSA Tennessee

May 2017

Apr. 2017

May 2016

% Change Apr. ’17May ‘17

55,311,251 85,104,870 729,984,618

55,890,123 84,924,359 757,299,253

53,245,202 82,082,615 685,464,196

-1.0 0.2 -3.6

3.9 3.7 6.5

15,193,982 23,954,498

15,366,913 24,056,731

14,680,344 23,203,507

-1.1 -0.4

3.5 3.2

AIR SERVICE (MCGHEE-TYSON AIRPORT)

Passengers Freight

Mar. 2017 149,555 7,621,346

Feb. 2016 123,011 6,332,331

Mar. 2015 135,891 6,913,181

% Change Feb. ’16Mar. ‘16 21.6 20.4

% Change Mar. ’15Mar. ‘16 10.1 10.2

Source: Metropolitan Knoxville Airport Authority

Local Sales Tax Knox Co. Knoxville MSA

*All 2017 building permit data is preliminary and therefore subject to revision throughout the year. Sources: U.S. Housing & Urban Development – SOCDS – State of the Cities Data Systems; U.S. Census Bureau – Building Permits Survey

*South – City Size Class B/C

SALES TAX REVENUE - STATE & LOCAL ($) State Sales Tax

1,885 8,752 $166,850

RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS

CONSUMER PRICE INDEX (CPI) - ALL ITEMS % Change May ’16June ‘17

June 2016

% Change June ’16June ‘17 5.1 -17.6 7.8

Source: Knoxville Area Association of Realtors

Unemployment Estimates Knox Co. Knoxville MSA Tennessee

May 2017 1,931 7,062 $170,000

% Change May ’17June ‘17 2.6 2.1 5.8

Source: Tennessee Dept. of Revenue

RETAIL SALES - NATIONAL (IN MILLIONS OF DOLLARS) Category Total Retail Sales Building Materials Clothing Stores Electronics & Appliances Food & Beverage Stores Food Svcs & Drinking Places Furniture & Home Furnishings Gasoline Stations General Merchandise Stores Health & Personal Care Stores Miscellaneous Stores Motor Vehicle & Parts Sales Non-store Retailers Sporting Goods/Books/ Hobby/Music

June 2017

May 2017

481,015 35,928 20,185 7,744 59,777 56,686 9,383 38,758 56,292 27,710 10,999 101,610 49,147

496,904 38,575 21,765 7,542 61,184 58,986 9,507 39,388 57,029 28,276 11,815 105,662 50,530

465,901 34,196 19,977 7,623 58,603 55,038 9,067 38,499 55,016 27,452 10,916 97,437 44,714

% Change May ’17June ‘17 -3.2 -6.9 -7.3 2.7 -2.3 -3.9 -1.3 -1.6 -1.3 -2.0 -6.9 -3.8 -2.7

6,796

6,645

7,363

2.3

June 2016

% Change June ’16June ‘17 3.2 5.1 1.0 1.6 2.0 3.0 3.5 0.7 2.3 0.9 0.8 4.3 9.9 -7.7

EST. 1869 For more information on research, contact Joe Riley, jriley@knoxvillechamber.com.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau – Advance Monthly Retail Trade Report

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Small Businesses Celebrate Success at Propel Graduation BY: KAYLA SMITH

Kyle and Elora Prichard were unsure what to expect when they joined the Propel mentor/protégé program two years ago. After a short meeting with the program director, Doug Minter, the owners of Eden Floral Design were on board and quickly discovered the value of the program. “The Propel program saved our business,” said Kyle Prichard, co-owner of Eden Floral Design. “The business boot camp trainings were significant to our company’s continued success. During one of the trainings we learned about profit margins and found our company’s numbers were way off. Doug sat down with us and broke down our monthly sales versus costs. We realized that in about 60 days the company would no longer exist. Immediately we made adjustments and changed our pricing structure. Now Eden Floral Design is a profitable business. Our sales have more than doubled since year one, our customer base has increased, and we are making money.” Eden Floral Design was one of 10 companies recognized at the 2017 Propel Protégé Graduation and Salute to Mentors on July 14. Held at Scruffy City Hall, the graduation marked seven years of the program’s success in supporting small business growth. It honored its graduates, thanked their mentors, and welcomed in a new class of protégés. Social media guru Mark Schaeffer was this year’s guest speaker. Graduating companies and their mentors included: AyerWaves Entertainment, mentored by Bandit Lites and Possum Trot; Darkhorse Entertainment mentored by Nano Mechanics; Eden Floral Design mentored by SunTrust and Lincoln Memorial University; Hibachi Pizza mentored by Titan Political Strategies; Mountain Laurel Leadership mentored by Cannon and Cannon; Quadramorphics mentored by Possum Trot; Outlier’s Advantage mentored by DME Leadership Development Consulting; Prime Medical Training mentored by Affirm Consulting; Sailaway Learning and Academy mentored by WIN Learning Systems; and Skillworks mentored by Johnson and Galyon. “The overarching goal of Propel is to grow revenue and jobs for the small business participants,” said Minter, director of small business at the Knoxville Chamber. “While revenue and jobs are essential, we also aim to increase the self-awareness, knowledge, and business development maturity of each firm. The ultimate measure is that after two

years the firm can look back and find themselves better off after their experience in Propel.” Propel prides itself on its economic inclusion and the diversity of the people and industries in the program. It is designed for small, women-, veteran-, and minority-owned businesses, and pairs established community business leaders with a protégé that is relatively new to the marketplace. Protégés have represented over 30 different industries with revenues between $100,000 to $500,000 and two to six employees. The Propel program is available to 15 Chamber of Commerce participants and its partners include the Small Business Development Center and SCORE of Greater Knoxville. Supporting sponsors of the program include the Knoxville Chamber, Knoxville-Oak Ridge Innovation Valley, SunTrust, and the Tennessee Economic and Community Development department.

2017’s Incoming Propel Protégé Cohort A&A Investigation and Consulting Group AK Lambert Coaching and Development Anderson’s Grocery, Inc. Anthony Houde Design and Motion Britnie’s Balloon Bonanza Baxter Talent Blue Diamond Enterprise Caribbean Soul Diligence Security Diversified Engineering Services, Inc. G Way Solutions, Inc. GateWay Grocery Delivery Green Village Green Guaranteed Services, LLC Harper’s Naturals Hasty Waste

Hyperion Networks Joyce Development Just Tease N Hair Salon MBK Wellness Off The Hitch Grill Sandra G’s Alterations SmartFit Training Systems, Inc. SouthFork Audio Specialty Concrete Solutions, LLC The Flying Locksmiths TLC Transportation Walking With Joy World O’ Wireless Your Time Clock and Watch Repair

2017 Target Market Showcase On June 12, partners from Knoxville-Oak Ridge Innovation Valley traveled to Nashville for Target Market Showcase visits with Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the Tennessee Economic and Community Development department (TNECD). The visit allowed Innovation Valley to facilitate dialogue with members of the TVA and TNECD teams and share a presentation on our region’s assets, available land and buildings, and workforce development efforts.

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Young Entrepreneurs Academy Accepting Nominations, Applications YEA provides students the chance to develop, fund, and run their own businesses or non-profits.

BY: MEGAN WRIGHT

The Knoxville Chamber’s Young Entrepreneurs Academy (YEA) is currently accepting applications and nominations for its 2017-2018 class. The 30-week program provides middle and high school students with the skills and resources to start and run their own businesses or non-profit organizations. Students will be admitted on a rolling basis until the 24 available spots have been filled. The final application deadline is Sept. 15. Visit knoxvillechamber.com/yea to nominate a student or apply.

AUGUST - MEMBER ANNIVERSARIES Since 1869, the Knoxville Chamber has been the leading voice for business in the region. Each of these businesses are celebrating milestone anniversaries as Chamber members during the month of August. Thank you for your commitment to the Chamber and the community! 31+ YEARS

MEMBER SINCE

20 – 24 YEARS

MEMBER SINCE

East Knox County Business & Professional

Knoxville Marriott Hotel

2002

Peak Restaurants LLC

2002

Witt Building Material Co., Inc.

1951

General Shale Brick Inc.

1953

Rose Mortuary, Inc.

1961

Furrow Auction Company

Regions Bank

1964

Woolf, McClane, Bright, Allen & Carpenter, PLLC 1994

MillenniTEK, LLC

2003

Belk, Inc. - West Town Mall

1972

Moon Capital Management

1995

Goodson Bros. Coffee Company, Inc.

2003

University Health System, Inc.

1972

East Tennessee Foundation

1995

Carol R. Johnson Associates, Inc.

2004

Tennessee Valley Title Insurance Co.

1978

Scripps Networks Interactive

1995

McCarty Holsaple McCarty Architects & Interior

Blackberry Farm

1984

Enrichment Federal Credit Union - Main Office

1996

Consolidated Nuclear Security Y-12

1984

Exedy America Corporation

1996

Knoxville Fire Fighters Association

2005

Keep Knoxville Beautiful

1985

Meridian Trust & Investment Company

1997

MACH 5 Leadership Performance

2006

The Muse Knoxville

1985

Knoxville Bolt & Screw, Inc.

2006

The Stokely Company

1985

15-19 YEARS

Tennessee State Bank

2006

BB&T - Knoxville Main

1986

Realty Trust Group, LLC

1998

Hedstrom Design LLC

2007

Cooper Realty Investments, Inc.

1999

Connell Properties Inc.

2007

Wal-Mart Store #1320

2000

25 – 30 YEARS

MEMBER SINCE

Association

1993

Designers

MEMBER SINCE

Knoxville Comprehensive Breast Center

1989

Hodges & Pratt Company, P.C.

2000

Martin & Company, Inc.

1989

Wal-Mart Store #1318

2000

Buddy’s Bar-B-Q

1991

Hines and Company

2000

FASTSIGNS 1991

Advanced Communications, Inc.

2001

David’s Carpet Sales, Inc.

Dale Carnegie of Knoxville

2002

1992

10 – 14 YEARS

1994

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MEMBER SINCE

2005


Celebrate the Spirit of Business at Tailgate-Themed Schmozapalooza XVII

BY: JESSICA KARSTEN

More than 700 businesspeople are expected to attend the Knoxville Chamber’s Schmoozapalooza XVII at the Knoxville Expo Center on Aug. 31. With approximately 100 exhibiting businesses, this tailgate-themed networking event and tabletop expo gives attendees the chance to make business connections in a fun, casual setting. “Schmoozapalooza is a great opportunity for businesses to market their products or services to a large crowd and make connections with area professionals,” said Lynsey Wilson, director of marketing and events for the Knoxville Chamber. “This high-energy event makes it easy to have fun while doing business.” Rural/Metro of Knox County and SERVPRO of North Knoxville will present this fall’s event, along with media sponsor NewsTalk 98.7 and goody bag sponsor Threds. Businesses interested in exhibiting at Schmoozapalooza should visit exhibitschmoozapaloozafall2017.eventbrite.com. Individual tickets will be $10 at the door, and Chamber members can purchase discounted tickets online prior to the event. Visit the events page at knoxvillechamber.com to learn more.

SPONSORED BY:

SCHMOOZAPALOOZA SPONSOR ADVERTIORIAL

RURAL/METRO FIRE DEPARTMENT In 1977, the West Knoxville Fire Department merged with a sister organization, Rural/Metro of Arizona, to create a county-wide fire and emergency service that now serves 230,000 residents in unincorporated Knox County and the town of Farragut. In 2016, Rural/Metro opened a new fire station in the Choto community in Southwest Knox County, and in early 2018 it plans to open new fire stations in the Powell/Halls community and on Strawberry Plains Pike in East Knox County. That will bring the number of fire stations operated by Rural/ Metro Fire to 17. Since its inception, Rural/Metro Fire has introduced a number of innovations that improve service to residents while controlling costs. For example, it employs highly-trained professional firefighters to staff its stations 24 hours daily and seven days per week, as well as a large number of highly trained part-time firefighters. All of its professional firefighters are licensed emergency medical technicians or paramedics, as 70 percent of the emergency calls in the community are medical emergencies. Rural/Metro’s Paramedic engine companies can respond and provide the same care as an ambulance until an ambulance can arrive and transport the patient to a hospital. The department recently completed the installation of a $2.6 million computer-aided dispatching system designed to reduce response times, improve accuracy, and use resources more efficiently, thus improving services delivered to its customers. Unusually for a large suburban fire department, Rural/Metro is not funded by local tax dollars. Instead, residential and commercial property owners have annual contracts, or subscriptions, with Rural/Metro for service. Non-subscribers are charged by the call at significantly higher rates and do not qualify for insurance premium discounts available to most home owners. In addition to emergency services, subscribers receive non-emergency safety services such as home safety checks and various other nonemergency services. Property owners supporting Rural/Metro through contracts ensures that it can continue to better serve the community of Knox County. Property owners interested in Rural/Metro’s services and costs, can contact its Member Services team weekdays from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. at 865-560-0239.

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Petland Knoxville Hosts Morning Networking Event BY: JESSICA KARSTEN

A large crowd gathered for the Knoxville Chamber’s unique a.m. Exchange on July 13 at Petland Knoxville in Cedar Bluff. Attendees enjoyed browsing pet merchandise, meeting the location’s variety of animals, and making connections with other local professionals over coffee and breakfast provided by All Occasion Catering. Four lucky guests took home the morning’s door prizes, a $25 gift card to Petland Knoxville: Seema Singh Perez, candidate for Knoxville City Council District 3; Monica Sheppard-Viator of Kelly Services; Bryan Eaves of Sourcing Business Solutions; and Heather England of Adecco.

UPCOMING EVENTS

AUGUST 17 Member Appreciation

4 - 7 PM • The Main Event – 9081 Kingston Pike, Knoxville, TN 37923 This event is exclusive to Knoxville Chamber Members. Hosted by:

AUGUST 31 Schmoozapalooza XVII 4 - 7 PM • Knoxville Expo Center – 5441 Clinton Hwy, Knoxville, TN 37912 Individual tickets and exhibitor registration available.

Sponsored by:

RIBBON CUTTING Suzi Hall of Zoo Knoxville makes a new furry friend at the Knoxville Chamber’s July a.m. Exchange.

Guests enjoyed networking in a unique location for the Knoxville Chamber’s a.m. Exchange at Petland Knoxville.

EnSafe celebrated the grand opening of its newly renovated office space on July 14 with a bluegrass and breakfast celebration. EnSafe is a global provider of environmental, engineering, health & safety, and technology solutions. Its newly renovated space is located at 308 North Peters Road, Suite 200.

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August 2017 Commerce  
August 2017 Commerce  
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