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Knox

2013-2014

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Academic Catalog

2013 足足足- 2014 Academic Catalog

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“I believe God has raised up Knox Seminary to have both a national and an international impact which will reach and prepare servants of Christ to take the good news of the gospel to our desperately needy world.”

Dr. D. James Kennedy Founder, Knox Theological Seminary

Why is Knox unique? The Apostle Paul exclaimed, “I am not ashamed of the gospel, for it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes” (Romans 1:16). That emphasis on the gospel has been a hallmark of Knox Theological Seminary from the first moment of its founding by Dr. D. James Kennedy because it was also the cornerstone of his worldwide ministry. Apart from Christ we are nothing and without hope. Our desire is to train new waves of gospel-centered graduates who will bring spiritual renewal to the church and moral certainty to our culture. Our academic program offers an extraordinary blend of biblically grounded intellectual rigor and effective leadership training so that you will be prepared for ministry in the 21st century. Firmly committed to the authority and inerrancy of Scripture as well as to historic Reformed theology, our capable faculty is eager to instruct you and assist you as you begin to prepare for your noble calling from the Lord. Here you will discover a realistic grasp of the problems that face our culture and await you in ministry. You will come to understand the Bible far better, learn about the history of God’s people and their struggles, and develop the ability to communicate these things well. We do not promise to teach you everything, but we will teach you what is important for ministry, and we proceed with the knowledge that God is able to do far more than we can begin to imagine. We place ourselves in the hands of Him for whom nothing is impossible and pray that He will use our efforts to bring another great spiritual awakening. You are invited to become part of God’s great work at Knox. May the Lord be with you as you seek His direction for your life and I hope we will see you at Knox.

Dr. Luder G. Whitlock, Jr. Chairman of the Board

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Contents Welcome to Knox Theological Seminary......................................................................................................................................... 6 Knox and South Florida ................................................................................................................................................................. 7 Campus Visits................................................................................................................................................................................. 8 Board of Directors and Administration........................................................................................................................................... 8 Faculty............................................................................................................................................................................................ 9 Student Commitments.................................................................................................................................................................. 17 Admission..................................................................................................................................................................................... 18 International Student Policies........................................................................................................................................................ 19 Registration................................................................................................................................................................................... 20 Academic Policies.......................................................................................................................................................................... 21 Tuition and Fees............................................................................................................................................................................ 23 Veterans’ Information.................................................................................................................................................................... 24 Financing Your Seminary Education.............................................................................................................................................. 25 Programs of Study Master of Divinity ........................................................................................................................................................... 28 Master of Arts (Christian and Classical Studies)................................................................................................................ 29 Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies­).............................................................................................................. 30 Online Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies).................................................................................................. 31 Certificate in Christian Ministry....................................................................................................................................... 32 Doctor of Ministry........................................................................................................................................................... 38 Course Descriptions..................................................................................................................................................................... 33 Academic Calendar...................................................................................................................................................................... 44

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“If we can but show the world today that being committed to Christ is no tame, humdrum, sheltered monotony, but it is the most thrilling, exciting adventure that the human spirit can ever know, then those who have been standing outside the church looking askance at Christ will come crowding in to pay their allegiance and we might well expect the greatest revival since Pentecost.“ Dr. James S. Stewart Edinburgh, Scotland

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Welcome to Knox...

Knox fulfills this purpose by: •

In obedience to the Great Commission and desiring to meet the need for laborers in the harvest—in our nation and indeed, the world—Dr. D. James Kennedy and leaders of Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church met in 1989 to establish a seminary faithful to the entire Word of God.

• •

training students who have heard the call to become fulltime pastors; providing ongoing education and advanced degree opportunities for those involved in full-time ministry; equipping laypersons with greater biblical and theological understanding while sharpening their ministry skills.

The theological perspective from which training is offered is that of historic Reformed theology as expressed in the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms and in the principles of Presbyterian church government. However, students from other evangelical perspectives are encouraged to apply and are heartily welcomed.

Our Mission: To equip servant leaders for effective Reformed

ministry that is Christ centered, gospel driven, and mission focused. Our Vision: To train men and women for full-time gospel

ministry and to enrich and enable all laypersons who seek to become more knowledgeable and effective in their own personal ministries.

A Knox education enables our students to discharge a variety of functions in God’s kingdom, such as pastoral work, counseling, evangelism, missions, church planting, establishing Christian schools, and media ministries.

Our Goal: To prepare leaders of the 21st century, emphasizing

the application of Scripture to all aspects of our culture and providing them with excellent academic instruction, guidance in each student’s personal spiritual growth, and hands-on ministry experience.

Accreditation

I die!”

Knox Theological Seminary is an accredited member of The Association of Theological Schools of the United States and Canada. The Association’s Commission on Accrediting is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation for the accreditation of graduate professional theological education.

Knox Theological Seminary is the fulfillment of those dreams. A Knox education develops both mind and heart. Instruction and inspiration are given by godly, caring scholars and teachers who are concerned that the historic Christian faith is both conceptually understood and passionately embraced.

Students who believe the seminary has violated ATS standards in any way should submit their complaint in writing to the Accreditation Liaison Officer who serves as the coordinator of matters related to institutional accreditation at Knox. See the Student Handbook for additional details.

Knox seeks to provide students with nothing less than the integration of solid biblical, historical, and practical theology with true spirituality, enabling these men and women to become leaders of the church and society.

Authorization

Our Model: Scottish reformer John Knox. Future leaders,

inspired with his commitment, fervor, and fire, will cry from their hearts for their own homelands—and the world—just as he did with his now famous prayer: “Lord, give me Scotland, or

Knox Seminary is in compliance with Section 1005.(6)(f ), Florida Statutes, and is therefore not under the jurisdiction or purview of the Commission for Independent Education, and is not required to obtain licensure.

Knox Theological Seminary combines a rigorous theological education with effectual leadership training. The administration and faculty are committed to the truths of Reformed theology: the sovereignty of God, the inerrancy of His Word, and the Great Commission.

The degree programs of Knox Theological Seminary are designed solely for religious purposes.

Statement of Purpose The purpose of Knox Theological Seminary is to prepare and equip Christian men and women to serve under the lordship of Christ and the authority of God’s Word; to fulfill the Great Commission (Matthew 28:18-20); and to obey the Cultural Mandate (Genesis 1:28).

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Knox and South Florida

The campus is only minutes from the Atlantic Ocean and is easily accessible from three major airports: Fort LauderdaleHollywood International, Miami International, and Palm Beach International.

The South Florida Region—Broward, Palm Beach, and Miami-Dade Counties

Library

Knox prepares leaders to minister in a 21st-century context by emphasizing the application of Scripture to all areas of life, providing exceptional academic instruction, in the tradition of the Reformed faith, as well as guidance for spiritual growth. Attention is directed to the inner life of the pastor/teacher as well as an emphasis on community, blending the theoretical and practical in an urban environment. We seek to become a blessing to the city where God has placed us, bringing spiritual, cultural, and community renewal to south Florida.

The Seminary’s automated library currently houses 50,000 (and growing) catalogued titles, including special collections such as the complete works of John Calvin, the Early Church Fathers, and numerous works on Evangelism, Culture, and Leadership Development. Students have access to computers and Internet resources for language tutorials and research.

Campus Life The smaller class sizes at Knox make interpersonal connections with professors a valued part of student life. The student body includes a wide variety of denominations and age groups, from seasoned pastors to young ministerial candidates and laypersons desiring to enrich their personal walk with the Lord. Faculty and staff work closely together to promote student’s interests and activities and intentionally build a community of encouragement and support.

Planted in sunny Fort Lauderdale, in the sixth largest urbanized area in the U.S., Knox has a distinct urban opportunity. Miami is one of the most unchurched cities in the country with one of the highest concentrations of poverty, as well as wealth, since south Florida is home to one of the world’s most important financial centers. As a hub for the art world, the fashion world, and a business axis to more than 1400 multinational corporations, south Florida is cosmopolitan, creative, dense, and diverse. Recognized as the gateway to Latin America, ministry in south Florida now will impact Latin America and many American cities with growing Hispanic populations for generations to come.

Spiritual Formation The entire Seminary family is encouraged to place first priority in individually knowing the Lord more fully, loving Him more deeply, and growing in commitment to lead His people in worship and service. Knox provides many opportunities for spiritual growth, including chapel services, prayer groups, and days of prayer. These activities give students, faculty, and staff the opportunity to join in an attitude of humility and praise as they pray, worship, and fellowship together.

Knox rests in a truly international environment. Consider how your seminary education will be strengthen ed by our outstanding faculty in this rich, culture-shaping context. Prepare yourself realistically for the kind of ministry that will be required in the future. What better place to live, work, study, and minister in the earthly city in anticipation of the heavenly city that is to come?

Housing The campus is conveniently located near many residential communities with an abundant supply of rental properties. Apartments, duplexes, and houses are within walking and short driving distance, and a few local church members rent out rooms to seminary students for reasonable charges. Rental information is posted on the student bulletin board.

Facilities The campus is in close proximity to Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. This allows students to experience ministry opportunities in local outreach, educational, and benevolence programs. Specifically, an example of quality Christian education (K-12) is displayed through the ministry of Westminster Academy.

Students in need of housing accommodations should contact the Admissions Office immediately upon acceptance into a program.

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Campus Visits... Your journey begins here! We encourage you to visit us to meet our faculty, students, and staff. Please call the Admissions Office to arrange an appointment.

Board of Directors Dr. Luder G. Whitlock, Chairman of the Board Mr. William Ashcraft Mr. Clark Cochran Dr. Howard Edington, Vice Chairman Rev. Thomas Hendrikse Mr. Tom Hutchison Mr. J.L. Jackson Dr. Steve Kitchens

Dr. Ronald Kovack Mr. Donald Marks Dr. Ann McClintock Mr. Daniel Smith Mr. Kendall Spencer Rev. Tullian Tchividjian

Administrative Staff Miss Lori Gottshall, Registrar Mrs. Joyce Grothmann, Administrative Assistant Mr. Munier Jallad, Executive Vice President of Administration Mr. Steve Jeck, Program Director for the Master of Arts (Christian and Classical Studies) Dr. Jonathan Linebaugh, Dean of Students Ms. Darlene Lynch, General Administration Dr. Scott Manor, Associate Dean of Knox Online Ms. Ruth Parrillo, Distance Course Design Mr. Doug Rohm, Media Technician Mrs. Ivey Rose Smith, Director of Communications Rev. Jonathan G. Smith, Dean of Distance Education Mrs. Emily Stellfox, Admissions Coordinator Mr. Kendell Stellfox, Market Development Representative Mr. Alan Wibbels, Director of Library & Information Services

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Our Faculty

Resident Faculty

One of the most important factors shaping your seminary education is the faculty. At Knox, we are pleased to have on our faculty those of high academic reputation who see themselves as mentors and disciplers; those who care about the students God has entrusted to them for nurture and education.

Dr. Gerald Bray

Distinguished Professor of Historical Theology McGill University, BA; University of ParisSorbonne, MLitt, DLitt (Historical Theology).

Dr. Bray holds a BA degree from McGill University and an MLitt along with a DLitt from the University of Paris-Sorbonne. He is the most widely renowned evangelical church historian and, specifically, the evangelical expert on the history of biblical exegesis. With a vast curriculum vitae, he is the Research Professor of Divinity at Beeson Divinity School where he has taught church history and theology since 1993 and he has also served as director of research for the Latimer Trust, an evangelical think tank in London. Dr. Bray is an ordained Anglican minister in the Church of England. He is editor of the Anglican quarterly and academic journal The Churchman as well as the Contours of Christian Theology book series (for InterVarsity Press). He also served as editor for The Anglican Canons 1529–1947 and Tudor Church Reform, which contains the Henrician Canons of 1535 and the Reformatio Legum Ecclesiasticarum, and for three volumes in the Ancient Christian Commentary Series (on Romans, 1-2 Corinthians, and James to Jude) and, most recently, for the inaugural volume in the much anticipated Reformation Commentary on Scripture series on Galatians and Ephesians by InterVarsity Press,. Dr. Bray has a systematic theology that was released by Crossway in March 2012: God is Love: A Biblical and Systematic Theology. He is presently preparing a companion volume on historical theology and is engaged in writing and speaking on a variety of theological issues of particular relevance to the contemporary church. Publications:

All of the faculty hold to the Reformed faith, sincerely and wholeheartedly believe the Bible to be the inerrant Word of God and the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms to contain the teachings of the Word of God. The faculty has covenanted together to affirm the vision of Knox and to teach in accord with it. Committed evangelical Christians who have special gifts and abilities that will benefit Knox students are invited as visiting lecturers. Their evangelical faith is evidenced by their commitment to the ecumenical creeds of the early church (e.g., the Apostles’ Creed, the Nicene Creed) and to contemporary evangelical statements as those of the National Association of Evangelicals and InterVarsity Christian Fellowship.

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The Doctrine of God (Contours of Christian Theology)

Creeds, Councils and Christ: Did the early Christians misrepresent Jesus?

The Faith We Confess: An Exposition of the Thirty- Nine Articles

Translating the Bible: From William Tyndale to King James

Biblical Interpretation: Past and Present (1997 Book of the Year by Christianity Today)

Galatians, Ephesians (Reformation Commentary on Scripture Series Reformation Commentary)

God is Love: A Biblical and Systematic Theology

Dr. Bryan Chapell

Dr. Bruce Waltke

Distinguished Professor of Preaching

Distinguished Professor of Old Testament

Northwestern University, BSJ; Covenant Theological Seminary, MDiv; Southern Illinois University, PhD.

Houghton College, AB; Dallas Theological Seminary, ThM, ThD; Harvard University, PhD (Near Eastern Languages and Literatures).

Dr. Chapell presently serves as President Emeritus and an Adjunct Professor of Practical Theology at Covenant Theological Seminary where he served as President from 1994-2012. His teaching career began at Covenant Seminary in 1984 after ten years in pastoral ministry. Prior to becoming President at Covenant, he served for six years as Vice President of Academics and Dean of Faculty. After a long and distinguished career in academics, Dr. Chapell announced in January 2013 that he accepted a call to return to pastoral ministry and serve as Senior Pastor of Grace Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Peoria, Illinois.

Dr. Bruce Waltke, one of the preeminent Old Testament scholars, holds a doctorate in Greek and New Testament from Dallas Theological Seminary and a doctorate in Ancient Near Eastern Languages and Literature from Harvard. His teaching career, spanning Dallas Theological Seminary, Regent College, Reformed Theological Seminary, and Westminster Theological Seminary won him a reputation of being a master teacher with a pastoral heart. Dr. Waltke also pastored several churches, lectured at many evangelical seminaries in North America and has spoken at numerous Bible conferences.

Dr. Chapell’s responsibilities include teaching the introductory homiletics courses to master’s-level students and also contributing to the biblical preaching and teaching track in the Doctor of Ministry program. He helps set the tone not only for how preaching is taught, but also for how Knox envisions Christian worship, holiness by grace, and the daily practice of the Christian life.

He is a member of the Committee of Bible Translation of the New International Version and helped translate the New American Standard Version. He served as editor for the Theological Word Book of the Old Testament, The New International Dictionary of Old Testament Theology and Exegesis, The New Geneva Study Bible, and Spirit of the Reformation Study Bible.

Dr. Chapell and his wife, Kathy, have four children.

Dr. Waltke has traveled widely as a Bible expositor, as an Area Supervisor for excavations at Gezer, Israel, and as Director of field study trips to the Middle East and the Classical World. He is married and has three grown children.

Publications: •

Christ-Centered Preaching: Redeeming the Expository Sermon

Christ-Centered Worship: Letting the Gospel Shape Our Practice

Holiness by Grace: Delighting in the Joy That Is Our Strength

Each for the Other: Marriage as It’s Meant to Be

The Hardest Sermons You’ll Ever Have to Preach: Help from Trusted Preachers for Tragic Times

Praying Backwards: Transform Your Prayer Life by Beginning in Jesus’ Name

Why Do We Baptize Infants? (Basics of the Faith) (Basics of the Reformed Faith)

Dr. Waltke has published widely in various scholarly journals and contributed to many scholarly reference volumes, including: Publications: •

An Old Testament Theology

Finding the Will of God

Knowing the Will of God

Genesis: A Commentary

The Book of Proverbs

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew Syntax

Ephesians (Reformed Expository Commentary)

Commentary on Micah

Using Illustrations to Preach with Power

The Psalms as Christian Worship

1-2 Timothy and Titus (ESV Edition): To Guard the Deposit (Preaching the Word)

The Hermeneutics of Dispensationalism

Promises of Grace, The: Living in the Grip of God’s Love

A Biblical Theology of Origins

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Dr. Warren A. Gage

Dr. Samuel Lamerson

Professor of Old Testament

Professor of New Testament

Bob Jones University, BA; Knox Theological Seminary, MDiv, Magna Cum Laude; Trinity International University, PhD (Theological Studies).

Southern Methodist University, BA, Summa Cum Laude; Dallas Theological Seminary, ThM, Highest Honors; Southern Methodist University School of Law, JD; University of Dallas, MA, PhD (Political Philosophy); University of Tübingen (Germany), Post-graduate studies.

Dr. Lamerson’s teaching philosophy can best be summed up in a quotation from William Butler Yeats; “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” He desires to light a fire in his students that will cause them to become life-long students of the Word of God. He uniquely combines academic research and teaching with 16 years of pastoral experience, ranging from senior pastor to director of children’s ministries.

Dr. Gage believes that students should be trained to preach the Word, be prepared in season and out of season, to correct, rebuke, and encourage — with great patience and careful instruction (2 Tim. 4:2-3). Passionate about biblical theology and the great books, Dr. Gage relishes the opportunity to prepare Knox Seminary students for the highest of all callings—the gospel ministry of our Lord Jesus Christ.

Outside of the classroom, Dr. Lamerson is an Associate Pastor at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church. He was the Sunday morning preaching and teaching pastor during the illness of Dr. D. James Kennedy, from February of 2008 until Easter of 2009.

His love of the Reformed faith was born out of a deep sense of his own unworthiness, and a profound joy in the pure grace of God. A bit of a Renaissance man, he is trained in Old Testament, philosophy, history, and law. Prior to entering ministry, Dr. Gage spent ten years as a trial attorney. In addition to teaching seminary students, he is an Assistant Minister at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church and has two books in progress on the topic of resurrection in the Old Testament. He is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society.

Prior to joining the Knox faculty, Dr Lamerson taught at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. He is a member of the Evangelical Theological Society, the Evangelical Philosophic Society, the Society of Biblical Literature, and the International Jugglers Association. When he’s not teaching, Dr. Lamerson enjoys sleight of hand and juggling. He is married and has two grown children.

When not teaching, Dr. Gage enjoys the Great books, conversation with friends, World War II history, and all things German. He is married and has two children.

Publications: •

English Grammar to Ace New Testament Greek (Zondervan, 2004).

The Gospel of Genesis: Studies in Protology and Eschatology (Eisenbrauns. Republished by Wipf and Stock, 2001. Korean Edition published in 1999).

Teaching the Parables to a Post—Modern Society

The Openness of God and the Historical Jesus

The Story of Joseph and Judah (St. Andrews House, 2005).

Forgiveness in the Gospel of Matthew

An Introduction to Biblical Typology

Publications: •

Dr. Lamerson has presented papers on various topics including the parables, contextualization of the gospel, and ethics. His special interests include the Synoptic Gospels, the historical Jesus, forgiveness in Second-Temple Judaism, and the parables. He has also been published in various academic journals such as the Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, The Journal of Biblical Literature, Currents in Research: Biblical Studies, and Trinity Journal. He was also a contributor to Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible.

Dr. Gage has published articles in various academic journals such as Crux and the Westminster Theological Journal.

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Dr. Michael Allen

Dr. Jim Belcher

Dean of Faculty, D. James Kennedy Associate Professor of Systematic Theology

Associate Professor of Practical Theology Gordon College, BA; Fuller Theological Seminary, MDiv; Georgetown University, PhD (Political Philosophy).

Wheaton College, BA, MA, PhD ((Biblical and Theological Studies: Systematic).

Dr. Belcher’s teaching is informed and inspired by a quote from Nicholas Wolterstorff, “Shalom is both God’s cause in the world and our human calling; We are workers in God’s cause, his peace-workers. The missio Dei is our mission.” He believes that Jesus is at the center of all that we do. He informs the mindset and inspires the mission as we create culture and seek the peace of the city (Jeremiah 29:7).

Dr. Allen teaches students to delight in the careful study of God’s mighty deeds (Psalm 111:2), integrating the study of Bible and theology to prepare students for faithful ministry of worship and witness in local churches. Two principal concerns shape his classes and his writing ministry: 1) theological commentary on the Bible and 2) systematic theology shaped by rigorous exegesis and engagement with historical theology.

Dr. Belcher is best known for his widely acclaimed, awardwinning book, Deep Church: A Third Way Beyond Emerging and Traditional (InterVarsity Press, 2009). Deep Church argues that faithful Christian ministry must learn from the great tradition of classical and Reformed theology as well as engage in the practice of discerning and creative contextualization. It illustrates this commitment by considering a host of issues, ranging from worship to evangelism. It continues to be read widely and to be used as a textbook in many seminaries and colleges. He is currently completing its sequel, In Search of Deep Faith (InterVarsity Press, forthcoming 2013), which is a winsome and positive presentation of the faith for people living in a post-Christian world. Preparation of this new volume has involved a year of research and writing in Europe that served as a backdrop while he went in search of deep faith. There he investigated the sources of modern doubt and skepticism as well as a number of remarkable examples of Christian witness through heroes of the faith like Lewis, Wilberforce, John Newton, Corrie ten Boom, and Dietrich Bonhoeffer.

The son of a lawyer who became a Presbyterian minister, he grew up in both the South and in south Florida. Prior to joining the faculty at Knox, he taught undergraduate and graduate students at Wheaton College. He is a teaching elder in the Evangelical Presbyterian Church and enjoys serving in local churches. With Dr. Scott Swain, he serves as general editor of the prestigious T & T Clark International Theological Commentary series. He also serves as book review editor for the International Journal of Systematic Theology and the New Studies in Dogmatics series for Zondervan Academic.. When not busy at the seminary, he enjoys time with his wife Emily and his son Jackson, watching NBA basketball, running, reading, the beach, and sweet tea. Publications: •

The Christ’s Faith: A Dogmatic Account (T & T Clark Studies in Systematic Theology; London: T & T Clark, 2009).

Reformed Theology (Doing Theology) (London: T & T Clark, 2010).

Theological Commentary: Evangelical Essays (ed. Michael Allen; London: T & T Clark, 2011).

He and his wife, Michelle, have four children.

Karl Barth’s Church Dogmatics: An Introduction and Reader (London: T & T Clark, forthcoming 2012).

Dr. Belcher has been published in Leadership Journal and re:generation quarterly.

Justification and the Gospel (Grand Rapids: Baker Academic, forthcoming).

Publications: • Deep Church: A Third Way Beyond Emerging and Traditional (InterVarsity Press, 2009).

Dr. Belcher is the founding and former lead pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church (PCA) in Newport Beach, California, where he served from 2000-2010 and led a period of steady growth. He previously led the Twenty-Something Fellowship and The Warehouse Service at Lake Avenue Church in Pasadena, CA, and was a co-founder of Renaissance Skateboards.

Dr. Allen has published numerous articles in various academic journals such as the Journal of Theological Interpretation, Scottish Journal of Theology, Horizons in Biblical Theology, Westminster Theological Journal, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, and the International Journal of Systematic Theology. He also regularly writes for Modern Reformation.

In Search of Deep Faith (InterVarsity Press, forthcoming 2013).

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Dr. Jonathan Linebaugh

Dr. Scott Manor

Assistant Professor of New Testament

Associate Dean of Knox Online, Assistant Professor of Historical Theology

Messiah College, BS; Trinity Episcopal School for Ministry, MDiv; Durham University, PhD (Theology and Religion).

Covenant College, BA; Covenant Seminary, MA; University of Edinburgh, MTh, PhD (Early Church History: Patristics).

Dr. Linebaugh’s desire is to accompany students as they come to know and proclaim God’s love for sinners (Romans 5:6-10). Eager to hear the gospel afresh alongside his students, he understands theology to be the prayerful process of listening to and learning God’s gracious words so that the Church can, in witness and in worship, speak truthfully about the God who comes to us in Jesus. His research and writing have focused primarily on the letters of Paul, but his interests and teaching include the historical and theological context of the New Testament, the history of interpreting scripture, and the intersection between exegesis and systematic theology.

Dr. Manor believes in the importance of understanding how our Christian heritage informs our faith today, especially as it relates to the historical and theological developments of the early church. Just as Hebrews 11 encourages us to better understand how great men and women of faith throughout the Old Testament bear witness to the truth, the great legacy of Christian faith and God’s faithfulness to His Church continues from the time of the apostles to the present. Born and raised in central Florida, Dr. Manor completed his PhD in Early Christianity at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland. In the year prior to coming to Knox Seminary, he held a postdoctoral position in research and language study at the Institut Catholique de Paris.

Born, raised, and educated on the East Coast, Dr. Linebaugh completed his PhD at Durham University in England. Before coming to Knox, he taught graduate students at Trinity School for Ministry and undergraduates at Durham University. He is ordained in the Anglican Communion and tries to connect his academic theology with service in and for the church.

The primary focus of his research is on the relationship of textual authority to issues of orthodoxy and heresy in the early church. He has been published in various journals including Studia Patristica, Vigiliae Christianae, and The Expository Times.

When not teaching and writing, he enjoys spending time with his family, surfing, playing and watching lacrosse and basketball, reading, and traveling.

In his free time, he enjoys spending time with his wife Rebecca, traveling, running, and sailing.

Publications: •

Publications:

‘Announcing the Human: Rethinking the Relationship Between Wisdom of Solomon 13-14 and Romans 1:18-32.’ New Testament Studies 57.2 (2011): 214-237.

Papias, Origen and Eusebius: The Criticisms and Defense of the Gospel of John.” Vigiliae Christianae 67.1 (2013), 1-21.

‘Rational or Radical: Origen on Romans 9:10-14.’ Studia Patristica 52 (2011, forthcoming).

“Epiphanius’ Account of the Alogi: Historical Fact or Heretical Fiction?” Studia Patristica 52 (2012), 161-70.

‘Debating Diagonal Δικαιοσύνη: The Epistle of Enoch and Paul in Theological Conversation.’ Early Christianity 1 (2010): 107-128.

“Proclus, the North African Montanist?” Studia Patristica 65, forthcoming.

‘Paul’s (Re)Reading of Israel’s Scripture: 2 Corinthians 3:614.’ Trinity Journal for Theology and Ministry 3.1 (2009): 111-130.

“Lord Jesus Christ? The Extent of Early Christian Worship of Jesus.” Book of the Month Review: Did the First Christians Worship Jesus? By James D. G. Dunn. The Expository Times 122, 8 (May, 2011), 386-8.

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Rev. Jared R. Reed

spending time with his wife Ivey Rose and two children, Jillian and Sterling.

Lecturer in Hebrew

Miami Christian College, BA; Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, MDiv; Princeton Theological Seminary, ThM; Westminster Theological Seminary, PhD (candidate).

Rev. Tullian Tchividjian Lecturer of Pastoral Theology

Columbia International University, BA; Reformed Theological Seminary, MDiv.

Rev. Reed is a full-time Bible teacher at Westminster Christian School in Miami. He is also the Director of Miami International Seminary, a school committed to providing theological training for pastors and leaders throughout South Florida. Over the years, Rev. Reed has served as a youth pastor, a church planter, and a senior pastor.

A South Florida native, Tullian Tchividjian is the grandson of Ruth and Billy Graham. He is a graduate of Columbia International University, where he earned a degree in philosophy, and Reformed Theological Seminary, where he earned his Master of Divinity.

He is the father of three teenagers: Taylor, Schaeffer and Ransom. When not in the classroom, Rev. Reed spends his free time driving between soccer games.

Tullian was the founding pastor of the former New City Church, which merged with Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church in 2009, where he now serves as Pastor. He speaks at conferences throughout the United States and his sermons are broadcast on the radio. Additionally, Tullian is a contributing editor of Leadership Journal, and has authored The Kingdom of God: A Primer on the Christian Life; Do I Know God? Finding Certainty in Life’s Most Most Important Relationship; Unfashionable: Making a Difference in the World by Being Different; Surprised by Grace: God’s Relentless Pursuit of Rebels; Jesus + Nothing = Everything, and Glorious Ruin: How Suffering Sets You Free.

Rev. Jonathan G. Smith

Dean of Distance Education/Knox Online University of West Florida, BA, BA; Webster University, MBA; Reformed Theological Seminary, MA; Knox Theological Seminary, MA; Liberty Baptist Theological Seminary, ThM; Knox Theological Seminary, DMin (in progress).

Prior to his seminary training, Jonathan spent over eight years in corporate sales and training where he earned a number of international awards. His teaching is motivated by his desire to see students boldly proclaim the gospel and be trained in all aspects of ministry, not just preaching. He particularly enjoys the teaching of pastoral studies, leadership, and administration. His teaching philosophy is inspired by I Peter 3:15, “But in your hearts honor Christ the Lord as holy, always being prepared to make a defense to anyone who asks you for a reason for the hope that is in you; yet do it with gentleness and respect.”

Tullian and his wife, Kim, have three children. Publications:

The son of an accountant and a licensed mental health counselor, Jonathan blends practically-minded ministry training with a pastor’s heart. What motivates him as Dean of Distance Education is to meet people where they are at in their ministry training and provide them with the tools and teaching necessary to make them more effective in the place and ministry context God has called them to.

The Kingdom of God: A Primer on the Christian Life

Do I Know God?: Finding Certainty in Life’s Most Most Important Relationship

Unfashionable: Making a Difference in the World by Being Different

Surprised by Grace: God’s Relentless Pursuit of Rebels

Jesus + Nothing = Everything

Glorious Ruin: How Suffering Sets You Free

*For a full list of faculty publications,

In addition to his experience in the corporate world, Jonathan has also served as an adult Sunday school teacher, worship pastor, associate pastor, interim minister, and has taught in a variety of Reformed settings.

please visit our website at www.knoxseminary.edu

A native Floridian, Jonathan loves fishing and scuba diving. He also enjoys reading, weightlifting, college football, and

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Visiting Professors

Dr. Haddon Robinson

Dr. Leith Anderson

Southern Methodist University, MA; Dallas Theological Seminary, ThM; University of Illinois, PhD.

Visiting Professor of Homiletics

Visiting Professor of Preaching Bradley University, BA; Denver Seminary, MDiv; Fuller Seminary, DMin.

Dr. Daniel A. Siedell

Dr. Steven W. Brown

Visiting Professor of Christianity and Culture

Visiting Professor of Practical Theology

University of Nebraska-Lincoln, BA; SUNY-Stony Brook University

High Point College, BA; Boston University School of Theology, STB; King College, LittD.

in Stony Brook, New York, MA; University of Iowa, PhD.

Dr. William Edgar

Visiting Professor of Theology

Dr. Kevin Vanhoozer Westmont College (California), BA; Westminster Theological Seminary (Philadelphia), MDiv; Cambridge University, PhD.

Visiting Professor of Apologetics Harvard University, BA; Westminster Theological Seminary, MDiv; Universite de Geneve, DTheol.

Dr. Paul Zahl

Dr. Robert W. Evans

Visiting Professor of Systematic and Pastoral Theology

Visiting Professor of Counseling

Harvard College, BA; University of Nottingham, MPhil (New Testament); University of Tübingen (Germany), DThéol; St. John’s Theological College (Nottingham, England), DPS.

Pastor/Teacher Christ Church, CA; University of California, Los Angeles, BA; Western Seminary, MA; Fuller Theological Seminary, MDiv (Equiv.); California’s Professional School of Psychology, PhD; Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, PhD; Harvard University, PostDoctoral work in Moral Philosophy and Ethics.

Visiting Lecturers

Dr. John Frame

Dr. Steve Carpenter

Visiting Professor of Apologetics

Visiting Lecturer of Biblical Theology

Princeton University, AB; Westminster Theological Seminary, BD; Yale University, MA, MPhil; Belhaven College, DD.

John Brown University, BA; Dallas Theological Seminary, ThM; Knox Theological Seminary, DMin.

Dr. Terry Gyger

Dr. Heather Clark

Visiting Professor of Church Planting

Visiting Lecturer of Counseling

University of Arizona, MEd; Denver Seminary, MDiv; Philadelphia University in Brazil, DD.

University of Florida, Psychology, BS; University of Central Florida, MS; Georgia State University, PhD.

Dr. Simon Kistemaker

Dr. Cassius Daly

Visiting Professor of New Testament

Visiting Lecturer of Worship

Calvin College, AB; Calvin Theological Seminary, BD; Free University of Amsterdam, ThD.

The Hiram Scott College, University of Nebraska, BA; The University of the South, the School of Theology, MDiv, Cum Laude; Andersonville Theological Seminary, DMin, Summa Cum Laude.

Dr. Henry Krabbendam

Dr. Ron Jenson

Visiting Professor of Leadership

The Theological University (Netherlands), BA; The Theological University (Netherlands), MDiv; Westminster Theological Seminary (Philadelphia), ThM, ThD.

Visiting Lecturer of Leadership Clark College, BA; Western Baptist Seminary, MDiv.; Western Baptist Seminary, DMin.

Dr. Richard Pratt

Dr. Michael Metzger

Visiting Professor of Old Testament

Visiting Lecturer of Practical Theology

Roanoke College with advanced studies at Westminster Theological Seminary, BA; Union Theological Seminary, MDiv; Harvard University, ThD.

Western Michigan University, BA; Dallas Theological Seminary, ThM; Trinity International University, DMin.

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Adjunct Faculty Rev. Chad Causey

Adjunct Instructor of Missions and Christian Education Lee University, BA; Knox Theological Seminary, MDiv; Talbot School of Theology, PhD (candidate).

Dr. Hakjae Lee

Adjunct Professor of Old Testament Kosin University, BA; Reformed Theological Seminary, MDiv; University of Stellenbosch, DTh.

Dr. Won Suk Roh

Adjunct Professor of Practical Theology Biblical Theological Seminary, MA; University of Pretoria, PhD

Dr. Jae-Juh Seo

Adjunct Professor of Systematic Theology Asia Center for Theological Studies and Mission, PhD.

Dr. Sung-Hun Cho

Adjunct Professor of Old Testament Hansung University, BA; Refrormed Theological Seminary (Seoul), MDiv; Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, MCS; Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, MACE; Biola University, Talbot School of Theology, DMin.

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Student Commitments All students must affirm The Apostles’ Creed: I believe in God the Father Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth. And in Jesus Christ his only Son our Lord; who was conceived by the Holy Ghost, born of the Virgin Mary, suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, dead, and buried; he descended into hell; the third day he rose again from the dead; he ascended into heaven, and sitteth on the right hand of God the Father Almighty; from thence he shall come to judge the quick and the dead. I believe in the Holy Ghost; the holy catholic Church; the communion of saints; the forgiveness of sins; the resurrection of the body; and the life everlasting. AMEN.

Conduct Policy Student conduct is under the supervision of the faculty, acting through the Dean of Students. The Seminary assumes that its students will conduct themselves as mature Christians. The Seminary reserves the right to dismiss a student whose conduct is found to be in violation of the moral, spiritual, and ethical principles of Scripture as interpreted by the Westminster Confession of Faith and the Larger and Shorter Catechisms. As a group under the oversight of the faculty and the Board of Directors, the Seminary reserves the right to take action beyond dismissal as it may deem necessary. The Seminary’s policy on student conduct presupposes that students who enroll are in good standing in their congregations. If, at any time, Knox becomes aware that a student’s standing in their church is subject to question, the Seminary reserves the right to review the situation with the student and appropriate parties and to withhold enrollment, if necessary, until the matter is resolved.

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Admission

In order to enroll, non-matriculating students must submit the following documents to the Admissions Office:

Admission Requirements

• •

Knox encourages all interested prospective students to apply for admission to one of its programs of study. Admission to a program is based on a range of factors, including the applicant’s possession of intellectual skills, personal and spiritual maturity, and desire to serve God and others.

Admission to a master’s program with degree standing requires a bachelor’s degree (or its educational equivalent) from an accredited college with a grade point average (GPA) of at least 2.75 on a 4.0 scale. Exceptions to the GPA requirement are made when, in the view of the Admissions Committee, the student’s other credentials indicate a clear potential to complete the requirements of the degree program to which he or she would be admitted. Therefore, all interested students should apply, regardless of their GPA.

Completed application (four pages) with application fee Written notice from the institution in which the student is enrolled, confirming that each course to be taken at the Seminary is approved for credit toward their degree requirements. Written notice from the Registrar of the school in which the student is enrolled, confirming the student is in good standing both academically and financially.

In consultation with the Registrar, the Dean of Faculty makes a final determination whether a non-matriculating student has sufficient academic background to enroll in a particular course.

Application Procedures To apply for admission to one of the Seminary’s programs or as a Special Student, the prospective student should do the following:

Qualified applicants who have received an unaccredited bachelor’s degree, or whose college GPA is below 2.75, are granted provisional admission with an academic review by the completion of a minimum of 12 credits to determine if the applicant should be granted full admission to continue in the degree program.

• • •

A limited number of applicants who do not hold a bachelor’s degree may be admitted to master level programs. In these cases, the Seminary will evaluate the applicant’s life experience to ensure adequate preparation for graduate study. Portions of the Graduate Records Examination or other measures of academic ability may be used to determine the applicant’s academic maturity.

Complete an online application or request an application packet from the seminary. Distribute reference forms to be completed and mailed directly to the Admissions Office. Arrange for official transcripts from all undergraduate and/ or previous graduate schools—even if no program was completed and even if the credits appear as transfer credit on another transcript—to be sent directly from the institution to the Admissions Office. Complete our online application with a $100 application fee and a personal testimony.

Tuition Deposit

Qualified applicants are granted provisional admission with an academic review by the completion of a minimum of 12 credits, to determine if the applicant should be granted full admission to continue in the degree program.

Once a student is accepted for study at Knox a $50 tuition deposit (this is in addition to the non-refundable application fee) is required within one month of that acceptance or at least one month prior to registration, whichever comes first. A student accepted within the month prior to registration is required to submit the deposit immediately upon receipt of the acceptance letter. The deposit is applied against the first semester’s tuition charges. However, the deposit is non-refundable in the event that the student does not enroll.

Applicants for admission to the Doctor of Ministry program should refer to the Doctor of Ministry section of the catalog.

Special Students An applicant not seeking to complete a program of study at Knox Seminary, but wishing to take courses for credit, may seek admission as a Special Student. Special Students should consult with their academic advisor regarding admission to a program before earning more than 15 credit hours. See the Registrar for a suggested course of study. The admission procedure for Special Students is the same as that for degree-seeking students.

Late or Incomplete Applications Applications with all application components received after the published deadlines may be assessed an additional $50 late application fee. Applicants who enroll without all application components must communicate directly with the Registrar. In these cases, all remaining components must be received by the last day of the semester. The student will not receive credit for classes taken during the semester until all components have been received and the student is officially accepted. If the application remains incomplete after two semesters, the applicant will not be permitted to enroll in any subsequent semester until the application is completed.

Non-Matriculating Students Students enrolled in undergraduate or graduate programs at other educational institutions may, without matriculation from Knox, take courses at the Seminary for transfer of credit to their current degree program.

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International Students

Transfer of Credit from Another Graduate Institution Students who wish to transfer previously earned credits from another graduate institution must submit to the Registrar’s Office an official transcript from the previous institution, preferably with their application. In cases where the coursework is partially parallel, the faculty may allow partial class attendance and/ or assign research projects or reading to fulfill the Knox course requirements. All courses for which credit or partial credit is granted will be shown on Knox Seminary’s official transcript with no record of grades. Determination of transfer credit should be completed by the end of the first semester after initial enrollment.

International Students refers to those who hold U.S. student visas, exchange visitors, or other non-immigrant classifications. Knox Seminary is authorized under federal law to enroll nonimmigrant alien students in the Master and Doctoral level programs. International students enrolling at Knox will need an F-1 student visa. In order for the applicant to receive the Certificate of Eligibility (Form I-20) necessary to obtain the student visa for non-immigrant students from the Seminary, the applicant must:

Students transferring credit into any master’s program must take the final one-third (1/3) of their degree program credit hours at Knox. Students in the Doctor of Ministry program may transfer in as many as six credit hours.

1. Complete the application for admission and be accepted as a full-time student. 2. Note: Transcripts (Statement of Marks) from international institutions of higher education may require a credit recommendation by a recognized evaluation service selected by Knox. Any required fees for such an evaluation are the responsibility of the student. The evaluation service’s recommendation will be carefully considered but the final decision for admission, based on the international applicant’s academic credentials, rests with Knox. 3. Prospective international students must also establish and document their means of financial support while enrolled in the Seminary by submitting a Statement of Financial Resources, a Bank Letter of Deposit from the student’s bank, and a Bank Letter of Deposit and an Affidavit of Support from each individual, church, or organization who will be supporting the student while in the United States. Refer to the Knox website to download forms and for further details. Materials must be received by the Admissions Office no later than three months prior to the expected date of entry. Contact the Admissions Office for more information on international application procedures.

Advanced Standing or Multiple Degrees Students who wish to apply for advanced standing or multiple degrees must obtain prior approval from the Dean of Faculty.

Policy of Nondiscrimination Knox admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, and physical handicap to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students of the Seminary. Knox does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin, or physical handicap in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarship programs, or other seminary-administered programs.

Special Needs Students requiring special attention, including seating arrangements and alternative forms of testing, must provide to the Registrar documentation of professional evaluation of the disability, date of said evaluation, and specifications of assistance required. Such documentation must be provided upon application for admission to the Seminary’s programs unless the need for special attention is discovered thereafter. In the latter case, written notification to the Registrar must occur no later than 15 days after the date of evaluation.

TOEFL and TWE Scores Any applicant, regardless of citizenship, whose primary language is one other than English must submit TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) and TWE (Test of Written English) scores. Applicants must achieve the following minimum scores on each section of the test: Writing - 22; Speaking - 23; Reading - 21; Listening - 17 for a combined score of no less than 83. The exam must be taken no more than 12 months and at least three months prior to the first day of the term in which the applicant intends to enroll. This testing requirement may be waived for applicants who have earned an academic degree from an accredited institution of higher learning in the U.S. or those who have passed level 109 at an ELS Language Center. Admitted students may, at the discretion of the faculty, be required to take remedial English language course work and submit current TOEFL and TWE scores.

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Registration

Students may withdraw from a course without academic penalty in the first through the eighth weeks of full semester courses (or three-fifths of the meetings, excluding final exams, of a winter term or other intensive modular course). Students who withdraw in the second through the eighth weeks will receive a grade of W. Students who withdraw from a course in the ninth through the twelfth weeks will receive a grade of WF (withdrew failing) but may petition the faculty in writing to change the grade to W. Petitions must include the grounds that would justify the grade change. Students who withdraw from a course in the thirteenth week or after will receive a grade of F.

Registration Deadlines Students currently enrolled are required to register during designated times; those who do not are assessed a $50 late registration fee. Before registering, students should see the Registrar for a copy of their degree audit. All students are assigned a faculty advisor and are encouraged to meet with their advisor during registration to review their degree audit and plan their course of study for the semester. Advisors are also available throughout the year for spiritual and vocational counsel.

Cancellation of Courses

Auditors

Knox reserves the right to cancel any course during a given term or semester due to insufficient registration.

Most courses may be audited. Knox welcomes auditors to listen to class lectures and discussions. Auditors must defer to the interests of credit students and limit their class participation to various opportunities outside of class (e.g., break time and appointments). Exceptions to this general rule are at the professor’s discretion.

Withdrawal from Seminary To withdraw from the Seminary, a student must submit a completed withdrawal form to the Registrar after completing an exit interview with the Dean of Faculty, the Dean of Students, or the Registrar. Refund information is found on page 22.

Auditors should register and pay the application, audit, and student fees.

Spouses of Full-Time Students Spouses of full-time students may audit courses (space permitting) without charge except for audit application and student fees. Spouses of full-time students may take courses for credit at half tuition upon admission to a program.

Course Load Students who enroll in 12 to 18 credit hours are defined as fulltime. Students who wish to enroll in more than 18 credit hours must obtain special permission from the Dean of Students. Students who work 20-30 hours per week should consider carrying no more than 10 credit hours.

Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses or Changing Credit Status Students may add a course for credit, withdraw from a course, or change their status in a course from audit to credit within the first week of the semester (or within the first two meetings of a winter term, or other intensive modular course) by completing the appropriate form, available in the Registrar’s Office. Students who wish to change their status in a course from credit to audit must petition the professor and the Registrar before the ninth week of classes by completing the appropriate form, available in the Registrar’s Office.

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Academic Policies

The grade scale is as follows:

The Knox Theological Seminary Academic Catalog is the primary means by which the Seminary communicates policies, procedures, and regulations affecting tuition, admission, registration, graduation, and withdrawal. All students have both the right and the responsibility to know these policies and procedures.

Course Requirements

Attendance is taken and students are required to attend all classes. Absences do occur, however, and are handled as follows:

A- = 3.7

C = 2.0

F

B+ = 3.3

C- = 1.7

B

D+ = 1.3

= 3.0

B+ = 92-91

C- = 79-77

B = 90-88

D+ = 76-75

Some Applied Theology courses are evaluated with the Pass/ Fail method. Pass/Fail courses are not taken into account when a student’s GPA is calculated.

Knox uses a 4.0 grading system: D- = .07

F = 69-0

Required courses in which a student receives a grade of D+ or below must be retaken in order to fulfill graduation requirements. (See “Academic Requirements for Completion” in each program of study.) Courses in which a student receives a grade in the “C” range may be retaken to raise one’s grade, but not courses in which the student receives a grade in the “B” range. The GPA changes when a course is retaken.

Academic Standing

D = 1.0

D- = 71-70

C = 82-80

F – The student who receives an “F” in a class has not demonstrated any of the knowledge, skill, or ability required to pass the course. The student has failed either because of a lack of effort or because of inadequate preparation for the class.

Every effort is made to assist students who are providentially hindered from attending classes. The student is responsible for notifying the instructor of their absence and for contacting the instructor to arrange for all make-up work. Exceptions will be considered by the professor on a case-by-case basis.

C+ = 2.3

C+ = 85-83

A- = 95-93

D – The student who receives a “D” for a class has performed significantly below expectations on most course assignments and must retake this course for credit.

Unexcused absences will be recorded and will result in a reduction of two points per absence from the student’s grade for the course. Students who accumulate more unexcused absences than there are credit hours for the course will fail the course. Tardiness and early departures for any portion of an hour can, at the professor’s discretion, be counted as a full hour of absence.

B- = 2.7

A = 98-96

C – The student who receives a “C” for a class has met the minimum requirements for the course. Work of this caliber is passing but is below the level expected in graduate school. Any student who receives a grade of “C” in a first-year language course is strongly advised to take the steps necessary to improve their proficiency in the language before taking upper-level courses in that language.

There are two categories of absence: excused and unexcused. Excused absences are those absences resulting from extenuating circumstances such as personal illness, jury duty, active military service, death in the immediate family, or previously scheduled ministry activity. All other absences are considered unexcused. Excused absences will be granted only if submitted in writing (including e-mail) to, and approved by, the professor before the anticipated absence.

= 4.0

D = 74-72

B – The student who receives a “B” for a class has performed very well in the class. Work of this caliber is very solid and sound. This is the level of performance normally expected from a graduate student.

Attendance

A

B- = 87-86

A – The student who receives an “A” for a class has performed well above the range of expectations. Performance of this caliber goes above and beyond the class requirements. This student completes all assignments in a near-perfect form, and grasp of subject and method is exemplary.

Instructors outline course requirements, including special assignments and examinations, at the beginning of each course. Students are expected to have assignments complete on the days assigned. Any change must be approved by the instructor.

A+ = 4.3

A+ = 100-99

Extensions and Incomplete Course Work

= 0.0

The Seminary recognizes that a student may be providentially hindered (by extended illness, death in the family, etc.) from completing a course on time. In such cases, an incomplete (I) grade may be given. To receive an incomplete grade, the student must secure the instructor’s approval before the last day of the class. If approval is granted, the student will be required to submit the late work to the instructor within five weeks from the last day of final exams. The instructor will use a grade sheet to provide

Grades are released within 15 business days from the last day of each final examination period and are recorded on the student’s permanent transcript record.

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Transfer of Knox Seminary Credits to Another Institution

written notice of this approval to the Registrar. To have an incomplete grade removed from his or her record, the student is responsible to submit the late work to the instructor on time as required. The instructor will notify the Registrar in writing of the grade change. If the deadline passes without the work being completed, the grade will automatically be changed from the incomplete (I) grade to an F, and written notification of the grade change will be sent to the student and the instructor.

The decision to accept credits earned at Knox is at the discretion of the receiving institution.

Graduation Requirements Academic requirements for graduation are specified in each program under the section “Academic Requirements for Completion.” Although faculty advisors assist students in working through their own curricula, students are responsible to ensure that all of their graduation requirements are met. All course work, including independent studies and ITS courses, must be completed by the last day of final exams. Failure to do so will result in the forfeiture of the privilege of graduation until the following year. Graduating seniors are required to take final exams.

Academic Probation A student whose cumulative GPA falls below the level required for graduation or who fails to pass three-fourths of the credits in one semester may be placed on academic probation. During the probationary semester, the student must receive a semester GPA of 2.5 or higher in order to continue on probation. When the student’s cumulative GPA reaches 2.5 or above, the probationary status will be removed.

Non-academic requirements for graduation include continued compliance with the Student Commitments described on page 15.

Students who fail to achieve a semester GPA at the required level during their next semester of enrollment will be dismissed from the Seminary. Students so dismissed may petition the faculty for consideration of special circumstances.

Students must notify the Registrar in writing of their intent to graduate. They must submit this notification no later than the registration period of the fall semester preceding the desired May graduation date, after they have met with the Registrar to review their degree audit.

Students who are on academic probation may not be eligible for scholarship.

Transcript Requests

All outstanding financial obligations to the Seminary must be satisfied and all borrowed library books must be returned before a student can receive a diploma and have transcripts released.

Student requests for transcripts of coursework at Knox are to be directed to the Registrar’s Office. The fee is $5 for each official transcript. Due to requirements of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, all requests for transcripts must be submitted in writing and must include the student’s original signature. Transcripts are issued only after a student has settled all financial obligations and all borrowed library books are returned to Knox.

Graduating students are expected to attend Commencement exercises. Appropriate academic regalia is supplied by the Seminary at a nominal fee.

Graduation Honors

Transfer to Another Degree Program

Students who have achieved a cumulative GPA of 3.55 will be graduated cum laude; a cumulative GPA of 3.75 qualifies the student for magna cum laude honors; and a cumulative GPA of 3.90, with faculty action, qualifies the student for summa cum laude honors. Honors will appear on transcripts and on the student’s diploma.

Students wanting to change their degree program must submit a written request to the Dean of Faculty and a copy to the Registrar, giving reasons for the change and requesting a faculty review and approval of this change. Additional references may be requested. All students considering a change of degree program should consult their faculty advisor for assistance in selecting courses that will satisfy requirements for both degree programs.

Post-Graduation Placement information is available to all interested graduates through the Dean of Student’s Office. Knox graduates should recognize that a seminary diploma does not in itself constitute certification of the abilities for the pastorate or other ministry opportunities. Presbyteries and equivalent authorities determine the candidate’s fitness for ordination or ministry in light of a range of criteria. Additionally, other employers and licensing bodies have standards that may apply.

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Right to Privacy

If students wish to see their records, the Registrar provides supervised access to them. Students may place in their records any additional information they wish to have included. Administrative staff and faculty will respect the confidentiality of student information acquired in the course of their work. General directory information may be disclosed, such as student’s name, address, telephone number, e-mail address, photographs, honors and awards, dates of attendance, and participation in officially recognized activities. Students may withhold directory information by notifying the Registrar in writing within the first two weeks of the fall semester. Requests for non-disclosure will be honored by Knox for no more than one academic year.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-280), pertaining to the protection of the right to privacy of students, governs access to and release of student records. This law provides the following: 1.

2. 3. 4.

Educational institutions must provide student access to official records upon request (except for letters of recommendation) and provide an opportunity to challenge such records on the grounds that they are inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise inappropriate. Educational institutions must obtain written consent of students before releasing personally identifiable data from records other than a specified list of exceptions. Students must be informed of their rights specified by this statute. The Department of Education may investigate any alleged violation of the Act.

Tuition & Fees Master’s and Certificate Level Tuition per semester: Full-time (12-18 credit hours)...................................................................................................... $3,900.00 Tuition per credit hour (residential).................................................................................................................................. $325.00 Tuition per credit hour (online)........................................................................................................................................ $375.00 Senior citizens, 55 or over, per credit hour (residential)..................................................................................................... $275.00 Senior citizens, 55 or over, per credit hour (online)........................................................................................................... $325.00 Audit Fee, per credit hour................................................................................................................................................... $35.00

Doctor of Ministry Level Tuition per credit hour.................................................................................................................................................... $425.00 Major Project Fee......................................................................................................................................................... $2,750.00 Project Binding Fee.......................................................................................................................................................... $150.00 Additional Program Committee Member (optional)......................................................................................................... $500.00 Audit Fee per credit hour................................................................................................................................................... $35.00

Other Application Fee (one-time fee for all students).........................................Non-refundable................................................. $100.00 Auditor Application Fee...........................................................................Non-refundable................................................... $25.00 Graduation Fee........................................................................................Non-refundable................................................... $75.00 Incomplete Application Fee (per semester)...............................................Non-refundable................................................... $50.00 Late Application Fee................................................................................Non-refundable................................................... $50.00 Late Registration Fee...............................................................................Non-refundable................................................... $50.00 New Student Tuition Deposit (applied to first semester tuition)..............Non-refundable................................................... $50.00 Software Fee............................................................................................Non-refundable.............................................. $2,700.00 Student Fee - Activity and Technology (per semester)..............................Non-refundable................................................... $50.00 Student ID Replacement Fee ..................................................................Non-refundable................................................... $10.00 Transcript Fee..........................................................................................Non-refundable..................................................... $5.00

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Payments

Veterans Information

Students are responsible for all tuition, charges, and fees related to their seminary education. Those who depend on support from an individual, a local church, or another organization are responsible for meeting their financial obligations when due. Tuition and the student fee are due at registration.

Both Master and Doctoral level programs have been approved for the training of veterans by Florida’s Department of Veterans’ Affairs. Veterans eligible for VA educational benefits should confer with the Registrar.

Admission to Advanced Standing for Previous Work

Past due accounts are subject to a finance charge of 1% per month on the outstanding balance. Students may not register for a new semester or receive transcripts until all financial obligations from the prior semester have been met.

Students who receive educational benefits from the VA with prior post-secondary educational training must request that official transcripts be sent to Knox from their previous schools. This work will be evaluated for possible advanced standing during the student’s first semester in residence, with a final determination made at the beginning of the second semester. If advanced standing is granted, training time will be shortened and tuition reduced appropriately, and the VA and the veteran will be so notified.

Payment Plans Knox Seminary understands that circumstances may occur that cause financial hardship. If payment cannot be made in full at registration, a minimum of 25% of all tuition charges and all fees is due at the time of registration with a maximum of three equal additional payments to be received by Knox by the fifth calendar day of each of the following three months.

Attendance Policy Students receiving VA benefits are required to attend all classes. Excused absences will be granted only for extenuating circumstances substantiated by entries in the student’s files (personal illness, jury duty, active military service, death in the immediate family). Early departures, class cuts, tardiness, etc., for any portion of an hour will be counted as a full hour of absence.

Payment arrangement contracts can be obtained through the Business or Registrar’s Office and are available to students whose accounts are in good standing. Payment arrangements should be completed along with registration. A credit card will be required as security, although payments may be submitted by check or cash.

Educational benefits of VA students who accumulate three days of unexcused absences in any calendar month will be terminated for unsatisfactory attendance.

Credit Card Payments Knox accepts payment by credit card for tuition and fees. While offering this as a convenience, we encourage students to be discerning and to use credit cards responsibly. Visa, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express are accepted.

The VA student may petition the school to be recertified for educational benefits after one grading period has elapsed. The school may recertify the student only if it determines the student’s attendance-related problems have been resolved.

Tuition Refund Policy

Academic Probation

A student who withdraws from the Seminary or from individual courses receives a tuition refund based on the following schedule:

Week of Class 1 2 3-4 5-6 7-8 Beyond 8 weeks

A cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 is required for graduation. For the purposes of veteran’s training, it is required that veteran students reach that level at least halfway through their program and maintain it through completion. Probation and dismissal (or the termination of VA educational benefits) will ensue if a veteran student fails to meet such a standard.

Refund Percentage 100% 80% 60% 40% 20% 0%

The correlative time and monetary percentages will apply for Winter and Summer Term courses. A student who changes from credit to audit after the first week will receive a percentage refund based on full tuition charges.

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Refund Policy

Financing Your Seminary Education

The refund of the unused portion of tuition, fees, and other charges for veterans or eligible persons who fail to enter a course, or withdraw, or discontinue a course prior to completion, will be made for all amounts paid which exceed the approximate prorata portion of the total charges that the length of the completed portion bears to the total length of the course. The proration will be determined by the ratio of the number of days or hours of instruction completed by the student to the number of instructional days or hours in the course.

Knox Seminary seeks to keep educational expenses as low as possible. While tuition amounts to only approximately one-third of the actual cost of operating the Seminary, we do everything we can to ensure that no student is turned away for financial reasons. Students who need financial assistance to meet the costs of master-level tuition are encouraged to apply for financial scholarship. A number of scholarships have been established through the generosity of families and friends who have been faithful supporters of Knox:

Permanent Records

The Church Partnership Program This is a scholarship program whereby the Seminary joins together with the local church to support students and their financial and ministerial needs. The Seminary will match up to one-third of the cost of tuition provided by the church. In other words, if the Church contributes one-third and the student contributes one-third then the Seminary will contribute the final one-third of the tuition costs. Arrangements must be made through the Registrar’s office. This partnership helps keep the Seminary linked to local church ministries.

The Julia Abdullah Scholarship This scholarship was established in 1998 by one desiring to honor the memory of a woman whom he believed to be one of the finest Sunday school teachers he knew. The annual award is based on submission of the best essay entitled “How the Sunday/Church School Hour Can Be Made the Most Interesting Hour of the Week.” [Note: The essay must be submitted with the scholarship application to the Scholarship Committee (for review by faculty readers) no later than June 1 each year. The essay must be a minimum of 2500 and no more than 3000 words in length.]

The Andrew Pallay & Mary Pallay Covell Scholarship Mary P. Covell, PhD, established this scholarship in 1995. As a direct descendant of John Husz, Dr. Covell wished to honor the memory of this great Reformer, her ancestor, who died for his precious faith. The recipients of this award are designated as John Husz Scholars.

The Ross L. and Edna M. Harman Scholarship Established in 1989, this scholarship is designed to assist theological students as they prepare for service to our Lord.

The Kovack Securities Scholarship Fund This scholarship fund was established in December 2006 to assist those seeking to enter the ministry and enrolled in the Master of Divinity program. The fund especially favors those inclined towards exegetical preaching or military chaplaincy.

The John Joseph Mogle Scholarship Fund The John Joseph Mogle Scholarship was established in 2002 using funds given to Knox in a bequest from his estate.

The Mary M. Patton Scholarship Fund The Mary M. Patton Scholarship was established in 2001 using funds given to Knox in a bequest from her estate.

VA students will be provided a written grade report at the end of each grading period. A copy of the report will be placed in the student’s permanent file maintained by the school.

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obtaining individual support as a missionary. (See the Church Partnership Program on page 24 for details.)

The Charles Fund Scholarship In December 1989, Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Sweat established this fund in perpetuity as a memorial to the life of their beloved son, Charles.

Employment

The Reverend William A. Swets Memorial Scholarship This scholarship was established in March 1999 by his wife and children, in loving memory of Rev. Swets who served as Minister of Pastoral Care at Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church from 1970-1994. Rev. Swets shared with Dr. Kennedy the vision of establishing Knox Seminary and had the joy of seeing that dream come to fruition as his prayers were answered. He prayed that Knox students would always be enthusiastic for the privilege of preaching the gospel of Jesus Christ.

In addition to work in local area churches, Knox students and their spouses may choose from a wide variety of full-time and part-time employment opportunities in the Fort Lauderdale area. Contact the Admissions Office for current employment information.

Additional Funding Support For those seeking additional scholarship resources, the following sources may be helpful:

The Thomas Family Scholarship This scholarship was established in June 1992 as the Thomas family’s testimony to the love of others and to life both here and in eternity. The family wanted others to know the comfort and love of the Lord in times of trial and suffering and believed this message should come from those properly trained in the ministry who would be of service to others. The scholarship is designed to assist those called to the Lord’s service through ministry.

Fund for Theological Education (FTE) FTE offers support to help gifted young people explore and respond to God’s calling in their lives. Our mission is to advance excellence as we encourage caring, capable, and courageous young adults from diverse backgrounds on their journey to become pastors and scholars—the next generation of leaders for the church. For more information, visit http://www.thefund.org/. Lilly Endowment Lilly Endowment Inc. was established in 1937 by members of the Lilly family (Eli Lilly and Company — pharmaceutical company), to support the causes of religion, education and community development, placing special emphasis on projects that benefit young people and promote leadership education and financial self-sufficiency in the nonprofit, charitable sector. For more information, visit: http://www.lillyendowment.org/ theendowment.html.

Scholarship Application Procedures Awards for most of the scholarship funds are determined by the Scholarship Committee. While awards are primarily based on financial need, other criteria include academic achievement, spiritual maturity, and ministry potential. Some scholarships have specific requirements in addition to the application form. Each student must be sure to submit any additional requirements with the application.

Luce Foundation The Henry Luce Foundation was established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time Inc., to honor his parents who were missionary educators in China. The Foundation seeks to bring important ideas to the center of American life, strengthen international understanding, and foster innovation and leadership in academic, policy, religious and art communities.

New Students: The scholarship application is available on the website and should be returned no later than July 1. To be eligible, the applicant must be admitted to a program of study by July 1. Late applicants who apply for scholarship, and who would ordinarily be eligible, will be put on a waiting list in the event that funds become available. Current students: All current scholarship recipients must reapply for the scholarship each year by July 1. Scholarship application forms are available on the website. Current students who miss the deadline, and who would ordinarily be eligible, will be put on a waiting list in the event that funds become available.

Visit: http://www.hluce.org/home.aspx.

Unless otherwise noted, a scholarship is granted for the current academic year only.

Church Support Many students find significant support from their home churches, through organized funds, or from individuals within the church. Students may want to speak with their pastor regarding assistance with education expenses, or talk to their missions pastor about

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Programs of Study 27

Master of Divinity

Biblical Languages

The Master of Divinity is a professional degree that prepares students for pastoral ministry. We seek to shape the whole person to communicate the gospel and demonstrate its implications in everyday life. Pastors and church leaders must be biblically saturated, theologically discerning, and contextually sensitive Christians; to that end, the curriculum focuses on three major areas: biblical, theological, and practical ministry studies.

NT712

Biblical Hermeneutics

3

NT512

Greek 1

3

NT514

Greek 2

3

OT612

Hebrew 1

3

OT614

Hebrew 2

3

NT702

Advanced Biblical Exegesis

3 Hours

Academic Requirements for Admission

Biblical Studies

A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution or the educational equivalent is required. Transfer students must take their final 33 credit hours at Knox.

Academic Requirements for Completion The Master of Divinity program requires completion of a total of 90 credit hours. To graduate, a student must earn at least a grade of C- (1.7) in each course, must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale), and participate in a Supervised Ministry Internship. See course descriptions for more information.

NT502

New Testament 1 – Gospels and Acts

3

NT504

New Testament 2 –Epistles and Revelation

3

OT602

Old Testament 1 – Genesis to 2 Samuel

3

NT504

Old Testament 2 – 2 Samuel to Malachi

3

ST502

Biblical Theology

3

ST506

Systematic Theology 1 – God and Creation

3

ST602

Systematic Theology 2 – Christ and the Church

3

ST604

Systematic Theology 3 – Salvation and Eschatology

3

ST608

Ethics

3 Hours

• •

12

Historical Studies

A graduate of the MDiv program will:

3 15

Theological Studies

Learning Outcomes

18 Credits

Hours

Upon successful completion, the student is awarded the Master of Divinity degree. The requirements for receiving a diploma are the same as the requirements for receiving a degree in this program.

Credits

Effectively communicate Christ and His gospel throughout the entirety of Scripture. Be increasingly transformed by the gospel and grow in desire and competence for sharing that gospel with others. Articulate the centrality of the gospel for every aspect of Christian life and ministry. Thoughtfully exegete their culture and understand the Christian’s responsibility to participate in God’s work of making all things new. Faithfully and winsomely lead the people of God in worship and witness.

CH502

History of Christianity 1 – Ancient and Medieval

3

CH504

History of Christianity 2 – Reformation to Modern Era

3

Hours

6

Pastoral Studies

*Students will graduate with a concentration in one of these areas: • Christian and Classical Studies: Preparation for work in classical and/or Christian education. • Anglican Studies: Preparation for ordination in an Anglican setting. • Academic Focus: Preparation for further academic study (MA, ThM, PhD). • Biblical Theology Focus: Preparation for advanced biblical interpretation. • Pastoral Theology Focus: Preparation for pastoral work.

AT608

Ministry and the Church

3

ME702

The Missional Church

3

AT704

Worship

3

AT502

Introduction to Homiletics

3

AT602

Preaching Practicum 1

1

AT604

Preaching Practicum 2

1

AT702

Preaching Practicum 3

1

AT706

Supervised Ministry Internship

3 Hours

18

Hours

21

Total Hours

90

Electives*

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Master of Arts (Christian and Classical Studies)

Christian and Classical Studies

The Master of Arts (Christian and Classical Studies) is an academic degree program designed for persons who intend to be teachers or headmasters in Christian schools, to pursue further graduate theological studies, or to become conversant on the dialogue between the Bible and the “Great Tradition” of literature. The coursework provides a solid foundation in two areas: the Bible and selected great texts of the classical (Western) tradition.

CC502

Plato and Augustine

3

CC504

Aeschylus and Aristotle

3

CC602

Aquinas and Machiavelli

3

CC604

Dante and Milton

3

CC702

Thucydides and Tocqueville

3

CC704

Nietzsche and Dostoyevsky

3 Hours

18

NT502

New Testament 1 - Gospels and Acts

3

NT504

New Testament 2 - Epistles and Revelation

3

New Testament Studies

Academic Requirements for Admission A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution or the educational equivalent is required.

Hours

The Master of Arts (Christian and Classical Studies) program requires completion of a total of 48 credit hours and a comprehensive paper. To graduate, a student must earn at least a grade of C- (1.7) in each course, and must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale).

OT602

Old Testament 1 - Genesis to 2 Samuel

3

OT604

Old Testament 2 - 2 Samuel to Malachi

3

Hours

Learning Outcomes

CH502

History of Christianity 1 - Ancient and Medieval

3

CH504

History of Christianity 2 Reformation to Modern Era

3 Hours

A graduate of the MACCS program will:

• •

6

Church History Studies

Upon successful completion, the student is awarded the Master of Arts (Christian and Classical Studies) degree.

6

New Testament Studies

Academic Requirements for Completion

Credits

6

Hermeneutics Studies

See Christ effectively in His suffering and glory throughout the entirety of Scripture. Knowledgeably work with and understand the great literary and philosophical books that constitute the Western Tradition. Articulate the development of Christian doctrinal reflection through the ancient, medieval, and modern periods. Articulate the Christian and non-Christian worldviews and engage the culture both poetically and philosophically.

NT712

Biblical Hermeneutics

3 Hours

3

Biblical Theology Studies ST502

Biblical Theology

3 Hours

3

Hours

6

Total Hours

48

Electives

*For a full list of works read in the MACCS program, please visit our website at www.knoxseminary.edu.

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Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies)

Biblical Studies

The Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) is an academic degree program designed for persons who intend to pursue further graduate religious studies in biblical exegesis and theology or who desire to broaden and deepen their knowledge in these areas.

Academic Requirements for Admission A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution or the educational equivalent is required.

The Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) requires completion of a total of 60 credit hours. To graduate, a student must earn at least a grade of C- (1.7) in each course and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale). Upon successful completion, the student is awarded the Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) degree.

3

NT504

New Testament 2 – Epistles and Revelation

3

OT602

Old Testament 1 – Genesis to 2 Samuel

3

OT604

Old Testament 2 – 2 Samuel to Malachi

3

ST502

Biblical Theology

3

NT712

Biblical Hermeneutics

3 18

Theological Studies

3

ST506

Systematic Theology 1 – God and Creation

3

ST602

Systematic Theology 2 – Christ and the Church

3

ST604

Systematic Theology 3 – Salvation and Eschatology

3

ST608

Ethics

3 12

Historical Studies

A graduate of the MA (Biblical and Theological Studies) program at Knox will:

New Testament 1 – Gospels and Acts

Hours

Learning Outcomes

NT502

Hours

Academic Requirements for Completion

Credits

Effectively communicate Christ and His gospel throughout the entirety of Scripture. Be increasingly transformed by the gospel and grow in desire and competence for sharing that gospel with others. Articulate the centrality of the gospel for every aspect of Christian life and ministry. Thoughtfully exegete their culture and understand the Christian’s responsibility to participate in God’s work of making all things new.

CH502

History of Christianity 1 – Ancient and Medieval

3

CH504

History of Christianity 2 – Reformation to Modern Era

3

Hours

6

Pastoral Studies ME702

The Missional Church

3 Hours

3

Hours

21

Total Hours

60

Electives*

*Elective concentrations include: • Christian and Classical Studies: Preparation for work in classical and/or Christian education. • Anglican Studies: Preparation for ordination in an Anglican setting. • Academic Focus: Preparation for further academic study (MA, ThM, PhD). • Biblical Theology Focus: Preparation for advanced biblical interpretation. • Pastoral Theology Focus: Preparation for pastoral work. Note: Elective hours can be used to take Greek and Hebrew in traditional format or in E-format online.

30

Online Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies)

Biblical Studies

The online Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) is an academic degree program designed for persons who intend to pursue further graduate religious studies in biblical exegesis and theology or who desire to broaden and deepen their knowledge in these areas.

Academic Requirements for Admission A bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution or the educational equivalent is required.

The online Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) requires completion of a total of 60 credit hours. To graduate, a student must earn at least a grade of C- (1.7) in each course and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.5 (on a 4.0 scale). Upon successful completion, the student is awarded the Master of Arts (Biblical and Theological Studies) degree.

3

NT504

New Testament 2 – Epistles and

3

OT602

Old Testament 1 – Genesis to 2 Samuel

3

OT604

Old Testament 2 – 2 Samuel to Malachi

3

ST502

Biblical Theology

3

NT712

Biblical Hermeneutics

3

Revelation

18

Theological Studies

3

ST506

Systematic Theology 1 – God and Creation

3

ST602

Systematic Theology 2 – Christ and the Church

3

ST604

Systematic Theology 3 – Salvation and Eschatology

3

ST608

Ethics

3 Hours

A graduate of the MA (Biblical and Theological Studies) program at Knox will:

New Testament 1 – Gospels and Acts

12

Historical Studies

Learning Outcomes

NT502

Hours

Academic Requirements for Completion

Credits

Effectively communicate Christ and His gospel throughout the entirety of Scripture. Be increasingly transformed by the gospel and grow in desire and competence for sharing that gospel with others. Articulate the centrality of the gospel for every aspect of Christian life and ministry. Thoughtfully exegete their culture and understand the Christian’s responsibility to participate in God’s work of making all things new.

CH502

History of Christianity 1 – Ancient and Medieval

3

CH504

History of Christianity 2 – Reformation to Modern Era

3

Hours

6

Hours

3

Hours

21

Total Hours

60

Pastoral Studies ME702

The Missional Church

3

Electives*

*Elective concentrations include: • Logos Concentration: Substitute nine credit hours of electives for NT500 (E-Greek), OT500 (E-Hebrew), and NT510 (EInductive Bible Study). • Christian and Classical Studies: Preparation for work in classical and/or Christian education. • Anglican Studies: Preparation for ordination in an Anglican setting. • Academic Focus: Preparation for further academic study (MA, ThM, PhD). • Biblical Theology Focus: Preparation for advanced biblical interpretation. • Pastoral Theology Focus: Preparation for pastoral work.

31

Suggested Course Sequence

Certificate in Christian Ministry

Serving the Church by Interpreting and Applying Scripture

Program Description

Outcome: To Interpret, Appreciate, and Work with the English Bible

The Certificate Program at Knox Theological Seminary is specially designed for individuals who are interested in pursuing theological training without the commitment to a master’s-level program. The program is well suited for lay leaders in the church, missionaries who require a year of formal theological training, or individuals desiring to both broaden and deepen their understanding in the Christian faith. The 24-hour program is designed with flexibility in mind. Certificate students may take courses as desired in any department of the school. To receive maximum benefit, the following course track is recommended.

NT502 NT504 OT602 OT604

New Testament 1 - Gospels and Acts New Testament 2 - Epistles and Revelation Old Testament 1 - Genesis to 2 Samuel Old Testament 2 - 2 Samuel to Malachi Total Hours

Admission to Program

Serving the Church by Interpreting the Faith

Applications to the Certificate program at Knox is open to students who have completed a high school diploma or beyond. Interested students should complete an online application or contact the school to receive an application. The admission requirements include college transcripts from all previous institutions attended, personal testimony, and a pastoral reference.

Outcome: To Think Theologically

ST506 ST602 ST604

Systematic Theology 1 - God and Creation Systematic Theology 2 - Christ and the Church Systematic Theology 3 Salvation and Eschatology Total Hours

3 3 3 3 12

3 3 3 9

Serving the Church in the Community General Electives: Students may select any courses with the following prefixes: AT, CC, CH, ST, NT, PT and OT Elective Hours: 3

Program Total Hours 24

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Master’s Course Descriptions

AT706 Supervised Ministry This course refers to field-based training in a local church with ministry opportunities in a congregation under the supervision of experienced mentor(s). The Dean of Students has more complete information on the requirements of this supervised ministry internship.

(Alphabetical Listing by Department)

APPLIED THEOLOGY Required Courses

ME702 The Missional Church 3 Credit Hours

AT502 Introduction to Homiletics 3 Credit Hours

This class will explore the missional church. Topics will include God’s grand narrative of mission, perspectives on the missional church, and analyzing gospel-centered mission in the local church.

This course introduces the biblical basis for preaching and the fundamentals of expository preaching. Students will gain experience in classic elements of sermon construction along with fundamentals of persuasion and pulpit delivery.

APPLIED THEOLOGY

AT602 Preaching Practicum 1 1 Credit Hour

Elective Courses

AT503 Christian Education 3 Credit Hours

This introductory course focuses on the basics of biblical preaching.

This introduction to Christian Education presents the biblical and philosophical foundation for CE in the local church with attention to the unique dimensions of covenantal thinking that defines a Reformed philosophy of education. The course also surveys teaching and learning methodologies in the basic dimensions of educational ministry.

AT604 Preaching Practicum 2 1 Credit Hour This practicum will require the student to preach a sermon based upon exegetical work in the Greek New Testament. Prerequisites: AT502 and either NT612 or NT614.

AT609 Introduction to Urban Church Planting 3 Credit Hours

AT608 Ministry and the Church 3 Credit Hours

The course is designed to give students an experiential introduction to the ministry of church planting and urban missiology. The emphasis will be on equipping students with the principles, strategies, and practice needed for starting and developing gospel-centered, city-positive, reproducing churches that seek the flourishing of society. Utilizing a unique immersive environment, the student will learn, in very practical ways, how to exegete a community, and ask and identify pertinent details that will help develop a biblical vision for ministry in an urban context.

This class will explore the foundations of ministry in the church. Beginning with the call to ministry, the class will explore what gospel-centered ministry looks like in a post-Christian world. It will include discussion on the importance and development of a well-thought-out philosophy of ministry and resources on how to effectively minister in the stream of the Great Tradition. AT702 Preaching Practicum 3 1 Credit Hour This practicum will presuppose completion of at least one Old Testament Hebrew exegesis course and will require students to prepare and deliver a sermon based upon exegetical work in the Hebrew Old Testament. Prerequisites: AT502 and OT712.

CHRISTIAN AND CLASSICAL STUDIES Required Courses

AT704 Worship 3 Credit Hours

CC502 Plato and Augustine 3 Credit Hours

This class is designed to motivate and equip pastors and worship leaders to develop worship ministries in the church that are biblical, God glorifying, full of reverence and joy, and formational in the life of God’s people, transforming them into people of gospel experience, action and mission. Students will gain a theological and biblical foundation for worship, as well as practical helps in planning and leading worship services that are excellent in quality, contextually relevant, transformational and balanced in joy and reverence.

This second course in the Christian and Classical Studies program presents the two visions of culture as represented by the images of two cities: the city of God and the city of man. The course concentrates on a complete reading of Plato’s Republic and excerpts from Homer and Vergil, set in contrast with significant portions of Augustine’s City of God.

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as it relates to the founding and refounding of the American Republic, followed by a consideration of the divergent European visions that have challenged the Republic up to the present time. There are lectures on The Federalist Papers of Madison, Hamilton, and Jay; the Speeches of Lincoln; and directed readings of Beyond Good and Evil, Genealogy of Morals, and Twilight of the Idols of Nietzsche; and the Brothers Karamazov of Dostoevsky.

CC504 Aeschylus and Aristotle 3 Credit Hours This third course in the Christian and Classical Studies program continues the “Great Conversation” of the Western Tradition in antiquity by focusing on the nature of the soul: the effects of sin and the possibility of redemption. This course incorporates selections from the comic Greek poet Aristophanes and the Greek tragedians Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides. The main part of the course focuses on Aristotle with full readings of his Nichomachean Ethics, Politics, Rhetoric and Poetics. Students reflect on the ancient quarrel between poetry and philosophy by a close reading of Plato in his Apology of Socrates. The course concludes with the supplemental Christian vision of ethics as found in Augustine’s Confessions.  

CHURCH HISTORY

Required Courses

CH502 History of Christianity 1- Ancient and Medieval Church History 3 Credit Hours This course provides a detailed study of the theology of the ancient and medieval church. In each era, key figures, confessions, and themes are examined (focusing especially on issues of biblical interpretation, the doctrine of the Trinity, Christology, and church practice). Students gain familiarity with these eras by reading primary source texts, including the Apostolic Fathers, Irenaeus, the Cappadocians, Augustine, Cyril of Alexandria, Anselm, and Thomas Aquinas.

CC602 Aquinas and Machiavelli 3 Credit Hours This fourth course in the Christian and Classical Studies curriculum further explores the conflict between the city of God and the city of man as it developed in the Middle Ages. Set against Plato’s Symposium, students read On the Necessity of Loving God by Bernard of Clairvaux, the Consolation of Philosophy of Boethius, the Summa Theologica of Aquinas (selections), the Mandragola and the Prince of Machiavelli, the Rape of Lucrece and Henry V of Shakespeare, and the Leviathan of Hobbes.

CH504 History of Christianity 2 - Reformation to Modern Era 3 Credit Hours This course provides a detailed study of the Protestant Reformation, Puritanism, and various modern movements and events (including revivalism, the Enlightenment, fundamentalistmodernist controversies, the Second Vatican Council, postmodernism, and the rise of global South Christianity). In each era, key figures, confessions, and themes are examined. Students gain familiarity with these eras by reading primary source texts, including Luther, Dordt, Owen, Edwards, Kant, Barth, and Machen.

CC604 Dante and Milton 3 Credit Hours This fifth Christian and Classical Studies course explores comedy and tragedy, as they are found both in the classical world and in the Christian church, in order to further develop an understanding of the two cities. This course provides a directed reading of Aristophanes’ great comedies (Frogs, Peace, and Birds), the Divine Comedy of Dante, Paradise Lost of Milton, and Shakespeare’s greatest tragedy (King Lear) and greatest comedy (The Tempest).

CHURCH HISTORY

CC702 Thucydides and Tocqueville 3 Credit Hours

Elective Courses

CH503 Historical Theology 3 Credit Hours

This sixth course in the Christian and Classical Studies program marks a transition to a focused study of political regimes and the foundations of liberty. Students are presented with the strengths and weaknesses of the various political regimes, with special attention given to democracy, through a directed reading of Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War, Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress, Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, and Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter. Additional texts employed in this study are The Merchant of Venice by Shakespeare, and The Freedom of the Christian by Martin Luther.

This course gives a detailed study of English Puritanism and Western Evangelicalism since the 18th century. In the examination of English Puritanism, the focus is placed on John Owen, Oliver Cromwell, and Richard Baxter. In the discussion of Evangelicalism since the 18th century, particular emphasis is placed on Jonathan Edwards, George Whitefield, and the Wesleys, William Carey and the rise of the modern missionary movement, the Holiness Movement and the emergence of Pentecostalism, B.B. Warfield and the Evangelical response to liberalism, and the contribution of D. Martyn Lloyd-Jones to the discussion of Christian unity. In the final two lectures of the course, a possible future history of Evangelicalism is considered in light of the shift of Christianity’s center of gravity from the transatlantic worlds of Europe and North America to the Orient and Africa.

CC704 Nietzsche and Dostoyevsky 3 Credit Hours This capstone course in the Christian and Classical Studies program continues the discussion of political regimes, specifically

34

NEW TESTAMENT

NEW TESTAMENT

NT502 New Testament 1 - Gospels and Acts 3 Credit Hours

NT565 The Caring and Feeding of Logos Software 1 Credit Hour

This course presents critical and introductory issues in the scholarship of the Gospels and Acts. The issues will be such topics as: the synoptic problem, seeming contradictions between the gospels, an introduction to the historical Jesus conversation, and historical considerations in the book of Acts. This class will divide itself into three sections: first, the background of second-temple Judaism before the birth of Christ, second, the Gospels and particular exegetical issues inherent in gospel scholarship, including the life of Jesus; third, the book of Acts and introductory/historical issues that are particular to this important book of Church History.

This course will teach the student to get the most from his or her Logos software. The course starts at the very basic level by teaching students to update and back up the program. By the end of the program the students are familiar with “fuzzy searches” and can construct complex syntactical searches, key link documents, and use the program to its fullest extent.

Required Courses

Elective Courses

NT612 Greek Syntax and Grammar 3 Credit Hours This third course in the series provides a comprehensive survey of New Testament Greek syntax, while reading selected texts in the Greek New Testament, thereby increasing the student’s working vocabulary. Students will learn to diagram sentences and pay special attention to the relationship and use of words by authors. Prerequisite: NT514.

NT504 New Testament 2 - Epistles and Revelation 3 Credit Hours This course will present critical and introductory issues in the New Testament epistles. The issues will include such topics as authorship, normative vs. cultural understanding of commands contained in the epistles, the authorship of disputed epistles, and the life and work of the apostle Paul. These issues will be in addition to the typical introduction and overview of the books from Romans to Revelation.

NT614 Greek Exegesis 3 Credit Hours This course presents the procedures of New Testament Greek exegesis, including: textual criticism, linguistic analysis, structural analysis, historical analysis, grammatical analysis, word analysis, and the proper use of critical commentaries. The emphasis is on making the student self-critical in his or her own work in the New Testament. Prerequisite: NT612.

NT512 New Testament Greek 1 3 Credit Hours This introductory course presents the basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek as well as a rationale for studying the language. Greek 1 and 2 should always be taken in the same academic year.

NT645 Readings in New Testament Greek 2 Credit Hours This course is designed to help the student gain a grasp of the New Testament so that he/she may be able to read many passages with only the help of a reader’s lexicon. The course begins with easier passages and progresses to more difficult texts each week, with readings from the LXX, ancient creeds, and early church fathers taking up the final weeks. Prerequisite: NT514.

NT514 New Testament Greek 2 3 Credit Hours This second Greek course concludes the instruction in basic grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. At the end of this course the student will be able to read easier portions of the New Testament (I John, portions of Mark and John). Prerequisite: NT512.

NT659 The Quest for the Historical Jesus 3 Credit Hours This course will examine the history of attempts by the church and by skeptics to understand who Jesus was and what He did. The course will be taught in three parts: first, a history of the three modern quests for what has come to be called the “Historical Jesus,” second, an examination of the flaws in reasoning and evidence that have driven many of those who were involved in these quests; third, a look at much of the evidence that is being put forth today by critics to deny the fact that Jesus lived or that He is accurately portrayed in the Gospels. Thus, this class is not only a history of the quest, but also an apologetic argument against much of what passes today for Jesus research.

NT712 Biblical Hermeneutics 3 Credit Hours This course is designed to introduce the student to the history and principles of interpretation as defined by the Protestant Reformed tradition. A survey of the people and events that have shaped the discipline will be followed by the rules of interpretation. Finally, the student will attempt to master the methodology of biblical interpretation by exegeting passages in the Greek New Testament and the Hebrew Old Testament.

35

NT731 Sermon on the Mount in Greek 3 Credit Hours

OLD TESTAMENT

This course will very carefully examine the greatest sermon ever preached, both on a macro and on a micro level. The sermon will first be looked at overall, for structural clues, chiasms, poetic sayings, and parables. After the bird’s-eye look at the sermon, the serious and careful micro exegesis will take place. Students will learn to examine historical contexts in narrative documents, look carefully at changes in tense or mood for special emphasis, and make decisions about this passage’s (Matthew 5-7) connection to similar material in another synoptic gospel (Luke 6) and make decisions about some of the more difficult theological material contained in the sermon. Prerequisite: NT614.

OT582 Holy Land Tour 3 Credit Hours

Elective Courses

This three-credit class is offered as an elective in all programs. It is a focused study tour of Israel, surveying the most prominent sites of biblical interest. It is led by a seminary faculty member and a local licensed guide. Highlights include: Joppa (The port of Jonah), Caesarea by the Sea (Paul’s Prison, Herod’s palace), Mount Carmel (Elijah and the priests of Baal), Megiddo (view of Jezreel Valley, site of biblical Armageddon), Nazareth, Cana (site of Jesus’ miracle of wine), Sea of Galilee (boat ride on the Sea, Mount Arbel, Mount of Beatitudes), Tell Dan (Caesarea Philippi), Beth Shean, Jordan River baptism, Dead Sea, Masada, Qumran (Dead Sea scrolls), Jerusalem (Temple Mount, Mount Skopus, Mount Olives, City of David excavations, Garden of Gethsemane, Garden Tomb communion), Bethlehem, Valley of Elah (David and Goliath).

NT735 The Epistle of James in Greek 3 Credit Hours The purpose of this course is to increase the student’s reading and exegetical skills in the Greek New Testament. In addition, the class will wrestle with some of the old difficulties presented by this book (e.g., faith and works, the place of riches, and other interesting issues). Students will be very familiar with the structure, content, and theology of the book at the end of the class. Prerequisite: NT614.

OT615 Israel’s Hymnbook — the Psalms 3 Credit Hours This course on the Book of Psalms aims to edify the student by exegeting selected psalms and by providing the student with background information to guide the student into a lifetime of enriching their appreciation of the Psalms and for some to use the Psalms to edify others. The background information will focus on various methods of interpreting the Psalms.

OLD TESTAMENT Required Courses

OT602 Old Testament 1 - Genesis to 2 Samuel

OT617 Biblical Wisdom and Exegesis of Proverbs 3 Credit Hours

3 Credit Hours This course is the first of two classes that constitute a survey of the Old Testament canon. Beginning with the creation account in Genesis, this class traces the redemptive-historical development through to the end of King David’s reign. The emphasis is on the narrative of the Bible story as presented through sacred history.

In a world bombarded by inane clichés, trivial catchwords, and godless sound bites, the expression of true wisdom is in short supply today. The church stands alone as the receptacle and repository of the inspired wisdom that carries a mandate for a holy life from ancient kings and their courtiers. As the course and bulk of biblical wisdom, the book of Proverbs remains the model of curriculum for humanity, especially youth, to learn social skills in relation to God and others. As such, the book of Proverbs invites serious study to do and to teach its wisdom in a world characterized by mediocrity, superficiality and blatant foolishness.

OT604 Old Testament 2 — 2 Samuel to Malachi 3 Credit Hours This course completes the survey of the Old Testament canon and the conclusion of the redemptive-historical story up to the time of Christ. Much attention will be given to Hebrew Psalmody and wisdom literature as well as the prophetic oracles that established the contours of the history of Israel.

OT712 Hebrew Exegesis: Narrative 3 Credit Hours

OT612 Old Testament Hebrew 1 3 Credit Hours

This class is one of two classes that constitute the second year of Hebrew studies. Moving beyond the essential elements of Hebrew grammar and syntax, this course will help the student to develop skills in the interpretation of the Old Testament narrative. The course will focus especially on the books of Genesis and Exodus. Prerequisite: OT614.

This course introduces the students to the basic elements of Hebrew. OT614 Old Testament Hebrew 2 3 Credit Hours This course completes basic Hebrew grammar and vocabulary, enabling students to work with the Hebrew language. Prerequisite: OT612.

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OT714 Hebrew Exegesis: Poetry 3 Credit Hours

ST604 Systematic Theology 3 - Salvation and Eschatology 3 Credit Hours

Focusing on the Psalms, the course examines the unique character of Hebrew poetry. Attention is given to the classical genres of epic, tragic, and comic as they find form in the Psalms of praise, lament, and acknowledgement hymns. Prerequisite: OT614.

In this course the students will examine the application of the gospel to individuals and to the whole earth. We will focus on the application of salvation (the ordo salutis), the means of grace, and the kingdom of God. The students will be introduced to pertinent biblical texts and themes, theological terms, key figures, and the importance of culture and history in framing various debates. As the last of three courses in systematic theology, particular attention will be given to the eschatological shape of all Christian theology.

OT 717 Jeremiah 3 Credit Hours This course examines the prophet who is a remarkable type of Jesus (Matthew 16:14), whose prophecy of judgment came at the time of great crisis in Israel’s history and whose prophecy of comfort foresaw the New Covenant of Jesus.

ST608 Ethics 2 Credit Hours This course examines the relationship of the gospel to obedience. It considers the theological virtues of faith, hope, and love. It then addresses the role of the law as a framework for Christian life, noting the impact of redemptive-historical and cultural shifts in our appropriation of the law.

THEOLOGICAL STUDIES Required Courses

ST502 Biblical Theology 3 Credit Hours

ST612 Theologyt of Martin Luther 3 Credit Hours

This class examines the literary and historical development of major biblical themes across redemptive history. It is developed through a method of biblical intertextuality and thematic concordance.  It examines the relationship of protology and eschatology, and the progress of redemption focused on the centrality of Christ, His suffering and glory throughout the Scriptures. Key concepts explored include the covenants, the tabernacle/temple, and the city or “kingdom” of God.

This course examines a topic in theology by carefully reading key texts and engaging in seminar- style discussion. the student will grow in their ability to understand the role of Martin Luther in shaping Protestant theology, appreciate the exegetical argumentation in his work, and grasp the structure and emphases of his theology. Students will also familiarize themselves with his literary style in his own context, discern various interpretations of or responses to his theology, and assess the value of his theology for contemporary theological formulation.

ST506 Systematic Theology 1 - God and Creation 3 Credit Hours In this course the students will examine the character of God, the creation, and the nature of humanity. The students will be introduced to pertinent biblical texts and themes, theological terms, key figures, and the importance of culture and history in framing various debates. As the first of three courses in systematic theology, particular attention will be given to theological method and the nature of theology as biblical reasoning within God’s economy of grace.

THEOLOGICAL STUDIES Elective Courses

ST703 Topics in Theology 2 Credit Hours This course examines a topic in theology by carefully reading key texts and engaging in seminar style discussion. Topics vary each semester and have included: the theology of John Calvin, Missional Theology, and the theology of Martin Luther.

ST602 Systematic Theology 2 - Christ and the Church 3 Credit Hours In this course the students will examine the person and work of Christ (the historia salutis), as seen in the context of God’s covenant of grace and in the community of His people created by His gospel. The students will be introduced to pertinent biblical texts and themes, theological terms, key figures, and the importance of culture and history in framing various debates. As the second of three courses in systematic theology, particular attention will be given to the centrality of the gospel in all Christian theology.

ST706 Apologetics 3 Credit Hours This course provides an introduction to the need and basis for Christian apologetics. Students will discuss various apologetic barriers (e.g., refusal to believe in absolute truth, refusal to listen to propositional statements, etc.) and explore possible answers to these barriers. The focus of the class will be on objections which might be encountered in the course of personal evangelism or other church work.

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Doctor of Ministry

At least five of the eight courses must be completed residentially and up to three courses may be taken online.

The Doctor of Ministry is a professional program for pastors, missionaries, and others actively engaged in ministry-related fields. Courses are normally offered in intensive one-week sessions as well as online throughout the year. Students receive precourse assignments that include assigned readings and/or written papers. At the end of the sessions, students receive post-course assignments that may include a written project requiring the students to apply course material.

The candidate will complete a total of 30 credit hours with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. This includes successful completion of eight seminars (24 credit hours) plus the major project (six credit hours). Upon completion of the major project, the candidate will make a successful oral presentation of the work for evaluation. All students are required to complete the project presentation and evaluation at least five weeks before graduation.

Academic Requirements for Admission

Upon successful completion, the student is awarded the Doctor of Ministry degree.

A Master of Divinity degree from an accredited seminary, or its equivalent, with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, followed by at least three years of ministry experience is required. (Equivalency will be decided by the Admissions Committee, and will ordinarily be defined as 72 graduate semester hours or comparable graduate credits in other systems that represent broad-based work in theology, biblical studies, and the arts of ministry and that include a master’s degree.)

Doctor of Ministry course schedules may be obtained by contacting the Registrar’s Office.

In cooperation with Reformed Theological Seminary of Seoul, Korea, Knox offers a Doctor of Ministry course to Korean pastors. Pastors attend classes for two weeks per year in Fort Lauderdale and Knox faculty travel to Seoul to teach up to two courses during the summer.

At their discretion, the Doctor of Ministry Program Committee will interview a prospective student to evaluate their knowledge and skills for ministry in light of the Seminary’s vision for ministry.

Academic Requirements for Candidacy Satisfactory completion of all coursework (24 credit hours) with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 and Program Committee approval of the major project proposal. At their discretion, the Program Committee will interview a candidate to evaluate their readiness for candidacy.

Academic Requirements for Completion All requirements for the Doctor of Ministry degree must be completed within six years from the time of matriculation. Petitions for an exception to this requirement must be approved by the Program Committee.

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Doctor of Ministry

Doctor of Ministry

The Gospel in Church and Culture Track

Biblical Preaching and Teaching Track

Coordinated by Dr. Jim Belcher

Coordinated by Dr. Warren Gage

The Gospel in Church and Culture track is designed to equip pastors in the art of ministering the gospel in both the church and the culture, drawing on the Scriptures and the wisdom of the Christian tradition, exegeting the culture around them in order to help bring transformation to individuals, communities, and society.

The Biblical Preaching and Teaching track is uniquely designed to equip pastors in the art of preaching and teaching. The Apostle Paul challenged Timothy to devote himself to developing his pastoral gifts so that everyone would see his progress (1 Timothy 4:15). Our program seeks to do that by combining the best of the newest technology and the best of the old tradition of sound, biblical preaching. It will strengthen a pastor’s understanding of Scripture and enrich their preaching by enhancing their exegetical skills and deepening their understanding of exegetical theory and methodology.

Learning Outcomes Graduating students will be capable of: • • • •

Learning Outcomes

Exegeting contemporary cultures Communicating the gospel in winsome, clear, and compelling ways Employing the Great Tradition in ministry Articulating the missional implications of the gospel for life in the city

Graduating students will be capable of: • • •

Required Courses • • • • •

DM856 Mission and Tradition: Seeking Balance in Ministry One course in the gospel cluster (courses include: DM846 Show and Tell: Communicating Christianity in the TwentyFirst Century; DM828 Gospel-Driven Ministry) One course in the church cluster (courses include: DM841 Church Planting) One course in the culture cluster (courses include: DM876 Deep Justice) 4 electives courses*

Interpreting the Bible in a Christ-centered way Identifying the story of individual Bible texts Preaching or teaching the text within a broader biblical theology Preaching or teaching the text with sensitivity to the congregation

Required Courses • • •

DM918 Christ-Centered Preaching One course in the preaching cluster (courses include: DM836 The Art of Exegetical Theology in Preaching) One course in the hermeneutics cluster (courses include: DM831 Gospel Hermeneutics 1; DM839 Gospel Hermeneutics 2) One course in the biblical theology cluster (courses include: DM878 Biblical Theology and Preaching that Inspires; DM887 Preaching Christ in the Law, Prophets, and Psalms) 4 elective courses*

Various courses fill the requirements of the clusters listed above. They may vary year to year and involve different instructors.

Final Project

The final project will be both theoretical and practical, addressing the link between the gospel and the church and/or culture. It will demonstrate a strong theoretical understanding of the issues being discussed, carefully dialoguing with the source material, and understanding the Scriptures themselves. At the same time, it will apply these issues concretely to an area of the church or community.

Various courses fill the requirements of the clusters listed above. They may vary year to year and involve different instructors.

Final Project The final project is meant to be a concrete case study. The student will offer exegesis of some portion of Scripture, showing its Christ-centered interpretation, its place amidst a wider biblical theology, and its contemporary relevance for the author’s or other contexts. The project concludes with a practical guide to employing this material in the church, whether as a teaching series or a framework for some other ministry, and measuring outcomes.

*For Logos students, one of these electives will be replaced with DM818 Enriching Plreaching Through Logos.

*For Logos students, one of these electives will be replaced with DM818 Enriching Plreaching Through Logos.

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Doctor of Ministry

Doctoral Course Descriptions*

Theological Exegesis Track

DM834 Radical Grace 3 Credit Hours

Coordinated by Dr. Michael Allen The Theological Exegesis track is uniquely designed to equip pastors in the art of theological exegesis of the Bible. The track fosters an appreciation for reading of the Bible that is canonical, creedal, and contextual. Students learn how to draw on the rich history of exegetical theology for the sake of interpreting the Bible for the church today.

This course analyzes how churches and individuals revert to institutional and personal molds that are religious rather than Christian, legalistic rather than liberated; how they can change; and how they can make a major impact on the world with the good news of grace, freedom, and faithfulness. DM855 Pastoral Counseling 3 Credit Hours

Learning Outcomes

Pastors are called to disciple their sheep - counseling should be considered an intense form of discipleship. This course offers practical tools for helping people weather the storms of life and reconcile problems in relationships. Scripture will be both the diagnostic tool and the prescriptive guide to changing inappropriate behavior and destructive relational styles.

Graduating students will be capable of: • • • •

Understanding the integration of biblical teaching with the disciplines of systematic and historical theology Interpreting the whole Bible in a Christ-centered way Using the history of exegesis (classical and modern) for their own ministry Reading the Bible in a canonically, creedally, and contextually sensitive way

DM937 Revival in Scripture and History 3 Credit Hours

Required Courses • • • •

This course seeks to establish the definition and scope of the benchmark of biblical revival, to evaluate its reflection in church history, to determine its application to the Church of today, and to appraise our personal embrace and display of the ways and means that God has appointed toward “Revival.”

DM916 Scripture and Doctrine DM926 Using the History of Exegesis One OT Exegesis and Theology book study (courses include: DM868 Deuteronomy: Exegesis and Theology; DM936 Job: Exegesis and Theology) One NT Exegesis and Theology book study (Courses include: DM838 Romans: Exegesis and Theology; DM908 Ephesians: Exegesis and Theology; DM872 Hebrews: Exegesis and Theology) 4 elective courses*

DM999 Major Project Dissertation 6 Credit Hours The Major Project Dissertation must demonstrate the student’s ability to build an adequate bridge between significant ministerial concerns in a creative and meaningful way. It must be sufficient in length to demonstrate an ability to integrate exegetical and theological insights with understanding of the practice of ministry in contemporary social contexts.

The book studies listed vary year to year and involve different instructors, though an OT and a NT book study will be offered each year.

Final Project

*This is a representative list of courses

The final project will be a concrete case study. The student will offer theological exegesis of a selected portion of Scripture, showing its canonical testimony, its creedal importance, and its contemporary relevance for the author’s or other contexts. In so doing the student will draw on classical and modern resources, demonstrating competence to read critically within the tradition of Christian theological exegesis. The project concludes with a practical guide to employing this material in the church, whether as a teaching series or a framework for some other ministry. *For Logos students, one of these electives will be replaced with DM818 Enriching Plreaching Through Logos.

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Doctoral Course Descriptions

DM878 Biblical Theology and Preaching that Inspires 3 Credit Hours

DM818 Enriching Preaching through Logos Software Application 3 Credit Hours

Biblical theology culminates in systematic theology. This course takes the student of the Scripture and teaches him to recognize the beauty of the Word of God. It moves from analysis of the text to an appreciation of the beauty and rich meaning of the text. It explores the meta-narrative, or grand story, of Scripture. What is the meaning of God’s marvelous history of redemption? How can you best capture its wonder and express its delight?

Biblical Preaching and Teaching Track

To preach and teach effectively, the pastor must have a foundation of sound exegetical competence upon which to build. This course is a developmental course designed to teach pastors and teachers the latest software tools in exegetical analysis stressing proficiency in skill and efficiency in time. Logos Bible Software is the principal software engine used in the course.

DM887 Preaching Christ in the Law, Prophets, and Psalms 3 Credit Hours The law uniquely teaches the love of Jesus. The prophets show how His justice leads to His mercy. And the Psalms show the tender heart of the Davidic king. This course is designed to show forth the love of Christ even through the preaching of the thunder of the law. It teaches you to proclaim the comfort told by the prophets, all tuned to the merciful harp of David, the sweet singer of Israel. Christ is all in all, even in—and especially in—the Old Testament.

DM831 Gospel Hermeneutics 1: Typology, Symbol, and the Christ 3 Credit Hours This course will provide the initial introduction to the hermeneutic of Christ and the apostles. It will show that a typological reading of the biblical text is essential to the discovery of the fullness and beauty of Christ in all the Scriptures. It will survey and develop multiple illustrations of the hermeneutical categories employed throughout both Old and New Testaments to tell the story of the sufferings and glory of Christ.

DM905 Preaching Christ Prophetically 3 Credit Hours Two spies sent into the great city, seven trumpets sound, a great city falls, the people of God rescued. Is Joshua’s battle against Jericho the basis for the dramatic narrative of the Book of Revelation? The fathers of the church taught as much, but modern expositors have overlooked this completely. What have we missed? Also, there are significant literary patterns interweaving the fourth gospel and Revelation. Is John’s Gospel a significant interpretive clue to The Apocalypse? This course seeks to establish a clear framework within the Scripture for understanding Revelation: its genre, its symbols, and its meaning to the church today.

DM836 The Art of Exegetical Theology In Preaching 3 Credit Hours Adele Berlin correctly noted that we must know how the Bible speaks, not simply what it speaks. This course develops a poetic vision of the biblical horizons, carefully considering textual structure. It looks to the iconic aspect of the text, developing a sense of symbol. It explores the redemptive message of the Bible, especially the story of heaven’s Bridegroom who comes to slay the great, red dragon to rescue you, His beloved, and to take you to the palace of His Father, the King. It teaches the student to preach the message of the Bible as a wooing of the beloved, the church of all the ages. It teaches us, with John the Baptist, to “hear the voice of the Bridegroom,” and so to rejoice!

DM918 Christ-Centered Preaching 3 Credit Hours Moving from theory to practice, this course teaches the student how to read hearers, how to show the relevance of the text to them, how to structure a sermon or lesson for maximum effectiveness, what style to strive for, how best to illustrate and how to tell Scriptural stories effectively.

DM839 Gospel Hermeneutics 2: Preaching Christ in All the Scriptures 3 Credit Hours

DM982 Holy Land Tour

The Savior claimed that the Scriptures spoke of Him (John 5:39), that the theme of the Old Testament was the suffering of Messiah and the glory to follow (Luke 24:25-27). Paul claimed that the Scriptures taught that Christ must suffer death and burial followed by a third-day resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:4). This course is designed to enable you to see the gospel clearly and pervasively in the Old Testament, just as the New Testament authors claimed. It focuses on the many, many foreshadowings of the death and third-day resurrection of Christ in the Old Testament. It further explores the New Testament method of typology and symbols of Christ that unite the testaments around the theme of the coming of Christ, as Matthew stated, “that it might be fulfilled.”

This three-credit class is offered as an elective in all programs. It is a focused study tour of Israel, surveying the most prominent sites of biblical interest. It is led by a seminary faculty member and a local licensed guide. Highlights include: Joppa (The port of Jonah), Caesarea by the Sea (Paul’s Prison, Herod’s palace), Mount Carmel (Elijah and the priests of Baal), Megiddo (view of Jezreel Valley, site of biblical Armageddon), Nazareth, Cana (site of Jesus’ miracle of wine), Sea of Galilee (boat ride on the Sea, Mount Arbel, Mount of Beatitudes), Tell Dan (Caesarea Philippi), Beth Shean, Jordan River baptism, Dead Sea, Masada, Qumran (Dead Sea scrolls), Jerusalem (Temple Mount, Mount Skopus,

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Doctoral Course Descriptions

Mount Olives, City of David excavations, Garden of Gethsemane, Garden Tomb communion), Bethlehem, Valley of Elah (David and Goliath).

Theological Exegesis Track

DM999 Major Project Dissertation 6 Credit Hours

DM838 Romans: Exegesis and Theology 3 Credit Hours

The Major Project Dissertation paper is an applied dissertation. It should be a minimum of 120 pages and demonstrate the student’s ability to build an adequate bridge between significant ministerial concerns in a creative and meaningful way.

A study of Paul’s Letter to the Romans focused on its literary and canonical argument, engaging the history of interpretation, and considering its theological and pastoral implications. As we engage the text we will encounter a number of major issues in theology and ministry: the person and work of Christ, the meaning and content of God’s righteousness and grace, the definition of and distinction between law and gospel, the world as created and fallen, the relationship between faith, freedom, and obedience, and a Christological reading of the Old Testament. DM868 Deuteronomy: Exegesis and Theology 3 Credit Hours A study of Deuteronomy that focuses on its literary and canonical argument, drawing on the history of interpretation and considering its implications for Christian doctrine and ministry. In so doing, we consider a number of major issues in theology and ministry: the people of God and the place (kingdom) of God, the importance of remembrance in the life of faith, the relation of the Old and New Covenants, the objective and subjective aspects of the Christian life, worship, social ethics, Christian formation, and the relationship of faith and obedience. DM872 The Epistle to the Hebrews: Exegesis and Theology 3 Credit Hours A study of the Epistle to the Hebrews that focuses on its literary and canonical argument, drawing on the history of interpretation and considering its implications for Christian doctrine and ministry. In so doing, we consider a number of major issues in theology and ministry: the work of Christ, the relation of the Old and New Covenants, the objective and subjective aspects of the Christian life, suffering and perseverance, assurance, and the nature of faith. DM916 Scripture and Doctrine 3 Credit Hours Doctrine begins and ends with scriptural interpretation. By working with and testing this basic thesis this course will commend an account of the relationship between scripture and doctrine in which doctrine is understood as a reading of scripture and as that which enables us to read scripture well. To consider this reciprocal relationship – theology flows from scripture and returns us to scripture as better readers – this course will explore the character and content of the Bible, the relationship between the Old and New Testament, the process and history of interpretation, and a number of case-studies demonstrating the biblical basis for doctrinal formulations and, conversely, how doctrinal formulations can aid biblical interpretation. Throughout, attention will be given to the effectiveness and creativity of God’s word, indicating that ultimately it is not we

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Doctoral Course Descriptions

who interpret scripture, but God who interprets us through his word.

The Gospel in Church and Culture Track

DM926 Using the History of Exegesis 3 Credit Hours

DM828 Gospel-Driven Ministry 3 Credit Hours

We do not read the Bible alone. We read within the “communion of saints” and are reliant upon the Holy Spirit’s illumination of this biblical text throughout the centuries and around the globe. In this course, students learn how to make use of the exegetical resources drawn from church history. We familiarize ourselves with the interpretive work of the patristic, medieval, and Reformation eras, so that we can employ not only contemporary but also classical voices in our ongoing conversations about the Bible. We learn how to glean the strengths of the history of exegesis, while doing so critically and faithfully.

In this course we will consider the impact of the gospel on the shape of the Christian life and the practice of Christian ministry. We will explore the way in which the work of Jesus not only justifies, but also sanctifies the Christian. Further, the ministry of Jesus not only grounds our ministries, but sustains them day by day. Grace changes everything: we will consider its implications in our lives and our ministries. DM841 Church Planting and Revitalization 3 Credit Hours Examines in-depth the biblical principles and practice of church planting and revitalization. DM846 Show and Tell: Communicating Christianity in the 21st Century 3 Credit Hours This class will explore the challenge of communicating the depth and beauty of Christianity in the 21st Century –to thoughtful believers and honest skeptics. Starting with the assumption that all people have a worldview and are moral beings, we will look at the best way to reach them, both by showing and telling the amazing message of Christianity. We will spend time ― “exegeting” some of the major cultural trends around us, look deeper into the current loss of self, truth and community in our world, and discover how to present Christianity, which is the only way to regain human flourishing, horizons for purpose and meaning, and life-changing community that meets our deepest need for belonging and growth. DM856 Mission and Tradition: Seeking the Balance in Ministry 3 Credit Hours This class will explore the emerging and traditional churches, as we seek to discover a third way to be the Church in the 21st century. Deep Church is the phrase C. S. Lewis used to describe the body of believers committed to mere Christianity. Unfortunately church in our postmodern era has been marked by a certain shallowness. This course brings hope to those who may be fed up with contemporary pragmatism by offering alternative visions for this present culture. While some traditional churches have reacted negatively and/or defensively, we will seek to bring the best insights from all sides of the issue to forge a third way between emerging and traditional: a missional church committed to both its own culture and its Christian tradition, valuing innovation in worship, arts, and community (mission) but also creeds, confessions, and historic patterns of worship and discipleship (tradition). *Other courses listed in the program outline are forthcoming.

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2013–2014 Academic Calendar 2013 Fall Term July 29–August 2 Registration for Fall Semester August 20 Student Orientation / Convocation August 22 Fall Semester Classes begin September 2 Labor Day Holiday (Seminary Closed) September 10 Day of Prayer September 10 Incompletes Due from Summer Term October 14-18 Fall Semester Break November 28–29 Thanksgiving Holiday (Seminary Closed) December 2-6 Registration for Winter Term/Spring Semester December 3 Last Day of Fall Semester Classes December 4 Make-up Day December 5-6 Reading Days December 9-13 Fall Semester Examinations December 14–January 3 Christmas and New Year’s Holiday 2014 Winter Term January 6 First day of Winter Term classes January 22 Last day of Winter Term classes January 22 Incompletes due from Fall Semester 2014 Spring Term January 23 Spring Semester Classes begin February 6 Day of Prayer March 10-14 Spring Semester break April 18 Good Friday (Seminary Closed) April 28–May 2 Registration for Summer Term/Fall Semester May 2 Last Day of Spring Semester Classes May 5 Make-up Day May 6-7 Reading Days May 8-14 Spring Semester Examinations May 14 Major Project Proposal Due (DMin—one year prior to graduation. See Project Manual for complete schedule.) May 16 Commencement 2014 Summer Term June 2 Summer Term classes begin June 18 Incompletes Due from Spring Semester July 28–August 1 Fall Registration August 14 Last Day of Summer Term classes August 15–16 Reading Days August 19 Summer Term Examinations September 23 Incompletes Due from Summer Term

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Our Director of Admissions will be happy to assist you through your application process ___________________________________________ Please call to arrange a campus visit, too!

You may reach us by telephone Monday through Friday 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST 1-800-344-KNOX (5669) 954-771-0376 Direct all correspondence to:

Knox Theological Seminary Admissions Office 5554 North Federal Highway Fort Lauderdale, FL 33308 Fax: 954-351-3343 admissions@knoxseminary.edu www.KnoxSeminary.edu

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Ministry Partners

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Knox Theological Seminary Academic Catalog 2013-2014