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The Outdoor Specialist For more than 50 years, Fjällräven has been dedicated to making the outdoors more accessible for everyone. Our lightweight, robust backpacks and signature G-1000® fabrics have proven the test of time on expeditions to Mt. Everest and Greenland.

In 2009, our Kajka Backpack won Gear of The Year in Sweden and Finland. In 2010, our Akka Dome tent was awarded the same prize. Our Keb Trouser and Gaiter Trouser were awarded The Outdoor Industry Award for best outdoor trouser in 2011 and 2012 respectfully.

From the world’s fi rst condensation free tent to our iconic backpacks, Fjällräven has We are proud of these recognitions, and we become the leading brand in Scandinavia. continue to be committed to developing

functional, timeless and durable outdoor apparel and equipment that will accompany their owners on adventures for many years to come. For more information about Fjällräven, visit our website www.fjallraven.us or one of our retail partners today.


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1. Keb Trosers Technical trekking trousers in stretch and durable G-1000® Eco. Structured fit, ventilation and pockets. 2. Kånken The classic Fjällräven Kånken backpack in hardwearing Vinylon-F® fabric. 3. Greenland Wax Environmentally friendly wax that makes the G-1000® fabric water resistant and improves its durability. 4. Greenland Jacket Iconic jacket in G-1000®, pockets and tight fitting fixed hood.

5. Kajka Unembellished, durable and highly functional backpack in classic Fjällräven spirit. Perfect fit adjustment system and wet/dry compartment. 6. Vintage Backpack Top-loading, vintage inspired backpack with leather staps. Large side pockets, padded shoulder straps and framed back. 7. Gaiter Trousers No.1 Advanced trekking trousers in G-1000® Eco and G-1000® HD for demanding outdoor activities any season of the year. Zip-off solution with built-in gaiter.


S T R E E T FA S H I O N F O R INTELLECTUAL SLACKERS


2012

WeActivists DANIJEL STANKOVIC & LOVE ENEROTH SHOT BY ROBIN ÅHLGREN www.wesc.com


info@syncindustries.com

www.ragwear.com

facebook.com/ragwear


CHRISTIAN MAALOUF brixton.com


Michel Menard (604) 688.3765

www.fabinc.ca


Booth

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Also showing at Capsule New York, Capsule Las Vegas & Agenda Long Beach For sales and inquires, please contact info@arcaid.ca


Booth 115 spring 2013

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Emilie Marchand Cell: 403.797.3743 Fax: 403.263.3743 Email: emarchand@trimeragroup.com


artist: janice wu

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SPRING 2013 COLLECTION

C1RCA.COM / FACEBOOK.COM/C1RCAFOOTWEAR


ISSUE #1 VOL #2 SPRING / SUMMER 2013

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Léa C. Kiefer Lea C. Kiefer currently resides in Vancouver and works at Zebraclub Clothing and Accessories.   She loves throwing life’s curve balls back at the pitcher, and you’ll generally find her exploring these bends on her bike (...or eating eggs). www.loveladylea.com

Jules Moore Jules Moore is a freelance writer and an editor at Hobo Magazine. She was born in Winnipeg and currently stalks Bob Dylan from her home in Vancouver.

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Daniel Curtis Daniel Curtis is an art director, traveler and skateboarder A few of his favorite things are 80s motocross, Helmut Newton, Paul Simon and Rushmore. www.danielcurtis.ca

Greg Haasbeek Greg Haasbeek is a proud Winnipegger and runs the family business Royal Sports/Kings with his brother under the watchful eye of the big guy. He has been known to confidently take over the room no matter what the topic is and enjoys a skinny dip from time to time. royalsports.me

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Kendra Jasper Kendra Jasper possesses many talents and was once even a magician’s assistant. When she’s not running a fashion boutique, you may find her playing the piano, writing, or creating her custom jewelry line, Feasting On Rainbows. feastingonrainbows.tumblr.com

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Jeff Nieckar Jeff Nieckar currently lives in Vancouver, B.C, where he divides his time between putting words together, keeping his heart from falling apart, degenerate internet gambling and asinine university studies.

On the cover: “Oil Slick One” by Michael Carter - 2012

The publisher, authors and contributors reserve their rights in regards to copyright of their work. No part of this work covered by the copyright may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written consent of the publisher. © KnowShow 2012


SHECKLER SHOT WEARING HIS SIGNATURE CHINO PANT, BALL PARK HENLEY, AND RIDING BLOCKED PRO BOARD.

RYAN

SHOP THE COLLECTION AT: PLANBSKATEBOARDS.COM

NOSEGRIND FULL LENGTH VIDEO IN PROGRESS

SHECKLER


PHOTO: STEPHEN WILDE

WWW.LIFETIMECOLLECTIVE.COM


ISSUE #1 VOL #2 SPRING / SUMMER 2013

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MEN’S FASHION - “STILL GOT IT” GASTOWN EMPIRE ARTIST FEATURE - MICHAEL CARTER

PRODUCT FEATURE - “NITTY GRITTY” CITY FEATURE - WINNIPEG

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Creative Director Paul Higgins paul.megadestroyer.com Editor-in-Chief Perry Pugh perry@knowshow.ca Editors Kendra Jasper. Jules Moore Fashion Editor Tanus Lewis tanuslewis.com Layout and Design Paul Higgins Production Controller Nick Brown lifetimecollective.com Advertising Director Perry Pugh perry@knowshow.ca

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WOMEN’S FASHION - “HAPPENSTANCE” PHOTO FEATURE - “HOARDERS” SHOP PROFILE - MENU SHOP PROFILE - F AS IN FRANK BANDTRACKER - MUSIC REVIEWS

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We decided that after 12 issues it was time to seal off the first dozen and start anew on a second volume. Though our recipe is largely the same as it was when this magazine was first published late in the summer of 2006, the experience of the years has allowed us to continually improve the tome you have just opened. If you need any more testimony to the idea that things get better with age, look no further than the photos Brett Beadle shot in our editorial aptly named “Still Got It”. The handsome gentleman in the shoot is actually my 96 year old grandfather, Douglas Pugh. After a lifetime in which the rap sheet of his achievements would out-word this intro, he effortlessly added “male model” to his resume. I welcome you to the first issue of the next twelve. We hope you enjoy this issue of the KNOWMAG and look forward to where we are going as much as we do. Regards, Perry Pugh GM, KNOWSHOW

Contact KnowMag 130 - 49 Dunlevy Avenue Vancouver BC, Canada V6B 4E3 www.knowmag.net / www.knowshow.ca info@knowshow.ca The publisher, authors and contributors reserve their rights in regards to copyright of their work. No part of this work covered by the copyright may be reproduced or copied in any form or by any means without the written consent of the publisher. © KnowShow 2012


Environmentally friendlier apparel and footwear ElementBrand.com


fall 2012 elementeden.com

“It is activity that breathes life into our world. Get outside.�

alex jacket, savanna dress, margo knit


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Fashion Editor TANUS LEWIS tanuslewis.com

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Additional styling KENDRA JASPER feastingonrainbows.tumblr.com

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ALTERNATIVE APPAREL tank and shorts RVCA hoodie KANGOL hat WESC hoodie BODY GLOVE bikini


WESC shorts SNAP by F AS IN FRANK shirt IS EYEWEAR sunglasses CIRCA shoes F AS IN FRANK vintage hat ANN COLE swim suit INSIGHT shorts


BRIXTON hat and shorts RIPCURL shirt NATIVE shoes SUPER sunglasses MAAJI bikini F AS IN FRANK sunglasses


LRG tank PETER GRIMM hat HUSTLER shirt QUICKSILVER shorts


LIFETIME dress BODY GLOVE bikini top LIFETTIME poncho, shorts, shoes, hat


LRG hodie, t-shirt, jeans ETNIES shoes RIPCURL swim suit and shorts


THE CRITICAL SLIDE SOCIETY shirt and shorts KANGOL hat INSIGHT bikini SUPER sunglasses BIRDS OF A FEATHER bracelets


SNAP by F AS IN FRANK top and sunglasses SKYE bikini WESC shoes MITCHELL & NESS hat and jersey LIFETIME sweatpants WESC shoes


PROFILE - GASTOWN EMPIRE

G A S T O W N Interview & Story by Jeff Nieckar

Photography by Ian Azariah

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PROFILE - GASTOWN EMPIRE

To be sure, a Zissou cap, a picot jacket and a pair of skinny jeans just doesn’t cut it in Vancouver. And who know this better than Rob Lo, the man behind the newest high end boutique in Gastown, Roden Gray. And this avenue is no stranger to attempting avant-grarde men’s fashion, as once being home to Raif Adelberg’s child, Richard Kidd. But that model of luxury street wear didn’t work at that time, so it must be that Lo had something other in mind. We caught up with Rob Lo, to hear what he has in store for the new Roden Gray. After having a shop on Cambie, the space on Water Street came to Rob’s attention. “There’s better foot traffic and you just get that much more exposure being on a main street like Water”, says Lo. Finding a space on Water and Carrall would basically put them in the expanding cultural locus of Vancouver. At present, Water St was mostly absent of menswear boutiques which put them at the forefront of an increasing untapped demographic, with all the new money moving into Gastown. There were several abandon buildings up Water and Abbott that were ripe for renovation, and Roden Gray jumped on the opportunity as quickly as it came available. Lo says aout he location, “ Being at this end if Gastown is great, there’s a kind of cohesiveness between the shops and restaurants that you don’t see anywhere else in town.” But perhaps it’s just the sake of timing for Roden Gray. Gastown’s resurgence is appropriately suitable for their lines and price points. It could have been at one time that this district was not ready for a shop such as this. But Lo is re-assuring in the sense that he feels a part of the Gastown community. Lo says, “Myself and the staff at Roden Gray don’t just come to Gastown to work, it’s where we live, where we spend our nights out, and where we shop for our friends. It’s easy to point a customer in the right direction if they’re looking for a place to have dinner or drinks after shopping the neighbourhood, and we’re proud to be part of the community.”

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It is no doubt hard to attempt to re-appropriate a history or an image in some place that is wrought with its history of its own, such as Gastown. I asked Rob about this, and about what, if any, legacy could be placed on this resurgence of this old community. He says, “[We have a] shared appreciation for what the neighbourhood represents in Vancouver. Gastown has such a rich history as the the oldest part of the city and it’s fitting that a lot of the retailers and restauranteurs in the area play off of that idea in their design and direction. I certainly feel connected to the other shop owners in the neighbourhood and when a new shop or restaurant opens up here, it’s better for all of us.” But back to the business. In regards to the expansion of an online division, Rob says that, “The online store has been a great way for us to promote our brick-and-mortar store, with the internet and especially social media we’re able to reach new customers and educate our existing customers on new product and trends. It’s also raised our brand to an international level that’s helped everything from buying to employee recruitment. E-commerce is a new arena for us, but we’re growing quickly and I think it has the potential to spin off as its own business in the future.” With the expansion of space, comes also the contemplation of expanding to other demographics. The stores have always been menswear, but something for women may be in the works. Lo says” We’ve always had women coming into the shop saying things like “why don’t you carry women’s brands?”, even way back on Cambie St. I think a lot of ladies appreciate what we’ve done with menswear and we’re trying to offer the same sort of experience to them.” It’s no doubt true that roden Gray has cornered a market of style, elegance, and taste that is unlike anything else in Gastown. True to form, it’s the early bird that chimes in full. Yet, it’s not without the hard work of Lo, and a finger on the pulse to find him where he is today .

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PROFILE - GASTOWN EMPIRE

G A S T O W N

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PROFILE - GASTOWN EMPIRE

From the dust and ashes that teased the cobblestone streets of Gastwon in 2007 or before, come a story fit for a miniseries, or one rife with contention, one where hero is played against society, the fool, the sad, the sympathetic, the guilty.

of the murkiest area of Hastings, and the clash of luxury and destitution left patrons with a second thought. It was 2007, and the cultural efficacy of the Gastown industry was not yet at its full capacity.

Mark Brand is a man of appearances. This is not a superficial meandering, but simply an evaluative that legitimizes the Vancouver entrepreneurs place in the world. My ears have been open to anyone who could recently spout an opinion of him. And the emotion runs the gamut. Invested, distant, professional, adolescent, fair, honest, respectful, self-interested. Adjectives are brief and mean for their very part, so I decided instead to approach his calculated appropriation of a historic Vancouver neighborhood with a degree of neutrality.

Yet, Boneta was outmatching most of the other establishments in the area. It seemed like a good time to expand. Brand found a small listing on Alexander to open a clothing shop called Sharks & Hammers. This was at the time the olympics were coming up. With the success of Boneta, Brand thought it was a good opportunity to scoop up some more dead real estate in the area. It was prett well known that Gastown was about to undergo a resurgence, with major furniture retailers and property management companies buying up space on Water and Powell.

When I worked as a sous chef in a semi reputable restaurant in Gastown, Mark would frequent the place and order the best of our list. He always complimented me or my chefs on the excellent job we did preparing his meal. To me, he seemed like a nice guy, and to boot he was street, he was

By 2010, Brand had opened his clothing retail, plus a cocktail forward lounge on the corner of Powell and Carrall. In addition to that, he found another space on Powell to open Catalog Gallery, equipping cultural relativist Robert Squire to curate only the best of up and coming art and

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into hip hop and had a tattoo on his neck. I mean what the fuck? Anyways, I met some heavy hitters in the restaurant industry during this time, and heard some rumblings about a be-all-end-all restaurant that was in the works for Gastown. Rumour had it, that Andre McGillvry (formerly LeCrocidle, Steve DaCruz, Neil Ingram and a baller unnamed chef) were going to open a restaurant somewhere close that would blow the shit apart. It was apparent the owners of my restaurant were concerned. Though their original plan was never consummated, the coveted space of 1 W Cordova came available after a failed business came to a halt. DIY reno’s took place, and these savvy restaurant men, knowing how to squeeze margins, erected Boneta within a few months thanks to basically their own hands. Boneta opened to instant rave reviews and rewards. Chef Jeremy Bastien was in full control of the kitchen, creating a menu that was unmatched in the area, or even the city for that matter. Gastown was still young at this time, as there was no other fine dining options in the area. New money and old money flocked to Boneta as a consequence of its parochial success. The problem was, was that the location of Boneta was less than inviting. 1 Cordova bent on the lines

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artists. From there, Sea Monstr Sushi became a shoe in, and the empire was in full commence. Now, most of the fame, and the glory has been made upon Save-On Meats. I can understand the nostalgia from the community point of view. When I lived there, I indulged in their diner burgers on several occasions. When it closed its doors, I gave it a big, “What the fuck?”. Now this is where the story turns from being about an entrepreneur to being about a tycoon. Please excuse my words, but there is nothing better to describe such. When Mark Brand decided to invest in SaveOn, he became not the business man in Gastown, but the business man here. With The Diamond, Boneta, Catalog, Sharks & Hammers fully behind and in front of him, the possibility of acquiring the Save-On space seemed limitless. And his entrepreneurial mind wouldn’t let this opportunity pass. Even after logistic complications, Brand resurrected the classic diner to its full potential. This success led him to a dedicated mini series on the Oprah Winfrey network called Gastown Gamble. This

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PROFILE - GASTOWN EMPIRE

publicity, along with much other recognition has steamrolled Save-On Meats to the forefront of Vancouverites consciousness. But that’s not it. Underneath it all, or should I say, above it all, is a commissary kitchen that’s providing a wealth of growth and opportunity to all parts of the city. We mentioned previously how Gastown lies precariously on the edge of the most ill afforded, drug addled area of the western world. The management at Save-On takes care in initiating the less fortunate in its hiring policies, and even with their price point. Each day, they offer discounted breakfast sandwiches to the street, as an offer of contrition. The commissary is an offering to many local businesses and charities. Each day, the troop offers meals to various in need charities in the Eastside, as well as specific food products for bigger companies such as the Donnelly Group. If anyone has spent time in Gastown between now and some time ago, It’d be plain to see that there is a lot that has changed. There is certain public opinion that revels in the style of gentrification and the rejection of such for whatever purpose. Now, gentrification, may in fact be a viable concern.. I express this concern to Mark, and he echos my thoughts in saying that what he has appropriated were buildings that had no plans for them, or which the government was never vying for. It seems important when we vilify or champion an entrepreneur for what he has done, what he is willing to do, or what he isn’t willing to do. The thing is, Gastown was just waiting to be reified. When Mark Brand moved to Vancouver, he aligned himself with the right people. He was aware that there was something missing. His time spent at Chambar gave him a good education, and a good initiative to think that he could provide the city with something that it had yet to encounter. At that time, in 2007, we ask, what is it about Vancouver that didn’t make it a dining destination like New York? Cocktail forward, I think, was Brand’s response. With the help of some of the best bartenders and managers in the industry, Mark cut his chops and Mark figured out what was right, and what Vancouver lacked, what Vancouver needed. Sure, there are plenty of near perfect restaurants in Vancouver that know how to provide a certain experience. But, it was something different, for Brand. The everyman, for starters. As a writer, I look at the eyes of my subject, then take the words second. A product of psychology, or philosophy, whatever. As I said initially about my thorough investigation, it came back skewed, to both the left, the right, the good, the proverbial bad. I like Mark Brand, because I can engage with him and feel I’m getting the truth. I can understand his commitment to business and posterity, and negate the poetry of capitalism for just a little moment. I leave all the personal conflict, the agitation of society in general, and the amusement of the celebrity. Out of the ashes came Gastown, and it would never, I mean, never, have happened without the dream of a young man from Nova Scotia.

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PROFILE - GASTOWN EMPIRE

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

M I C H A E L Interview by Gunnar Kvaran

Portrait Photography by Mike Selsky

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Michael Carter is a Los Angeles based Art Director and Designer. A graduate of the Alberta College of Art and Design, he has worked primarily in the world of commercial art, creating ad campaigns, products, printed material and logotypes for companies such as Burton Snowboards, Nixon, Lifetime, Native Shoes and many others. Could you give us some background as to how you got started? I have known what I wanted to do with my life since I was very young. My mom put me into pottery classes when I was 7 and always supported creating art and being a creative person. I had no real interests in school apart from art class and computer lab. Some early design programs called Postermaker and Hypercard got me interested in how a computer could be used to design and visualize content from a young age. I was making graphics and zines for skateboarding, and snowboarding as a teenager, went to school for design, and luckily continued doing what I’ve always wanted to do. Where did you grow up? I was born and raised in Sydney, Australia. I ended up moving to Vancouver with my mom and brother, we lived in the Sylvia hotel for a bit while my mom was doing her post doc. From there spent a lot of time in Kelowna (Rutland church ramp), and then ended up spending the rest of my formative years in Calgary, Alberta. What was it like growing up in Calgary? Calgary is an interesting place. First day at school I got beat up by a crew of native kids because I had an Australian accent, and was probably wearing some weird colorful clothes. Full beat down by some descendants of native warriors. I came home covered in blood with all my shit torn up. Second day at school I got beat up by some young aspiring hockey players. From there I ended up getting in a lot of fights before I made some good friends. I was wearing a Westbeach hoodie that my brother gave me and this was the uniform that introduced me to a bunch of kids that skateboarded and snowboarded at my school. I had a beat to shit new deal slick with rat wheels, a bootlegged copy

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

nixonnow.com/santigold

nixonnow.com

The journey is the reward, get on it and make it your own. Jeremy Jones.

nixonnow.com

beastieboys.com nixonnow.com nixonnow.com/jeremyjones

Various NIXON advertising 2007-2011

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of The Plan B questionable video, and a black snow. That got me into the club (protection), and from then on we ran around Calgary getting chased by wannabe G’s driving Honda CRX’s, Going to punk shows at Carpenters Union Hall, then the same night going to some weird rave in a warehouse. Snowboarding was definitely a very positive thing for me as well there, and I made some great friends out of it. We all loved to snowboard and skateboard and some of us went on to making careers out of it. I was always on the sidelines, got exposed at an early age as to how the whole company sponsorship thing worked, how kids would market themselves with sponsor me videos, and end up with boxes of free boards, t-shirts and stickers the next month. All pre-internet, making VHS edits with “Pause, Record” editing, then overdubbing some music to it. Self-promotion and understanding how rudimentary marketing worked was something that was ingrained in all of us I think. How did you get into designing stuff for skateboard and snowboard companies? One of my friends TJ Schneider was snowboarding for Sessions, I had the opportunity to do some T-Shirts for them. Jamie Cormack hired me as a shop kid at a store called “The Source”, that’s where I met Reid Stewart who was also working there and was just starting up a company in his parents basement called Lifetime. I did a bunch of T-shirt designs with him in the beginning, mostly a lot of angry protest inspired stuff. We were super naïve, and had a really fun time feeling like we were making the world a better place by talking shit about the government on a T-Shirt. Around the same time I was publishing a small independent snowboard, skateboard, art, music, weirdo zine called “Truth Zine”. Again I was really naïve and just making them for fun, convincing companies my friends were sponsored by to pay for ads so I could afford to print it. TJ Schneider helped me out a lot, kicking me little design projects and introducing me to marketing people in the states to get me freelance work. I ended up doing his second pro model for Capita, which was called the “Mid-Life Crisis”

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These moments were brought to you by Jeff Curtes, Dean "Blotto" Gray, Adam Moran, and Vincent Skoglund.

ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Moments

that matter

We know it's hard to believe that this is the last ad of the season—we had so much more we wanted to show ya. Here is a gallery of moments to hold you over until the next snowfall. Keep the ride alive at burton.com

BUR0127 End of Season Ad

PUBLICATION AND/OR PRINTER NOTE:

Burton No

4c/p

1:1

cyan

yellow

magenta

black

The printing material for this insertion/printed piece is to be examined carefully upon receipt. If material is deficient or does not comply with your requirements, please contact Traffic at Jager Di Paola Kemp Design immediately: 802.864.5884 (fax 802.863.8803). ALL MECHANICALS AND ARTWORK SHOULD BE RETURNED UPON COMPLETION TO: Jager Di Paola Kemp 47 Maple St. Burlington VT 05401-4784 USA

These moments were brought to you by Jeff Curtes, Dean "Blotto" Gray, Adam Moran, and Vincent Skoglund.

PUBLICATION AND/OR PRINTER NOTE:

Project number: BUR0317 Project name: Snowboarder

Client: Burton Keyline to print: NO

Colors: 4c/p

Scale: 1:1

Cyan

M a g e nta

Ye l l o w

Black

The printing material for this insertion/printed piece is to be examined carefully upon receipt. If material is deficient or does not comply with your requirements, please contact Traffic at Jager Di Paola Kemp Design immediately: 802.864.5884 (fax 802.863.8803). ALL MECHANICALS AND ARTWORK SHOULD BE RETURNED UPON COMPLETION TO: Jager Di Paola Kemp 47 Maple St. Burlington VT 05401-4784 USA

Various BURTON advertising and board graphics 2005-2010

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

while I was in college. I was on rep flow from Scott Currie who was the Burton rep in Alberta at the time as well. I think the only reason I even tried to get on the Burton flow program was so I could get the new graphics before anyone else. I was really obsessed with everything Burton made from the mid 90’s to early 00’s… Loved the whole look and feel of the brand, and learned about Burton’s design agency JDK and what they did for the company. From then on I knew I had to work there. So you just thought about working at JDK and it happened? Yeah Basically… During my last year of school I was freelancing quite a bit. Justin Heit who was working at Nixon left to start an agency and hired me to do a lot of various projects for him down in California. My good friend Dustin Koop who I went to college with dropped out of ACAD to go be the Art Director at Skateboarder magazine, and I crashed on his couch for a month or so in San Juan Capistrano while designing stuff, and finishing my last class of school. I went back to Calgary to get my diploma and had a letter waiting for me at my Moms house. It was basically the Willy Wonka golden ticket, in it was a phone a number to call and arrange a flight over to Vermont to have an interview at JDK . Went over to the interview, everyone there was super cool, and they gave me a job. How was your time at JDK? JDK was a great place to work. It was like a finishing school of sorts. I was exposed to so many talented people from all over the world that were great at what they did, and we were all eager to learn more and push each other. They knew I came from snowboarding so placed me on Burton projects right away. Ad campaigns, board graphics, the Burton rebrand, all the stuff I dreamed of doing. It was a really great experience. Got to travel around the world, work with some great photographers, and design board graphics… What more could a kid from Canada that is a designer want? Alongside the Burton work I was also working on a lot of the super corporate stuff that paid the bills for the studio. Microsoft, Virgin, Pepsi, a spattering of various energy drinks and we even worked on a new logo for Spike TV, which was random. Met some friends for life there,

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Various BURTON advertising and board graphics 2005-2010

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Photos by Tim Barber, Klara Kalstrom and Thobias Faldt

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

and have some very fond memories of that place! We had a mini ramp in the basement and a fully decked out silkscreen studio we could use as we please. Oh yeah, I’m also the undisputed 2006 JDK Boxing Champion. So from there you ended up at Nixon? Yeah, I was working one day and my phone rang. It was my friend Randy Laybourne, he’s a friend in the Canadian design connection that migrated to Cali to work for skate brands in the 90’s. He got offered a position at Nixon as their Art Director but turned it down to do art direction at Element. He said my name came up in conversation and that I should call Chad DiNenna from Nixon right away. Next thing I know I’m on a plane over to Encinitas for an interview and I’m packing up my house in Vermont the following week to move out to west. What does an Art Director do at a brand like Nixon? It was an interesting time for the brand, they had just been bought by Billabong and had a nice budget in place to build a bigger in-house team. They hired Eric Crane as the Director of Product and Design, he’s a veteran in the action sports design game, he designed the Arnette logo in the early 90’s, and went on to setup and art direct a number of successful brands. Nixon was working with an agency in Portland at the time called Cinco. Chad and Eric were looking to setup an in-house studio instead of outsourcing everything, and also wanted to appeal to a broader audience and revitalize the brand. That’s where I came into the picture. I walked in the first day and there was one production artist there with a pile of work to keep 10 people busy. I had to basically setup a creative team from scratch while jumping straight into a global rebrand. New logo, new type systems, new advertising, new everything. 548,180 miles flown over 4 years, meetings upon meetings all over the world, and a lot of work was done to help them sell more watches. Manning the creative helm of a global brand like that you really feel like you’re on call 24/7… Non-stop emails and phone calls at all hours of the day, the endless travel, and all the people looking to you for an answer. It’s exciting, can become highly addictive, and is not recommended for the faint of heart.

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Being an Art Director at a brand is an ambiguous job, a lot of people in companies, especially the ones holding the money don’t really understand what an art director actually does, and they also don’t understand where all the money goes to get the job done. Luckily at Nixon they are a very design forward company and understood the benefits of investing in good design. There was however a lot of time spent explaining why something should cost X amount of dollars, and what their return would be on it. I’m a big advocator of supporting the idea that asking about a return on investment is the wrong question, the question you should really be asking is, what is the return on involvement? Apart from creating documents filled with fang charts and matrix diagrams to explain what I was doing there, there was a lot of gut feeling design and decisions made. Chad was very supportive in progressing the brand and open to new ideas when it came to working with more artistically inclined photographers like Thomas Campbell, Jason Nocito, and Vincent Skoglund to name a few. We had a lot of fun traveling around the world for almost 4 years documenting the Nixon team and creating visually interesting ad campaigns that ended up winning awards I can’t remember the names of. Did you like working in-house for a brand versus an agency? Both places have their own advantages and disadvantages. At a big brand things move very quickly, decisions get made quickly, work is done quickly, and you have complete transparency as to how much money you can spend on something. At a design agency decisions take a lot longer to make and can be frustrating at times depending on who your point of contact is at the company and/or what your relationship is to them. Agencies are modeled to allow for more time and craft to be devoted to the work, but they can sometimes be in-house extensions of a brand, which is a tiresome place to be. Brands have a lot of baggage that come along with them as well, and I’ve come to learn that working on the juicy bits (Ad Campaigns, Identities, Special Projects) and staying away from a brands internal water cooler talk is the best place for me to be in a positive / creative place.

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Artwork by CODY HUDSON for YARDBIRD YARDBIRD chicken logo drawn by EVAN HECOX


ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Top: Gaza Strip 2009 Bottom: Egypt 2009

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

iPhone 3 photo collage from cuba 2010

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Top: Mos Def & Friends, New York 2010 Bottom: Mos Def, San Diego 2010

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Bruce Irons in the kiddy pool 2010

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

Saqqara Egypt 2009

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

What influences your work? In no particular order; Traveling, movies, music, photography, humor, friends, books, magazines, technology, being alone, modernism, casual encounters, and post-good art. So you’ve done the freelance thing, worked at an agency, and worked in-house at a brand. What are you doing now? Since leaving Nixon a year and a half ago I’ve been freelancing a bit and figuring out what I want to do next. The first project I took on was for my friends Matt Abergel and Lindsay Jang’s restaurant in Hong Kong called Yardbird. Matt had a fairly clear vision as to what he wanted to do and I helped him on the front-end creative direction for it. I had the pleasure of art directing Evan Hecox who did the chicken logo and logo type, and I designed the house Sake bottle, and art directed Cody Hudson on the newest release. We’ve since gone on to setup Yardbird Sake as a retail brand and are in the process of bringing it over to the US later this year, and hopefully Canada by spring 2013. Other projects I’ve been working on are the Lifetime Free Thinkers zine, which is a new version of the first zine I did with them called Selector. We’ve done 3 issues so far, and it’s been a fun project to work on. I did some really fun photo shoots, branding and catalog work with Native Shoes, continuing to work on board graphics for Burton, designing a bag line for Herschel that comes out Fall 2013, an ongoing book project with Leica, a few other books for photographer friends, shooting a lot of photos for myself and setting up a new Agency with Vincent Skoglund and Xavier Burt called “Art & Council”. What’s Art & Council all about? Being positive, having fun, and working with our friends. We’re positioning ourselves more in the space of Art and Culture. All of our tastes have matured and we’re working on some more “grown up” projects I guess you could say. The first big project we’ve started working on is Hong Kong’s first contemporary art museum, which opens next year, bringing Yardbird Sake over to the US, Two events that will take place at Art Basel in Miami this upcoming December, and the A&C Shop which is an ever evolving art project space that will be opening in Venice later this summer. Stay tuned for more info. Artandcouncil.com Michaelcarter.ca

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Top: “Oil Slick 2” 2012 Bottom: “Oil Slick 3” 2012

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ARTIST PROFILE - MICHAEL CARTER

"Oil Slick 12" 2012

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Photography IAN AZARIAH ianazariah.com

G R I T T Y

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DEATHWISH hat COMUNE t-shirt C1RCA button up INCASE headphones

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BRIXTON hat INDEPENDENT hoody DEATHWISH board HEROIN wheels ACE trucks

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VESTAL watch LOSER MACHINE t-shirt HUF pants LG board INCASE iPhone cover

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NEFF watch NEFF t-shirt GOOD WOOD bracelets DEATHWISH belt VOLCOM pants DGK board GOLD wheels SILVER trucks HOUSE OF MARLEY headphones

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SHAKE JUNT hat KITCH board

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EXPIDITION ONE hat C1RCA COMBAT button up G-SHOCK watch DIAMOND pants

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DIAMOND backpack DGK/DIAMOND tee DGK jeans

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LRG tee KROOKED deck KROOKED wheels

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RDS flannel DESTRUCTO trucks KITCH deck RVCA jeans

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ZERO zip hood RICTA wheels INDEPENDENT trucks PLAN B deck RDS jeans MENU tee GOOD WOOD necklace

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CITY PROFILE

WINNIPEG some say misunderstood, we say influential By GREG HASBEEK Edited by JULES MOORE

Winnipeg. Many of you know where it is. Many of you have been there. Many of you know people who came from there. And, unfortunately, many of you would not want to live there. But that is likely where your knowledge of Winnipeg ends. Winnipeg, Manitoba, my home town, is the most misunderstood city in Canada. I remember being in elementary school when Winnipeg was the third largest city in Canada behind Toronto and Montreal, but check us out now - what are we, eighth or ninth? One of our most successful indie rock bands, The Weakerthans, enshrines Winnipeg with their song “I Hate Winnipeg,” which only Winnipeggers understand less as a derogatory statement than a great big bear hug. Salbury House, VJ’s, Kelekis, Dairy Whip, Rae & Jerry’s, Bar Italia and The Falafel Place: all are words that sound like no big deal, yet they trigger a lot of feeling in a lot of people. To a native ‘pegger, bands like Red Fisher, The Weakerthans, Propaghandi, The Guess Who and Neil

Young feel like not-so-distant relatives. As do artists like Guy Maddin, Marcel Dzama, Paul Butler and Pat Lazo. Names like Kelly and Curtis Rose, Jai Pereira and Steve Harnish roll off the tongue as legends whose incredible stories just get louder and spread farther every year. Yet Winnipeggers have been flying the coop for as long as I remember. When I spend time in Calgary or Vancouver, it’s hard not to run into prairie folk who seem genuinely happy to be living elsewhere. I can’t help but wonder what the deal is. Why do people keep leaving? Sure, it is cold. Sure, our summers can be bothered by mosquitoes. But I’m stumped for any other good reason. I thought about all the people who once left Winnipeg and how many of them have found and flourished as influential figures within our industry. Many of these people I’ve kept in contact with and we often look back on Winnipeg, both the light and the dark sides. When Mike Wilson (Lifetime) describes “the genuine support and respect people have for one another mixed with a sense of particular sense of humor

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not available anywhere else on earth,” I know exactly what he means. “Winnipeg never quits,” Ace Tiller (Roxy) once told me, “times get tough and Winnipeg has the tenacity to always be there, as is.” I remember a friend once telling me a story about when he was a little kid in Winnipeg. Every morning in the winter he had to walk through a field in order to get to school. He wore winter boots (definitely not “cool”) and he always went to school early (also uncool). Every day he walked though the field and on snowy days he noticed that all the kids that walked to school after him, followed in his exact footsteps across the field. So, he decided one day that instead of going through the field in a straight line, he would walk in a serpentine, creating an inefficient path, and see what would happen. Later that day, on his way home from school, he received confirmation of what the “cooler” kids had no problem wasting their own time by following the footsteps of others. And this is true everywhere. This particular trailblazer was a Winnipeger. Throughout my travels I have heard countless people compliment Winnipeggers for having exceptional abilities when it comes to at serious activities like hockey, drinking, BMXing and skateboarding, and I always did (and still do) attribute it to a lack of options. When Winnipeggers get into something, they get into it. And because there are less things that distract, it’s likely they will stick with their choice and get very very good at it. How does this story relate to Winnipeg? Well, it’s symbolic of a similar story that seems to repeat itself again and again. And it relates directly to the industry for which I’m writing. Take, for instance, two successful athletes named Cindy Klassen and Clara Hughes, the most decorated Canadian Olympic athletes of all time. Both Winnipeggers. Then there’s our one and only action sport athlete that became a world champion, the best in the world at his prime. David Osato won world championships, X-Games medals, Gravity Games medals and was the most influential BMX rider on the planet with his technical expertise. Dave has attributed his success to his friends and fellow bike riders in Winnipeg, as well as the ramps and indoor skate-park and the great street spots. Winnipeg also has an action sports athlete that changed the way the word “professional” can work within action sports, and that is Jason Enns who instead of rolling with the standards of the time, became a “video pro.” Instead of competing in contests, in the 90’s Jason made a vow to his fans that his video parts would blow-away the previous footage year after year after year. And he did, making way for different kinds of trailblazers to come. It is truly amazing that Winnipeg has created so many important and influential people in action sports without parks (until 2005) and especially without mountains. As you can see, many became trailblazers by being the first to land an ollie impossible, an ice-pick over the spine or

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double-corked 1080, but myself and others did it by making the same products available in Southern California and in Winnipeg at the same time (not 6- 12 months later). Others, like my peers and I, did this by hosting skateboard and BMX demos, by throwing skateboard, snowboard and BMX contests as early as 1985, and most importantly by employing hundreds and hundreds of skateboarders, snowboarders and BMXers that have gone on to make Winnipeg as influential and legendary as ever. My good friend and Winnipeg legend Dom Adam summed up a lot of that spirit when describing his own experience: “People in Winnipeg tend to just say and do what needs to be said and done and naturally that approach offends people, but hey, that’s real life. The two shops I was a part of in Winnipeg were run by dudes who were popular within the industry, but from time to time I would hear that they were far from everybody’s favourite. I’d often have to act as mediator between business partners or between a shop and a distributor. Although it was more erratic and unpredictable, I ‘d never want to do it again in any other way.” Looking back at the past thirty years, from when I first got into action sports and the many feelings I’ve had towards Winnipeg, nothing makes me prouder than being one of the many “real” influencers who has provided a foundation for others to build on. For every Winnipeger there will be 1000 that don’t get it’s charm. And it’s odds like those that keep the rest of us even and loving it… even if only from afar. Editors Note: This article is an attempt to examine how each of our local scenes influences our country as a whole. When putting this together, Greg reached out to a list of people with a common tie in that they all at one time hailed from the ‘Peg. We want to thank the following people for their contribution to this project : Dom Adam, Harry Chan, Frank Daneillo, Steven Dubienski, Jason Enns, Andrew Geeves, Jay Good, David Hawthorne, Jordan Kendall, Zev Klymochko, Jake Kuzyk, Nicole Marcenuk, Kevin McCoubrey (KM1), Kristen Motkaluk (KM2), Mike McDermott, Drew McOuat, Jules Moore, David Osato, Ken Paul, Brian Peech, Matte Raine, Jake Stewart, John Stewart, Ace Tiller, Rob Williamson and Mike Wilson

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MINK PINK bustier c/o ZEBRA CLUB MINA UK pants LINE & DOT kimono ALDEN RAE bracelets DOLCE VITA shoes c/o ZEBRA CLUB


LIFETIME t-shirt MINK PINK dress


QUICKSILVER sheer dress LINE & DOT shirt HUDSON jeans ALDEN RAE jewelry KANGOL hat DOLCE VITA shoes c/o ZEBRA CLUB


BB DAKOTA bolero LIFETIME tank LINE & DOT skirt NATIVE shoes ALDEN RAE jewelry MAAJI bra


ROXY dress LINE & DOT shirt ALDEN RAE jewelry SEYCHELLES shoes


NUMPH blouse LAUGH CRY REPEAT shorts c/o ZEBRA CLUB ALDEN RAE jewelry SEYCHELLES shoes


QUICKSILVER tank WESC pants ALDEN RAE jewelry BC shoes


MINK PINK t-shirt BB DAKOTA shorts QUICKSILVER wrap skirt, worn as cape ALDEN RAE jewelry DOLCE VITA shoes


MAAJI bra MIA MELON shirt MINA UK skirt DOLCE VITA shoes c/o ZEBRA CLUB


Kevin Kelly - Owner - BLVD Skateshop


HOARDERS? Photography COLIN ADAIR colinadair.com Some people in our industry have a problem. Instead of riddicule, we congratulate them on keeping treasured pieces of the past alive and out of the garbage dumps.


Matt Bitts / ‘Dj Science’ - Marketing Coordinator - Take Five Trading


Scotty Arkwell / ‘Vinyl Ritchie’ - Professional DJ


Tory Potoroka / Cash the dog - Filth Mode Motorcycle Club Members


SHOP PROFILE

MENU a shop for me and you By JULES MOORE

It’s shaping up to be a big year for Syd Clark. After burying his sales cap at Centre Distribution, on June 2nd he opened doors to a new skate shop in Vancouver’s Gastown district. Destiny? I’ll say. Twas a warm Summer’s day in 1986 when Syd picked up his first skateboard. A lot has happened since. JM- Hey Syd, what can you tell me about the first time your toe touched a skateboard? SC- My neighbor ordered a Christian Hosoi Hammerhead out of Thrasher and we used to take turns on it.  That was probably in 1986 or 87.  I loved skateboarding right away, and soon traded some GIJoe toys for my very own Vision Mark Gonzales that was beat to shit. JM- When did skateboarding transition from a passion to a proper, fully paying job? SC- I think around 1993 after the Whiskey Videos.  I got hooked up by Etnies and ended up riding for them for 10 years. I rode for a few Canadian board companies and ended getting hooked up by RDS and Ezekiel as well.  JM- Have the majority of your friendships come from skateboarding?  SC- Mostly yes.  Skateboarding pretty much consumed my life so they’re wasn’t anywhere else to meet people, except maybe the bar for girls (laughs). JM- Are there challenges in opening a store like Menu in Gastown right now? SC- Obviously the rent is high due to all the tourist traffic. Other than that, there’s lot’s of cool stores down here: Complex, Livestock, Sharks and Hammers, as well as ALife and the Stussy store. I’m just trying to fill the void by having a skate shop and hope to complement all of those stores.  JM- Can you tell me whereabouts you live or is that a secret? SC- I live in Gastown with my girlfriend.  I’d been kinda

watching the area for the past year and was getting a little tired of all the travel that goes along with repping.  When the RDS store closed it left a little whole in my heart. I felt the timing was right to do my own thing. JM- Is it true you have an astonishingly small dog?  SM- Yes.  His name is Mee, and he’s a tiny Merle Chihuahua.  I also have a Boston Terrier that my girlfriend brought with her. I used to bring Mee with me to work at Centre, and he’d just hop around from lap to lap. Mostly on Dave and Robin’s laps in the Art Department at Red Dragon. JM- What’s your relationship like with other heart-fueled skate shops in the city? Antisocial, for instance… SC- Michelle and I are friends and Antisocial is one of my favorite skate shops. I had spoken with her before I opened Menu to let her know, and she was stoked for me. Michelle has done so much for the Vancouver Skate Scene, as well the Art scene.  I hope I can do 1/4 of what  she’s done.  Underworld is awesome as well; Alex always has lots of cool events popping off in the Summer. JC- You have a sea of experience in both skateboarding and the business behind it. Any nuggets of wisdom you can share? SC - It’s a lot of hard work, not to mention scary to open a store in the current financial state of the world.  I was going to have a partner but everyone said I should do it on my own… so  I did.  It’s 100% my vision and I’m stoked.  My girlfriend Danna has been a huge help and my support system when the stress levels get too high.  I opened June 2nd, one day off my goal.  The first month has been great!   JM- What can people come to expect from Menu?  SC- You can expect a party at the shop on one of the nights of Knowshow. JM- Most excellent. Thanks Syd!

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“F” AS IN FRANK everything old is new again By KENDRA JASPER

The old adage “everything old is new again” rings true for F As In Frank, the favoured destination amongst the hip set for scoring eclectic and on trend vintage goods. It’s no surprise, as F As In Frank boasts one of the largest collections of vintage clothing and accessories, deadstock, 80’s and 90’s sports apparel and snapback hats, as well as their own reworked vintage collection, SNAP. With two brick and mortar locations in Vancouver and Toronto respectively, F As In Frank also touts an impressive online presence featuring e-commerce, a wholesale program and location specific store blogs, frequently updated with staff musings and upcoming events (these guys aren’t scared of a party).

selection is curated thoughtfully so as to (very) easily find a one of a kind piece to add to your collection. Sourcing these great finds is no small feat, however. Countless hours are spent researching and contacting vintage and deadstock resellers as well as picking and sorting through the thousands of pounds of used clothing that the company procures across North America. Their warehouse in South Vancouver is a testament to this, housing impressive stacks of denim jackets, vintage tees, camouflage print jackets and pants, and covetable sports jerseys to name only a few items. Let a vintage lover loose in this warehouse and they will likely not come out for days (and when they do it will be with an armload and a smile).

Raised on the merits of vintage fashion by their collector father, brothers and owners, Jesse and Drew Heifetz, have been purveyors of some of the most rare and unique vintage pieces since they opened their first location in Whistler, BC in 2007. With their sharp eye for desirable vintage and keen knowledge of trending fashion, FAIF quickly became a hot spot amongst the locals and it’s popularity soon allowed the company to grow into it’s two urban locations in the east and west, as well as it’s office and warehouse in Vancouver.

F As In Frank also prides itself in it’s remarkable collection of vintage hats and has become well known in it’s industry for having the largest assortment of rare and limited edition snapbacks (it’s in fact considered the largest wholesaler of vintage hats in North America). It’s not uncommon to receive calls from well versed vintage stalkers or drop in visits from famous faces (Raekwon, Renee Renee and Trouble Andrew have all rooted around, as well as Kanye West’s camp most recently).

The guys’ rich history in vintage fashion is notably apparent as you step into each retail location. It’s finely tuned

Aside from it’s vast and unique assortment, what sets F As In Frank apart from other used clothiers is it’s ulterior

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philosophy to not only sell “old” vintage product, but “new” vintage items as well, providing that it’s relevant and fashionable in the current marketplace. To them, fashion is fashion and vintage is vintage, whether it be five or fifty years old. Perhaps being one of F As in Franks best attributes is the fact that they have skillfully achieved a sustainable business model wherein very little waste is created. From the abundant amounts of vintage sourced and bought by the company, unused and unsold pieces are either sold at a wholesale level to other vintage retailers or are craftily re-

designed in-house and sewn together into new garments under their house label, SNAP- a primarily women’s collection, with a men’s line currently in production. The back room of the Main Street, Vancouver, location is home to ten hard-working employees who can be found on any given day cutting and sewing together garments into the SNAP line. The collection- heavy in colourful cut-off shorts, oversized bleached denim shirts and music-inspired cropped tees and tanks for spring/summer- manages to marry modern day styling with vintage prints and fabrics successfully and fashionably. Available at FAIF retail

locations and for wholesale, SNAP is based on trend-driven fits but arrives in-store reworked in a variety of prints and fabrics according to it’s predecessors. Already in select locations across North America, SNAP was most recently picked up by retail giant Urban Outfitters and the popular Quebecois department store, Simons. What’s next for F As In Frank? The team will continue to build upon the SNAP reworked vintage label, incorporating men’s pieces and expanding upon the women’s line. Most recently, they’ve released a limited edition collection of motorcycle-inspired garments, FAIF MC by SNAP, and will

continue to develop the line with limited edition releases while staying in step with changing trends. With plans to move and expand their back of house operations under a single roof (where each department- administration, production and wholesale- can be housed), the future is looking big~ both literally and figuratively~ for these vintage mavens. F As In Frank will be presenting a selection of vintage goods available for cash and carry and debuting the SNAP line at KNOWSHOW this summer.

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MUSIC REVIEWS

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TANLINES -  Mixed Emotions 2012 (True Panther; 2012) I fell in love in Paris. With Tanlines. Mixed Emotions, the debut album release from friends Eric Emm and Jesse Cohen, is a smart and punchy fusion of pop, electro and indie rock. As the title suggests, listen to the album from start to finish and you’ll likely find yourself zoning out as these guys take you on an emotional trip down your personal memory lane. Close your eyes to Brothers and remember the summer night’s when the wind was warm and morning came too soon. Ride your bike to All of Me, lay on the beach to Yes Way, party to Cactus, make-out to Not the Same and finish things off nicely with Nonesuch you’ll swear you just walked into an angst filled John Hughes’ prom scene (in the good way). Mixed Emotions gives me good feelings a musical feat of it’s own and has been on repeat since it’s discovery. If you haven’t found the soundtrack to your summer quite yet, I’d urge you to start (and maybe just finish) here. Rating: 4 / 5 - KendraJasper

CASINO - Sainte Rose (BTR Records; 2012) Bred a few miles out of Montreal, Casino has taken a leap beyond their garage door and into the ‘scape of streets and sidewalks with their EP titled Sainte Rose. Brother duo and long-time neighbourhood friends, who’ve earned the ties of endearment among matching bracelets, form a collective that epitomizes everlasting childhood ambition which never proves to grow old. Words that dig up lost hopes and dreams translate into playful pop melodies with smirky vocals that fit neatly beyond crisp arrangements. The seven tracks and their charisma readily provide you with an accommodating back-drop for a few laps around the cruise that lent an ear to vulnerable emotion when you were sixteen. Nostalgic recollections surface between catchy rhymes and urging sing-alongs. Relatable harmonies layered over fairy-tale rhythms might have the dance floor consumed at your local Sok Hop, but you still may find the rebels paper-bagging it in the washrooms. Casino’s admirable efforts and flirty tones may inevitably place ‘Language’ on your Christmas list this year - for all your cousins still tackling puberty. Rating: 3 / 5 - Leah Kiefer

ZULU WINTER – Language (Arts & Crafts; 2012) The first LP released by British band Zulu Winter tells a tale of a soul eagerly trying to uncover its outer image and inner desire.  The swirly melodies and dreamy tones seem suitable for a cruisy walk through your favorite park, but your intrigue may sway among the tranquility of the trees rather than the buds in your ears. Frontman Will Daunt’s droning vocals coo with subtle optimism layering over melancholic guitar rants. As potential glimpses through attempted experimentalism, the quartet could have taken a bolder step towards revealing their confidence.  Daunt’s cry, “What kind of man are you, holding onto that feeling?” sung in ‘Small Pieces’, lacks a genuine execution that leads to a loss of anticipation for the stories next chapter.  The hipster album artwork resembling a faint photograph projected on draped fabric, may urge Zulu Winter to rearrange their route in attempting to stimulate an interest beyond the threads.  These blokes are fresh off the boat but perhaps they’ll consider an identity reassessment to keep it rocking before their next release. Rating: 2 / 5 - Leah Kiefer - 103 -


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