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2011

We A c t i v i s t s SHOT BY C H E RY L D U N N w w w. w e s c . c o m


B RYA N

FOX


9 5 5 F R A N C I S C O S T. TO R R A N C E , C A 9 0 5 0 2 D V S S H O E S . C O M JAMIE ANDERSON STEVIE BELL DAN BRISSE DANIEL EK EERO ETTALA EIKI HELGASON JOHN JACKSON CHRIS LARSON MIKEY LEBLANC MARC FRANK MONTOYA JUSSI OKSANEN LOUIF PARADIS

JOHN JACKSON PRO MODEL SHOE COMING FALL 2011 ACTION PHOTO: SERFAS LIFESTYLE PHOTO: PETER MORNING

SUPRADISTRIBUTION.COM


DA N IE L ES PI N OZ A.

SW IT CH FS BI GS PI

N . JU D O O UT N OW. SE

E AL L CO LO RS AT LA

LAKAI LIMITED FOOTWEAR: THE SHOES WE SKATE

FOSTER / CAPALDI / JOHNSON / CARROLL / MARIANO / HOWARD / WELSH / BIEBEL / LENOCE / FERNANDEZ / ALVAREZ / ESPINOZA TERSHY / HAWK / GILLET / BRADY / JENSEN / 955 Francisco Street, Torrance, CA 90502 / ad# 139 / lakai.com / supradistribution.com

KA I. CO M


THE CAPITAL COLLECTION BY MATIX I N 19 6 5 , 9 5% O F T H E C LOT H I N G W O R N I N A M E R I C A WA S M A D E I N A M E R I C A . I N 20 0 9, O N LY 5% O F T H E C LOT H I N G W O R N I N A M E R I C A WA S M A D E I N A M E R I C A .

With companies continually moving production overseas, more and more American factories are disappearing and garment making is quickly becoming a lost art here in the United States.

Matix Capital Collection is proud to support the art of American clothing manufacturing, and stands behind the quality and craftsmanship of Made in USA goods. Each piece in the capsule is made exclusively of materials sourced domestically and is crafted in downtown Los Angeles.

M AT I XC LOT H I N G .C O M SUPRADISTRIBUTION.COM


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J U L I A N

D A V I D S O N

K E E G A N K E V I N

S A U D E R

“ S P A N K Y ”

L O N G

R O M E R O

N E S T O R

T H E

T E A M

K E N N E D Y

J O S H

L E O

T H E

F O S T E R

D A V I D E D

T O

J U D K I N S

B A L A N C E

O F

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R V C A . C O M

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At home with Stella - November 28, 2010 - Hollywood, California timebombtrading.com facebook.com/timebombtrading


F A L L\W I N T E R NATIVE SHOES

F A L L\W I N T E R NATIVE SHOES

DEAR KNOW?SHOW

ABOUT THIS AD

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The 2011 Tiger box art concept by Dave Arnold.

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ISSUE #10 FALL / WINTER 2011

CONTENTS

Page 24 VIVO HEADWEAR Page 26 HERSCHEL SUPPLY CO. Page 29 SAXX Page 30 FASHION - “ROCKET QUEEN” Page 42 ARTIST FEATURE - RORY DOYLE

Page 86 SHARKS + HAMMERS Page 88 MR. LEE’S Page 90 BOARDROOM Page 92 BALLISTIC Page 94 NRI DISTRIBUTION

Page 56 FASHION - “THIS IS THIS”

Page 96 LYNDON + JAMIE CORMACK

Page 80 RED BULL’S MEGAHURTZ

Page 98 RYAN TARON

Page 82 CAPTURED No part of this publication may be produced in any manner, either in whole, or in part without the written permission of the publisher. © Know?Show 2011

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ISSUE #10 FALL / WINTER 2011

MASTHEAD Editorial Directors Paul Higgins megadestroyer.com André Paul Pinces pincesphoto.com Editor-in-Chief Ben Couves ob1enterprises.com Executive Editor Michael Haawk Fashion Editor Tanus Lewis tanuslewis.com Production Controller Nick Brown lifetimecollective.com Advertising Director Perry Pugh ob1enterprises.com

Contact Know?Mag 130 - 49 Dunlevy Avenue Vancouver BC, Canada V6B 4E3 www.knowmag.net / www.knowshow.ca info@knowshow.ca

No part of this publication may be produced in any manner, either in whole, or in part without the written permission of the publisher. © Know?Show 2011

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2011 SUMMER COLLECTION

P E N FI EL D E S T. 1 9 7 5 H U D S O N M A .

W W W. P E N F I E L D U S A . C O M


BRAND FEATURE

VIVO headwear Interviewed by Hayley Nirenberg

In a niche industry, times can be tough for young entrepreneurs and start up companies to break through the surface, and tap on the heels of household international brands. Just when you think the market is over saturated with products and new innovations, there always seems to be a company or individual that catches your eye as being something unique. The difference these companies have is their drive, and that they throw themselves out there at any chance to take a risk to stand out from the crowd. Vancouver based company Vivo Headwear has done just that by introducing a lifestyle brand that is rider driven, rider owned, artist inspired; created by professional snowboarder Anthony Leffelaar and professional skater Corey Sheppard. Two years in the making, they have been sticking to the lifestyle of their brand and making a dent on the international market, while focusing on premium fabrics and signing names like Mark Appleyard and Tadashi Fuse.

Vivo is definitely doing unique things within the industry, and it leaves me asking, what’s the story behind Vivo’s creation? AL: Vivo headwear was born in 2009, I had recently reached a turning point in my snowboard career just earlier that year. It was at this time I had finished writing my business plan, and wanted to get my dream project underway. I spent about 6 months completing that, while researching some manufacturing contacts that I picked up along the way. We started sampling products and talking with our close friends who are now our team riders, and it started snowballing from there. A few months down the road I met Corey, from day one Corey was down with the cause and the relationship has since been great. Together we re-looked over the business plan and realized there was an opportunity to open up into the skate market that I was not yet connected with. Soon after this, we decided to take a trip to Asia to meet our suppliers and really see how we could push the boundaries with headwear by staying innovative with our fabrics. We’re very excited to introduce some new products to the market this year. Corey, as Creative Director the pressure is on you to keep designs innovative and fresh. What else does your position involve, and how do you keep up with always maintaining

your design concept to be different from the rest? CS: My position with Vivo as Creative Director involves a lot. Nearly everyday is different, there’s always something new to work on. You don’t realize it until you’re actually putting some of this stuff together how much work there is behind it. Things such as laying out ads, catalogues, and trying to think of fresh new ideas and materials to use have taken what seems like endless days to work on at times. Another thing that I believe is important to do is to speak with all the team from skate to snow, to ensure that everyone likes what we’re doing. It means a lot to me personally to make them happy with the end results of the brand. Design wise I really use life, art, and skateboarding to motivate me. It’s these passions in life that keep me inspired to keep on doing this. Anthony, you used to snowboard nearly everyday, and now you’ve traded it in to run a full time operation in Vancouver. How has the lifestyle change effected your snowboarding? AL: I wouldn’t call it a so-called lifestyle change, I’m pretty lucky to be still so deeply involved in the snow and skate industry. Grouse Mountain is only a 15 minute drive from our office, so after a heavy workload day I can continue to do what brought me to this part of my career. I definitely can’t

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BRAND FEATURE

enjoy snowboarding on a daily basis how I used to, but living in Vancouver is an amazing place. It has great food, and is the perfect place for business, so I really enjoy the other benefits this city has to offer me.

you try to look out side the box once in a while, there’s a different world that you may or may not have ever thought was there waiting for you.

Corey, five years ago would you ever of thought you’d be so heavily involved in a company such as Vivo? CS: Well I knew that one day the passion I have for skateboarding and designing would have to come together, so it was no doubt that I found myself now with this career. It’s not everyday that you create something on a computer and see the process actually come alive.  I feel very lucky to have a great business partner and team who support our brand to the fullest.  Without these elements Vivo wouldn’t exist.  Things have taken off so fast that I am overwhelmed with excitement to see what else is next. How does it feel to be on the other-side of the industry so to speak? CS: It feels great! I believe that everything happens for a reason. I knew the type of skating I was at before wouldn’t be in my life forever, but I love what I do now more than anyone knows. Nothing feels better then going into your office and designing a product that you know was all your creativity. If

The past two years of hard work you’ve put in has built you a steady path to success, what’s Vivo’s next move now? AL: The past two years have sure been a huge learning curve to say the least. The path to success has definitely not come easily, with a lot of hurdles along the way. Blood, sweat, and tears with countless deadlines and nights of no sleep have been what it has taken to get it to a successful point. There is a lot of exciting plans on the agenda as we keep up with our fast pace growth. Our current 2011 winter collection has branched out in over 16 countries. We recently appointed a USA sales manager, along with an amazing marketing campaign with snowboard magazine in the USA to keep up with it all. The past year we have done colabs with Red Bull, Yes Snowboards, Blue Tomato, The Source, Push.ca, and have even had the legendary hip hop artist Bun B rocking our hats on tour. Things are moving at a very fast past, which is a positive sign that what is next on the list for Vivo will never stop!

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BRAND FEATURE

the

herschel supply company

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BRAND FEATURE

The Herschel Supply Co. is a Vancouver based bag and accessories company. We started development and sourcing about 18 months prior to this show and we delivered our first product to market in May of last year. It was an on going thought of ours to start an accessories brand and get into the bag market, we felt we were providing the market with something it had been missing for a while. The response has been amazing so far in regards to the stores, demand and press. Managing a small company with a limited amount of full time employees comes with both its advantages and disadvantages. We all have a great understanding of what each other’s strengths are and who the right person for the job is. Although everyone is taking care of a lot of various aspects it allows us to achieve an intimacy with our product that we don’t feel is achieved in a larger environment.

One question we get a lot is “where the name is from?” It started back in the early 1900’s, my great grandfather Peter Alexander and his wife Annie moved from Wick, Scotland through the Canadian Homestead program. The land that Peter and Annie were given through the program was set in the rolling hills just outside of the village of Herschel. Today the population of Herschel is counted at 30 residents. My great grandfather was a barrel maker by trade and although we are creating bags and backpacks (instead of barrels) our brand is a tribute to him, our past and his early days in Canada. We appreciate a focused approach to new product lines. We felt we could bring a relevant product to the market with good style and simplicity through bags and accessories. At The Herschel Supply Co. we have always been fond of bags, luggage and accessories in general. There is nothing better than a great - 31 -


BRAND FEATURE

bag, whether walking city streets, strolling through the airport, pedaling or pushing around town; your bag can define you. We also believe in accessibility, we find that a lot of the more desirable bags are at price points that make them inaccessible to a wide range of consumers. Our biggest push was to bring products that have a sophisticated look, great attention to detail and durability while still striving to bring them to market at a reasonable price point. The Herschel Supply Co. pulls its influences from many places. We are very keen on some of the iconic Heritage brands and the simplistic well-built approach to their products. We set out to create bags and accessories with simple aesthetics

and although some of our products have a vintage look we try to update the shape and fit as well as add modern necessities such as computer sleeves, media, sunglass and organizer pockets. Our current and future lines will continue to modernize the old and have a healthy mix of both heritage and progressive products, a combination of the old and the new. Our fall line is introducing some great new brand extensions in terms of style, purpose and price point. We now have 12oz. and 20oz. cotton canvas products as well as Cordura速 products. This season we have also expanded into travel accessories, kids bags as well as introducing a complete wallet collection.

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BRAND FEATURE

SAXX

Saxx was founded on a simple inspiration. Make men more comfortable by re-thinking and re-designing men’s underwear.   In 2006, the first pair of Saxx underwear was introduced in a University cafeteria. Saxx founder Trent Kitsch manufactured 200 prototypes, which he sold in a matter on minutes to his fellow classmates. The underwear featured integrated parallel mesh side panels, which eliminated contact between a man’s package and inner thigh. The product was an instant hit and introduced a new level of comfort to the men’s underwear market.

With its initial success, Saxx appeared on season 2 of Canada’s hit TV business development show Dragons’ Den. Over one million fans were exposed to the brand with another 30,000 viewers awarding the innovative underwear that season’s People’s Choice winner for best new product. Saxx became an instantly recognized brand overnight, which propelled the product into specialty retail outlets across Canada.   Saxx focuses its sales and marketing efforts on educating retail staff and consumers on the benefits of its product. “Retail staff are a brand’s front line of workers,” says Saxx Marketing Manager, Adrian Hembruch. “While the topic of added male comfort through underwear might not always be the easiest message to communicate, once men try the product they are hooked. It’s because we work so hard to get staff behind our brand, to try our product and educate them on its benefits, that we see success time and time again at retail.”   Today Saxx continues to pursue its mission of producing the most comfortable underwear for men. The product has

evolved and now features a patented Ergonomic Comfort Pouch (parallel stretch mesh side panels with an articulated front pouch which has no inner seam). Each pair of Saxx is crafted to fit the natural contour of a man and is available in three-fabric options in both Boxer Brief and Trunk leg lengths.   24 – Seven: Made from soft stretch cotton, the 24 - Seven line is designed for everyday comfort, getting a man through whatever his day entails.   Pro Elite: Saxx’s sport specific line features integrated support added compression and a long leg option. The Pro Elite line is a great option for the active man and a favorite among professional athletes. Ultra: Luxurious stretch viscose made from natural fibers take the Saxx Ultra line to that next level in softness and comfort.

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Fashion Editor TANUS LEWIS Hair & Make-up JENNA KUCHERA Stylist’s Assistant LEANNE TRIGG Model - Lauren NEXT MODELS

this page & opposite: BB DAKOTA vest and leggings URANIUM necklaces BRAVE studded cuffs OBEY tiger ring

Photographed by ANDRÉ PAUL PINCES - 34 -


rocket queen

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LIFETIME pants

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LIFETIME denim shirt WeSC jeans from ZEBRACLUB URANIUM necklaces, bracelets, earrings BRAVE studded cuffs OBEY ring ROXY watch

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QUICKSILVER top from ZEBRA CLUB ALTERNATIVE APPAREL shorts

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ALTERNATIVE APPAREL tank dress (customized) URANIUM necklaces BRAVE studded cuffs OBEY tiger ring

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BB DAKOTA fringe jacket iT! denim shorts

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JACK BY BB DAKOTA jacket URANIUM necklace, earrings, bracelet BRAVE studded cuffs OBEY tiger ring

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ROXY tank LIFETIME trousers URANIUM bracelet BRAVE studded cuff

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MEGADESTROYER t-shirt (customized) URANIUM necklaces & bracelets BRAVE studded cuffs OBEY tiger ring

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QUICKSILVER men’s shirt CHEAP MONDAY dress from ZEBRA CLUB BRAVE studded cuffs OBEY tiger ring ROXY watch

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MATIX tank BB DAKOTA sequin jacket URANIUM necklace

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ARTIST FEATURE

DoyLe ROR Y

Interviewed by Paul higgins, portrait photo by Neil Singh

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ARTIST FEATURE

Skateboard or snowboard, chances are some of you have scribbled on yours at some point. This was the case for Rory Doyle growing up, and so ended up eventually designing boards for a living. Working full time as a production artist for an international video game developer, his broad skill set as a commercial artist has given him a versatile approach when moonlighting as a graphic designer. Producing a wide range of graphics from illustrated Art Nouveau tributes to famous landmarks being swallowed by futuristic graffiti, Rory enjoys the challenge of something new and loves cranking out work for a culture that has been a huge part of his life. We caught up with Rory on new year’s day for a fireside chat...

Paul: You do a lot of work for the action sports industry. Has it always been a big part of your life, and how do you think it influences your art? Rory: Ya it’s been a pretty big part of my life, not so much designing but the lifestyle itself when I was young and then I got into designing when I was older. I’ve skated since I was really young, a tiny kid, and started snowboarding many years back too. My friend Jeremy Ricketts was starting a skateboard company called Manual Skateboards and at that point I was just getting into graphics, so I designed him a logo. That was the first one I ever made. More towards the question I think being a part of the industry for many years influenced my art for the better. You see a lot of corporate cookie cutter art these days that ends up looking a bit disconnected from the culture. Skater/shredder owned and operated companies are usually the best in my eyes. P: Other than skateboarding and snowboarding, what other influences and inspirations do you feel affect your work? R: I don’t know, it’s tough because half of it is what the client wants, and half is what you come up with on your own, right? So your inspirations are kind of set off by what is needed, unless you’re doing something that is fully personal, you have that initial idea and that’s when you start pulling inspiration. I think sometimes it’s a collaboration between you and the client. I look for the parallel of what direction we’re heading in, and then branch off a little bit from that. I think the city influences me for sure. There are loads of rad artists here with lots of new stuff to check out. I really appreciate timeless stuff as well, and don’t get caught up in what’s hot or whatever. P: You have probably seen a few trends come and go? R: Oh for sure, that’s why I’ve always been a fan of strong and simple design that holds up forever. I like looking at old books and old movies. A lot of old movie posters are really inspiring because they’re the original ones that everyone’s copying today and trying to bring back. I’m guilty of it too but just looking to those versus a remake is more valuable in my opinion. I also look through vinyl, old records always have rad designs

and they’re usually hilarious too. P: So you have a full time job, what do you do? Describe what a normal day at work is for you. R: I’m a 3-D artist that builds environments (for video games), so I’ll take concept art and a grey blocked level that a leveldesigner has made and create a 3-D environment. Anything and everything other than a character. Right now I’m helping out on Captain America making levels for him to run around fighting ze Germans. I roll into work, check emails, specifically the 10 that you or Andre have sent... P: hahaha R: …of various crude images. Then usually we have a team meeting and then I just start pluggin away. P: So pretty much all day you’re sitting in front of a computer R: Yeah. I try to get up once in a while and go for coffee, or go talk to someone. P: Do you have a bucket under your chair? R: A Cartman bucket? Yeah, haha. No, any excuse to get up and stretch is a good one though. P: So when you get the opportunity to create something that doesn’t involve a computer, do you like that? R: Yeah for sure. A large part of my job is to paint texture maps for the 3D models, so I get some time to draw when I’m at my desk because when you’re building the files on your system it can bog your computer down. I either have a stretch or get a quick doodle in. In the last few years I’ve been in more of a lead position at work, which means even less content creation and more art direction. So any kind of chance to create is always good. We also have life drawing models come to the studio usually once a week, which is great. P: A lot of your stuff looks like it’s not done digitally, but that’s part of the trick right? R: Oh yeah, for sure. I think that would be pretty funny to

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ARTIST FEATURE

start doing what I used to do when people ask you for work, and give them a drawing, haha. Here you go. Pencil crayons. P: On a napkin! R: Ha. Ya, it always goes back to the computer these days. There are some amazing concept artists at work and over the years they’ve inadvertently taught me how to digitally paint. I think digital art gets knocked for being “digital” but the foundation of the illustration or design still has to be there regardless of the medium. You just have to embrace the time that you’re in, and ours is obviously a digital one. I mess around with painting and other mediums but I’m not afraid to be representing the digital side of things. P: Who are some of the companies that you’ve worked for within the skate and snow industry? R: First off was Manual Skateboards like I mentioned earlier. Manual was rad. It was family. Those were fun days. I did some stuff for Westbeach way back when I was young. To be honest, it was horrible stuff. I don’t even think it made it to print…I’m hoping. For several years I’ve worked for Endeavor Snowboards. They’re great, lots of exposure to the artist behind the graphic. Airhole face masks, and Megadestroyer. Mega D is rad too because if I were to just design something for personal pleasure, you could probably slot it into their lineup. P: So during your long grueling days, what gets you through? R: I love comedy. I listen to stand up comedy a lot while I’m working. It would be cool to try it one day or take a workshop. I taught 3D at Vancouver Film School for a while and standing up teaching in front of a class was scary at first but then you get comfortable and play off them. Maybe it would be similar. Then again, I would rather get slapped in the ear on a cold day than try stand up and bomb. The odd joke and prank help the day go by as well. There is a good crew of guys at work that share the same humor. One guy threw a hard hat on and just barged a construction site across the street with all of us watching. Within minutes he was delegating and had some legit worker moving fences. Once we glued a toonie to the sidewalk and watched from above. A lot of laughs came out of that until one dude sat there kicking it until came free. Party over. P: So recently you bought 2 motorcycles, any other new additions in your life? R: Ya, I found out I was going to be a dad so I bought another - 48 -


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P: Good thing everyone was drinking ceasars too. So nobody could tell if it went in their drink. R: All in all, I have good buds close by, as well as back in the hometown and most of them know each other anyway so it makes for one good posse.

bike. Haha, no that sounds bad, but the deal was too good. I’ll be selling my first one when I’m done building it. I’d just like to reinforce that fact. P: So you have 3 new additions to the family. R: Yeah it’s crazy to think. Pretty exciting. It would be cool to have a little man to take shredding. Happy and healthy is priority one though. I can’t wait for dad power too. I think it’s already kicking in, I picked up a Honda Civic with one arm and grew a beard on the way over here.

P: So on your quest for knowledge, what were the stops? High school then straight to college? R: Ya pretty much. I worked at Air Canada for 7 years straight out of high school and was laid off a couple times so I went to school when I was off. My close pal Matt went to CDIS before me so gave me the goods on which courses to take and which courses were a waste. Everyone would pay through the nose on a diploma that didn’t mean anything in digital media. So I basically cherry picked some courses, saved a bundle of money and came out with the same outcome, a demo reel and a job. P: I see graffiti in a lot of your pieces, I can tell that was a big part of you growing up and developing as an artist. What was that like? How did you get started in that? R: My sister’s boyfriend was a writer. He was one of the best dudes painting in Tsawwassen. He still may be.

P: What was growing up in Tsawwassen like? R: It’s a rad little town to grow up in, lots of shredders. We grew up skating The Rez, a spot made famous in Virtual Reality. It was a 10 minute skate from my house, and we had a lot of good days there. It’s been fenced for years now and the new local skatepark that was built is sick, but the Rez is a sanctuary. We’ve scaled the fence a couple times in recent years. The flat is still as smooth as eggs, it’s a great place. My family and a lot of close friends still live in Tsawwassen, so it’s always good to go back to.

P: Give him props. R: SONE. He taught me how to paint. Took me out a couple of times and tought me some foundation like cuts and fades etc. My friend Matt who helped with school also painted. We started painting a lot together. He became really good and we started getting the odd paint gig. He mixed airbrushes into the productions too, which brought them up further in quality. He still airbrushes and does custom painting on cars and bikes. My wife Shannon just bought me a paint gun and airbrush for Christmas so I’m pretty excited to try my hand and that too. I’ve branched off from graffiti but when I have down time I’m still drawing letters. They’ve come in handy for freehand logotypes.

P: So, you still see your friends from when you grew up? R: Ya for sure, especially with all the networking like facebook and what not, it’s hard not to. I have a pretty close group of friends that I grew up skating with and we still manage to get some grinds in. A larger group of us also started doing an annual bicycle/skate trip to the Island. We all peddle onto the ferry and find a local skatepark and hotel to accommodate the mission. You were there on the last trip, remember Greg’s elbow shot blood right across the dinner table like it came out of a super soaker?

P: What era was that? It seems like skateboarding in the mid-90’s, graffiti and hip-hop all went so hand in hand, especially here in Vancouver. Pre hipsters with flannel beards... R: That was when Vancouver was so rad. Old Slam City days at Plaza I’ll admit I was into the whole hip-hop culture when I was younger; early 90’s, like 93/94…all the way up to ’98. Painting, freestyling and deejaying a lot. My friends had a hip hop night at a shitty bar in Ladner when I was still in high school. It was on a school night but my parents were cool as long as I wasn’t haggered for school the next day. That was the - 50 -


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ARTIST FEATURE

golden era though. It’s safe to say it will be never be as good. P: Have you tried anything other than virtual 3D projects? R: I was asked to be in State of The Art, an art show in Whistler during Telus week. I wanted to try something new so I handmade a series of wooden clocks and then silk screened tags of cities that I drew. It was another case where the graf past makes its way into my work. It was inspired from the world clocks you see in airports. There was Vancouver, London, Tokyo, Paris and New York. They ended up selling a couple hours into opening night so I was pretty happy about that. I actually just finished another set that a couple commissioned me to do. P: When you’re not working or shoveling food into your giant-cat’s mouth, what’s an average day in the life of Rory? R: Summer time and winter time are different. Summer time, an ideal day is getting a skate in, maybe going for a pedal to the beach, cold beers, good buds, good wife, good laughs….. Winter time is a good shred in the morning, some hockey, some more beers and buds. Wrenching on the trump at the Duggy is always a pleasure year round too. P: It seems like you live a pretty full lifestyle, squeezing it all in there. R: Yeah. First and foremost I have to mention I have a pretty understanding wife, Shannon is really supportive of my sometimes hectic schedule. Most of my weekdays are 9 to 5 at Next Level, and then 6 to Midnight at home back drawing and on the computer, so that takes up a lot of my time. P: Hockey, skating, snowboarding get slid into the cracks

too? R: Ya definitely it’s a lot to pack in there. I play hockey with the same dudes I’ve been playing with since I was a kid. I usually never pass up an opportunity to go skating or snowboarding. Although lately it’s been easier to fit other things in because I’ve been kind of banged up over the last year. I went under the knife twice on account of me forgetting a few key things. The first injury was a dislocated shoulder in hockey because I forgot I wasn’t tough and this guy who happened to be a fireman with above average upper body strength and iron lungs reminded me of that. I asked him for a fist fight, he more than obliged, basically dropped me and I dislocated my shoulder when I hit the ground. From that point it never healed and it’s been coming out ever since. Sooo worth it. I just had surgery to hopefully fix it. The other surgery was because I forgot I’m not 23 and that I generally don’t ride park anymore… especially on a hard day…after lunch brews. Long story short, I overshot a landing, exploded in the flat, and shattered my thumb so they had to put a couple of rods in there. I keep the x – ray of the rods in my hand at the top of my drawing table as a reminder that I need my hand for work. Both those were on my left arm which is my drawing hand. P: What’s the worst experience you’ve ever had with a client? R: I’ve been pretty lucky actually. This one finishing company… P: You don’t have to name names, haha. R: Ya, I’ll just say ‘this company’. They got me to do some shirts and usually I’ll make really loose conceptual ideas to get - 54 -


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ARTIST FEATURE

the ball rolling and then when we get set on a direction then that’s when I’ll do the real work and put the hours in. But this woman was pretty keen on getting me to do most of the work before she picked which one she liked the best. So I did a couple of designs, put in a bunch of hours and when she got them back she said the one basically looked like a dick. Haha, so I did some revisions to de-dickify it and sent it back. Then she just disappeared. P: Uhhh, that’s a rough one. R: To top it off, her company made all the boardroom tables at our office so I get constantly reminded when i’m sitting at them. Other than that, I’ve been pretty lucky so far. Clients are usually pretty good about me having a full time job and the work I’m doing for them may take a bit longer as a result. P: What about traveling? Have you been to any places that were cool and inspiring? R: Yeah I was in China for a month for work, that was an amazing trip. That was right in the heat of summer and I had a scooter to rip around on. That was super rad. Just basically drinking dollar beers every day and eating like a king. P: I heard you had a good tour guide. R: I did, I had an amazing tour guide that showed me all the KTV’s and the bikes with omlettes, haha. They had bikes everywhere that just cook omlettes on the back of the bike, it could probably break every health code in North America twice over, but there it’s just regular. Once you get the first couple of pukes out of the way then they stay in your stomach. And trying to navigate a cab in China…that was pretty rad.

R: Yeah, I learned how to navigate a cab in China. Half the time the guys would be stoked, and half the time the guys would yell at me when spoke to them. It didn’t really hit me until the day I got home and jumped in a cab. I told him exactly where I was going, but in China I was basically saying “left, right , go, stop”. If you jumped in a cab here and just told the guy “go” and “left” etc some of them would probably yell too haha. Like am I going to Main Street or am I going to Whistler? I’ve gone to England a bunch of times. Pretty much all my relatives live in Liverpool, which is a rad city. I went to Hawaii a couple times when I worked for the airlines. One of the times I was laid off from Air Canada, I had a bunch of buddy passes left so I took 7 dudes to Calgary to skate the millennium park because it just opened. That was a heavy trip. I just went to Mexico and got married. That was awesome. 65 people came down with us. Best two weeks ever… aside from feeling like I was literally dying the day before my wedding. I drank a keg of Mexican tap water trying to avoid a hangover the night before. It’s not a myth about the tap water. P: What’s next on the agenda for Rory Doyle? R: I just want to keep cranking away and progress in my field. I work a lot but I love my job so it doesn’t really burn me out. As far as everything else, I’m going be a dad pretty soon so I plan on embracing the changes that bring and just try to be good dad with lots of dad power. Keep skating and shredding, riding motorsaaaaaackles with the posse and having fun.

P: Hahaha - 56 -


ARTIST FEATURE

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ARTIST FEATURE

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ARTIST FEATURE

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this IS thiS

IT AIN’T SOMETHIN’ ELSE Fashion Editor TANUS LEWIS Art Direction DUSTIN FISHBOOK Stylist’s Assistant LEANNE TRIGG

Photographed by ANDRÉ PAUL PINCES

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COPY cardigan LIFETIME shirt WeSC jeans QUICKSILVER shirt ALTAMONT sweater and toque LRG jeans model’s own vest, vintage sunglassesglasses

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PENFIELD jacket ALTERNATIVE APPAREL sweater NORSE PROJECTS shirt* STORMY KROMER hat*

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*courtesy Mr. Lee’s General Store & Haberdashery


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opposite: LIFETIME sweater, pants, jacket STORMY KROMER hat and FILSON gloves* ALTERNATIVE APPAREL duffle model’s own henley and boots *courtesy Mr. Lee’s General Store & Haberdashery

this page: C1RCA jacket photographer’s own vintage Oakley goggles

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STORMY KROMER hat from Mr. Lee’s VANS shirt ALTERNATIVE APPAREL sweatshirt LIFETIME jacket LRG pants model’s own boots

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QUICKSILVER jacket ALTERNATIVE APPAREL shirt LRG pants VANS toque model’s own glasses and boots

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left: LIFETIME sweater, jacket STORMY KROMER hat and FILSON gloves from Mr. Lee’s right: EMERICA henley LRG pants and sweater PENFIELD vest BRIXTON toque

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C1RCA jacket and denim shirt LRG sweatshirt VANS pants FILSON gloves from Mr. Lee’s ALTAMONT duffle

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this page and opposite: LRG jacket and shirt ALTAMONT sweatshirt VANS pants C1RCA boots model’s own watch

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QUICKSILVER shirt ALTAMONT sweater and toque LRG jeans model’s own vest, vintage sunglassesglasses

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LIFETIME vest, shirt, pants ALTERNATIVE APPAREL sweatshirt HERSHEL backpack STORMY KROMER hat from Mr. Lee’s model’s own boots

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EMERICA shirt, sweater, jacket LRG pants VANS toque

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bottom: PENFIELD jacket ALTERNATIVE APPAREL sweatshirt ALTAMONT gloves VANS toque STANFIELD long johns from Mr. Lee’s model’s own sunglasses and boots

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QUICKSILVER shirt ALTAMONT sweater and toque LRG jeans model’s own PENFIELD vest model’s own VESTAL sunglasses

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QUICKSILVER shirt ALTAMONT sweater and toque LRG jeans model’s own vest and vintage sunglasses

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MUSIC

mega hurtz

Red Bull MegaHurtz went down on November 13, 2010 in Vancouver, BC and as expected...it was mega. The only event of it’s kind in Canada, MegaHurtz made its debut in Vancouver, BC to a sold out crowd of 1500 sweaty fans!

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MUSIC

W2 Storyeum played host to a sold out crowd in attendance to see some of the best Canadian Sound-Crafters, BeatMakers, and Production Beasts (ANGO, Azari and III, Love & Electrik, LUNICE, Megasoid, Blank Capsule, Nautiluss, Calamalka, Egyptrixx, Felix Cartal), topped up with some love from international Taste-makers (Black Milk and MixHell). Red Bull MegaHurtz allowed forward-thinking artists to push the idea of live performances by creating the perfect audio/ visual atmosphere for this kind of concept. The sold out crowd witnessed a night that crossed genres and senses in two separate rooms and infinite styles of music. The result was a high voltage, live event for the ears, eyes and mind. Samba met Ghettotech, Hip-Hop met Electro and the audience witnessed the only event of it’s kind. By submerging partygoers in a cataclysmic live production, orchestrated by twelve top electronic/live performance producers, the audience experienced their favourite artists drop new tracks accompanied by custom created visual content throughout the venue. A stadium sized production in the main room and the 3D room 2 made for a night to remember; or at least try to. Safe to say that Red Bull MegaHurtz was a smashing success. With these twelve artists it’s easy to see why this event was nothing but epic. - 85 -


CAPTURED - PHOTO FEATURE

CA PT U RE D

Definitely a stand out building (Museum of Civilization in Hull) and one I’ve visited quite a bit. I don’t think I really ever go inside the actual museum itself but just tend to hang around the grounds. Pending how you look at it, its always reminded me of an incoming swell or an tweaked skatespot turned sideways. Jesse Bowden Montreal, Canada www.tigerdistribution.com - 86 -


CAPTURED - PHOTO FEATURE

Joe let his alarm clock go. It was to wake us up to take a ferry, then catch a bus, then board a flight to London, so we could take the tube and get on planes back to Canada. But Joe wanted to sleep in (a WeSC party probably had influence). Though we eventually made it off the island by the skin of our teeth, I had a dark feeling I might have to get used to the looks of this Baltic Coastline. Perry Pugh Vancouver, Canada www.knowshow.ca - 87 -


CAPTURED - PHOTO FEATURE

The light at the end of the tunnel! A reassuring sign that there is hope you’ll emerge from the darkness. No matter how you look at it, symbolic or literally, a tunnel photo always looks amazing. I shot this on my iPhone4 while driving the Autobahn in Germany doing 200 KM. Max Jenke Vancouver, Canada www.endeavorsnowboards.com - 88 -


CAPTURED - PHOTO FEATURE

Every time I visit Tokyo, I end up walking over to Yoyogi park. Every morning, no matter what. It’s an amazing place with some great history and heritage. It’s home  to a Shinto shrine called Meiji Shrine, it was the site to the first successful powered aircraft flight in Japan and hosts many great and interesting markets, festivals and events. It’s a home away from home for me now. These sake barrels are part of Yoyogi park. Reid Stewart Vancouver, Canada www.lifetimecollective.com - 89 -


SHOP PROFILE

SHARKS +

hammers Sharks & Hammers was started in 2008 by Alex Rhek Usow, Mark Brand and the inventor of Napster, Justin Timberlake. Brand had the belief, motivation, confidence and business mind to make something out of nothing. Rhek had a pirated version of Photoshop and a creative spirit. Justin enjoyed singing and dancing. As is often the case, an alcohol-fueled conversation became a pulsating hangover that became a reality.

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SHOP PROFILE

Sharks & Hammers, the brand, started with graphic tee’s. They are a natural canvas, a cost effective wardrobe staple, and aren’t downloadable via the Internet. There has never been one set agenda or point of view unifying the direction of the tee’s, they are just visual samples and are as varied as life’s experiences. The influences of rap culture is always underlining, as it was a predominant childhood influence for both Rhek & Brand, but being open minded there are no limitations or restrictions – it’s just graphics on t-shirts. The first line included Dirty Harry, Hot Knives, cartoon pizza, a Biggie quote and a sock monkey riding a chicken. Totally normal. Future plans includes more random graphic tee’s, several artist collabos, expanded distribution, accessories and a cut and sew line late next year. Sharks & Hammers, the storefront, opened soon after the birth of the brand. A hideously purple failed bong shop and former office of the Georgia Straight in Gastown (Vancouver) became the headquarters. After 2 great years, 3 shitty break ins, countless beers and BBQ’s, it was time for the store to grow and change. The obvious answer was to open a better store that was also a Sushi Restaurant. The plan embodied the unpredictable and resourceful spirit of the brand and was totally possible in the building directly across the street from the original store. Thus Sharks and its new Japanese sibling, Sea Monstr Sushi, currently share a beautiful and unique space full of warm character, exposed brick and hand poured concrete and resin sinks. The restaurant sells delicious raw fish on one side and the store on the other side carries a diverse and ever changing variety of carefully selected products, none of them being moustache wax, skinny jeans or mass produced brand-name-driven apparel.

Sharks & Hammers has also had great success in its partnership with DIY, creative guy, Rob Werd Geary and his local Welcome To East Van brand (plus it’s global offshoot, AllCitees). Together this union has managed to saturate the city with products that instill and represent neighborhood pride. This includes their ever-popular streets shirts and other items such as mugs, totes, and aprons. There are an absurd number of products slated for future production and customized expansion to all cities is imminent. Random Facts & Fiction: Sharks & Hammers favorite color is blond. Sharks & Hammers saw Gwar last year and has a collection of Dancehall 45’s. Sharks have no hands and hammers don’t dance. Sharks constantly need to swim in order to survive. It’s the only way their gills can extract life-sustaining oxygen from water. If they don’t move forward they die. Hammers don’t require oxygen to move forward. Hammers are the oldest tool in the world; an instrument used to both build and destroy. MC Hammer managed to both build and destroy a successful career and wore memorable pants. Sharks & Hammers is an alcohol appreciation society. Sharks and hammers sounds like something Ghostface would say. Sharks & Hammers is a black music listeners club. Mos Def used to come by the old shop and smoke weed. Then he’d ramble about silent screams and vent that writing the song “Human Nature” should be enough to absolve Michael Jackson of any crimes. Mos Def can’t roll a joint to save his life. Sharks & Hammers is an Aquarium Construction contracting agency. Sharks & Hammers appreciates David Suzuki. Sharks & Hammers has no plans to retire. If Sharks & Hammers were an animal it would be a monkey that smokes cigarettes. - 91 -


SHOP PROFILE

mr. lees

Mr. Lee’s General Store & Haberdashery is closing on it first year of being open for business and intends to stay the course. Bringing it’s customers time honoured tradition as well as garments and sundries of the finest quality.

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SHOP PROFILE

Since it’s inception Mr. Lee’s has strived to bring its customer’s high quality and unique goods to outfit the needs of daily living. The team at the shop work hard to keep the selection well curated and innovative, and constantly seeking new products and brands for our client base. From utility, to daily grooming, well-tailored garments, to local craftsmanship Mr. Lee’s has got you covered. Strolling into the shop itself is a refection of a time past, flanked by a traditional barbershop, the hand painted gold leafed window, it’s warm wall color and antique cabinetry from various sources (including Vancouver’s own Chinatown, circa 1935) come together to present an experience rather than just another monotonous necessity. Mr. Lee’s in not affixed to any particular aesthetic, but rather plans to grow and change with it’s customers to ensure its continued relevance in an ever evolving landscape of the modern world. The one thing that will remain constant however is our dedication to quality.

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SHOP PROFILE

board room - 94 -


SHOP PROFILE

When Ben asked me to recount the history of the Boardroom, I thought I could rattle off all that has transpired in the last 20 years. I said “I would try to recap the history of the Boardroom”, but decided to tell the story as “I”, “we”, and “us”, as so many people have been involved in the Boardroom over the years Back in the spring of 1988 I was down at the SIA show in Vegas and bumped into Mike Olson in the Gnu booth. I left the show with 2 Gnu Antigravity boards under my arm. Upon returning to Vancouver I learned to snowboard at Cypress Mountain. I became the Canadian distributor of Gnu and proceeded to try and find snowboard shops across Canada to sell Gnu. There were a few snowboard shops scattered across Canada (ie. The Snowboard Shop in Calgary was one of my first dealers) but both Westbeach and Pacific Boarder were not selling snowboards at the time. Both declined my efforts to open them as a Gnu dealer.

I said “screw it then” and I’ll open my own shop. I was eating in the Pine Street Café (Pine and 4th) with one of my staff at the time Justin Harris. I looked across the street and saw a “For Lease” sign. I wrote the phone number down on a napkin, went back down the street to my office (no cell phone) and called to rent the space. The owner of the building said the space was 800 sq ft. (when I moved out and measured the space, I found out it was less than 600 sq ft.). We started to renovate the shitty space to open for the fall of ‘89. The store only sold boards, bindings and Sorel snowboard boots. Board brands were Sims, Crazy Banana, Kemper, Gnu, and Checker Pig, which gave us the best selection of snowboards around. We at the Boardroom have always been proud to have one of the largest selections of snowboard products in Vancouver. Burton was available, but I turned it down, as Sims was the number one brand at the time. The next year Westbeach and Pacific Boarder got into the snowboard business and locked up Burton.

In 1993, 3 years after opening on Pine St. we moved the Boardroom to 1717 West 4th. The space was “huge”, 2200 sq ft up from 600 sq ft on Pine St. We had to spread everything out to make the shop look full. Pear came to work at the Boardroom in the fall of 1994 and is currently the GM of Boardroom retail. By 1996 we were selling skateboards, street wear and shoes. In 1998 we were in need of more space and added 1745 West 4th. In October of 2000 The Boardroom North Van opened at 21st and Lonsdale. Erik Traulsen, who had been a Rad Air snowboard team rider and West 4th employee moved back from Toronto to manage the North Van store. In 2006, the West 4th store expanded again as space became available next door at 1749 West 4th. A hole was cut in the wall to connect the two buildings. In that same year we expanded the square footage of the North Van store as space became available.

Back in 1990, we held what I think was the first snowboard contest on the North Shore mountains at Cypress. Over the years we have held numerous snowboard contests on the local hills, with the Boardroom Slopestyle events held at Mount Seymour through 2004. The last 5 years has seen our attention shift to growing the business and the plan is to initiate a Boardroom snowboard event for spring 2011. After 20+ years on West 4th and 10+ years on Lonsdale, I look back at all the staff that contributed to the evolution of the Boardroom. Many have come and gone and many remain an integral part of the history and future of the Boardroom. What I really have enjoyed about the business all these years is meeting so many great people and have many working relationships evolve into lifelong friendships.

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SHOP PROFILE

ballistic Ballistic Skate & Snow has been pushing in St. John’s for the last 15 years. What owner Lorne Loder started as a oneman operation in a small downtown location, has now evolved into the biggest downtown clothing retailer in St. John’s.

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SHOP PROFILE

In the attempt to find the best store location to suit its customers, the shop has moved twice on the same downtown block over the last six years. But as of Nov 3, 2010 Ballistic has found a home in its new location at 181 Water St. In the summer of ’95 Ballistic first opened its doors to the public. On the shelves were some skate tee’s and hardgoods from S & J and Ultimate, along with a box of Freshjive overnighted from the founders of Timebomb. Customers were giving a great response to the unique product offered, and later that year, while searching for new lines to carry, Lorne found Volcom and became the second account in Canada. With hot new clothing lines in the store, no competitors in the province and a growing customer base, Ballistic was off to a strong start. With the business growing, and downtown becoming an increasingly popular shopping destination, Ballistic outgrew its location and moved into a new space that was twice the size a couple doors down the street. After fine tuning the store and getting it just the way he wanted, Lorne received an unexpected late night call. There had been a fire at the new shop, a lot of product had been damage and there was a lot of work to get done before that shop would open again. After relocating temporarily, and blowing out whatever product remained, the shop had been repaired and Ballistic moved back to its downtown location. As board sports and street fashion became more mainstream West49 moved into the mall. This was the first competitor able to compete on the same level as Ballistic. With their purchasing power and mall location West49 quickly became a popular store in St. John’s, especially for those customers/parents not wanting to deal with the traffic and parking in the downtown core. Soon it wasn’t just West49 we were competing with, there were stores in St. John’s picking up many of the lines that just a couple years earlier were only available at Ballistic. To keep our competitive advantage in the market we have made it a priority to offer the products our competitors cannot. Constantly looking for the next great clothing line is what will separate us from the competition in the future. While our roots are, and will always be, in skateboarding and snowboarding, we have had to change with our customer. That has meant bringing in more women’s fashion and carrying more products for young boys and girls who are truly the ones pushing this industry. What was once a lifestyle for just a select few, is now enjoyed by most, and when a prime downtown location became available earlier this year we knew this was the next step for Ballistic. The new store makes a better shopping environment for our customers. All of the clothing we have to offer now fits on one floor, while the separate skate/snow/footwear section still keeps a small shop feel. I am confident we won’t be moving again, Ballistic has found a home. - 97 -


DISTRIBUTOR PROFILE

NRI Thinking outside the box with Peter McKenna

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DISTRIBUTOR PROFILE

I know you’ve been in this industry for some time now. How did you get your start and how long have you been doing what you’re doing? I got involved in the industry in 1995 with a couple of partners. I have been doing this kind of work for a long time and self employed since 1988. What is NRI and what brands do you guys work with? NRI is a 4PL. We provide logistics services directly to our customers as well as coordinating relationships on their behalf with other logistics companies. We work with 43 brands today. Most but not all are in the “industry”. Quik, DC, Volcom, Electric, Sitka, Arson, Orb, Rusty, Metal Mullisha, Lost, Circa, Globe, Dwindle, Surftech, Oakley, Toms Shoes, 686, Mervin, Signal, K2, Northwave, Herschel, Ambiguous. Many of these brands have been with us for over 10 years now but we are trying to mix it up. Going forward we are focused on finding the best which doesn’t mean the biggest. Enjoying the relationship is important.

I know you’ve been to some crazy parties and met some unique individuals. What is your craziest party experience? You don’t have to go far to find unique individuals. There are one or two right here in Kamloops. I had a period from 2000 to 2003 where I was single so there were a few messy scenes. Blacking out in the 3rd quarter of the Superbowl at Rum Jungle the Sunday before SIA started and finishing the night (or next day) at Spearmint sober and finding everyone I thought had gone home were still there. Being called “stripper licker” in the halls of the show made me wonder what I missed.

What is your opinion of the Canadian retail industry and where it is heading? Certainly not where I want to see it going. People that lead trends don’t shop in the mall. We need to continue to have strong independent retailers to support brands that are going to continue to keep our industry relevant. There needs to be a balance between satisfying the shareholders and supporting the core shops. A difficult challenge… Best and worst things about your job? Best is my office is over the daycare and I look out onto the playground. Before everyone thinks this is creepy my 17 month old son goes to the daycare. Also my dog is here every day. The worst thing is that my partner won’t get a haircut. With the state of our economy right now where do you see our industry heading? The economy has presented everyone with challenges. Some of the decisions made are not the best but the spinoff is a lot of creative people pushed out to try and do things on their own. This creates new ideas which become opportunities for all of us. We need to support this creativity by offering capital, structure without confinement (not sure if I chose the right words) and it will keep the industry relevant. We need to be willing to pioneer new lines.

With all the traveling and managing of brands, how do you make it all work? I always had partners at work I could count on. Now I have some great people helping to manage the business. The biggest challenge has been to make sure everyone knows how I feel about NRI and our customers. A lot of our relationships are personal to me. Any tips on time management for the rest of us? There is always lots of time but most of us waste too much of it. Make sure you are measured or measure yourself based on achievements and not time at work. Last big purchase? Next big Purchase? Dale Rehberg 157. It started a significant shift in my lifestyle. As far as the next big purchase…a laser Vasectomy. I have 5 kids.

What does Peter McKenna like to do outside work? Try out product we handle. I have 5 kids and the newest is my primary source of entertainment. I try to be outside doing something with my family. This year we are going to be sheep farmers in the French Alps for 3 weeks.

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REP PROFILE

lyndon + jamie

cormAc I know you’ve been in this industry for some time now. How did you get your start and how long have you been doing what your doing? Lyndon: I started snowboarding at a young age and was fortunate enough to live in a city that had the likes of The Snowboard Shop, Skaters, Westbeach and Authentic Sportz. I spent many days and nights riding COP and the resorts in the Rockies. We were a small group back then and most of us were friends with some of our industries pioneers. My experience working with Mark and Dave at The Source and Brian Cooke at The Bicycle Café helped me crave a job in sales within the industry. Back in 2001 Michael Costigan and I started the Radio Agency and had an amazing 8 years working together. Today I work along side Adam Ruddell and we conduct the business as the Holepunch Salesagency. Jamie: I would say I got my start by working at The Source in Calgary while I went to school. I have had my agency for 9 years now.

Calgary in a house with a tobogganing hill for a back yard, and during the winter I would snowboard on it every day. In the spring and summer we built skate ramps at the end of our cul-de-sac with a bunch of the neighborhood kids. My family also has a cabin in the East Kootenays of BC where we were able to wakeboard and waterski for a couple months of the year. I started working in retail which combined these activities with my enjoyment for sales. When I was 21 I applied a for a Job with a Large bike distributor called Bell Sports Canada (Giro, Bell, Santa Cruz Bicycles, Rock Shox, Shimano, etc.) and landed a sales job taking care of the interior and northern parts of B.C. I have been in the industry ever since. Jamie: Calgary is pretty small so growing up when you snowboard you just really know everyone in the industry. After getting out of school I started a magazine called Sequence so I guess I had a plan to work in the industry. Having the magazine lead me to getting an interview with Ride for a rep position.

What brands do you work with? Lyndon: I work for Vans Canada and handle all of the Categories under the Vans Banner as well as Pro-Tec, which Vans owns. Jamie: We work with Ride Snowboards so it keeps us primarily winter based so there is time to work on Herschel over the summer months.

If being a sales rep wasn’t so glamorous what kind of career path do you think you would be following? Lyndon: I have always had a passion for Photography and Design. So I may have tried something in one of those fields. I am not sure if it would have afforded me a living but I would have loved to make a go of it. Jamie: Designing and manufacturing contemporary products.

Growing up, what made you want to be involved in this industry? Was it something that just happened or did you actively work towards it? Lyndon: It was a pretty organic process for me. I grew up in

With the state of our economy right now where do you see our industry heading? Lyndon: I am fortunate to work for a company that was able to grow through the recession. We were able to grow with a

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REP PROFILE

cK very disciplined plan and a continued investment (both time and resources) towards action sports. Most of us got into this industry through the love the sports, and the lifestyle that surrounds them. We as an industry need to keep working together creating ways to bring new participants into the fold; grassroot events both competitive and inclusive will help immensely. Jamie: I feel the economy is slowly trying to turn it self around but we still have a tough road in front of us. So I think we will see great looking products and good designs at better price points. Do you see any new trends and patterns within our industry coming our way ? Lyndon: Fast fashion retailers will continue to put pressure on brands to bring products more quickly to market. The consolidation of Multi Store chains and also the addition of many US based retailers to our retail landscape will challenge not only retailers but the brands whom sell to them. Jamie: Earlier deadlines will be the biggest one. It’s going to be harder and harder for COMPANIES to ship on time and COMPETE if they don’t. China is a mess. Best advice someone has given you? Lyndon: There are often two different paths to the same outcome. Jamie: Hit down on the ball through impact. When you have downtime. What kind of other things are you into ? Lyndon: I spend most of my down time with my wife and two

little girls (aged 3 and 4) We are an active family and enjoy hiking, boating, travelling. During the winter we spend a good amount of time at the ski hill. Jamie: In the summer months being from Calgary we lack water so on any downtime I try and spend it at our cabin in BC on the lake or on the golf course. In the winter it would be trying to get days out sledding/riding and playing a ton of hockey. Favorite place you have traveled to and why? Back in 1999 Lyndon: I spent a few days Snowboarding at Island Lake Lodge with my brother Jamie. Pretty rad to be able to shred with your brother in those pristine conditions. Jamie: Japan would be ONE of my favorites. I’VE been THERE a few times over the years. Tokyo is more like New York where I don’t think you can go down a wrong street you will always find something to do or somewhere place to go into. I know you’ve been to some crazy party’s and met some unique individuals. What is your craziest party experience? Lyndon: The Vans sales meetings in Montreal were always a bit of a party fiasco. One of these nights ended up with me puking in Drew McOuat’s luggage. Sorry Drew. Jamie: Easy… Calgary Flames 2004 cup run… totally unexpected. Last big purchase? Next big Purchase? Lyndon: Surf Trip to Mexico. More Camera gear. Jamie: It would be a copy of Free and Easy Magazine. Probably next month’s copy of Free and Easy Magazine.

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REP PROFILE

taron R YAN

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REP PROFILE

I know you’ve been in this industry for some time now. How did you get your start and how long have you been doing what you’re doing? I started one summer in the nineties when I noticed there was no-one at the helm of sales at Nubile Distribution, which had great brands but at the time everyone was too busy being screw-ups to get anything done. It was an easy spot to get involved and make things happen. Over the years, Ryan, I know you’ve worked with a few brands. What brands is Apogee Sales Agency working with these days? I was born and raised on the coast but lived on the mainland for nearing 20 years now. Witnessing the incredible rise in appeal of the surf lifestyle, I decided to take a “satellite” office in the town where I was born, Tofino, to complement my agency in the city, and to offer legitimate branding into what could half jokingly be called Canada’s Huntington Beach. I have been repping RVCA—I’ll say passionately, I’m sure there is no argument out there on that, for going on 8 years this spring. With both retailer and consumer focus shifting to that “lifestyle” market, I’ve been fortunate to add FIREWIRE SURFBOARDS, MATUSE WETSUITS, KOMUNITY SURF ACC., INDOSOLE FOOTWEAR and the lovely CHRISTY FEAVER’s MODERN METALWORK as of last year. As well, I have quietly been doing printed decals and stickers with a business called IDEE PRO out of Quebec City. I named my business Apogee because it means “peak” or “highest point achievable.” This is the philosophy and common denominator for all brands involved with my agency, that is they each endeavour to promote better living or peak living. All the products I sell are not only of exceptional quality production and design but also give back or add in a positive way to the human experience on some level. Growing up, what made you want to be involved in this industry? Was it something that just happened or did you actively work towards it? It was really a light bulb moment. As I touched on above, I saw an opportunity that I don’t really think anyone but me at that moment in time could see. I had to act or I’d forever be kicking myself. That and I had been increasingly involved with the inner workings of the business through packing boxes, and with my then-sponsors, assisting with design concepts and their lines’ direction. I also found myself designing and constructing TS booths in Vegas and saw all these older dudes hustling shop kids that were living just like me. I thought, “Well, as if I can’t do what buddy across the isle was doing. And heck, we all shred and party already so shouldn’t I get a job like this and we can keep the dream going?” Yes! Times have changed a lot and that old guy deserved and earned his spot more often than not but it was enough inspiration for me to dive in with some level of entitlement.

If being a sales rep wasn’t so glamorous what kind of career path do you think you would be following? Bus driver for sure. Haha. Wood-worker is more likely but in a furniture/interior design capacity. With the state of our economy right now where do you see our industry heading? More specialty retailers to balance the box shop phenomenon. There will be less and less middle ground, and I think customers will look for these two types of retail experience. Neither of these types of shops will survive unless they are focused on the customer service/relationship. Do you see any new trends and patterns within our industry coming our way? Hoverboards!! Game changer haha Best advice someone has given you? Measure twice, cut once. But seriously, the best advice that was never told to me but what I’ve come to see as paramount to having a shot at success is to realize when an opportunity is unique to you and you alone…then seize it! When you have downtime. What kind of other things are you into? Surfing, skating, snow(board)ing, guitar, and of course the yoga to keep me right. Favorite place you have traveled to and why? Bali, Indonesia. It feels like a second (or third?) home and the culture of the natives is alive and well and very much intertwined with everyday life. That and the air and the ocean water are always around the same temperature, 30 degrees. Nice. Last big purchase? With out a doubt my definitely my custom fabricated showroom trailer. You will see it soon if not already, and yep I did what all us road reps dream of doing, getting the whole showroom experience on wheels. RVCA’s line has been perpetually expanding and there is just no space or opportunity to show the entire line with any level of grace using simply a couple rolling racks in store. Unless you can see all accounts in a hotel conference room, which is typically not possible, presenting the line well is more and more difficult. Now, the conference room travels to the shop and buyer. And when it rolls up it IS an event. Shops as well as customers seem to really dig it and being it is such a spectacle, many conversations spark up that would not normally. It has served s a great opportunity to have the organic experience with customers as well as shop staff. It’s also been a lot of fun and that is key.


When Mads is not breaking boundaries in snowboarding, he can be found playing the guitar and listening to music on his AERIAL7 Phoenix. One of AERIAL7's newest Ambassadors, Mads continues to search the world for bigger jumps and indie tunes.


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