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Do What You Love Green & Digital Business Programme

 

ERDF Project No: 600030

March 2013-June 2015

Evaluation Report July 2015

http://kwmc.org.uk/projects/dowhatyoulove/

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1. Executive Summary

This executive summary articulates what has happened during the ‘Do What You Love Green and Digital Business Programme’ and presents the outcomes, learning and recommendations from the programme activities, illustrating the difference the programme has made for local people, the local community and the partners involved. The Do What You Love Green and Digital Business Programme (DWYL) was developed and delivered by Knowle West Media Centre (KWMC) and partners re:work, (referred to throughout as ‘the team’) with additional input from the University of the West of England’s (UWE’s) Faculty of Business and Law, from March 2013 to March 2015. The programme was funded by the European Regional Development Fund, Arts Council England, Bristol City Council Arts Development and Bristol Futures.1 The overarching aim of DWYL was to develop an innovative approach to enterprise and skills development which would make the most of ‘green’ and digital technologies to provide opportunities to Knowle West and the wider South Bristol community.2 Within this overarching aim the programme developed six specific aims: To support local people to develop relevant skills through training. To support the development of community-based enterprise. To develop job opportunities for local people. To stimulate the local economy, providing positive social and economic development in the community, by making the most of new green and digital technologies. 5. To change external perceptions of Knowle West, in order to increase business investment and local pride. 6. To leave a legacy so that people who have been supported can continue to develop the work of the programme themselves. 1. 2. 3. 4.

The team sought to realise these aims through the following objectives: •

To engage meaningfully with partners, to develop relevant and sustainable opportunities for all participating.

To use a reflective and fluid process, working together with all involved to identify solutions.

To identify, conceive and deliver events to promote knowledge exchange between the local community and professionals from across the region and showcase the businesses.

To identify, conceive and pilot longer-term solutions.

                                                                                                              1

ERDF, Dept of Communities and Local Government.

2

DWYL on KWMC website http://kwmc.org.uk/projects/dowhatyoulove/#sthash.kHzRyrgb.dpuf6

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The programme was informed by KWMC’s 19 years of practice in Knowle West: “The "Do What You Love Programme" is a development of years of KWMC's work and is based on our experience of delivering many different kinds of projects collaboratively with the community. Very often we move from one project to another without having the opportunity to pick up unexpected outcomes or 'wild' ideas and nurture them. With this programme the aim was to take stock of the relationships we have built over the years and all the glimmers of great ideas that have emerged and through the lens of a Green and Digital approach, support people to bring those ideas to life as small businesses.” (Carolyn Hassan, Director, Knowle West Media Centre, March 2015) KWMC and re:work worked together, using a creative approach to co-design an innovative programme. They began by exploring and co-designing the parameters and details of the programme, through collaboration between themselves and with involvement of local people. Based on this co-designed programme, the team was able to deliver the objectives listed above through two strands of work or methods: 1. Introducing enterprise start-up ideas to people in South Bristol. This method was itself practiced in two ways: • Creating a portfolio of around fifty original green and digital business ideas, promoting these through events, social media, and face-to-face exchange with interested individuals. • Producing events and workshops to promote the portfolio and knowledge exchange between the local community and professionals from across the city. 2. Supporting South Bristol residents to develop their own ideas. It is through this strand of work that the focus on people ‘doing what they love’ was pursued, as the team realised the potential there was in supporting people to base enterprise developments on things that they feel passionate about and committed to, not least in terms of ensuring the sustainability of the businesses developed. The programme consequently had the following outcomes: • Local people were supported to explore, develop and establish businesses based on what they love doing.

A portfolio was created of original green and digital business ideas that DWYL partners (KWMC and re:work) and members of the steering group were able to convey to individuals and organisations in the community through face-to-face conversation, local press, websites and social media.

Sixty-five people were supported for twelve hours each regarding business start-up.

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Local people, including but not limited to those setting up businesses, were supported to build on their existing skills and develop a range of skills and knowledge relevant to their own businesses.

The following eight businesses were supported to become officially registered and thereby create further jobs for local people:

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

A Ride In The Park, CIC Leather Craft, Steve Probert, sole trader Artisan Carpentry, Martin Harrison, sole trader Harbour Training Ltd Steve Griffiths Gardening, sole trader SATV partnership The Laser House, Fiona Dowling, sole trader Sammy Payne sole trader 1.

These businesses created six jobs for local people. Three additional projects were supported to develop: • Sew Clever • Rising High • Knowle and West Eco Paints The local economy was stimulated through green- and digital-inspired activity by sewing group Sew Clever, special events such as the Make It! Festival and Wooden Pallet Challenge, locally-sourced and locally-produced food and fresh produce sold at events such as those provided by The Bread Group and Steve Griffiths, and local goods and services such as A Ride In The Park and The Laser House. External perceptions of Knowle West were changed, increasing local pride through marketing, social and broadcast media coverage, visitors from outside the community coming in for events and projects such as Wild Thing, presentations and presence at international conferences such as European Network of Living Labs and the International Fab Lab Conference in Barcelona. Through achieving these outcomes the DWYL team also: • •

Developed useful and significant learning points about how best to approach this type of work in contexts like Knowle West. Put into place long-term plans for a sustained programme, through the Bristol Maker Lab proposal, ensuring the programme’s legacy.

Furthermore, feedback from those involved has indicated that what has been of greatest significance is the quality of the programme. For example, what has been important to those involved has been the quality of the job acquired or of the business support delivered. The emphasis of the programme, as is illustrated in the name ‘Do What You Love’ has not been to simply create ‘any old’ job or business, but to develop

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opportunities for meaningful and engaging vocational opportunities, which incorporate opportunities for continued learning, for example: “Before, I was a factory worker moving flat-packs in an assembly line, it wasn't enjoyable. It was actually pretty negative but people here understand you. I love this job, I like how it's hands-on, and learning is fun.” (Cameron Burrell, aged 21, Do What You Love participant and Digital Fabrication Trainee, April 2015.) This was illustrated to potential participants in the short DWYL animation created to promote the programme to different audiences and on different platforms: “We think that lively, profitable communities are created by people making a living doing what they love.”3

Still from the DWYL animation by Nick Hilditch

Through ongoing processes of reflection, partners and participants have identified key learning points at crucial stages of the work, in order to inform programme development. The learning that has been identified and acted upon through the programme can be summarised as follows: Learning and recommendations: •

Creating Meaningful Work Creating jobs and businesses that are meaningful and engaging makes a greater positive difference in the long-term as it motivates people to continue learning and developing their potential as active citizens.

Harnessing Individual Expertise Developing plans for businesses and jobs on the basis of people’s actual areas of expertise and interest, rather than predefining the                                                                                                               •

3

See DWYL animation by Nick Hilditch: https://vimeo.com/71331124

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scope or range of businesses and jobs, ensures a greater range of people are engaged in the offer for support and thereby supported to set up businesses or gain a new job. This, in turn, diversifies the national creative workforce and addresses issues of worklessness in communities where job opportunities have been historically low.

Supporting People Effectively Meeting people one to one as well as in groups is a very valuable part of the process. Meeting participants in places that are familiar to them makes for a much more productive relationship. The programme identified that this sort of mentoring system is useful in this kind of support programme.

More Lead-in Time Needed The amount of time people needed to feel comfortable and confident starting their own businesses was underestimated. Funding for similar models to this programme in future might cover a research and development phase.

Long Term Development A permanent, sustainable centre is required to provide a base from which people have time to learn new skills or develop existing ones. A base that has no barriers to entry, which can provide expertise, inspiration, tools, networks and childcare is needed in the long term. Financial investment in training and equipment is needed when research has been conducted into local needs. Ideas and plans for such a base, entitled ‘Bristol Maker Lab’, have been developed and are expanded on in the full report.

Childcare Provision Childcare continues to be a stumbling block for people learning new skills. As identified in the Child Poverty Strategy 2011- 2020, 90% of Bristol families living in poverty are families with single mothers. It is therefore an absolute necessity to provide adequate childcare to enable those parents to acquire the new skills and social networks that will prepare them for future work. Knowle West Children’s Centre has identified a large demand for nursery places in Knowle West that is currently not being met. A nursery that services Bristol Maker Lab participants as well as other parents living and working in the local area would be particularly effective at Filwood Green Business Park.

Environmental Impact Measurement Traditional metrics used to measure environmental impact are not suited to grassroots, small start-up enterprises. Through work with UWE’s Faculty of Business and Law, the programme found that at this developmental stage it is safe and more appropriate to define a new business as ‘green’ simply by assessing the approach of the entrepreneur, their ethos and attitude to key themes such as impact

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on the environment, waste, pollution, and trading locally and using sustainable materials. Evidence of these outcomes and this learning is contained in the full report. It is clear that the programme has been developed in meaningful ways, based on the experience and expertise of all involved, to realise its main aims. Because of the reflective nature of the process, the team from re:work and KWMC have been able to respond to new opportunities and new challenges throughout the programme, in order to develop a wide range of sustainable opportunities that promise to make a positive difference for the local community now and in the future: “The Do What You Love programme will have a lasting impact for the area. There are new friendships, new businesses have started, people are actually talking about working for themselves, and I've seen increased aspirations in people.” (Vicky Beckwith, re:work CEO, May 2015) The programme has enabled a significant amount of learning and the adoption of an approach that will be valuable to future developments: “It’s been a fascinating journey, with many challenges as well as achievements and I am convinced that this approach will help us build resilient and successful communities. All of us who have worked on the DWYL programme share a belief that if you are doing something you love, in a supportive environment, it will be successful, and we will create the communities we want to live in.” (Carolyn Hassan, Director, Knowle West Media Centre, March 2015) Furthermore, the results of DWYL have exceeded expectations in several ways, not least in terms of the legacy plans to create a permanent centre for enterprise in digital manufacture: “The Bristol Maker Lab would help to transform Knowle West by providing much needed opportunities for local residents and especially young people. This project sounds very exciting and would bring huge benefits to Knowle West and beyond.” (Dame Dawn Primarolo, former Labour MP for Bristol South constituency, April 2015)

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The cover of the Bristol Maker Lab proposal (Appendix2)

Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary................................................................................. 2 2. Introduction ................................................................................................ 9 2.1 Report Structure ................................................................................................9 2.2 Partner Profiles ..................................................................................................9 2.3 Programme Timeline........................................................................................11 2.4 Programme Background: Why Bristol? Why Knowle West? ...........................13

3. Evidence relating to the Programme Aims........................................... 16 3.1 Aim 1: Support local people to develop relevant skills through training. ........17 3.2 Aim 2: Support the development of community based enterprise ..................22 3.3 Aim 3: Develop job opportunities for local people...........................................50 3.4 Aim 4: Stimulate the local economy ................................................................51 3.5 Aim 5: Change outside perceptions of Knowle West ......................................52 3.6 Aim 6: Leave a legacy ......................................................................................54

4. The Objectives used to realise the Outcomes ..................................... 56 4.1. Engaging meaningfully with partners..............................................................56 4.2. Using a reflective and fluid process, working together with all involved ........58 4.3 Identifying, conceiving and delivering events. .................................................59 4.4 Identifying, conceiving and piloting longer-term solutions. .............................67 4.4 Meeting targets ................................................................................................68

5. Learning and Recommendations ........................................................... 69 5.1 Creating meaningful work ................................................................................69 5.2 Harnessing individual expertise .......................................................................69 5.3 Supporting people effectively ..........................................................................69 5.4 More lead in time is needed in new businesses ..............................................70 5.5 Long term development...................................................................................70 5.6 Childcare provision ..........................................................................................71 5.7 Environmental impact measurement ...............................................................71

6. Conclusion................................................................................................ 71 7. Appendices ............................................................................................... 73 Appendix 2: Bristol Maker Lab Proposal ...............................................................73

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2. Introduction This report presents the findings of the Do What You Love Green and Digital Business Programme, developed and delivered by Knowle West Media Centre and partners re:work with additional support from the University of the West of England’s Faculty of Business and Law4, from March 2013 to March 2015. The programme began after a successful bid to the European Regional Development Fund5, match funded by Arts Council England, Bristol City Council Arts Development, and Bristol Futures.

2.1 Report Structure Section Three of this report presents evidence regarding how the aims of the programme were met. This report is structured around aims in order to provide evidence of how the aims were met as well as details of the activities that enabled the aims to be met. In reality, the structure of the Do What You Love (DWYL) programme was more complex than this, in that most activities relate to more than one aim. However for the ease of reporting, the details included are of those activities that relate most closely to the specific aims. Section Four of this report articulates the objectives used and how they were developed and revised. It presents evidence and examples of the activities and events that were delivered, through the programme, in order to meet the aims. The conclusion outlines the learning gained from this innovative programme and identifies a series of recommendations. This report and its recommendations are intended to enable this model to be replicated elsewhere. The report and its recommendations are also intended to highlight the requirements needed to ensure that the legacy of the programme is nurtured and can continue to contribute to the future of Knowle West and other communities where job opportunities have been historically low.

2.2 Partner Profiles Knowle West Media Centre (KWMC) is an arts organisation and charity based in Bristol that has been supporting individuals and communities to get the most out of digital technologies and the arts since 1996.6 In practice, this means providing exciting and relevant ways for people to get involved in community activism, education, employment, and local decision-making. re:work is a social enterprise based Knowle West that works to help South Bristol residents find their way back to employment or education. The re:work team have vast experience and expertise in supporting people to                                                                                                               4

UWE Faculty of Business and Law http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/

5

ERDF, Dept of Communities and Local Government.

6

KWMC http://kwmc.org.uk/about/

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develop skills, particularly young people who struggle in mainstream school. Re:work supports the local community to develop relevant vocational skills through their building and gardening teams, re:build and re:grow, and their furniture up-cycling and re-use shop, re:store. Re:work and KWMC both have significant profiles in the local community area and work with local people to bring about positive change for the community and beyond. The strength in their partnership lies in shared understanding and expertise of community engagement but using different means. Knowle West Media Centre http://kwmc.org.uk KWMC has a vast experience of working with the local community to use media, digital technologies and data to build new tools, skills and places that will support positive social change. KWMC also develops opportunities for local people to shape the way we will live in the future by experiment with ‘making and producing’ and sharing ideas with people. The organisation also prioritises work that will make visible the cultural and creative wealth that exists within communities – celebrating and building on it in order to extend opportunities for people to participate in and enjoy excellent arts and culture, particularly those who have had least opportunity to do so. Lead members of staff at KWMC were: Justin Ricks, Programme Manager for Do What You Love. Hazel Grian, Creative Ideas Developer for Do What You Love. Other staff at KWMC were also part of the delivery team, including Melissa Mean, Makala Campbell, Jen Rolfe, Martin Hanstead, Bart Blazejewski, Rachel Clarke and Roz Hall. re:work https://sites.google.com/site/reworkltd/home re:work is a social enterprise whose charitable objectives centre on increasing the economic resilience of South Bristol (and Knowle West in particular). They have a track record of teaching practical skills (retail, carpentry, building and gardening) and of generating a large quantity of their income through goods and services. Key staff at re:work were: Vicky Beckwith, re:work CEO Iris Eiting, re:work CEO Suzy Page, re:work Training Co-ordinator Other staff at re:work were also part of the delivery team, including Geoff Steeds, Gary Cole, Phil Campbell, Samuel Lam, Joe Beckingsale, Martyn Brooks, Julie Coyle and Jane Smallcombe University of the West of England’s Faculty of Business and Law http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/ UWE’s Faculty of Business and Law supports a thriving research community whose values are to promote innovative and collaborative research activity with a high level of commitment to theoretical development and empirical

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research that has practical relevance to the needs of business and the wider community. Key staff members were Anthony Plumridge and Jill Burnett and the intern was Ben Pullen.

2.3 Programme Timeline The programme’s overarching timeline was as follows: Application Date: Start Date: Date Expenditure First Eligible: Financial Completion Date: Practical Completion Date:

10/09/2012 01/10/2012 01/10/2012 30/06/2015 31/07/2015

The method used to deliver the programme was one of the unique and innovative features of the work, whereby a co-designed, creative approach was used to plan and develop relevant and bespoke approaches within the programme which would support the development of distinct and unique businesses. The programme developed this way of working - to explore and co-design the parameters and details of the programme and the businesses through collaboration between the two main partner organisations, KWMC and re:work, and local people. From the beginning, facilitated workshops between the two main partner organisations were used to help the partners to communicate, discuss and agree the programme’s aims and objectives. This dialogic planning process allowed the whole team to take part in exploring how the programme’s outputs and outcomes linked to aims and objectives. The programme adopted a Project Planning Form, which is used as a template throughout KWMC, and provides a framework for a very rigorous approach to project planning.7 Workshops complimented regular team meetings, during which the planning form was referred to as a decision tool. The planning form allowed the different organisational cultures of the partners to find a shared approach.

Year 2 programme timeline developed in a team planning workshop.

The delivery phase of the project started at the beginning of March 2013 when the Programme Manager, Justin Ricks, and Creative Ideas Developer, Hazel Grian, were employed. Several of the initial planned milestones of the project were based on these posts being filled from January 2013. The delay in these post being filled was due to funding agreements needing to be in place and this resulted in these activities and subsequent milestones moving                                                                                                               7

See Appendix 1: Project Planning Form.

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into the next quarter, causing the financial expenditure to differ from the original project budget forecasts. Recruitment and organisation of the Steering Group took place on 11th July 2013 and quarterly meetings were organised over the life of the project. Steering group members were: • Carolyn Hassan, Director, Knowle West Media Centre • Iris Eiting, CEO, re:work – replaced by Vicky Beckwith, CEO, re:work • Ed Boal, Corporate & Commercial Solicitor, Gregg Latchams LLP • Jill Burnett, Bristol Robotics Laboratory Innovation Manager, UWE • Andy Parkhouse, Founder of Team Rubber Ltd, Delib Ltd, Viral Ad Network Ltd • Iwona Tempowski, Business Manager, Filwood Green Business Park • Sarah Morrison, Economy, Enterprise & Inclusion Programme Coordinator, Bristol Futures, Bristol City Council It was found to be more productive to ask the group members to perform specific tasks in between meetings that related to their areas of expertise. Despite the delay, by April 2014 five businesses had already been supported to develop, as illustrated in the flyer below.

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This flyer was used to inspire others with an idea for a business to get in touch with the DWYL team and pursue their own business idea.

2.4 Programme Background: Why Bristol? Why Knowle West? Knowle West is also known as the Filwood ward of Bristol City Council and is referred to as such in statistical data. There is a need for skills development in the cultural and creative industries, as well as a need for equipment and training to improve relevant skills, create jobs and boost the local economy.8 Furthermore, there are many reasons why a programme like Do What You Love was ideally situated in Knowle West. Firstly, the location of the project can be seen as a logical response to the apparent indicators of a need for more vocational opportunities in the area. This is evidenced in the following examples and statistics: “All its citizens do not share Bristol’s prosperity and many areas experience multiple deprivation. Life expectancy can differ significantly within a few miles. Life expectancy in Filwood is 77 years, whereas in neighbouring Knowle it is 82.9 One quarter of all children and young people in Bristol live in poverty, greater than the national average.10 Again contrasting levels of child poverty in the city are experienced within miles of each other. Filwood is significantly over the national average, with over 30% of children and young people living in poverty. Whereas a short drive to the west in the city, that percentage is well below the national average of 19% and at its lowest is 3%.11 The number of Bristol residents who have been unemployed for more than two years grew continually between 2011-2013. Bristol’s labour market continues to show weakness in lower skilled occupations, with over 40% of claimants looking for work in the retail sector.”12                                                                                                               8

See appended case study re the garment industry  

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Neighbourhood Partnership Statistical Profile 2011 Childhood Poverty Strategy 2011-2020 11 http://bit.ly/WVKyrS 12 http://bit.ly/1gznqsJ 10

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Filwood Employment The latest Filwood Ward Profile (2011) states that the population of the ward is 12,267. Of these residents, 3,081 are economically inactive, which means that they are not employed and not actively seeking employment. Of the population 2,708 are full-time employed, 1,304 are part-time employed and 537 are self-employed. Of these people 1,739 are in semi-routine (semiskilled) occupations and 1,787 are in routine (skilled) occupations. 868 residents have never worked or are long term unemployed. Bristol State of the City 2014 reports that an unusually high proportion of Bristol children living in poverty (75.5%) live in lone parent families, compared with 67.4% in core cities and 68.2% in England as a whole. In Bristol the greatest numbers of lone parent families living in poverty are based in Lawrence Hill (1,750) and Filwood (1,270). The report shows that 92% of lone parents are women and that the recession and public sector cuts are disproportionately affecting women.13 The Bristol City Council Baseline Briefing14 notes that employment opportunities for those without a car are limited. Journey times from Knowle West to the city centre, although it is only two miles, have been identified as hampering employment opportunities for residents. The following map indicates that Filwood is one of the areas in Bristol where worklessness is most persistent. Filwood has the lowest satisfaction with local jobs across the whole of Bristol. 15

                                                                                                              13

http://bit.ly/1gznqsJ http://www.bristol.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/business_in_bristol/economic_development_ and_regeneration/regeneration/Knowle%20West%20Regeneration%20framework%20baseline%20bri efing%202014.pdf 15 http://www.bristol.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/council_and_democracy/consultations/qol20 13-report_0_0.pdf 14

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Indices of deprivation The ward has been divided into eight super output areas (SOAs), each of which has an average of 1,500 residents. Six of the eight SOAs in the Filwood ward have been ranked as within the most deprived 10% of SOAs nationally in terms of the overall index of deprivation. All eight SOAs are in the worst 10% nationally in terms of crime, education, skills and training.16 Of the eight SOAs in Filwood, three are the worst in Bristol in terms of education, skills and training. Half of the SOAs in Filwood rank as amongst the most deprived 10% nationally across seven of nine ‘domains’ of deprivation; income deprivation; employment deprivation; health deprivation and disability; education, skills and training deprivation; crime; income deprivation affecting children and income deprivation affecting older people.17

                                                                                                              16

www.bristol.gov.uk/statistics  

17

All indices of deprivation stats see: See https://bristol.gov.uk/WardFinder/pdfs/filwood-profile.pdf

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Quality of Life - Health In the 2014 Quality of Life report18 respondents from Filwood were the least satisfied with their life compared to all other wards across Bristol. Filwood also has a much higher proportion (39%) of households with a smoker than the average Bristol ward and has the highest levels of obesity in any Bristol ward with 41% of residents being obese; almost double that of other South Bristol wards.19 Filwood is also the ward with the highest number of residents (64%) who think that drug use is an issue in their neighbourhood. Young People and Education Knowle West has been reported to have the highest number of young people in care of any council ward in Bristol and the lowest number of young people with any educational or technical qualifications (under half).20 The Department for Education reports show that in South Bristol as a whole the percentage of young people achieving five GCSEs Grade A-C including English and Maths was 72.9% in 2011 and 81.9% in 2012. Whereas in Filwood, in both 2011 and 2012, there were none (0%)21 However, as has been indicated through much of KWMC’s previous work with the community, such as the ‘University of Local Knowledge’,22 there is also an abundance of untapped knowledge, expertise and enthusiasm for being productively engaged in meaningful activities. It is this potential that also informed to the development of the programme.

3. Evidence relating to the Programme Aims This section contains evidence of the programme aims being met, but also considers how these aims were met through strategic programme development, the outcomes thereby realised and the difference the project has made for those involved. Do What You Love is an innovative model for supporting community-based ‘green and digital’ enterprise. The approach that has been used has made a significant difference to both individuals and the local community and is                                                                                                               18

http://www.bristol.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/council_and_democracy/consultations/qol20 14final.pdf 19 http://www.bristol.gov.uk/sites/default/files/documents/council_and_democracy/consultations/qol20 13-report_0_0.pdf 20 Harvey, Dave (16 June 2006). "Let them eat pesto?". London: BBC. Retrieved 3 March 2014. 21 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/revised-gcse-and-equivalent-results-in-englandacademic-year-2011-to-2012 22 http://kwmc.org.uk/projects/ulk/

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transposable. This ambitious programme has succeeded in realising its aims, in the following ways:

3.1 Aim 1: Support local people to develop relevant skills through training There were many strands of the programme that supported local people to develop relevant skills through training. As a consequence, 60 local people have been supported, for 12 hours or more, to develop relevant skills. Individuals who have set up their own businesses have been supported, through training, to develop a range of business related skills, for example: “Hazel really helped me to understand my rates and costs. How do you put a price on your time? That was a struggle at first but I quickly learnt from under-selling myself what my rate should be.” (Sammy Payne, October 2014) Businesses that have been supported have gained vital business related skills. For example, the founders of ‘A Ride In the Park’, a Community Interest Company (CIC) that was established to promote and enable ‘allability cycling, have commented on the support they received: “Justin was really helpful showing us how to sort out the books and showed us how to set-up spreadsheets.” (John Bennett, Steve Winstanley, and Rob Dyer, January 2014) For further example, Adam and Sam, who have set up a filmmaking business entitled SATV, have been supported to develop their business skills through Do What You Love: “Do What You Love has been a really positive experience. We’ve had a lot of support. We only wish the programme was longer.” (Adam Trimnell, SATV, March 2015) The development of business skills through the DWYL programme has also nurtured greater confidence in those setting up their businesses. This is evidenced in the following section of this report, through feedback from the majority of people who have been supported to set up their own business. Furthermore, the business skills people have developed through DWYL and their consequent confidence in setting up a business have, as evidenced above, supported people to establish successful businesses. The wider programme and the businesses that have been established have also evolved a range of training opportunities for local people. For example, the Bread Group ‘Rising High’ is training local people to develop their culinary skills through regular breadmaking workshops:

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“I'm really enjoying the engagement with local people and this is something I hadn’t tried before. It’s a wonderful opportunity for people to get together, to interact, to learn new skills.” (James Newman, Rising High, community development worker, August 2013) Not only do the Rising High team teach local people - men and women of all ages - valuable skills in bread baking, but as is evidenced in the quote above they also use the process of baking bread together, in a group, as a way of encouraging people to spend more time with each other, nurturing greater community cohesion.

Breadmaking workshop by Rising High at KWMC’s Celebrating Age event, 2013.

For further example, the ‘Sew Clever’ group has supported many local people to develop a range of skills in sewing and making. Sew Clever featured in DWYL’s provision of regular weekly experiences for participants to develop an awareness of how they might create enterprise opportunities for themselves within the project. The focus was on developing skills to enable members to mend, up-cycle and re-use materials to create new products. This group proved to be DWYL’s most enduring portfolio activity. Running twice weekly for fourteen months and more, beyond the end of the programme, Sew Clever has attracted a core of eight attendees, aged 24-60, with an average of ten attendances per week. Full-time support, professional training and donations of machines, and materials (from nearby Bottleyard Studios) have lead to an increase in technical and social skills.

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Sew Clever workshops began in August 2013, supported by re:work’s training co-ordinator Suzy Page, with occasional sewing tutors providing practical industry training with enterprise awareness built into the sessions. Sew Clever sessions were delivered at various locations. Starting at the Knowle West Children’s Centre, inclusive of childcare provision, Sew Clever was later also hosted at Platform 51, which supports girls and women taking control of their lives.23 The demand for these sessions resulted in the DWYL team making the sessions twice weekly starting in January 2014 at Filwood Library, and in the disused café area at Knowle West Health Park. DWYL employed top industry experts as tutors, including costume designer Jen Saguaro, and lingerie designer Juliette Smith who ran a very successful eight-week bag-making course, free to participants: “The course was designed in three parts to build up confidence and sewing skills from very basic construction to a more complicated finished bag. Everyone completed the final most difficult part of the session. The group was a small, friendly group of women with all levels of sewing abilities who helped each other with the tasks involved. They were all keen to learn and develop their sewing skills with the bagmaking project and enthusiasm increased as each participant could see finished products emerging.” (Juliette Smith, designer and bagmaking course tutor, 2014) The course proved to be very popular and supported staff as well as participants to develop new skills that they are now able to pass on: "Juliette’s bag-making course was incredible.” (Suzy Page, re:work Training Co-ordinator.) As a green and digital business programme, DWYL identified the need for a permanent space where sustainable, forward looking skills and training for manufacturing could be gained within a thriving knowledge exchange network. The project set-up to fulfil this need is called the Bristol Maker Lab. The rationale for the development of the Bristol Maker Lab, and use of specific kit within it, was based on the DWYL team’s knowledge of the local community, as has been informed through the initial stages of the work: “The wider aspiration is to provide a maker space for people in Bristol to come together to make things using equipment they wouldn’t normally have access to. We also want to give local people the opportunity to find a new route in their lives in terms of job opportunities and careers.” (Viv Kuh, DWYL external consultant, 2014) Access to this equipment enabled people to develop skills in CNC and Laser cutting. Participants from DWYL were able to receive training in a new technology that would not otherwise have been available to them. For                                                                                                               23

These sessions were also providing childcare for the participants until Platform 51 closed in 2014.

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example, 21-year-old Cameron Burrell was a trainee in digital fabrication as part of DWYL and before this he had never seen a CNC machine or even picked up a power tool: “Before, I was a waiter at a big restaurant and a factory worker moving flat-packs in an assembly line, it wasn't enjoyable. It was actually pretty negative but people here understand you, and everyone's friendly. I love this job, I like how it's hands-on, and learning is fun.” (Cameron Burrell, Trainee, March 2015)

Cameron Burrell cutting with the CNC Router during his traineeship.

Laser Cutting workshops were also delivered in March 2015 by Fiona Dowling, of ‘The Laser House’, which is one of the businesses DWYL has supported to become established and registered, in March 2015. Eight people received twelve hours of free training at both Beginner and Intermediate levels.

Laura Ter Kuille, 26, Jake Phillips, 30 and Tom Rolfe, 24, at the Laser Cutting workshop.

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For further example, teachers from six local schools spent the day Laser Cutting at Eagle House in March 2015, kickstarting a year-long trial of the Bristol Maker Lab concept being brought into schools.

One of the key learning points from the skills development strand of the programme has been about the potential there is for skills exchange to be supported and nurtured within a community: “I've seen how social groups can flourish and club together to strengthen business locally. I've also seen how useful an exchange of skills can be, and how working together on something practical can strengthen a community and grow new relations.” (Vicky Beckwith, re:work CEO, March 2015) Making something together, be it bread, bags or bikes, not only supports people to develop a new range of useful skills that they can apply vocationally or in their own day to day lives, but it also fosters greater community cohesion. Furthermore, it also nurtures a positive sense of what members of a community can achieve together, promoting pride and confidence within that community and an increased sense of the potential there is for a community, with bespoke support, equipment and space, to bring about positive change. It is apparent that the businesses supported by DWYL have an enthusiasm and commitment to enriching the lives of members of the local community, through sharing their skills and knowledge: “Video and volunteering is our passion. We'd love to show young people that there's hope for them in the industry. We'd like to teach them filming techniques that they can use to start their own careers. Education is key and it's important to share.” (Adam Trimnell, SATV, March 2015) This enthusiasm and commitment within the businesses has been further nurtured, through the DWYL team’s support and encouragement to share their own expertise with the wider local community. This promises to ensure long term impact of the programme, as will be considered later in this report.

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3.2 Aim 2: Support the development of community based enterprise This aim has been met and the following eight community enterprises have been developed and established and registered as formal legal structures as businesses with HMRC: 9. A Ride In The Park, CIC 10. Leather Craft, Steve Probert, sole trader 11. Artisan Carpentry, Martin Harrison, sole trader 12. Harbour Training Ltd 13. Steve Griffiths Gardening, sole trader 14. SATV partnership 15. The Laser House, Fiona Dowling, sole trader 16. Sammy Payne sole trader In addition, the Sew Clever group became an un-incorporated organisation, through the support of the programme. DWYL supported them to set up their own constitution and to establish their aims, objectives and future progression towards becoming a business. Similarly, Rising High has been supported to establish an informal constitution and establish their role within the community and as a social enterprise working towards being an unincorporated organisation. Knowle and West Eco Paint is the third example of a business idea that has been developed but has not become formally constituted. A Ride In the Park CIC - All ability cycling

A Ride In The Park’s John Bennett and Steve Winstanley.

A Ride in The Park has been set up to support individuals and groups from the wider Bristol community who may not have access to, or take part in, cycling activities. The enterprise is committed to including those with physical and mental disability, and older people who may not have cycled for years are encouraged to try cycling in a safe, traffic-free environment. The enterprise provides a friendly and supportive place to improve customer health and in many cases reduce social isolation.

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The idea for an “All Ability Cycling” business came to the DWYL team from a group working at The Park Centre in Knowle West. This group - John Bennett, 50, Steve Winstanley, 46, and Rob Dyer, 60 - had a keen interest in inclusive cycling and had already achieved instructor status. The A Ride in the Park team worked with DWYL to develop a test-trading pilot funded by LinkAge. The DWYL team supported the group to conduct market research to assess demand for their services through groups that cater for adults with learning and physical disabilities. Supported by DWYL, initial research revealed a possibility for this to generate an income stream and led to the group being incorporated as A Ride in The Park on 16th December 2013. A Ride in The Park also raised money for inclusive bikes through crowd-funding platform JustGiving by cycling from Land’s End to John O’Groats. The A Ride in the Park team have fed back that the support from the DWYL team has been vital to them, not just in terms of the research and business support, but also through additional support such as their logo and marketing material being designed at KWMC: “We wouldn't have set this up without the help from Do What You Love. They made it very easy for us by doing all of the paperwork, we just had to sign. Knowle West Media Centre also designed our logo and made some flyers for us to get us up and running.” (John Bennett, Steve Winstanley, and Rob Dyer, January 2014)

The DWYL team also supported them with their presentations and pitches, for instance to Bristol City Council transport committee. This led to them getting more support from other organisations, such as Sustrans, and raising awareness of their work to a broader network. A Ride in the Park have been aware of the extent to which members of the DWYL team have supported them in a range of ways, to raise their profile and extend their networks: “And then there's a lot of stuff that goes on behind scenes that we're probably unaware of. I know they tell a lot of people about us and help to promote our work.” (John Bennett, Steve Winstanley, and Rob Dyer, January 2014) Based as it is, on an idea that John Bennett, Steve Winstanley, and Rob Dyer felt passionate about, A Ride in The Park continues to enthuse them in ways that ensure legacy, as the business promises to be sustained through their passion and commitment: “When we go out on a ride, it's always a laugh, it just doesn't feel like work. It's not just about cycling, it's a social group that ranges from 79 to 12 years of age.” (John Bennett, Steve Winstanley, and Rob Dyer, January 2014)

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Leather Craft, Steve Probert, sole trader Steve Probert Leather Craft Ltd is a business based on making and mending with recycled leather. Steve Probert, who is 52 and lives in Knowle West, loves crafting and, with DWYL support, the former Royal Mail post-worker has set up his own leather craft business. Steve was no longer able to continue his role for the Royal Mail due to illness: “I was a postman for 14 years… I’ve got an injury in my foot and arthritis, which limited the duties I could do, so 18 months ago I took ill health retirement.” (Steve Probert, March 2015) Steve first came across the DWYL programme at the Make It! Festival, in September 2013, then also engaged during a Making Day in February 2014.

Steve meets David Henshall, UWE lecturer in Product Design, with mini CNC Router at the Make It! Festival 2013.

Steve then began regularly attending the Sew Clever group and took advantage of the free industry standard eight-week bag-making course provided by the programme: “I heard about the sewing club through my partner, at first I thought it might just be a women's group so I called up and asked but it was for everyone. It was a really useful group, and the bag-making course was enjoyable. I would go to learn something new and then fix the sewing machines when they needed it.” (Steve Probert, March 2015) Steve went on to register his business, Steve Probert Leather Craft Ltd, with DWYL providing help with the necessary paperwork: “I'm building my business up slowly through word of mouth, mainly I'm doing repairs for bikers in my workshop in the garden. The business meetings with Justin have really helped me to set-up the legal side of things.” (Steve Probert, March 2015)

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In addition to support in business skills and legal requirements, KWMC have produced design and logos for the business, as pictured below.

Steve also benefitted from the DWYL team’s in-house expertise at KWMC, in gaining online marketing expertise and training to set up a Wordpress website:

Steve’s love for making and the sense of satisfaction it brings him promise to see the business sustained: “I'm used to working with my hands, I like DIY and general work because you get a satisfying sense of achievement when you finish a project and see it complete.” (Steve Probert, March 2015)

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Artisan Carpentry sole trader Martin Harrison (56) runs Artisan Carpentry as a sole trader from his workshop based at The Park, Knowle West.24 The business also employs carpenter Liam Trow (24). The DWYL team have provided Martin with support that has given him the confidence to develop and register his business: “Being involved with the Do What You Love programme gave us confidence. It really helps just to know the support is there.” (Martin Harrison, March 2015) As well as receiving help with financial and legal decisions, Martin and Liam accepted and benefited from places on the eight-week laser-cutting course for beginners, offered for free by DWYL: “The laser cutting course was brilliant! We’d definitely like to learn more. We were really impressed with the precision and effortlessness of the machine. If we could have access to the laser cutter in future we could extend what we can do and extend our customers.” (Martin Harrison, March 2015) Not only did this course provide Martin and Liam with relevant skills for the future, but also introduced them to useful networks: “The laser cutting course was really good. I’d like to stay in touch with the people on that course, it’s good to keep networking and making connections.” (Liam Trow, March 2015)

Artisan Carpentry at the DWYL beginners laser-cutting course. Martin Harrison (centre) and Liam Trow (far right), with fellow attendee Fiona Hobbs, March 2015. Photo by Fiona Dowling.

                                                                                                              24

http://www.theparkknowle.org.uk

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As a new business, Martin and Liam confirm that networking opportunities have been one of the main advantages of the DWYL programme: “It was good being introduced to new people. Justin introduced us to Chris Ball from the Real Wood Project here at The Park and we’ve learnt a lot from him. We also met Russ Henry, the artist who was making furniture with volunteers at Eagle House Pop-Up. We had some good chats with him and from there some new jobs are in the pipeline.” (Martin Harrison, March 2015) Martin and Liam also attended a demonstration in 3D printing at Knowle West Media Centre in May 2015, given by students of Bristol University Civil Engineering department. At the event Martin and Liam were introduced to Dr Theo Tryfonas and, with the DWYL team, negotiated an opportunity for Artisan Carpentry to use the University’s 3D printers, which will be valuable to the future extension of their business: “The 3D printing talk was good and it will definitely be useful to us in future. For instance for our bespoke kitchens, instead of using the shop-bought plastic feet that aren’t any good, it would be brilliant if we could 3D print our own.” (Martin Harrison, March 2015) Following an accident, several years ago, Martin permanently walks with crutches. The support of DWYL to set up his business has reinvigorated Martin with an enthusiasm for life: “Now I’ve got the business with Liam, it’s given me an incentive to get out of bed and go to work.” (Martin Harrison, March 2015) This is evidence of the difference the DWYL programme has made to people, through supporting them to set up their own businesses based on things they feel passionate about. In terms of contributing to a sense of wellbeing of people like Martin, the programme has made a significant and substantial difference. The legacy of the programme will be, in part, about these long-term differences, which the programme has brought about for individuals like Martin. However, the commitment that the individuals’ commitment to their businesses means that the programme’s legacy will also reside in the future development of those businesses and the people who benefit from the future employment opportunities that such businesses as Martin’s such as Martin’s will offer to the local community: “Our main focus is on getting plenty of work to keep the workshop going and keeping up the networking. One of our goals is to eventually take on an apprentice.” (Martin Harrison, March 2015)

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Harbour Training Ltd

Harbour Training: Kate Bruce, 60, and Frances Coates, 40.

Harbour Training is a global education service brought to life by part-time Bristol City College lecturers Kate Bruce and Frances Coates. The ethos of the organisation is about developing online learner-focused opportunities: “Harbour Training offers a safe space to learn online, bespoke education packages, and courses for a variety of needs for people everywhere. We noticed we had the expertise and felt big organisations weren't always learner-focused, so by running a smaller company we could be more responsive to individual needs.” (Kate Bruce, March 2015) Kate and Frances had been working together since 2001 and decided they wanted to start their own businesses within a week of each other. After getting together to join forces, they were referred to DWYL and went through a thorough process of exploring and considering whether self-employment was right for them. As with other businesses reported on previously, the DWYL team has supported Kate and Frances to develop relevant business skills: “Do What You Love has been a huge support. Justin was so brilliant sharing his knowledge. He made suggestions about the type of business we could register as, gave us loads of information, and we recently sent him our 'T&Cs' to look over and he gave us some feedback.” (Kate Bruce, March 2015)

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In addition, Harbour Training have also found the graphic design support helpful: “We also got our logo designed for free.” (Kate Bruce, March 2015)

With the support of the DWYL team Kate and Frances were able to make an informed decision to register 'Harbour Training Ltd' in June 2014. Kate and Frances have indicated that one of the ways in which DWYL provided useful and relevant support was by making the support practical and by providing this support in response to the needs of Harbour Training, rather than applying any pressure to adhere to a framework or timeline: “There has been lots of practical help and advice, and all on our own terms without pressure.” (Kate Bruce, March 2015) The reach of Harbour Training is international: “We've trialed an English Language course for students in Pakistan. We sent the school handouts, the school in Pakistan projected us onto a big screen, and from there we ran an hour workshop.” (Frances Coates, March 2015) It is this reach that promises to ensure a sustained business that will continue to grow and develop: “The potential is huge. There will always be people who want to learn English and it's not common for foreign schools to have native English speakers so we're offering something unique. We'll target countries like China, Japan, Turkey, and Brazil.” (Kate Bruce, March 2015) Frances and Kate are prepared to make a leap of faith and invest all their time in Harbour Training to develop this international work in the next five years: “In the next five years, we should both be supported by the business… we can't focus on that if we're working part-time for the college, at some point we're going to have to jump.” (Frances Coates, March 2015)

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Steve Griffiths Gardening, sole trader The Knowle West Health Association’s Get Growing scheme had employed Steve to grow fruit and veg for their own use at the Springfield Allotments in Knowle West. DWYL supported Steve extensively, supporting him in promoting his fresh produce by inviting him to set up stalls at DWYL events. For example, Steve had a successful stall at a KWMC event that took place as part of Bristol Food Connections Festival in May 2014. For further example, stall held by Steve at the ‘Make your own Neighbourhood’ festival at KWMC in June 2014, sold out of locally grown veg and was visited by local Councillor Chris Jackson.

Steve’s passion for nurturing and growing, together with his expertise and knowledge for plant care, provided the idea of setting up a community gardening service. “I just love being outdoors and working with the land and nature. Being able to make this my work is very rewarding and is what makes me get up and out in the morning.” (Steve Griffiths, May 2015) The DWYL team supported Steve to think about his customer base and pricing. As well as developing a bookkeeping system and supporting Steve to register as a sole trader, Steve was supported to identify the opportunity to win a contract with the newly built Filwood Green Business Park. Steve has already started to plant and maintain their edible planters: “I plan to develop workshops for people to learn about plant care and healthy eating. I have already run these within the community and know they provide enjoyment and a health benefit for those that have come along.”

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A surprise nomination by the DWYL team saw Steve progressing to a much larger, national event as part of Bristol Food Connections 2015. Steve won the prestigious BBC Radio Bristol Food Hero Award, beating nominees from across the city. This award brought Steve national attention for his passion and commitment to education in the community for growing and cooking fresh food.25

Steve is very modest about his award but this has expanded his already large network and started to provide him with other business opportunities. Winning the contract to be the resident gardener at the new Filwood Green Business Park provides Steve with the confidence that he can further develop his training and gardening services.

                                                                                                              25  BBC Food and Farming Awards winners, Bristol Food Connections

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mediacentre/latestnews/2015/food-and-farming-awards-winners

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SATV Partnership

Adam Trimnell and Sam Haylings of SATV. Photo by Sammy Payne

Adam Trimnell, 27, and Sam Haylings, 25, are the duo behind the budding video production company, SATV. Adam and Sam were working full-time night shifts at a supermarket but their passion was filmmaking, so they spent seven months polishing their business skills with the DWYL team. Adam and Sam have a passion for filmmaking and have welcomed this opportunity to develop this passion as a business and make it their main form of income: “We love being on set, there's a real buzz to it and it's a lot of fun. Making documentaries and filming is all we want to do. We've worked non-stop on it.” (Adam Trimnell, March 2015) They are also committed to sharing this enthusiasm with others, supporting more young people to develop skills and nurturing more creative businesses to develop, as was illustrated in the previous section of this report.

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The Laser House, sole trader Fiona Dowling, 26, graduated from Swansea Metropolitan University with an MA in Product Design and moved to Bristol. She had no access to the equipment she needed so commuted to Wales to work as a freelance graphic designer. She was introduced to DWYL in 2013 and in 2014 became a registered business based in Knowle West, providing both training and bureau services in laser cutting. Fiona now runs The Laser House full time. DWYL supported Fiona with business start up advice and with access to equipment at UWE where a full Fabrication Centre exists. This facility is only usually accessible to UWE students but the DWYL team gained free access through networking, enabling Fiona to develop her idea prior to equipment being funded and sourced. DWYL provided Fiona with free office space in KWMC from which to base herself. Following the pilot period, Fiona moved to Eagle House, also in Knowle West, using the new Laser Cutter to complete her commissions. She now runs her business, The Laser House, full time, using the laser cutter:

“I couldn’t have dedicated myself to my passion if it wasn't for Do What You Love offering me free rent, and access to a laser cutter”. (Fiona Dowling, March 2015) Fiona has also been supported to design The Laser House branding, as pictured below.

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Fiona and DWYL worked together to identify the right equipment for both The Laser House and for the wider future plans for the Bristol Maker Lab. For example, DWYL and Fiona travelled to the Trade Fair at Birmingham NEC in 2014, to look at laser cutters and the latest in digital manufacturing, as pictured.

In addition to business support and access to relevant equipment, Fiona has recognised the significance of the networking opportunities and contacts that DWYL has introduced her to: “Most of the work I get comes through the contacts and connections I've made across the city from taking part in the Do What You Love programme. The contacts I've made have been invaluable.” (Fiona Dowling, March 2015)

Fiona Dowling with Dame Dawn Primarolo MP for Bristol South

Fiona has also set up an online shop for The Laser House on the international market site Etsy: “The first thing I sold on Etsy was a Valentine's card and it was very cool.” (Fiona Dowling, March 2015) The Laser House was able to immediately produce a range of seasonal decorations and gifts and sell these on Etsy, as pictured below.

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As evidenced in the previous section of this report, Fiona has also been commissioned by DWYL to share her skills with the wider community and develop a new strand of work that is about facilitation and training for local people and schools. The support that the DWYL team have provided for Fiona has ensured that she had the confidence to set up her own business, but also to continue to develop that business in the future: “It's still early days for me but I hope to take all the help I've had from Justin and Hazel forward. They guided me and made me feel a lot more confident about how I should price my products, they also introduced me to other small businesses so that helped.” (Fiona Dowling, March 2015) As a consequence, Fiona has a clear idea of how she would like The Laser House to develop and a vision for the future of her business: “In two to three years time I'd like to have my own machine, have my design brand sorted and be giving regular workshops. In five years time I want to have my own product collection. At the moment, I'm building my portfolio and selling greeting cards and jewellery.” (Fiona Dowling, March 2015) Fiona is clearly committed to continuing her business because of the way in which the DWYL team have supported her to develop that business on the basis of her own interests and enthusiasm: “I wouldn't give up now, I wouldn't back out. This is it.” (Fiona Dowling, March 2015)

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Sammy Payne, Sole Trader Sammy Payne joined Knowle West Media Centre in 2014 when she was employed as a Junior Digital Producer (JDP).26 A recent graduate in journalism with an interest in marketing, Sammy joined the annual cohort of JDPs, who work for six months in a role supported by the Creative Employment Programme. Throughout the six months they receive skills training, employability training, project training, project work and research opportunities. The ‘Meet the Junior Digital Producers’ booklet features the group’s main project, which turned community data collection into an interactive experience in a ‘living living room.’ Sammy proved herself to be an incredibly hard working, mature and professional young woman with skills in photography, content writing and social media marketing. Sammy applied herself enthusiastically to everything she undertook with a positive attitude. She successfully developed new skills by coding complex animated web pages. With a passion for journalism, Sammy demonstrated high levels of skill by writing content for the KWMC website, photographing the installation, and running the social media campaign for the project.27 Sammy also initiated work at KWMC, such as a series of portraits of women to celebrate International Women's Day 2014. Sammy invited the women of KWMC and visitors to examine their hopes for the future and the barriers they face as women in a series of photographs that were published on Tumblr: http://womenofkwmc.tumblr.com/   This series of photographs has had over 100,000 hits. On completing the role 23-year-old Sammy wasn't sure about becoming selfemployed: “I hadn't really thought about freelancing before. It was only when a digital marketing company approached me and asked me to freelance for them that I considered working for myself. It was daunting because you have to believe in yourself and your skills. You have to know that you have something to offer. I didn't believe in myself so it took a long time for me to register as self-employed.” (Sammy Payne, September 2014)                                                                                                                 26 27

http://kwmc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/The-Junior-Digital-Producers.pdf Cardboard Living Room & Data Patchwork http://kwmc.org.uk/projects/datapatchwork/

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However, support from the DWYL team ensured that Sammy developed confidence in her own business and helped her to establish a network of contacts and subsequent contracts: “If it wasn't for Justin's help with the legalities of self-employment and how to value my time, I wouldn't have had the confidence to start freelancing when I did. As soon as I took the plunge, it was amazing. Suddenly, I had freelance contracts flooding in.” (Sammy Payne, October 2014) Since Sammy registered as freelance in April 2014, she has written articles for the Bristol Post, been hired by five small businesses, and had her press releases printed in national magazines and newspapers including The Telegraph. 28 Sammy is now also running Open Bionics with Joel Gibbard.29 Together, they design robotic hands for amputees that can be 3D printed. In November 2014 they won $200,000 by pitching to Intel’s international Make It Wearable competition.30 Amongst several other prestigious awards for Open Bionics Sammy has won a New and Emerging Talent residency at Bristol’s Pervasive Media Studio, and was also short-listed for the Bristol and Bath Women in Business, Young Entrepreneur of The Year Award 2015.31

Sammy Payne with judge Venus Williams at the Intel Make It Wearable final in California, USA. Also pictured, Sammy’s Open Bionic’s partner Joel Gibbard, and an Intel representative.

                                                                                                              28

Sammy has also been commissioned by Do What You Love to produce many of the photographs that appear throughout this report. 29 Open Bionics http://www.openbionics.com 30 Intel Competition http://www.openbionics.com/open-bionics-big-win-from-intel/ 31 http://www.bathchronicle.co.uk/Bristol-Bath-Women-Business-Awards-2015-Winners/story26193166-detail/story.html http://www.pmstudio.co.uk/pmstudio/news/2015/06/01/introducing2015-new-and-emerging-talent-residents-samantha-payne-roz-dean-and

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Sew Clever The Sew Clever group became an un-incorporated organisation with the support of the programme. DWYL supported them to set up their own constitution and to establish their aims, objectives and future progression towards becoming a business. Sew Clever, led by re:work and supported with marketing and business support from KWMC, has been developed to offer an environment in which local people can acquire and hone skills using donated or recycled materials, and develop an awareness of how to create enterprise opportunities. The group has run twice weekly for fourteen months and is the most enduring portfolio activity. There is a core of eight attendees, of a total of 37, aged 24 – 67, with an average of 10 attendances per week. Full-time support, professional training, and donations of machines and fabrics have led to an increase in technical skills. Using recycled materials (and machines at the outset) has worked for the group on several levels, for example saving money, improving their ‘green’ credentials, providing opportunities to make mistakes without breaking the bank, and providing opportunities to make links with other organisations in the area, not least those established through DWYL. For example, Sew Clever’s labels were laser-cut by The Laser House, the Bottleyard Studios and local sewers donated fabric, and the group have established a good working relationship with a machine engineer, Cathedral Sewing Machines, and forged links with local business with support from Business in the Community. The first Sew Clever session was led by Julie Ellison of Social Enterprise Works in July 2013. She took the group through the process of making a high quality tote bag from vinyl and mesh banners from the Arnolfini Gallery. The business idea was to sell the bags back to the gallery and for them to sell them from their bookshop. Unfortunately this was not a viable proposition due to restructuring at the Arnolfini, but did lead to a commission for chair backs from them.

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Pinning chair backs at the library

The end product

       

From August 2013 the group, supported by Suzy Page, re:work’s Training Coordinator, began to run weekly at Platform 51. At the time, Platform 51 was supporting young women in taking control of their lives, and the group fitted in perfectly with their aims. As demand grew (and to reach a non gender specific audience), a second weekly session began upstairs in Filwood Library from January 2014. After the close of Platform 51, they were offered the disused café at Knowle West Health Park and later a room within Eagle House. They have just reopened in their home at 4 Filwood Broadway.

The first event

The abilities of the group were mixed at the outset so some skill sharing and teaching has happened naturally, but in order to improve the group has employed several tutors during its short life. To date they have been tutored by Jen Saguaro, costume and production designer, who took them through the basics for several sessions; Juliette Smith, lingerie designer who ran a successful eight week bag making course; and Tricia Hamilton, milliner, who ran a workshop based around making hats and gloves from old jumpers. The courses have been designed to ensure that people with differing levels of experience could be supported to develop confidence as well as skills in sewing:

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“The course was designed in three parts to build up confidence and sewing skills from very basic construction to a more complicated finished bag. Everyone completed the final most difficult part of the session. The group was a small, friendly group of women with all levels of sewing abilities who helped each other with the tasks involved. They were all keen to learn and develop their sewing skills with the bagmaking project and enthusiasm increased as each participant could see finished products emerging.” (Juliette Smith, designer and bagmaking course tutor, March 2015) The skills acquired on these courses have been used to generate income and thereby invest in more sewing machines and supplies. Commissions to date include documenting an event via the medium of bunting (photo below), providing the Arnolfini with forty replacement director’s chair backs, and constructing the catwalk collection for young designer Lydia Cooper.

‘Fixin’ it ourselves’ event where older local activists from Knowle West shared their knowledge and hints for future activists. The results of their discussion were sewn into bunting and strung around the venue during the event.

Impact The group has been successful on many levels. The diversity of the group, with a range of ages, genders and ethnicities, has provide opportunities to form relationships with people they would not ordinarily have met.

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Working at Knowle West Health Park

For some, the group has provided not only the chance to learn new skills but also a chance to socialise. Furthermore, exposure to the group and business support has meant that several members of the group have taken a different path than they might otherwise have taken.32 For example, ‘A’ had been considering going into counselling as a career (following a traumatic event that affected her son) but due to her time with Sew Clever she rekindled her love of fashion and design. She is consequently about to finish her first year studying fashion at City of Bristol College. For further example, ‘B’, following redundancy, had been training in leather repair and joined the group to gain confidence using a sewing machine. He discovered that he is an excellent pattern maker and is currently working on his first collection of bull whips. Another person for whom Sew Clever has made a difference is ‘C’, who was making tea cosies and bunting at home for friends and family. She has become a driving force within Sew Clever, is now volunteering up to two days a week and has been pivotal in managing the move to new premises. She about to embark on teaching her first Sew Starter group and is looking at working part time while she builds up experience of planning and running workshops. ‘D’ was suffering from anxiety and panic attacks but after six months with the sewing group she branched out into volunteering and is learning upholstery skills. Finally, ‘E’, a mother of two and victim of a violent crime (which is still an ongoing court case), became a huge reuse enthusiast sourcing banners from every city centre event she attended. She is still a member but has reduced her involvement to work towards formal qualifications in art and English. Sew Clever has developed into a user-led project. The role of re:work and KWMC has been to support the group to realise their own aims by giving                                                                                                               32

Participant’s names have been removed due to the sensitive nature of some of the information.

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advice on structure and business start-up, sourcing tutors, and ensuring adequate childcare provision during the sessions.

The Sew Clever room at Eagle House

Ensuring childcare has been one of the key elements that has made Sew Clever accessible for many women, for example: “Earlier this year I saw a leaflet for an event called ‘Sew Clever’ and I thought ‘bonus: there’s a crèche at Knowle West Children’s Centre!’ It was half term, so I was keen to go along and have a few hours to myself. It was the perfect opportunity for me.”(Jodie Gardener, from an article on the KWMC website, September 2013) The majority of members were not in a position to set up their own business, mostly due to childcare issues, age or health, so the group has not become a fully constituted or registered business. However, what has resulted is a new craft-based project that is continuing to teach skills, build commercial contacts, forge unlikely friendships and has the ability to support its members into income generation for the organisation and, when their circumstances change, for themselves. It is imbedded in a supply chain as a contact for unwanted materials and as a group who can successful fulfill small commissions. Sew Clever has evidently made a significant positive difference for those who attend the sessions, for example: “I came because I had some jeans that needed hemming. I'm a mother with a young daughter, Mary is four years old, and I think it can get quite isolating for Mums at home so a group like this is exactly what we need. It's a place to have a chat, make friends, bounce creative ideas off each other and get something done.” (Sarah Evans, member of Sew Clever, March 2015) The flexibility of the DWYL team has ensured ongoing support for Sew Clever and the group can continue to realise such outcomes without any insistence that the group formally register as a business. In this way the group has been able to determine its own ‘amazing’ journey, based on the members’ own priorities: “It’s been quite an amazing journey” (Nick Gill founding member of Sew Clever, March 2015)

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The flexibility of the group has also enabled people to engage in a range of ways and determine and produce products that are relevant to their own lives and needs. For example, Steve Probert has used the opportunity to design a pattern for and make a gardener’s trug.

Sew Clever also had the strongest social aspect, from meeting up once or twice a week or keeping in contact via Facebook. The evidence of ongoing exchange between members using social media is significant, for example:

Â

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This use of social media has enabled ongoing encouragement between members of the group and mutual support in developing new work and sourcing new materials. Other strands of DWYL’s support that have been important have included the introduction to the group of tutors. The relationship with Lydia Cooper, a fashion designer and student at UWE, was particularly important.33 It demonstrated to the group that they could                                                                                                               33

Lydia was introduced to the group by Julie Ellison of Social Enterprise Works. Lydia Cooper ‘s fashion label Imprint is a social enterprise that hopes to promote and encourage new skills and employment for women in local communities who are struggling to find work. In the future, Lydia hopes

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achieve a commercially viable product with the skills and equipment they possessed by working with Lydia to produce clothing for Fuze, a large student run fashion, dance and music event: “Lydia’s aim is to hopefully contribute, in some way, towards the group establishing themselves as a self-sustaining business, so that they can rent a workshop. In return for their help this year, she has given them money towards their group fund. Hoping to sell some of the designs, Lydia will be taking orders after Fuze, and an online store is on its way, with many more products to come. Everything will be at least partially produced by Sew Clever and they will receive a commission on each item. Naturally, the whole FUZE team encourages everyone to help Lydia in enabling such driven and talented women to keep doing what they enjoy and her items will be flying off the racks- all for an amazing cause.”34 (Blog post by Julie Gardener)

Designs by Lydia Cooper

The use of social media has again been important in sustaining exchange between the group and Lydia, as it has enabled the group to share in celebrating the success of the work:

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          to set up workshops that provide a place, training and onsite childcare to provide women the opportunity to work that they may otherwise be denied. 34

FUZE blog post by Julia Gardener https://www.fuze-bristol.com/post/fuze-2015-lydia-cooper/

 

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Sew Clever has also been commissioned to construct a Knowle West flag for the Run to Knowle West event in July 2015 and commissioned by the Council to make ‘blank’ bunting to be decorated by four local schools for Knowle West Fest in September 2015. It is having its website (www.wearesewclever.com) built by Lloyds’ Digital Content Manager, Michael McKirgan, and has a queue of new members waiting to do their Sew Starter course. In an attempt to keep the costs to a minimum, Sew Clever has hosted sewing classes at seven different venues over the last 14 months. Although some members left when the group has moved, each move has enabled the group to connect to new members. The current venue, No4. Filwood Broadway, has been empty for over three years and has a very visible shop front. It is an ideal place to meet clients for the current and future businesses and, as well as attracting new members, is helping to bring creativity and opportunity to a run-down shopping area. Re:work is committed to continuing to support Sew Clever with the basic costs (utilities and rates) and

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support for fundraising until the group is in a position to be fully selfsufficient. Rising High Rising High has been supported to establish an informal constitution and establish their role within the community and as a social enterprise working towards being an un-incorporated organisation. This informal group have been baking fresh bread and selling it not for profit from Knowle West Health Park for almost two years. They also teach bread making. The group is managed by James Newman, a community development worker who moved to Knowle West from Reading, and it attracts local people looking for a way to socialise and enjoy baking at the same time. DWYL supported the group to explore all aspects of a bread-making business, from retail and produce development to delivering bread-making workshops. The DWYL team also supported the group by producing a logo, which is included in a marketing and publicity photograph taken by James Newman, below.

DWYL invited the Bread Group to hold stalls and workshops at a range of events, such as at the Celebrating Age Festival at Knowle West Health Park in 2013, the Wild Thing event at KWMC in 2014, which was part of the BBC’s Food Connections festival, and the Make It! Festival at KWMC. At all events they have been a popular addition. The group continues to bake and sell

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produce from Knowle West Health Park every week. The success of the group in making bread and bread-based produce has been evident in the feedback received from customers at these events and at the weekly bread sales: “… we get the positive feedback every week with people's facial expressions as they see the see the bread, smell the bread and then get to taste the bread. It’s real positive, quick, clear feedback that what we do is good what we do is enjoyed.” (James Newman, March 2015)

Mike Chant, 29, Patrick Chant, 56, and James Newman, 36, of Rising High, at the KWMC Make It! Festival, September 2013.

By making bread in a ‘live’ way at festivals and events, Rising High have engaged people in the actual process of bread-making: “It’s important that we’ve been doing it by hand and enjoying the kneading process and the time it takes to make proper loaf of bread. It’s a very visual thing, as people walk past they can see what we’re doing they come in and say ‘I've been trying to make bread’ so we've been able to give advice as well.” (James Newman, March 2015) James Newman now works at Knowle West Health Park and in his role there he continues to be part of Rising High as well as facilitating other groups that support local men to develop their social and culinary skills. As with earlier examples in this report, the legacy of the project, in terms of the long-term sustainability of the businesses set up and those developed informally, has been underpinned by individuals’ love, passion and commitment, which has informed the focus of those businesses: “We really want people just to do what they love doing. We've just got

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a bug for baking, being together, baking together, just encouraging other people to do what they love doing. Come and bake if that’s what they want to do.” (James Newman, March 2015) Knowle & West Eco Paints

Knowle & West Eco Paints is a business based on remixing and repackaging discarded paint from a Recycling Centre. Re:work, who already sell cans of paint as ‘seconds’ in their Knowle West charity shop, re:store, engaged with staff at Bristol City Council who are responsible for the Household Waste Recycling Centre, to negotiate the reclaiming of paint taken to the recycling Centre. The Council’s Household Waste Recycling Centre has around half a ton of paint cans brought in by the public per day, many of which contain paint. The council usually pays to have these paint cans removed to land fill. A deal was struck between re:work and the Recycling Centre for re:work to be paid to take away the paint cans. Paint from these cans is now filtered and remixed by Knowle & West Eco Paints. The paint is repackaged for sale following commercial guidelines, utilising the specialist knowledge of re:work’s CEO Vicky Beckwith, who has chemistry qualifications. Re:work are running this project with a view to it becoming an enterprise. Volunteers have been engaged to ‘trial run’ the process, based in an empty shop in Knowle West. During this period small-scale workshops were delivered around this activity to develop entrepreneurial skills.

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Knowle & West Eco Paints project lead Vicky Beckwith, re:work CEO

3.3 Aim 3: Develop job opportunities for local people

This aim has been partly met and the outcome of creating six jobs has been realised. The jobs created were: 1. Sammy Payne (Sole Trader) 2. Fiona Dowling (The Laser House) 3. Steve Probert (Leather Craft) 4. Martin Harrison (Artisan Carpentry) 5. Liam Trow (Artisan Carpentry) 6. Steve Griffiths (Sole Trader) Within a few months of the start date, the target of creating thirty new jobs began to appear untenable within the twenty-four month time scale. To tackle this problem, six months in to the DWYL programme a longer-term solution was conceived in addition to the short-term activities: development of a permanent innovation centre for the development of green and digital enterprises, where anyone can learn, make and meet. In tandem with the DWYL team’s support of individual green and digital enterprises, the concept of the Bristol Maker Lab thereby evolved into one of the programme’s key outputs.35 However, the DWYL programme was also successful in signposting and supporting some participants to jobs through its activities and through its network. For example, Jane Harris (pictured centre in the photograph below) volunteered with re:work, then registered for one-to-one support with DWYL. After only one session Jane happily found a creative job in South Bristol.36

                                                                                                              35 36

See Appendix 2 See ‘Learning and Recommendations’ on page 67

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For further example, Phil Ashton found out about DWYL at the Make Your Neighbourhood event, volunteered with the Knowle & West Eco Paints miniproject for four weeks and then got a full time job elsewhere.

3.4 Aim 4: Stimulate the local economy This aim has been met and the following outcome has thereby been realised: The local economy has been stimulated by making the most of new green and digital technologies. This has happened through a range of green and digital activities. As has been evidenced above, Sew Clever developed income streams to support their work. For further example, special events that included food and fresh produce, for example the Make It! Festival and Wild Thing, have enabled local entrepreneurs Rising High and Steve Griffiths to sell their produce. Locally-produced goods and services have also been commissioned, such as for A Ride In The Park and The Laser House. The economic impact of each individual business is going to be assess using a methodology of gross value added. This takes place once a business has been trading for 12 months. The businesses created by the DWYL programme are not at this stage and therefore evaluation of their impact is not available for publishing at the tiem of writing this evaluation.

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3.5 Aim 5: Change outside perceptions of Knowle West to increase business investment and local pride This aim has been met and the following outcome has thereby been realised: External perceptions have been changed This has happened through increasing local pride through marketing, and social and broadcast media coverage of the businesses, their products and their success. It has also happened through visitors from outside the community coming in for events and projects such as Wild Thing, and presentations and presence at international conferences, such as the European Network of Living Labs and Barcelona Fab Lab Conference. The programme developed a strategic approach to marketing, inheriting the systems and previous expertise of the DWYL team. This assisted the team to develop creative and innovative ways of promoting the programme and provided clear objectives and key milestones in the marketing strategy. The identity of the programme was developed in order to ensure that a strong logo and brand were produced, based on one of the core principles of the programme: that the work people engage in, and which is the focus of their businesses, should be based on what they love:

The Do What You Love logo and badge

This strong and positive logo was designed to work in a variety of sizes and formats, from banners to t-shirts to button badges. High quality design expertise from the DWYL in-house graphic designer Bart Blazejewski was very valuable and increased the programme’s ability to communicate to different audiences. The programme aimed to raise the profile of Knowle West by representing the work positively through such promotional materials, as well as traditional media, social media and innovative events. Events that were organised as part of the DWYL programme, such as the Make it Festival, each had an extensive marketing campaign. This involved circulating flyers through local primary school book-bags, placing them on Â

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community notice boards, and circulating them electronically around community email groups, partners’ websites and other online spaces such as Facebook and Twitter. This aimed to not only generate attendance on the day but to raise the profile of the programme and of Knowle West. The DWYL Facebook account was managed by re:work and allowed the programme to keep in touch with the local community. As illustrated previously, groups such as Sew Clever have been supported to develop their own use of social media, especially Facebook, raising the profile of the work and of Knowle West. For further example, KWMC has developed a social media app, My Knowle West (MyKW), which was designed to facilitate hyper-local photo and information sharing, and has been used by businesses involved in DWYL, such as Steve Griffiths.37 A core area of support offered to participants was the ability to receive advice and guidance from the programme’s graphic design team. This proved very valuable for several of the businesses as it greatly assisted in piloting businesses and developing a professional brand identity.

For example, A Ride in The Park accessed branding and marketing advice and used the design to buy their own marketing materials such as branded clothing, postcards and flyers. They also used the design to develop their online brand via Twitter. For further example, the following logos were produced for use by all local food producers, to develop a brand identity for food sourced or produced in Knowle West:

The programme also commissioned short promotional films, beginning with an animation explaining the DWYL ethos,38 followed each year with films                                                                                                               37

MyKW http://mykw.org.uk

38

Link to DWYL animation by Nick Hilditch on vimeo

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made by film students at City of Bristol College, for example about the bread group.39

3.6 Aim 6: Leave a legacy This aim has been met so that people who have been supported can continue to develop the work of the programme themselves. The following outcomes have thereby been realised: Significant learning has taken place There has been a wide range of learning from the programme about how best to approach this type of work in contexts like Knowle West, which is contained in the learning and recommendations section of this report and constitutes a significant part of the programme’s legacy, for KWMC, re:work and other partners involved, as well as for the audience of this report. Businesses established will be sustained As has been evidenced throughout this report, there is great commitment from the people who have set up their own businesses in sustaining, growing and developing their businesses in the long term. Furthermore, there is evidence that the networks and contacts developed through the DWYL programme, including with partner organisations, will be sustained in ways that will support the businesses to continue to grow and develop, such as re:work’s commitment to continue to support Sew Clever. Groups and businesses like Sew Clever, A Ride In The Park and the bread group have the advantage of not only multiple members but also the continuing support of established organisations including KWMC, re:work, The Park, and Knowle West Health Association. Although the DWYL support has ended, the added advantage for the groups and businesses is that they already function in the community as a resource. For example, it is inevitable that both re:work and KWMC will be inviting Rising High to provide baked produce at events in the future and commissioning Sew Clever to make bunting for events. The ability of these groups and businesses to continue to flourish will be further ensured through the creative networks and opportunities that the Bristol Maker Lab will stimulate. The survival of the small, independent enterprises supported by the programme is partly dependent on the owners becoming increasingly networked and maintaining those networks, which would be supported through the existence of the Bristol Maker Lab. The Laser House, whilst being vulnerable as a single person outfit, has a solid and beneficial attachment to future Bristol Maker Lab development. Long-term plans for a sustained programme have been put into place These plans will ensure a concrete legacy, in the form of Bristol Maker Lab. The Bristol Maker Lab promises to improve future prospects for local people                                                                                                               39

Link to Bread Group film by FDA Students, City of Bristol College.

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and for those prospects to be sustainable, by continuing to nurture a communal sense of security. Through the extensive and continuing research conducted into the principle of developing the Bristol Maker Lab, there is evidence to suggest that this initiative can be a catalyst for several businesses and fulfil the aims and objectives far in excess of the programme, whilst providing the secure base needed to allow green and digital enterprise to thrive in areas of multiple deprivation. A detailed business planning process has been entered into with the assistance of a consultant and financial and legal assistance from members of KWMC board of directors and DWYL steering group.40 Bristol Maker Lab plans, including those for the schools and education programme Maker Lab in a Box, have become one of the DWYL programme’s key legacies.

Environmental and economic impact UWE Faculty of Law and Finance agree that it is feasible to make the following assumptions: that DWYL participants (whether through one-to-one mentoring, attending events or as audiences of media coverage) have a better understanding of a circular economy. This awareness has an impact on how they spend their lives and on their environmental impact throughout their lives and the lives of families and friends. This experience also helps to dispel the preconception that there is a local lack of optimism that good, new things can happen in Knowle West. Participation on any level helps with reframing old habits around recycling and re-using. The experience can lead to a person considering what they already do as something that is of contemporary relevance and therefore something they might feel more confident, positive and proud about doing, as well as recognising a wider potential for it as a vocational opportunity. This has a ripple effect not only on families and neighbourhoods but also on businesses and organisations like Lloyds Bank and Computer Share.41

                                                                                                              40

Business modeling to demonstrate feasibility and viability of the BML is continuing. This has also linked to fundraising activity through bids being submitted to Santander, Royal Bank of Scotland, Wrap and the Dream Fund amongst others. 41

See Learning and recommendations: Environmental

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Circular economy messages are a part of the programme’s legacy, illustrated in the Bristol Maker Lab plans.

4. The Objectives used to realise the Outcomes The programme achieved its outcomes by realising the following objectives:

4.1. Engaging meaningfully with partners, to develop relevant and sustainable opportunities for all participating

KWMC and re:work have worked closely as a partnership throughout the programme on ideas development, participant and volunteer recruitment, practical solutions, events management, and providing on-going support to participants. An example of this is re:work's practical support of the Sew Clever group42, the managing of groups of volunteers, and health and safety implementation. What both organisations have in common is that they are both embedded in the community and are particularly strong in community engagement with a long track record. Rather than ‘parachuting in’ to situatuons, both organisations have established familiarity with and gained the trust of the community.43 Furthermore, both organisations have drawn on their own networks to involve a wider set of partners in the programme development. For example, they have generated significant input from contributors including Bristol Robotics Laboratory, UWE Bower Ashton Fabrication Centre, Bristol City Council, Bristol Futures, Business In the Community, Bottleyard Studios, the University of Bristol Computing and Engineering departments, Social Enterprise Works, Watershed and Pervasive Media Studio, Real Ideas Organisation, Resource Futures, Crafts Council, the RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce), 00 Design, Pieminister, B&Q, Lloyds Bank, and other Bristol businesses.44 These contributions from organisations, businesses and individuals were voluntary, and given because of the strength of the DWYL team’s communication about the highly innovative aims of Do What You Love and the Bristol Maker Lab concept - being to support South Bristol residents in gaining fulfilling, sustainable employment through green and digital entrepreneurship.

                                                                                                              42

See page 38 ‘Sew Clever’

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Engagement with University West of England (UWE) Business School took the form of an initial meeting and concluding meeting about documentation and evaluation processes, and input from intern Ben Pullen. Jill Burnett continued to contribute as a steering group member and by networking especially when she took on a new role as Innovation Manager at Bristol Robotics Lab. 44

Computer Share, Filwood Green Business Park.

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Illustration49 Wordle™ Shows the networking of people and places beyond Knowle West Media Centre by the Creative Ideas Developer, documented in journal and calendar entries for the whole programme March 2013 to March 2015. (PM Studio refers to the Pervasive Media Studio)

These partnerships and networks have added value to the work in a wide variety of ways. For example, expertise in fashion has enriched the experience of members of Sew Clever. For further example, links with the City of Bristol College have led to their Foundation Degree students making documentary films, including a short documentary about the bread group to promote DWYL, which is available to view on Youtube: http://bit.ly/1LbQAuA These students also produced high quality photo documentation of the businesses and the project, such as the image below.

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A wide range of support was made possible for participants by the DWYL team, through networking with a wide range of partners. For further example, for Steve Griffiths has worked with Andy Moseley from Buried Treasure to develop an Egg Incubation mini-project, linked to Steve’s Sole Trader business development. The DWYL team brought in University of Bristol to support with specialist advice and guidance. This resulted in the donation of six egg incubation units from University of Bristol and a visit from Dr Mike Toscano. Andy Moseley with his chickens at Andy’s Haven Nursery1, at The Park in Knowle West, visited by fowl welfare researcher Dr Mike Toscano of University of Bristol.

There is also evidence throughout this report to indicate that many of the partners and individuals, such as Lydia Cooper, are committed to a continuing engagement with the businesses and individuals they have met and worked with through DWYL. In addition many members of the Steering group have developed long-term supportive relationships with many of the businesses established. In this way, the partnerships will be sustained beyond the life of the programme in useful and relevant ways, not just for KWMC and re:work, but for all the individuals involved.

4.2. Using a reflective and fluid process, working together with all involved to identify solutions The DWYL team used a reflective and fluid process to ensure that they might act on what they found in relevant ways. In this way the project followed an action research approach: of finding out and then taking action. A key tool for such a process was the journal, as this allowed members of the team to keep in-depth notes about every aspect of their interactions, then reflect upon and analyse these notes in order to make informed decisions about how best to proceed.

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Wordle™ created from the text in the Creative Ideas Developer’s journal for 2013, the first ten months of the programme.

Another key tool in this reflective and fluid process, which enabled the team to respond to what they found out, was through shared dialogue for the purposes of planning the activities of the programme. Re:work and KWMC worked together to reflect on what did and didn’t work in an ongoing way, to identify new strategic interventions. For example, early in the programme there was an ideas day with a crosssection of KWMC and re:work staff who worked together to identify what needs could be met locally through green and digital enterprise. Stakeholders throughout the first year of the programme, both formal and informal, added all of the ideas generated to the Ideas Portfolio (list of ideas). The portfolio itself was subject to regular editing in order to identify the types of ideas being generated and to evaluate the levels of success each of them was likely to achieve within the programme’s twenty-four month timescale. The aim was always to accept all original ‘blue sky’ ideas from programme partners and to take them through this process to identify all potential business models and markets. Ideas were discarded only when they did not pass satisfactorily through this process. All ideas presented by participants who fitted the programme criteria were pursued with the participants taking the lead. They were supported as ‘miniprojects’ led by the participants, to prototype the product or service and to establish the possibilities of success within realistic boundaries. The decision not to pursue a ‘mini project’ towards being a registered business was always the decision of the participants. DWYL continued to support these mini-projects at the discretion of the participants, with the notion that business ideas can take longer than twenty-four months to gestate.

4.3 Identifying, conceiving and delivering events to promote knowledge exchange between the local community and professionals from across the region and showcase the businesses Through the process outlined above, ideas for local community events were nurtured. These events enabled businesses that were developing to test their wares with local people and gain exposure, as well as enabling the DWYL team to make further connections with local people who might have ideas for setting up their own businesses. One set of events was focused on food production and raising the profile of local food businesses. Over 300 people attended these DWYL events, where local produce and catering have been a highlight.45                                                                                                               45

The DWYL team has also supported Jade Spicer, Whisk Café, Zoomoffee, and Rachael’s in this way. Although not directly supported to start up by DWYL, this support fits with the programme’s aims.

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From the beginning of the programme the DWYL team invited the bread group, as well as Steve Griffiths and Andy Moseley, to set up stalls at all DWYL events, at which they had great success selling fresh breads, vegetables, herbs and eggs.

For further example, to coincide with the Bristol Food Connections festival, the DWYL team, with support from the wider KWMC team, organised an event to explore and celebrate the city’s ‘wild food’ heritage. On Saturday 10th May 2014 the team collaborated with food professionals from Watershed Cafe Bar and ‘Source’ Food Hall & Cafe and local wild food experts to organise Wild Thing, an event that attracted over 70 people to KWMC. Proceedings began with a ‘Saturday Kitchen’-style cooking demonstration, which included the skinning and cooking of a rabbit by a local resident and the preparation of wild garlic risotto.

KWMC Caretaker Steve Belgium prepares a Knowle West-sourced rabbit, watched by Watershed Executive Chef Oliver Pratt. Photo by Bristol Food Connections

This was followed by a panel discussion exploring the legality, ethics and health benefits of sourcing wild food, including plants and fungi, rabbits, pigeons and fish. There was also a produce market where visitors

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could get a taste of locally-sourced food. The event culminated in a foraging walk in the green spaces of Knowle West. With lots of opportunities for tasting, networking and discussing, the event proved to be a thought-provoking and delicious experience for experimental foodies, chefs, and people new to the idea of catching and foraging wild food. One of the aims of the day was to establish exchange between people in Knowle West with skills in local food-sourcing and city centre businesses with a need for locally-sourced food for their menus. Another of the event’s aims was to facilitate sharing of knowledge and skills amongst local people about food production and sourcing, in ways that might help address food poverty. The national profile of the festival led to the programme having an extended profile. For example, the head of BBC Radio and Music, Clare McGinn, attended Wild Thing and subsequently local contributors appeared on the Radio 4 Food Programme: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04lpd9r There were also some symbolic outcomes from the day, such as special Knowle West inspired dishes appearing on menus at Watershed and Source, including ‘Knowle West Wild Garlic Risotto’ and Pieminister™46 creating a ‘Hopping Rabbit’ pie especially for the event and for the Tobacco Factory Sunday market in South Bristol.

Special Knowle West dish served at Watershed as part of the Bristol Food Connections Festival, May 2014.

Events such as Wild Thing helped to establish links for businesses established in Knowle West through DWYL to make important connections with city centre businesses, venues and customers. As illustrated below, these events provided a perfect platform for food-related businesses to share and sell their produce and raise awareness of the local food available in Knowle West.

                                                                                                              46

Pieminister http://www.pieminister.co.uk

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Fresh bread, experimentation and information – residents young and old, and those from further afield flock around the bread group stall at the Wild Thing event, 2014. Photo by Bristol Food Connections.

In addition a range of other events were organised and delivered by the DWYL team, to raise the profile of the programme and to familiarise local people with activities that relate to the programme’s environmental aims. For example, the Wooden Pallet Challenge took place on 12th July 2013.

Through advertising, local residents and DWYL staff were challenged to get together in teams and on the day produce a quality piece of furniture using wooden pallets. The event thereby raised awareness of the programme and encouraged people to recycle and up-cycle discarded items such as pallets into useable and useful objects. The event engaged 18 people including nine new community participants.

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Wooden pallets were donated from local companies and tools were loaned by B&Q, who also provided a gift token as a prize for best piece of furniture. Winners of the Wooden Pallet Challenge July 2013 and their winning item of furniture are pictured on the left.

For further example, the Make It! Festival took place on Saturday 21st September 2013. 60 people came to the Make It Festival, which was the DWYL version of a Mini Maker Faire™, a popular hands-on showcase for all kinds of tinkering, invention, craft and DIY. Of these visitors 33 were new community participants interested in accessing the programme on the day. Experts from around the region and local people held stalls to show off their hobbies and micro businesses. Visitors interacted with a 3D Printer, had their picture drawn by a robot and also learnt about the real-life ‘Pocket Spacecraft’ being developed in Bristol. Other stalls showed apple pressing, bread making and sewing. Visitors signed up for anything they would like to be involved in and these were followed up with further engagement. The Make It! Festival also boosted the interest in the initiative to develop a sewing themed business, which then evolved into Sew Clever.

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KWMC staff member Naomi Yates, who has also worked as a costume designer, facilitated a sewing workshop which contributed to recruitment of members to the Sew Clever group.

Re:work carpenter, Sam Lam, had constructed his own wooden apple press for the event and is pictured here demonstrating its use to some of the many participants on the day. The apple press remains popular and has been used on many occasions and at DWYL events. The Make It! Festival also showcased new technologies. For example, 3D printing was one of the several technologies appearing for the first time in Knowle West. Entrepreneur Richard Sewell came from Wales to show his DIY 3D printer.

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As the idea of the Bristol Maker Lab had evolved, the DWYL team decided to hold a Bristol Maker Lab workshop in March 2014. This was planned and organised to congregate a range of experts and interested parties in the “Maker movement” and to gain their support in the research and development of the idea of the Bristol Maker Lab. The 30 stakeholders from across the city and the region included the DWYL partners and Steering Group, UWE, Bristol Hackspace, successful digital entrepreneurs and young digital producers. Feedback was extremely positive and all stakeholders remain very supportive of the concept of Bristol Maker Lab as a permanent solution for green and digital enterprise, not only in South Bristol but also across the whole city. This has led to more useful networking connections and market research.

People engaged in dialogue at the Bristol Maker Lab workshop. Photo by Sammy Payne

Another example was the ‘Make Your Neighbourhood’ event, which took place on 21st June 2014. 50 people came to this event and joined in with a range of activities, included designing signs for Knowle West, making things out of recycled materials and making fresh apple juice with re:work’s applepressing machine. The clear favourite for many were the bike rides from A Ride in the Park.

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Finally, during Digital Bristol Week, DWYL organised ‘Made In Bristol’, which took place on 7th February 2015 at Bristol Central Library. The event was well attended, by 60 people of a wide demographic including regular library users, children, and BBC and Bristol City Council staff. Feedback indicates that the event successfully engaged people in a range of new technologies, for example: “Fascinating and inspiring” (Karin Smyth now Labour MP for Bristol South, February 2015) “Brilliant event with sixty 3D printing enthusiasts and an eleven year old who wants to work with us.” (Openbionics February 2015)

The event was also a showcase for the work of Open Bionics, with Dan Melville showing the 3D printed robotic prosthetic hand developed by Joel Gibbard (centre). Photo Sammy Payne

The event was the first of its type for Bristol Central Library and feedback suggests that it was the perfect venue: “An ideal location and we should do this again next year” (Mark Jacobs, BBC Academy, February 2015)

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4.4 Identifying, conceiving and piloting longer-term solutions

As has been shown in the evidence presented, this objective has been realised in many ways, including through work towards developing the Bristol Maker Lab. There is evidence to suggest that the businesses that have been supported to develop, based on local people’s own ideas and aspirations, will be sustained. This is due to the long-term commitment to, and enthusiasm for, the businesses from the people who run them: “We like the freedom of owning a business and getting to make the decisions. The next steps for us is to get more funding and start giving workshops full-time.” (John Bennett, March 2015) Furthermore, many of the people who are now running their own businesses already have ideas for future development, showing their own sense of the longevity of the business and indicating the likelihood of their business continuing to develop and flourish, for example: “In two to three years time I'd like to have my own machine, have my design brand sorted and be giving regular workshops. In five years time I want to have my own product collection.” (Fiona Dowling, March 2015) “We’d like to do more days a week and create a community hub; a neutral space where people can learn together so you don’t have to be an expert to be baking.” (James Newman, The Bread Group, August 2013) Furthermore, it is apparent in feedback from Harbour Training, that the bespoke support provided by DWYL is currently lacking across the city: “I think there's limited support for business startups in Bristol which is a real shame, as it's the right climate for lots of people to go into business. We've been really lucky to have got the help we needed from Do What You Love.” (Kate Bruce, Harbour Training, March 2015) Participants, staff and partners are all confident that the programme will be sustained and that is will continue to have positive impact, as expressed by re:work’s CEO Vicky Beckwith: “I'm really confident that what we've done will positively influence the future of the area.” (Vicky Beckwith, re:work, March 2015)

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To summarise, the DWYL team have found that the following key objectives were necessary to effectively realise the aims of the programme: Engage meaningfully with partners, to develop relevant and sustainable opportunities for all participating.

Use a reflective and fluid process, working together with all involved to identify solutions.

Identify, conceive and deliver events to promote knowledge exchange between the local community and professionals from across the region and showcase the businesses.

Identify, conceive and pilot longer-term solutions.

Through these activities the team realised the following outcomes: •

Supported local people to explore, develop and establish businesses based on what they love doing.

Created a portfolio of original green and digital business ideas that DWYL partners (KWMC and re:work) and members of the Steering Group were able to convey to individuals and organisations in the community through face-to-face conversation, local press, websites and social media.

Supported 65 people for twelve hours each regarding business start up.

Supported local people, including those setting up businesses, to build on their existing skills and develop a range of skills and knowledge relevant to their own businesses.

Supported eight businesses to become officially registered and thereby create further jobs for local people.

4.4 Meeting targets The following were key targets for the programme: • To support 60 people for 12 hours regarding business start up • To support the establishment of eight businesses • To create 30 jobs In terms of reaching these targets, the following outputs have been realised: • 65 people were supported for 12 hours regarding business start up • Eight businesses have been created • Six jobs have been created In addition the following outputs have been realised: • 359 sessions have been delivered • There have been 292 individuals who have attended sessions

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5. Learning and Recommendations 5.1 Creating meaningful work One of the key successes of this programme has been in supporting people to develop businesses that they feel committed to and which therefore promise longevity. Sustained businesses like these will make more impact economically and socially, by developing meaningful work opportunities and through continued growth over time. Recommendation Creating businesses and jobs that are meaningful and engaging makes a greater positive difference in the long-term as it motivates people to continue learning and developing their potential as active citizens.

5.2 Harnessing individual expertise By supporting people to ‘do what they love’ the programme has also ensured that a diverse range of skills and expertise have been harnessed. This has generated a unique set of business offers that utilise green and digital technologies in innovative ways, alongside traditional skills and processes, to make a positive difference socially and environmentally. Recommendation Developing plans for businesses and jobs on the basis of people’s actual areas of expertise and interest, rather than predefining the scope or range of businesses and jobs, ensures a greater range of people are engaged in the offer for support and thereby supported to set up businesses or gain a new job. This, in turn, diversifies the national creative workforce and address issues of worklessness in communities where job opportunities have been historically low.

5.3 Supporting people effectively There have been some challenges presented within the programme in terms of the time it takes to effectively support people who have not been in employment before, or for a sustained period of time, as they are not necessarily familiar with some standard workplace expectations and pressures. Recommendation Meeting people one to one as well as in groups is a very valuable part of the process. Meeting participants in places that are familiar to them makes for a much more productive relationship. The programme identified that this sort of mentoring system is useful in this kind of support programme. It might also be appropriate to consider the possibility of partnering with an additional training provider who might help prepare people for the workplace, as happens at MAKLab47 in Glasgow.                                                                                                               47

MAKLab, Glasgow http://www.maklab.co.uk

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5.4 More lead-in time is needed in new businesses The programme underestimated the time people needed to feel comfortable and confident starting their own businesses, as articulated clearly by Vicky Beckwith: “We did underestimate the time people needed to feel comfortable and confident starting their own businesses. People here face a skills gap, lack of ambition, and a real fear of leaving the benefits system. It's a real gamble for someone to start his or her own business in the hope it pays off. There's a lack of resources in the area and each person we spoke to needed new skills to develop their business. We needed more money and access to more people.” (Vicky Beckwith, re:work CEO) The financial risk proved unattractive to local people with vulnerable financial and domestic situations. For instance the bread group could have an increased and sustained impact as a social enterprise with investment in a managerial role, equipment and marketing. For further example, it has taken the Sew Clever group almost two years to become an Unincorporated Organisation. Recommendation It is important not to underestimate the amount of time people need to feel comfortable and confident starting their own businesses. Funding for similar models to this programme in future might cover a research and development phase for businesses setting up, and have lower expectations in terms of the number of jobs that might be created through new businesses in any initial phase.

5.5 Long term development A longer-term sustainable centralised effort is missing. Economic gaps in the manufacturing market are waiting to be filled. For example, it has been found that the fashion industry in and around Bristol has a great need for skilled seamstresses with manufacturing standard machines, to enable fast prototyping for local designers. Training and capital investment would create a much-needed symbiosis, which would nurture the local economy and sustainable jobs. Recommendation A permanent, sustainable centre is needed in the long term, in which people have time to learn new skills or develop existing ones. This base would have no barriers to entry and provide expertise, inspiration, tools, networks and childcare. KWMC’s ‘Bristol Maker Lab’ proposal and plan, which is appended (see Appendix 2) and downloadable from the KWMC website,48 clearly outlines the needs, the market and the possibilities for such a base                                                                                                               48

Appendix 2: Maker Lab Proposal

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and the ways in which it would transform the economies of communities within cities where inequalities are present.

5.6 Childcare provision Childcare continues to be a barrier to people learning new skills. As evidenced in the Child Poverty Strategy 2011-2020, 90% of Bristol families living in poverty are parented by single mothers, so it seems a necessity to provide childcare to enable parents to acquire skills and networks to prepare them for future work. Knowle West Children’s Centre has identified a large demand for nursery places in Knowle West that is currently not being met. Recommendation Knowle West Children’s Centre believe they can replicate their second nursery school for £90,000, creating a third nursery to service Bristol Maker Lab participants as well as other parents living and working in the local area. This would be particularly effective at Filwood Green Business Park.

5.7 Environmental impact measurement UWE’s Business School provided support by supervising an intern to carry out work about the programme’s carbon footprint. This resulted in the development of a framework to measure DWYL’s carbon footprint, which can be used in future with the start-up businesses supported by the programme. This is in line with the “environmental action plan” submitted as a condition of the funding agreement. However, the extent to which this framework was relevant to the businesses developed is limited, as explained by Anthony Plumridge, Associate Head of Department, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Faculty of Business and Law: “It is difficult to evolve any tight argument on carbon emission reduction across the DWYL enterprises. By their very nature, they are increasing activity in the community (rather than participants staying at home), which may lead to more transport demand (more emissions). On the other hand, participation as workers or customers of the enterprises may replace participation in activities outside the community and thus reduce emissions associated with travel. A Ride in the Park may well have given some individuals the confidence to cycle and thus replace other transport modes with consequent reductions in emissions.” (Anthony Plumridge, April 2015) Examples of how the businesses developed are reducing carbon emissions, such as Knowle & West Eco Paints reducing landfill and Sew Clever increasing the use of recycled materials, have been included in the narrative descriptions of the programme in this report. Any attempt at quantification of all of this, using the template developed, would not be realistic or accurate. Recommendation Traditional metrics used to measure environmental impact are not suited to grassroots, small start-up enterprises. Through work with UWE’s Faculty of Business and Law, the programme found that at this developmental stage it is safe and more appropriate to define a new business as ‘green’, simply by

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assessing the approach of the entrepreneur, their ethos and attitude to key themes such as impact on the environment, waste, pollution, and trading locally and using sustainable materials.

6. Conclusion Do What You Love has proved to be an innovative and transposable model for supporting enterprise start-ups in communities facing economic challenges. The team’s approach has been to leverage networks and mentors, and drum up support, interest, enthusiasm and participation through bespoke events that have captured many people’s imaginations. The approach has been one of bringing together people from different parts of the city with different expertise, to facilitate continued knowledge exchange. In this way the programme has bridged gaps and diminished barriers between the more and less affluent parts of the city. This approach has clearly made a significant difference for individuals and organisations involved and has been effective in nurturing a wide range of positive outcomes reflective of the aims of the programme. Furthermore, the approach has made a difference by bringing people together to share knowledge and skills, not only supporting people to develop new skills that can be applied vocationally or in their own day to day lives, but also fostering greater community cohesion. This has also nurtured a positive sense of what members of a community can achieve together, promoting pride and confidence within that community and an increased sense of the potential there is for a community, with bespoke support, equipment and space, to bring about positive change. As evidenced throughout this report Do What You Love has increased the ambitions of individuals and altered external perceptions of the area and boosted local pride. Local people have developed new and relevant skills and community enterprises have grown. Jobs have been created and the local economy has been stimulated through forward-looking green and digital activity. In addition the programme has generated a useful set of learning outcomes and recommendations. On the basis of this learning and these recommendations, long term plans for a sustained programme have been put into place through the Bristol Maker Lab. Perhaps most significantly, the programme has evidenced how work that shines a light on people’s passions, strengths and ambitions, which may have previously been hidden, can effectively support people to develop longterm sustainable income-generating businesses, based on those passions, strengths and ambitions. In this way Do What You Love has demonstrated that there is great potential there to work with communities and support them to develop their own ideas for long-term positive solutions, which will help to overcome barriers to work

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and promise to positively affect the community’s future economic sustainability.

7. Appendices Appendix 1: Bristol Maker Lab Proposal http://kwmc.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Bristol-MakerLab_proposal_23pg_LOW-RESpdf.pdf

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Do What You Love: Evaluation  

Knowle West Media Centre's Green & Digital Business Programme explored a new way of doing business for two years from 2013-2015. The aim of...

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