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STAFF

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Vaughn Himber PRINT EDITOR Sophia Page BLOG EDITOR Nick Halaby BUSINESS/SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Cameron de Matteis ADS MANAGER Grace McKagan WRITER Mina Kim ADVISOR Mrs. Elisia Harkins-James STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER: Christine Marie, Christine Marie Photography To catch up on past issues of The Knight Magazine, check out our e-magazine on The Knight News Blog at www.ndhsmedia.com/e-magazine/

march-April 2013 MAY 2013

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february 2013

NOVEMber 2012


May 2013 12 LONDON’S

04 CALLING 05 FINALS

SURVIVAL GUIDE FAREWELL

06 TO THE EDITORS

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CELEB/CANINE LOOK-ALIKES HEALTH

08 IN THE HOOD 09

DOES HIGH SCHOOL PREPARE YOU FOR COLLEGE? PROM:

10 OUT ON A HIGH NOTE

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COMPARING MONEY SPENDING

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NEW YEAR, NEW TECH: ELECTRONIC EDUCATION AT N.D.

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SRI LANKIDS CLUB

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I AM WHO I AM

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MARCUS STEWART, FASHION EXPERT

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GUESS WHAT I’M DOING THIS SUMMER!

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BASEBALL PARENTS SHOW THEIR LOVE

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WHAT I WISH I KNEW FRESHMAN YEAR

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CHEER TRYOUTS

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N.D. SPORTS YEAR IN REVIEW

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IMAGES OF THE YEAR AROUND N.D. AND THE WORLD MAY 2013

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By Gabriela Avila, Guest Writer

On Saturday, April 27th, the 38th Annual Luncheon and Fashion Show took place at Sheraton Hotel in Universal City, sporting the theme of London’s Calling. For the past 38 years the Holy Cross Mother’s Guild has put this show on to raise money for the Holy Cross Mother’s Guild Scholarship Fund, a financial aid program that assists students who have faced the death of a parent so they may continue their education at Notre Dame. This lovely event would not be possible without the hard-working mothers of the Guild, the generous donations of clothes and prizes from vendors, every student who participated in the show, and the support from everyone who attended. According to Sue Wellman, the moderator of the Holy Cross Mother’s Guild, the fashion show started as a simple tea in Bullocks’s department store before it was shut down. Over the years it has evolved into quite the event, being held at the Sheraton Hotel for over the past ten years. This year 550 people paid to attend, a record for the event. The day started at 10:00 a.m. with a Silent Auction in the garden. At 12:15 a.m. the luncheon began in the grand ballroom of the Sheraton Hotel. Finally, at 1:30 a.m. the winners of the Grand Raffle were announced, and then a live auction took place with David Burke as the Master of Ceremonies. A Strand Pearl necklace with matching earrings was auctioned for $1,500, a signed Kobe Bryant basketball went for $700, and a three-day-and-two-night stay at a lakeside cabin at Lake Tahoe was auctioned for $1,500. The item that was the most popular, raking in more money than the other three

items combined, was a four-pack of tickets to a One Direction concert at the Staples Center. Two parties went back and forth bidding until the final bid was placed at $4,000. Once the price was finalized, four more tickets were donated so both parties could leave with the promise of seeing the popular boy band in August. $8,000 was raised thanks to the extra contribution. After the excitement of the auction, it was time for the main event to begin.

compassion for all of her mom’s hard work.” The show exceeded my own personal expectations, feeling more like a musical than a fashion show. Wearing outfits donated by generous vendors, senior boys and girls danced and posed to music by The Beatles, One Direction, The Spice Girls, and several others. Some of the men’s casual wear was donated by Val Surf, and formal wear was provided by Friar Tux and Men’s Warehouse. Meanwhile, the girls sported clothes from brands such as Mimi Chica and Jill Roberts. While it was my first time at the show, several attendees have made it out in the past. Senior Krystal Alvarez has been coming for the past 3 years. “We waited for our invitation in the mail,” she said. When asked if she would try to make it out again, even after she graduates, she said, “Definitely maybe. It may be a little overindulgent for me.” It is true that tickets to the events are not cheap, but all the money goes to a great cause. Not to mention the fact that you get a great lunch and chances to win amazing prizes. Notre Dame teacher Mary Kay Munroe has been coming to the fashion show for about six years. She loves the opportunity to catch up with old friends and enjoy the festive atmosphere. “I also enjoy watching the students model,” she said, “especially since it’s usually the ones who are normally shy who do it.” Most of the students seemed pretty outgoing as they danced and strutted their way down the catwalk. All in all, the show had everything, even a surprise prom proposal. The evening ended with flowers, a beautiful song, and tons of teary eyes as the senior models presented their mothers with roses and thank you cards.

The models did not have it easy, either. “We rehearsed for about three or four months,” said Senior Noel Duer.

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The show, of course, is not an overnight occurrence. Everyone who participated in it worked long and hard with planning, booking, acquiring donations, and just making the show possible. The models did not have it easy, either. “We rehearsed for about three or four months,” said Senior Noel Duer. “By the time we were done it felt like we had been to 1,500 rehearsals.” When asked why he put in all the effort that came with being in the show, he said, “My mom really wanted me to do it, but it’s also been a passion of mine to be a model.” Senior Lily Peterson’s answer was similar, saying that she got involved because her mother was involved. “It was really fun,” she said, “and it was nice to be able to do something. It was a lot of work, and we would rehearse about every other Sunday. It was definitely worth it.” Both seniors said they gained something from the experience too. “I learned that everyone is beautiful,” said Duer, while Peterson said that she “gained a sense of


FINALS Survival Guide

By Yasmeen Faisal, Guest Writer

It is that time of year again….finals. It means we are closer to summer, but before we are free, we have to attack the books and study guides for a tiring week of tests and more tests. I know finals can be a lot of hard work, but students tend to stress themselves out more than necessary. Students prepare for finals differently, and some stress more than others. Simple steps can be taken to make sure you are comfortable for the test, and that you are not “over-preparing” and tiring yourself out. There are so many ways that you can prepare for finals that do not require much effort. Sophomore Katherine Bloch said “I use a study guide that the teachers give me, and rewrite them in my own words on Quizlet.” That’s so simple! Study guides are a great tool for finals. Rereading study guides and understanding the information is a great test taking skill that does not require long nights of flipping page after page in the textbook. So many students I interviewed said they use Quizlet as a way to test themselves and summarize the information they learned during the semester. Flashcards are another great study tool. You can use flashcards as a way to write down necessary information that you need, and you can pull them out anytime when you want to refresh your mind. It is always important to visit your teachers during X-period to make sure your questions are answered and that you are on the right path. Some students like to plan out which tests they are going to study on certain days, so they do not have to cram it all two days before the actual test. Sleep and eating well are the two most important ways to do better on a test. If you sleep longer, you have more energy, and are more relaxed so you can focus well on your test. Some students can easily say they study just enough for finals, while others say they underprepare for finals. Neither one is wrong; some students are just more relaxed than others. Some students have a high grade in their class, and do not worry, as much about the impact the final will have on their grade. Senior Andrea Diaz said

that, “I actually think I underprepare for finals, which is a bad habit, but I still manage to keep my grade in the class.” It is important to know your grade in the class, and maybe check out the impact the finals will have on your grades so you maintain the same score you want. Diaz said that, “definitely don’t stress as much as I did my last three years of high school because I’m a second semester senior and know where I am going to college.” Seniors are lucky to be heading off to college, but for the rest of us that are here for a few more years, it is important to understand that you never want to over-prepare for your finals. Overpreparing and stressing yourself out will hurt you on the test. Just tell yourself you know the information, and trust your first instinct. Spending a few hours on each subject, and taking breaks, is a good way to relax yourself and prepare just as much as you need for the test. Do you stress yourself too much for finals? So many students spend the week ripping their hair out studying and studying, overthinking and over-planning. Some students on the other hand, do not stress as much, go to bed early, and enjoy the night. Freshman Lea Schwartz said, “I don’t get too stressed, I just relax, go to bed early, you know..the usual.” On the other hand, Freshman Callie Loftus agreed that she “gets extremely stressed before the test.” Everyone is different, but it’s important to know that stressing yourself out will distract you from getting the right answers. Like Schwartz, if you go to bed early and tell yourself you know the information, you will feel good during testing days. Feeling stressed is not necessarily a bad thing because it shows you care about your grade. Some students don’t do as well on tests because they “psych” themselves out, and always say how scared they are. It is just a test, remember that. Finals are an important week of the school year, but if you follow the simple steps, take care of yourself, and relax, you will get the grade you want no doubt about it.

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FAREWELL TO THE EDITORS

Dear Students, It has truly been such an honor being an Editor for the Notre Dame Newspaper/Magazine. I am so proud of and forever grateful to the other students I have worked with. No issue would have been published if it wasn’t for every single student contributing to the class. It was so great to be able to turn the old boring newspaper into a colorful magazine, and particularly this year being able to use actual magazine material/paper. Publishing a paper takes a lot of work, and the past three years have been incredible. I also want to thank my Co-Editor, Tayce Taylor, for being so exceptional and handling me at my worst and supporting me through it all. We really are a power team and I’m so proud as to how much we have accomplished. I have no doubt in my mind that the future editors will be spectacular and will continue producing quality papers and keeping students updated and intrigued. Lastly, I would like to thank Mrs. Harkins-James for providing the whole class and me with a place to work after school and staying with us for all the late nights throughout the year. We couldn’t have done it without you! I am so lucky to have worked with such great people these past three years who’ve kept me sane through this entire process, so thank you all! And thank you for the students who have given interviews, pictures, stories and especially a big thank you to all the readers! -Anna Hovanesyan

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Last Words It has been an honor and a blessing to be your Editor for these past two years. Sophomore year I was accidentally placed into Journalism II and didn’t even know it was a part of the school paper. It turned out to be the best thing in my high school career because I grew as a journalist, a communicator, and a leader. I made friends that will last a lifetime as I worked next to the highly talented (and slightly short -tempered) Anna Hovanesyan. We have together transformed what used to be a black-and-white newspaper to a colorful and glossy magazine that we will keep forever. After working hard and long hours, I believe that I have made my mark on Notre Dame through the paper. I have learned so much through this process and will take it with me as I go through life. I will never forget the memories of Anna squawking like a rooster because we weren’t going to make deadline or my terrifying and intimidating speeches to the class. I want to thank my staff, thank my CoEditor, thank my classmates, and most importantly thank Mrs. Harkins-James for giving me this opportunity to run the paper for two years and to delve into my passion for leadership. So, for my last words written on the paper that I have worked so hard to evolve, I want to say that I am so humbly grateful for taking the role of your editor because these are the memories that I will never forget. –Tayce Taylor

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Celebs That Look Like Their Dogs By Kathryn Bracken, Guest Writer

You know how people begin to act and look similar after they’re together long enough? The same goes for celebrities and their pets. For example, Paris Hilton’s Chihuahua, Tinkerbell, famous for traveling by purse, is definitely just as pampered as Paris. This dog, which she obtained from a breeder in 2003, is furnished with her own mini-mansion and only travels first-class. Julianne Hough and her Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, Lexi, have the same adorable puppy-dog eyes and soft, approachable faces. Nicole Richie and her German shepherd, Iro, have identical dark manes and energetic personalities. How does this happen? Are celebrities a different breed of human being that can transform themselves into the mirror image of their pet? Or is it the pet that morphs into their owner? There are a few theories on this that need exploring. Ryan Gosling and his crossbreed canine, George are not only the best of friends; they are both as cute as a puppy and share the exact same hairstyle. A dog like this would never be seen at the local dog groomer. In fact, weekly home visits by a mobile dog groomer are more in line for this pampered pooch. Animal advocate Jessica Alba and her pug, Sid, which she rescued in 2012, both have seemingly morphed into identical, adorable faces. Is it possible that they exercise daily, get plenty of sleep and make sure they drink eight glasses of water every day? Britney Spears and her little white pooch Hannah have the exact same cute, little smile and big, brown eyes. Can it be a coincidence that Hannah wears the same color schemes as Britney, or is there a fashion consultant in the wings dressing them both? Many celebrities are quick to let us know they obtained their pet through a shelter or rescue organization. Since many celebrities are alleged to be self-centered and image conscious, one could make the argument they are building a family of pets in their own image or lifestyle. When he is in-between relationships, music star Joe Jonas spends his non-girlfriend time with his bulldog companion, Winston. The star can often be found dressing Winston in costumes and posting his picture on social media websites. Not the same as a girlfriend, but it works for Joe. Ashley Tisdale’s Maltipoo named Blondie is known for having a friendly personality and intelligence, and not unlike Ashley, Blondie sports a well-trussed head of blond hair. Lady Gaga famously dyed her blonde hair a soft brown to match the fur on her beloved cockapoo, Fozzi. Not only did she match their hair, but also buys matching accessories like the identical yellow polkadot Louis Viton x Yayoi Kusama collars they both wear on her world tours. Finally, the YouTube phenom Jenna Marbles has an Italian greyhound named Kermit, featured in many of her videos. Some say that an actor with a dashing smile would be better suited for the music videos, but Jenna will only cast her beloved dog in her scenes. No casting agent can overcome that amount of love for an animal.

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HEALTH IN THE HOOD

By Cameron de Matteis

Walking through the high school cafeteria, most students take the availability of healthy options for granted. Fresh fruits and vegetables are not something people are usually grateful for. It never crosses people’s minds that those very things are extremely scarce in some neighborhoods and are a privilege. In fact, many lower income areas in Los Angeles struggle greatly with nutrition and health. This issue has developed over time into a full blown health crisis. It is a direct result of limited access to supermarkets and the scarcity of local farmers’ markets and vendors selling fresh produce, which leads to a lack of healthy affordable food in lower income areas. Statistics show that there are 25% fewer supermarkets in low income zip codes. However, there are a prevalent amount of fast food restaurants and an influx of convenience and liquor stores. People are forced to resort to these options because of their affordability and proximity. Fast food chains such as, McDonalds, Burger King, and Carls Jr., offer fatty and processed foods that lack nutrition, but are available at unbeatable prices. Though convenience stores are a slight improvement, these often have a limited selection of healthy alternatives. In Los Angeles, three in ten stores located in neighborhoods of extreme poverty do not sell any fruits or vegetables. The Community Health Council(CHC) found that only three quarters of food retailers in South Central Los Angeles sell produce, which was most likely to be bruised or spoiled. Fresh produce, nonfat milk, and low-fat snacks were all found to be extremely rare and practically nonexistent. The absence of supermarkets is such an issue because of a lack of quick and easy public transportation in Los MAY 2013

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Angeles. According to the CHC, 16% of shoppers in South LA travel at least 20 minutes to find a grocery store. Limited access to private transportation results in many residents choosing the closest available option, often a fast food restaurant. A majority of South LA residents rely on corner stores to feed their families, including their young children. The consequences of this community crisis are outstanding. A poor diet with a lack of essential nutrients has many severe consequences on personal health and child development. There is an increased amount of diet related diseases, such as extreme obesity, cardio-

“This is evident here in Los Angeles by disproportion rates of nutrition related disease in areas such as South and East Los Angeles,” said Priya Saluja. vascular disease, and diabetes in these areas. Obesity rates are approximately 20% higher in areas with poor health. Priya Saluja, a representative from the Mayor’s office said, “This is evident here in Los Angeles by disproportion rates of nutrition related disease in areas such as South and East Los Angeles.” In addition, a poor diet, loaded with high trans-fat or not enough crucial vitamins and carbohydrates, is a contributing factor to depression. Recent studies show that residents with greater access to supermarkets consume more healthy items, greatly reducing their risk to these illnesses. There is also an economic component to this crisis. Economic development suffers in low-income communities that are

in need of jobs and private investments because supermarkets are considered to be anchors that attract other businesses. The best solution to improve these areas, often referred to as “food deserts”, is to build more chain grocery stores. This would stimulate their economy, create local jobs, and improve health. Unfortunately, there are many challenges and obstacles involved with this proposal. For instance, in South LA, much of the vacant landscape is too small and oddly shaped to accommodate a traditional supermarket. Strict regulations requiring a certain amount of parking spaces or sewer upgrades are often too costly and turn away investors. Grocery stores also require skilled labor, and because South LA has a low percentage of high school graduates, not enough people meet the demanding hiring requirements of chain grocery stores. Another possible solution, is to convince corner stores to carry healthier options. This would prevent residents from having to change their shopping habits and would allow them to stay in their area. Pursuing this route requires a lot of community support. The health crisis at hand is extremely complex and there is no simple resolution. However, the mayor’s office stated that “the LAFPC [the non-profit Los Angeles Food Policy Council] is convening food advocacy organizations from across the city to advance policy and projects related to improving neighborhood food environments in “food desert” communities, including projects related to urban agriculture, healthy street food vending, farmer’s markets, CalFresh promotion and incentivizing healthy food retail.” It is not a crisis that should be ignored, but must be addressed by the people and city government in order to restore social justice to the suffering areas.


others would be unable to. Their unceasing encouragement and pride in their work inspires their students to new heights and to follow their dreams. Time after time, I have heard horror stories about kids who went to high schools where they were nothing more than one student out of three thousand, and when those kids got to college, they were completely overwhelmed and drowned. These students, then, had to decide whether they would like to be miserable for three more years or drop out, a choice that could haunt them for the rest of their life. Unlike those huge high schools, Notre Dame has a comparatively small student body. Not only does that allow for more teacher-student interaction, but is also helpful for students struggling with their curricular. While public school class’ are aimed towards teaching the worst of the students, Notre Dame has a different style that allows each student to go at their own pace and even though the work load can be stressful, you know that you are learning something useful. Even the things that seem trivial now can really help later in life. “The teachers at Notre Dame really taught me how important time management is and how to take a big project, like the senior research paper, and break it into smaller, more manageable steps,” remarks Georgia Huston, now a freshman at St. Edward’s University. Though she once struggled in some aspects of her academic life, Georgia is now on the Dean’s List of her university and has earned several scholarships for her achievements. At Notre Dame, we pride ourselves on “educating hearts and minds”. Where would we be without our school? Study habits, time management, essay writing, researching skills, socializing, morality, volunteer work, and athletics are all important things to take to college and thanks to Notre Dame, we have a surplus.

Does High School Prepare You for College? By Veronica Huston, Guest Writer

Am I getting the best education I can? Will I be prepared for college and my future career? These are the questions that we all have to ask ourselves. In a society that follows the ‘kill or be killed’ statute, we are forced to fight for our every breath from the moment we turn eighteen to the moment we die. The four short years of high school are all that separates us from a lifetime of struggle. These four years need to be a time of preparation, focus, and learning. If you are lucky, you find a decent high school where you will meet some great people, get a pretty good transcript, maybe figure out your direction in life, and get into a respectable college. But shouldn’t we get more out of it than that? At Notre Dame, we do! “Notre Dame strives for perfection in a student and establishes those morals in life that every person needs including respect, integrity, and sportsmanship,” says alumni, Juan Padilla, a freshman at Loyola Marymount. Many people question Notre Dame’s academic reputation, calling it a “sports school,” but while we dominate in multiple athletic fields, we use that same strength and determination in all competitions. Our teachers utilize their influence by crafting us into better people so that we can benefit society in ways that

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OUT ON A HIGH NOTE

How Prom is the pinnacle of the high school experience By Andrew Gavinet, Guest Writer

to get out on a high note. This year’s Senior class certainly enjoyed their last few moments at Notre Dame by letting it all out at the Plaza Hotel on April 20th. Before prom had started there was already a huge build up to the event through all of the cute, sincere, and awkward prom proposals that occurred on campus. Once the plans were set, and wingmen were enlisted, the guys brought out their best bouquet of roses and chocolate to ask out there

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soon to be dates to prom in a variety of ways. Once the men had done their parts of asking the girls out to prom, the girls then reciprocated by putting on their best dresses and makeup to attend this special night. Prom this year cost $80 a person just to get in. The prom was held at the Plaza Hotel (where ironically enough the 2008 horror film Prom Night was filmed) and included a masquerade themed night in which many people showed up wearing their masks. It also included a DJ, a gourmet meal, and a huge dance floor with lighting equipment set up to provide attendees with the best possible environment to dance the night away. Senior Andrew Gowanlock said, “It was a fun and memorable experience. I really enjoyed being able to have one last great night with my friends before I left Notre Dame for good.” The prom itself was a massive success filled with dancing, food, and good times

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for all the Seniors and Juniors who attended. The prom included students dancing to different kinds of music such as techno, house, and pop. The Plaza Hotel served chicken and mashed potatoes with an assortment of vegetables and fruit. However, to most Seniors, the moments they will remember from prom probably will not be the food. What they will remember the most from prom will be the people they joked with, danced with, and probably spent 4 years of their lives with. In other words, their friends are the people who made their lives unpredictable, fun, and rewarding. Proms themselves represent a coming of age for most 18 year olds as the endeavors and fantasies of their youth come to a close and the brutal realities of life after high school set in. From here on out they are on their own and the next decisions they make after high school could very well be permanent. All of

those times hanging out with friends during lunch or playing on a sports team could very soon become distant memories of a life now consumed by college and careers. So at the end of it all what is left of your days at Notre Dame and your memories made here? That is for every senior to decide. The memories made by seniors here at Notre Dame span an incredible four years filled with many situations and memories made all the more special by many different people. Whether someone’s favorite memory of Notre Dame was trying to figure out their locker combination the first day of school or their senior prom, all that matters was the fact that those memories were made. In the end, all that this year’s graduating class has to look back on is memories, and hopefully Notre Dame provided them with enough good memories and friends to send them out satisfied with their high school experiences.


YOU ARE WHAT YOU BUY By Mina Kim

Four years in high school seems like a short period of time, too little time for much change to happen. We enter as small Freshmen and we leave as Seniors, but not much bigger. We move on and achieve our goals, and those four years barely leave their impression on our memories. High school can also be a time for subtle, yet significant change. Just in four years, we can grow up to be semi-adults with a sense of responsibility and priority. It was a French doctor, Anthelme Brillat-Savari, who said, “Dis-moi ce que tu manges, je te dirai ce que tu es.” [Tell me what you eat and I will tell you what you are] or simply “You are what you eat.” The same principle applies for what people buy. This maxim cannot be fully understood if one takes it literally; figuratively, this saying means that one’s personality or character can be determined by what one consumes. This can reveal changes in affinity or lifestyle in a person over a number of years. Freshman Chandra East talked about how she gets her money and her attitude towards spending. East said, “I get my money from my parents…[when] I help around the house and whenever I need money they give it to me. I mainly spend money on clothes, food, and movies … I am not money savvy at all, I spend it on impulse and never save up for anything.” Sophomore Jade Teetsel said, “I get my money from family and friends. I don’t have a job that pays, so I’ve just saved up money from birthdays and holidays. I don’t have an allowance. I don’t really need one.When I do spend my money, I usually use it when I go out with friends so I don’t have to bother my parents for any. I also use my money to buy food, and when I see

something nice that I want, I save up for it.I don’t really know if I’m more money savvy than others, but my parents have taught me how to invest my money and to only splurge every once in a while.” Junior Erin Sullivan said, “I do chores and get an allowance for gas money.
I only spend money on gas, weekend activities, and food. Yes I do believe I am savvy with my money because I don’t get much, so I learn how to conserve it and use it on important things.” Junior Hayley Friedman said, “I don’t really get money. If I do chores I get money for food when I go out with friends.
I get money from my parents.
I do not have an allowance.
I spend money on food, gas, small items of clothing (nothing fancy). I’m way money savvy. I make my own money and I don’t spend it on things I don’t need. I save a lot of money for something big if I really want it, but overall I’m good at not feeling the need to buy things everywhere I go.” Lastly, Senior Miki Shinmura said, “I work a part time job. I have never been given an allowance. I spend my money on my car payment, gas, and food. I would say I’m more money savvy because I have to work for my money and I think I just learn to appreciate every dollar more. And because I have to pay for my car I have to learn to say no sometimes to make sure I have enough to pay for my car and gas.” As student elevate in age, it appears that they take on more and more responsibility. Junior do not go out as much as Freshman and Sophomore since they have gas to pay for and have jobs. Working also makes one value every cent one gets because it is no longer free anymore and parents are less generous. At the end of our four years at Notre Dame, students walk away a little taller.

“Dis-moi ce que tu manges, je te dirai ce que tu es.”

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By Vaughn Himber

The hall was nearly empty now, as Junior Sean Joffe opened his locker to gather up textbooks for his weekend homework. “Heavy,” he said, as the stack rose like the Tower of Babel. Ironically, the back cover of one, The Language of Composition, touted, “Now available as an e-book”. Future Notre Dame students will no longer have to face this quandary, as our high school will soon begin a technological revolution that will entail the use of iPads, apps, and yes, e-books. Over the summer, Notre Dame will begin to implement the infrastructure of the shift, which will tighten Internet security and further strengthen the school’s wi-fi, especially in classrooms. “In order to sustain all those iPads, our wireless network must be top-notch,” said Communications Department Chair Sabrina Landinguin. Director of Technology Louis Weiss said the upgrade will expand wi-fi accessibility to students, teachers, and visiting alumni. “Ideally, by the ’14-’15 school year, we will have students with an iPad in hand,” said Weiss. Sorry, Seniors and Juniors: no iPad for you. However, distribution is still in development. “Are we just starting with the freshman class? The sophomore class? The full student body? That has yet to be established,” he said. Eventually, students of all grade levels will have their own iPads. While plans are still in progress and likely to change, The Knight was given a sneak preview of further upcoming developments. “Room 52 may no longer be a full [computer] lab anymore; there would no longer be a need for that,” said Weiss. Next year, 250 iPads will be purchased and divided between 10 school departments and five classroom sets in carts. Although teachers themselves (not Notre Dame) will ultimately decide on what subject-specific educational apps to use for their

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classes, faculty and staff have over 75,000 to choose from in the Mac App Store, including Notability, Idea Flight Enterprise, Quizlet, iTunes U, Google Drive, Evernote, and Smart Notebook, which turns the iPad into a mini SmartBoard. The majority of increased tuition costs due to iPad distribution (intended to “impact families as little as possible”) will be offset by hundreds of dollars in annual e-book savings, as the “old dead tree versions” of textbooks “cost a fortune,” said Weiss. E-books are less expensive, and “can be leased” by students during the school year and then returned later. The switch to iPads, said Landinguin, will improve instruction and further prepare students for college, since students and faculty alike at over a thousand universities have begun to use it in class. This outlook is the “consensus among the faculty and administration,” according to Lisa Nelson, computer teacher, who said, “Implementing iPads in the classroom would... help with motivation, collaboration, critical thinking, and working with peers and in groups.” The transition to iPads reflects a new view of learning that has been described as a “flipped” classroom. “It would be a whole paradigm shift where the learning is going to be student-based,” said Computer Department Chair Talin Shahoomian, “where the teacher is there to guide the students.” Despite this modern concept, subject material will not be altered. “The curriculum will remain the same, but the way the curriculum is taught will hopefully change. Teachers will find new activities and ways of teaching, beyond just lecturing,” said Nelson. But devices will not dominate the teaching. “We don’t want technology to drive the education,” said Landinguin. The administration has discussed how to incorporate one-to-one technology at Notre Dame, as laptops, Kindles, and other e-readers have been used at other schools

with mixed success. “We want to be current, not trendy,” said Vice Principal of Instruction Courtney Kassakhian. Using iPads and e-books yields a plethora of advantages. “iPads seem like the best choice,” said Kassakian, “because, one, Apple is really focused on creating educational applications, and two, the battery life makes sense for students. Now, every room is a computer lab.” Students cannot lose or forget to bring their textbooks to class, since they will have a library of ebooks centralized in one iPad. The reduction in physical textbooks will minimize wrangling gargantuan piles of books. “My locker is full, my backpack is about to explode, and just for Mr. Gamble’s class, I have 4 binders,” said Jim Harrell, Junior. Loads “will be a lot lighter,” said Joffe. In spite of the shiny allure of progress, not everyone is excited about the introduction of iPads. Many math and science e-book operations need the Adobe Flash program to run, which Apple products do not support. Harrell wondered what would happen if an iPad was broken, dropped, or damaged by a spill. “People’s backs today are actually suffering less from backpacks and more from stress on the neck and upper back from constantly looking down to study; iPads would not change that,” he said. Other concerns include potential theft (which might be lessened when everyone owns an iPad) and making sure students stay focused on lessons. Kassakhian considered how the iPad would affect “classroom management,” as “kids have access to games and the Internet,” a potential path of distraction that will lead to “big considerations and learning curves. At the same time, kids do not need iPads to be distracted. Doodling is centuries old. It’s going to be a new challenge, in some ways the same, in some ways really different, from what we’ve always had to deal with.”


Sri Lankids Club

By Sophia Page

Clubs are an important part of Notre Dame High School. They serve to build community and to involve students in activities that they are passionate about. A club on campus that many people do not know about is the Sri Lankids Club, moderated by Ms. Van de Bovencamp. Started this year by Juniors Tara Haniffa and Tatiana Kassam, this fairly new club involves active charity work and raises awareness of poverty in Sri Lanka, a small island just off the southern coast of India. These two girls are passionate about spreading the word and getting more people involved in assisting this beautiful, yet poverty stricken country. Tatiana and Tara were motivated to start the club not only because of their passion for charity work, but also because of their Sri Lankan and Indian origins. Because many people were left homeless after the massive tsunami that struck Sri Lanka in 2004, both girls were inspired to start a club that would bring that needed awareness and help to Sri Lanka. Tara actively participates in a charity foundation in Sri Lanka. This foundation, co-founded by her aunt, raises orphans in the povrty-stricken country. Tara contributes by traveling there every summer to help out at different orphanages. “I’ve been involved through that foundation through my

family, so I thought it would be fun to bring it to campus,” said Haniffa. In addition to visiting and helping out at Sri Lankan orphanages, Tara also sponsors an eight year-old child that was left homeless after the tsunami. Instead of doing fundraisers to raise money for their cause, both Tara and Tatiana hope to get Notre Dame to sponsor a Sri Lankan child. Tatiana, herself, went to Kenya last year to do global development work. While there, Tatiana taught English at a school and helped improve that school’s infrastructure as well. She also helped to de-worm four schools by handing out antimalarial medications. Kassam said, “It’s a lot more eye opening if you look at the bigger picture and go oversees to see what the problems are over there. It raises awareness.” By participating in and learning about global charity work, this Notre Dame club is inspiring and brings awareness to a beautiful country that needs it. By starting a truly unique club, Tatiana and Tara are an inspiration to all of us that are passionate about helping those in need. If you are interested in joining the Sri Lankids, get in touch with Tara Haniffa and Tatiana Kassam!

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I Am Who By Cameron de Matteis

Everyone has a unique identity that sets them apart from others. At such a young age it can be challenging to embrace the things that make us different. However, this generation of teens is full of proud individuals who love who they are and where they come from.

I Am Vegan

Autumn Porter, Freshman, embraces being vegan. “I’ve been vegan for about two years. I became vegan for health reasons at first and I remain vegan because a clean diet makes me feel better overall. I am proud of the discipline that being vegan has required me to have. I am more conscious about the things I eat and I tend to read labels. My favorite part about being vegan is feeling healthy all the time, having more energy, saving animals, and a lot of the food is surprisingly enjoyable!”

I Am Lithuanian

Edvardas Dabsys, Sophomore, explains his love for his Lithuanian culture. “The culture is unique because it is so old, its been around for over 1000 years. I love being such a small country and being able to be unique in my culture. We have all sorts of traditional songs, dances (which my friends and I perform), stories, etc.. It has a bizarre literature, and our language is an off set from all others. I am very proud to be Lithuanian. Just over 20 years ago we finally gained our independence from the Soviets. Back then we had to struggle to keep our culture alive and we were successful so now we can practice freely. My favorite thing would be the food, friends, and language. I can also honor my family, because we have a long history in Lithuania. Being Lithuanian means that I am a representative for my culture, unlike the french, english, and spanish cultures, there are very few of us, so people’s opinions on Lithuanians can be based on one or two people. It encourages me to be a good person and to make my nation/ family proud. All in all I love being able to tell people about it, and its interesting traditions. I’ve been going to a saturday Lithuanian school for 12 years and plan to finish the last two years. There is also the Lithuanian scouts which I’m a part of, which promote our culture and struggles through history. Finally, I am a part of a folk singing/ dancing group that performs at ethnic fairs. I have met some of my closest friends through the Lithuanian school I attend, and the girls are gorgeous. Finally since almost no one knows Lithuanian, those who do share a certain bond, even if you’ve never met someone, you can always kid around with each other in Lithuanian.”

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I Am

A Generation of Proud Individuals I Am a Girl Scout

Fiona Hayes, Sophomore, loves being a Girl Scout. “I’ve been a Girl Scout for nine years. My favorite part of Girl Scouts is meeting new people and camping. I’m proud to be a Girl Scout. It helps me make better choices and be more outgoing. I sell Girl Scout cookies every year. Through it all, I have made new friends and I currently help run a camp during the summer for younger Girl Scouts.”

I Am Mormon

Charlie Deakins, Junior, celebrates his religious background. “I love being Mormon because it defines who I am as a person, and because of my integrity, people respect me. There are a lot of unique things about my religion, but perhaps [the most is] going on a Mission next year. It has shaped my identity by causing me to have a different understanding of life. I would live way differently if I hadn’t been brought up and accepted my religion. I am beyond proud to be a Mormon, because it has raised me and taught me to avoid situations that might otherwise be destructive to my spirit. To be Mormon, to me, means to be part of a select and righteous few that represent the charity Christ himself exemplified to others at his time.”

I Am a Survivor

Byanka Alzaga, Sophomore, survived a traumatic house robbery. “They broke in on New Years Eve a couple years ago. I was home alone because I didn’t want to go to the store with my mom and decided to sleep in. When I heard them break in, I hid in the closet. I heard my dogs barking while I was in the closet and later on we inferred that they had been pepper sprayed. The rooms were a mess: clothes and shoes were thrown everywhere. Three police cars came after and I was asked a few questions. And to this day I see police cars patrolling the area where I live in because of the incident. [When asked how the experience changed her Byanka said] I was and still am not so trusting around people I know because it was scary. You don’t realize your life can end in a matter of seconds. I learned to enjoy life and not take anything or anyone for granted. I am proud of saying I survived and was able to get to my senses and that I was able to react fast to what was happening around me and that I didn’t try anything stupid when I heard them break in.”

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Marcus Stewart: ND Alum & Fashion Expert By Grace McKagan

At Notre Dame, we are given so many opportunities, including the chance to excel at them. Whether you want to be a surgeon, an anchor, or an architect, the choice is yours. Former Notre Dame student, Marcus Stewart, worked his way to the top of the high fashion business, starting from a young age of fifteen. You may recognize him from the Bravo’s hit TV series, “Dukes of Melrose”. The show revolves around the world-famous vintage boutique, Decades, which has pieces ranging from Chanel to HERMES. The buyers at the shop travel around the world, searching for key wardrobe pieces that are truly one of a kind. Today, Marcus Stewart is also a stylist to many celebrities and high-end socialites, including PJ Morton, the keyboardist for Maroon 5. Stewart grew up in New Orleans along with his family. “I always had an interest in the fashion industry starting from a very young age. But originally, I worked as a model and actor, but I was always around fashion,” exclaimed Stewart. The soon to be fashion mogul’s dad instilled a go-getter attitude in Marcus at a very young age. When Marcus was given his first car at the age fifteen, he had the responsibility of paying for his own gas, prompting him to obtain a job at a local boutique. He worked as a model greeter and by the time he was only sixteen, he worked his way up to being head of the women’s shoe and men’s clothing-buying department! When hurricane Katrina struck his hometown, Marcus moved to Los Angeles his Senior year and lived with a local family, who he still remains close with to this day. Marcus planned on attending F.I.D.M. (Fashion Institute of Design and Merchandise) for college, so he figured why not take a chance and start his life

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in Los Angeles early? This is when he transferred to the Notre Dame community as a Senior. Here, he worked on TV Production and shared the position of class president. “I wasn’t scared to move to L.A, until I actually got to the airport. I felt like I was in a movie, each step closer towards my plane, the sadder I got for leaving. This was the only time I really cried during the whole Katrina process,” said Marcus. By the age of merely seventeen, Stewart landed a job at the selective Dolce and Gabbana retail store. Stewart explained

“I ALSO GET OPPORTUNITIES TO TRAVEL THE WORLD, SEARCHING FOR GREAT PIECES. MY LIFE IS DIFFERENT EVERY DAY. IT’S GREAT. I’M TRULY BLESSED.” how every time he passed by the highend store, he dropped off his résumé and asked if there were any positions available. Eventually, he landed the dream job. After working at Dolce and Gabbana for one year, Marcus moved onward to work for sacred Blue Denim as the International Sales Representative. He then landed the most coveted job as a paid Fashion Intern at the world renowned Vogue Magazine at only eighteen. He became close friends with the fashion extraordinary, Andre Leon Talley and also began freelancing as a stylist assistant at magazines such as GQ, Lucky, Teen Vogue, Men’s Vogue, and Vanity Fair Italia. After about a year, Marcus decided that he did not want to devote all of his time to the magazine world. He however, had enjoyed the styling aspect of it. Being the jet setter that he is, Marcus decided

on a whim to move across country to New York City. It is there that he landed his role as the East Coast Buyer and Trunk Show Coordinator at the prelove consignment sanctuary known as Decades “People come to me, and hear about me through the grape vine, when they want to sell their high end clothing pieces. It’s a word of mouth business, it’s all about reputation and image, but I love to interact with people and look through their closets and hear the extravagant shopping and society stories. I also get opportunities to travel the world, searching for great pieces, my life is different every day, it’s great, I’m truly blessed,” explained Stewart. Recently, the Decades store in Los Angeles began a reality Television series on the popular network, Bravo. It was not until last minute that the producers asked Marcus to become part of the show, so, Marcus temporarily packed his bags to the Los Angeles location, and began production. Stewart admits he was nervous; however, once the cameras finally turned on, he felt confident and felt like he was at home again, like no one was even there. He discovered that now, the next step for him, is to work on fulfilling his dreams of becoming a familiar face in the television world. “I would love to break into the TV Hosting world; the bottom line is I’m a man for the people and I love the energy that a TV set offers, so I would love to venture over to that side of Fashion and Entertainment.” His ideal goal now is to create a daytime show, making over everyday women and helping to improve them from the inside out! Marcus said, “Every woman deserves to smile, women do so much for the world, and my mother is my best friend so it’s my goal to create happy women all over the world, she is my inspiration.”


Guess What I’m Doing This Summer!

By Grace McKagan

Everyone’s favorite time of year is approaching again…summer break! The 2012-2013 school year is quickly coming to an end and the clock is ticking towards warmer weather and beaches. Summer break is a time for teenagers and teachers to relax, travel, enjoy time with friends, and maybe do something a little out of the ordinary like this few Notre Dame students and teachers. Take a guess at who is doing what this break...

Take a guess at who is doing what this summer....

6

1

2 Mr. Curiel

Mr. Bissell Match each description (letter) to the right individual (number): A) “The first day of summer vacation I’m marrying the love of my life. We are gonna have a honey moon and go up to Mammoth and rent a cabin up there for the week. We are gonna go horse back riding and fly fishing. For the rest of the summer, Ill be here because of football and the summer camps.” E)”This summer I’m taking the Water Polo team to Barcelona for the first two weeks of August. Summer will consist of practicing for hours a day, and every weekend we will have tournmanets. I am also going to be working on preparing a new sailing team for next year.”

4

August McCabe, Junior

Derek Kraemer, Freshman

3

Mike Little, Sophomore

Analisa Blancarte, Senior

B) “This summer I will be spending a lot of time with friends and family. I’m also going to be working to build my career up as a freelance makeup artist. I’m going to start networking, and I’ve already started doing that by using social media, like Facebook, Instagram, and other tools in media.”

C) “This summer I’m planning on doing physical therapy and working on getting my knee better for the football season. I tore my meniscus in December by running a route during football practice and I made a cut and it just tore.This summer I’m most looking forward to being with the football team and not being at school.”

D) “This summer I’m planning on getting a job at my aunts law office. Basically what I do there is file, I do a lot of filing. This will be my second year working there.”

F) “I’m going with my brother to look at colleges upstate. I’m most looking forward to seeing Oregon College. I’m looking mostly for my brother, but I’m also going to get the feel of the colleges he sees.”

Answer Key: A-5; B-3; C-1; D-2; E-6; F-4

5

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Baseball Parents Show Their Love

By Tory Martinez, Guest Writer

Baseball: America’s pastime- a game watched by many and loved by all. With so many who love the game, how many are actually willing to support the livelihood of such a traditional sport? Notre Dame High School’s baseball program is considered to be one of the best. This not only includes the team, but also the parents behind it. The baseball program is a close-knit team with a ton of support from their families. Varsity head coach, Mr. Dill, feels that the parents of the players are a “great group of people [that] do all kinds of things [to support the players]”. This includes schedualing, donating food, and barbequing at double headers. Notre Dame’s baseball families work well with the coaches and also each other. “Anytime we need something, they get it done,” said Coach Dill. In times of emergencies, Dill stated that the parents “really do their best.” Just last week when a player was seriously injured and hospitalized, parents rallied together to get meals for the player’s family. They sup-

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ported him and sent many gifts. Parent participation extends to not only the Varsity team, but also the Junior Varsity and the Freshman teams. Head parent, Mrs. Muno, has been very involved with the program for four years. She assists Coach Dill with notifying parents on schedule changes and organizing events. Events range from barbeques to the alumni game in the beginning of the season. Muno gets all the parents involved

whether it is working the silent auction at the alumni game or cooking up food at doubleheaders. Alumni also come out and support the teams. Muno explained that “past players that are still playing come in their off season to talk and workout with the kids.” Chris Dickerson, a player for the Baltimore Orioles and a Notre Dame alum, is a big help. He took the boys out to watch the Angels v. Orioles in Anaheim and was also kind enough to give them hats, bats, and take photos with them. Players appreciate the hard work that their parents put in, whether it is all the events or just going to the games. Senior pitcher, Michael Knopf said, “It is a really nice help, not just from my parents but from all of the parents. It’s good for the team to have that kind of encouragement behind us.” All in all, Notre Dame’s baseball program would not be what it is today without the support of all the participatory parents who get involved by helping and offering encouragement.


WHAT I WISH I KNEW FRESHMAN YEAR

By Tiffany Langerstorm, Guest Writer

We all remember our first day at Notre Dame High School. Some students reminisce about the simpler times, while other students cringe when they think of their embarrassing moments. Freshman Year is an opportunity to discover new interests and strengthen existing passions. It is also a year to discover what you dislike or what you never want to try again. Here are a few things I wish I knew as a Freshman. 1. Be open to new ideas and different types of people. High School is a chance to learn different ideas inside and outside the classroom. Notre Dame is filled with different cultures, stories and backgrounds. Try to make new friends with different types of people. This will widen your perspectives and can give you long lasting friendships that may may have never experienced before. 2. Go to FroshBox! My friends and I still joke about that night. My FroshBox date and I are still good friends. Just go, this is the only High School dance offered exclusively for Freshman. Enjoy it! 3. Try a new extra curricular activity. At Notre Dame you have endless opportunities. So try something new! Try to learn an instrument or pick up a new sport. Who knows you may be an expert debater or a fantastic actor or actress? 4. You don’t need to wait outside your class fifteen minutes early. Trust me, you have time to go to your locker and talk with your friends. Waiting outside your class only hinders the great conversations and laughter you could share with your peers.

5. There are worse things in life than finals week. Work hard, but keep things in perspective. 6. Ditch the colored eye liner, please. Don’t cake on foundation. Don’t overdo the blue eye shadow. Your Sophomore self will thank you. 7. Do your service hours now, don’t wait. Seniors are only allowed free dress on Fridays if they have completed their Freshman, Sophomore, and Junior hours. I am so thankful I completed my hours but many of my friends have not and are struggling to complete over 50 hours in a month. Don’t put it off, do it now! 8. Regardless of what others may tell you, Freshman year counts! Work hard in all of your classes. You are developing good study skills and habits for the next few years. Go to X-Period and ask for help. If you don’t understand something, go to your teacher or to a student tutor from NHS. They are here to help you. 9. Enjoy this year. Don’t spend your time wishing you were older so you could drive or attend prom. Enjoy today, enjoy right now. Enjoy every class, every practice for the sport’s team, every conversation with your friends. In a few years it will all be over. As I’m sure many upperclassmen have informed you, the academics get tougher each year. Enjoy your life APfree! High School flies by, and as cliché as it sounds, you don’t want to miss it. Soon enough, you will be tossing your graduation cap in the air.

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Trying Out for Next Year’s Squad By Alex Stephenson, Guest Writer

Do you think you have what it takes to be a cheerleader? Well, think again. Little do people know how much hard work goes into cheer. It is no different here at Notre Dame, where the varsity cheerleaders are currently preparing for their tryouts that will take place on Sunday, April 28th in the gym. To be eligible to tryout, cheerleaders must have recommendation forms from seven teachers and must also fill out personal forms. In addition, they must attend “three clinics throughout the week to prepare and learn dances,” Lily Edwards, Junior Varsity cheerleader, explained. Edwards, a sophomore at ND, takes her cheerleading very seriously. Her process, as she puts it, is “stressful... definitely stressful.” For Edwards, there is a lot involved in preparing for tryouts. “We prepare together during the clinics but most of us prepare individually when we aren’t at the clinics. I practice at a dance studio once a week.” Edwards has been a dedicated tumbler for three years now and hopes that her past experience on JV cheer as well as her practice at home will help her save a spot on the team. Payton Hare, Sophomore, also will not go down without a fight... and fighting she is. Not only does Hare prepare at the clin-

ics with the other girls, but also practices outside. “I have private lessons at a dance studio to practice my routines.” Hare, a veteran from JV cheer, describes her process for the audition as “fun but stressful.” Hare said, “There are different routines each time, but we go over whatever we are going to do in the clinics.” That way, the cheerleaders know what to expect when they go in front of the judges for five to ten minutes each. Judges generally look for “knowledge of the routine, that the girls have memorized the dance and are able to perform it without assistance,” Courtney Kassakhian, cheer coach, explained. Judges are also looking for “...technique and ability. So, not only do [the cheerleaders] know what the movements are, but are they executing them correctly and cleanly. Then they are looking for performance quality. So, are they smiling? Do they have energy? Are they loud when they say the cheers?” Judging by the clinics, they are set and ready to go! Around 80 girls are trying out for the cheer team this year, but only around fourteen are actually selected for varsity. “We do not have a maximum or minimum. We really are looking for girls who have the ability to perform as part of the team,” Kassakhian said. Good luck to all girls trying out for the cheer team, break a leg!

“WE REALLY ARE LOOKING FOR GIRLS WHO HAVE THE ABILITY TO PERFORM AS PART OF THE TEAM.”

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Notre Dame Sports Year in Review By Nick Halaby

FALL

• • • • •

WINTER • • •

• • • •

The Boys Baseball team won more than 13 games this season. Highlights for them include their 10-7 win over Harvard Westlake and a 14-4 pounding of arch rival Crespi. Boys Golf had a great season, finishing with an 11-4 record. They got 3rd place in the first round of League Finals at Lakewood Golf Course which was a great accomplishment. The Girls Softball team won more than 10 games this year and had great wins over St. Bonaventure, Burroughs, and Louisville just to name a few. Highlights include their 3 win journey in the Desert Classic tournament. The Boys swim team finished with a 1-6 record. The boys worked hard and had some great wins, one of which included a win against Chaminade. The Girls swim team finished with a record of 2-5. The Girls did great in their win over Burroughs and Chaminade. The Boys Tennis team had a great year. They ended the regular season with a 3-11 record. Their wins included matches against Crespi and Braemar. The Track team had a great season this year. Their Highlights included wins over Crespi, Alemany and Chaminade. In the Arcadia invitational Khalfani Muhammad became the fastest High School Athlete in California with a 100 meters time of 10.46 seconds. The Girls Track team also did extremely well, beating Alemany, Chaminade and Louisville while also winning in the Mount Sac meet. The Boys Volleyball team finished with a 5-10 record and had many great moments, including their wins over El Camino and Harvard Westlake along with their win on the We Spike for We Spark night against Crespi.

This Year, the Football team had a great season which included highlights like their win in Ireland, their Four over time victory over the hated Crespi and their last minute win at home in the Playoffs. They finished the regular season with a record of 7 and 3 and won one game in the playoffs against Oaks Christian. The 2012 Cross country team had a great season which included many great meets and their second annual 5k in honor of Connor charity event. The Girls Golf team yet again had a great season and won CIF for the second straight year. The Girls also finished in the top 8 of the state for the third year in a row. They finished with a record of 10-1. The Girls Varsity Tennis team finished with a record of 5-7, which included many highlights like their wins over Chaminade, Alemany and Flintridge Sacred Heart. The Girls Varsity Volleyball team finished their great season with a record of 9-5 . They had some great wins and also advanced to the second round of CIF playoffs with a win over Bishop Amat. The Boys Water Polo team finished with a record of 3-10. Highlights of their exciting season include a win in the Conejo Valley Classic and a victory over Alemany.

SPRING •

• • • •

The Boys Basketball team had an exciting season this year , which included a win over Alemany at Alumany and two wins in the SFV invitational tournament. The fans of the team also created a new ND tradition, The Castle. The Girls varsity basketball team finished with a great record of 16-11. They advanced two rounds into the CIF playoffs with a win over Duarte High School. The Boys Soccer team had a fantastic season and finished with a record of 11-6. Their great year included their trip to playoffs . The Lady Knights soccer team finished with a record of 7-6-8 which included great wins over Louisville, Alemany and Malborough. The Girls Water-polo team had a fantastic year with a 17-9 record to show for it. They finished the year with a trip to playoffs.

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Images of the Year Around Notre Dame and the World By Nick Halaby

The Knight reviews the highlights of 2012-2013’s biggest stories from around the school, state, and nation. In 2012, President Barrack Obama was reelected as President of the United States. Students from Notre Dame went to Washington D.C to witness the inauguration. It is something that that will stay with those students for their entire lives.

Notre Dame Celebrated its 2012 Homecoming with a fun-filled spirit week, a gorgeous halftime fireworks show, and, of course, the dance, which was enjoyed by the entire student body.

Connor and Rory Smith were chosen to represent the United States by being a part of the national debate team. They are two of many who have represented Notre Dame in elite competitions of many fields in past years.

On December 14th, 2012, while Knights were preparing for finals, the nation was shook when Adam Lanza opened fire in Sandy Hook Elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut. More than twenty people were killed, and as a result police presence around schools increased, including Notre Dame.

Hurricane Sandy devastated many parts of the East Coast, including Notre Dame’s sister Holy Cross High school in Fleshing, New York. Clubs like the ND Grillers and Robo Knights had events to help give relief to our Holy Cross brothers and sisters.

Shortly before school began in August, the world celebrated the Olympics in London, England. Highlights of the world competition included outstanding performances from gymnast Gabby Douglas, swimmer Michael Phelps, and the U.S. Men’s Basketball Team.

The Notre Dame community and the entire country were devastated once again when two bombs went off in the Marathon at Boston in April. Three people were killed along with hundreds of others who were injured. One of the perpetrators was a man not much older than many of the students at Notre Dame, which showed that even people of our generation can commit acts of terror.

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The Knight Magazine May 2013 Issue  

The Knight Magazine May 2013 Issue

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