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St. Day Newsletter In this issue     

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Feast Dates Parish Council News Sunny days Lantern Procession Meet your Parish Councillors St. Day History Our Cornwall Councillor Diamond Jubilee Celebrations Not So “Silly Thoughts” Churches Notices Community School W.I. Copy d next i ate for ssue is 1st M ay

Issue no 37 February 2012 Published by St. Day Parish Council


St Day Parish Council Vacancy Sadly George Ross has had to resign from the Parish Council for family reasons and we now have a vacancy for a Parish Councillor. Unfortunately finding a new Parish Councillor is quite a slow process; we have to advertise the vacancy first of all and, provided 10 people do not ask for an election within a certain time limit, we can then advertise a casual vacancy and ask for people to apply for the position. If 10 people do demand an election then nominations have to be sought for the election and a public vote follows. Probably by the time you read this the first notice will have been posted and we shall know whether an election has been demanded or a casual vacancy has been called. Whichever is the outcome why not put yourself forward? There will be full information on what is happening in the process on the Parish Council notice board by the Town Clock or, alternatively, you can contact me – details below – and I’ll be happy to give you any information you require about what is involved in being a Parish Councillor. Steve Edwards, Parish Clerk. 01209 821829 stdaypc@gmail.com

St. Day Community Centre Located in the centre of the village for bookings and enquiries contact David or Hazel Beard on

01209 820929 2


To advertise in or contribute to this Newsletter Email

stdaynews@gmail.com

or send details to Newsletter, Cedric House, St.Day. TR165NQ Rates Full Page £16/issue or £60 for 4 issues ½ page £10/issue or £32 for 4 issues ¼ page £6/issue or £20 for 4 issues

Local community groups and clubs FREE We are happy to accept contributions either handwritten, typed or by email. Here are some points that will help us to produce the Newsletter quickly and efficiently. If you are not sure please ask!  Handwritten—please write clearly  Typed—double spaced is helpful  Email—please send contributions as attachments to your email as a word processor document, not in the body of the email.  Photographs—we need either the original picture (which will be returned) or the digital image sent as a separate file, not in the body of the document. If in doubt please ask for advice. 3


Community Litter Pick Saturday 25th February Meet in the back room of the Community Centre, West End at 10am

Please come along and help to tidy up St.Day

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Emlyn Stone Fabrications All types of Welding Aluminium, Cast Iron, Lead, Steel If you can’t buy it – We’ll make it

We Weld/Repair Anything from MOT Failures to Gates and Railings, Specialised Aluminium, Cast Iron and Brass etc.

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AIR DEAL AIR PRICE AMILY BUSINESS REE QUOTATIONS

For Free Quotation Phone Office: 01209 820990 Mobile 07767 792434 5


Sunny Days Nursery The pre-school room has been renovated and we have a new door to our outside area. This has meant that children can play outside more easily. During the dry autumn children took full advantage of this, although now it is wetter many choose to stay in more. Great that it’s warm though. We had expected to be exploring the cold weather and looking at ice and snow at this time of year. Our supply of wet weather gear, available for all our children and practitioners, including our youngest babies, means that the children can keep dry outside. At Sunny Days we realise the importance of being outdoors for both well being and learning. We make the use of our immediate space but also go on the field and around the village exploring. As we approached Christmas we made the usual Christmas cards and decorate the trees. We wrote to Father Christmas asking for a gift for someone we loved, as well as one for ourselves. Many of the children chose their Mum’s but some chose a best friend and one all her family. We also had an enjoyable Christmas party at St Day Chapel. The pre-school presented their nativity ‘a Christmas star’. This was supported by photographs of the children preparing for Christmas and acting out the story at Sunny Days. A large appreciative audience came to support us. We then had a traditional party for all our children with Father Christmas, lots of food and games. Noisy but fun. In the nursery room we are looking at how things move, including balloons, feathers and cars and clouds. Meanwhile in the pre-school we are exploring health and well being. We are looking at foods we eat and have turned our role play area into a gym. This is proving very popular. We are developing a range of story sacks to enhance children’s understanding and enjoyment of stories for all ages. If you would like to know more about this please pop in. If you would like to find out more about Sunny Days Nursery please contact Bobby or Rachel on 01209 281868 or call in. 6


St. Day Mid-Winter Lantern Procession 2012 Remember the procession last year?? Remember that March evening when lots of adults and youngsters paraded around St Day with their home-made lanterns, accompanied by Haylestorm Samba Band?? Remember how it got your feet tapping and cheered you up after that long, cold winter?? Remember the lovely scene with all of the lanterns along the avenue down to the Old Church?? Remember the lovely cake, hot soup and entertainment in the school hall afterwards?? Well the good news is - we shall be having another magical procession this year as it now seems to have become an annual event in the St. Day Calendar!! It really is about celebrating our community and bringing a little light, laughter, cake and entertainment to what can be a bit of a dismal time of year for many. If you would like to get involved, make a lantern to carry, help build a community lantern, if you have ideas, enthusiasm, like a chat, a cuppa and cake then please give us a call - we would love to hear from you. With your help we can make this year’s procession the best so far! You can contact Clare for details on 821684 or drop a card into No. 6 Church Street – she would love to hear from you. We also need help with stewarding so, if you can help out, please contact Steve Edwards on 821829 or at stdaypc@gmail.com 7


Meet your Parish Councillors Lesley Trotter When I was asked to write a bit about myself, I groaned - as a freelance researcher and writer, I am the last thing I want to write about! After an early career in London on science and medical publications, and later in business communications and multimedia design, my main client is now the Royal Forestry Society, whose magazine I edit. However, my real passion is finding out about the past and so I’m always delighted when clients ask me to do some work in archives or on heritage projects. In addition to freelance work, I have been studying down at Tremough. I recently finished an MA in Cornish Studies and have just started a full-time PhD with Exeter University researching what it was like for the 19th century wives who stayed behind in places like St Day when their husbands went abroad. We moved to St Day in 2004 when my late husband took up a post with Truro College, and I have been slowly (very slowly!) restoring the cottage and garden ever since. My son, Jamie, is a professional actor who works with the Maritime Museum and various local theatre companies, and I have a step-daughter in Oxfordshire. I haven’t been on the Parish Council very long but beforehand I was involved with the Mining Villages Festival, Action St Day, the ‘Walks from St Day’ booklet and the Parish Plan.

Do you have memories of St. Day in the past? We’d love to print your memories here in the Newsletter. If you’d like some help get them down on paper then get in touch. Call Nigel on 820441 or leave a message in the Post Office. 8


Sam James Plumbing and Heating • Heating Installed • Boilers Installed/Serviced • Outside taps fitted • Showers fitted

• Leaks Found and Repaired • Taps serviced/washers replaced • Hot water cylinders changed • Immersion Heaters changed

Living in Carharrack, I am fully qualified and insured. I aim to get to small local jobs within 3 days. So however large or small the job please ring me on

01209 820676 or 07896674084

Camborne and Redruth Live at Home Scheme have a weekly group for people over 60 years, Tuesdays 10am until midday. Refreshments, raffle, entertainment, crafts. Mills Hall Carharrack. Please phone Diane Bruford

01209 719062 for more details. 9


St.Day Launderette 10 Church Street, Tel. 01209 820280

Service Washes (Except Tuesdays and Sundays)

Double Loaders for Duvets etc. Monday to Saturday 8.30 to 7.00pm Sunday 9.00am to 2.00pm

Some dates for your diary at St. Day Methodist Church Monday 13th February Pop In 18th February Village Brunch 10am-1.00pm (see notice on page 53) 18th March Mothering Sunday 8th April Easter Sunday with Easter Breakfast 9.00, service 10.30 10


Second Monday of every month ‑ Pop In ‑ 11:00 am ‑ 1:00 pm ‑ A chance for a soup and sweet lunch, chat and fellowship. Tuesdays 2:30 pm ‑ 4:00 pm Bright Hour—a fellowship meeting for ladies and men. Wednesdays 4th Wednesday of the month 12 noon for 12.15 Luncheon Club 1st and 3rd Wednesday—(not in Dec.) Ray’s Bargain Bin 10.00-3.30pm Thursdays 10.15 am Coffee, Prayer and Bible Study Fridays 7:30 pm Fellowship & Bible Study at 5 Carew Road, St. Day Other special events are organized, details can be found on the Church door or notice board. Contacts Church services and activities Ralph Gilbert 821100 Junior Church – Steven Pomfret 07791950980 Hirings – Janet Homer 820881 11

The Methodist Church in St. Day warmly welcomes you to share with them in their events and activities. Methodism has been present in St. Day for many years. The Methodist Church and family seek to serve and follow Christ's teaching as a group of believers and individuals. We extend the love of God to all. Friendly fellowship, transport no problem, Comfortable surroundings, genuine love and support offered to all.


St. Day Historical & Conservation Society Eric Rabjohns, local historian and author, gave a brilliant presentation of the history of the Redruth & Chasewater Railway to St Day Historical and Conservation Society at Teyluva Children's Centre in St Day, after their AGM, in autumn 2011. At their AGM Chairperson Bernadette Fallon was re-elected, as was Secretary, Mark Johnson, whilst Joanne Laing was elected as Treasurer. January brought former miner and author Allen Buckley to lecture on Killifreth Mine and Early Mining at Chacewater, the title of his latest splendid book. Mr Buckley highlighted the main characteristic of Killifreth as being its typicality of the historical development and decline of the local tin-mining industry. Never mined to great depths, it averaged 150 feet, and used second-hand pumping engines. At its peak it employed some 280 miners, producing modest tonnages of ore and modest profits. Mining probably began here in the late mediaeval period with the earliest tin bounds recorded in a will from 1517, suggesting mining was already well-established. Thereafter there are continuous references to tin-mining in this district; the ore lay at shallow depth throughout Killifreth Woods, and an examination of these and Unity Woods today reveals the extent to which the surface has been turned over in the historical search for tin. Large cassiterite crystals, the native ore of tin, were always a feature of the workings here, and fine specimens have been recovered by geologists in recent years. The mediaeval and Tudor periods were anarchic ones in Cornish tin-mining, with many unscrupulous adventurers invading tin-works to steal the produce. This was probably the cause of the violence recorded in 1517 at Killifreth, when the rightful occupier had to flee into the adjacent woods for her own safety from the unlawful intrusions into her workings of two Truro businessmen and brothers, William and Stephen Langhar, the latter of whom was a Kenwyn constable notorious for his violence. Already having stabbed to death one William Hoskin for refusing to leave a public house and assist him, he, together with his brother and Thomas (Continued on page 14)

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ST DAY HISTORICAL AND CONSERVATION SOCIETY

Forthcoming Events

Wednesday 15th February at 7.30 p.m. CAERHAYS CASTLE AND ITS ASTONISHING HISTORY AND ECCENTRIC OWNERS, an illustrated talk by Stephen Tyrrell Wednesday 14th March at 7.30 p.m SIR RICHARD CAREW; a look at Cornwall through the eyes of this fascinating 16th.c. gentleman, an illustrated talk by Carole Vivian. Wednesday 11th April at 7.30 p.m. THE EARLY SETTLEMENT AND MEDIAEVAL CHAPEL OF ST DAY; some potentially exciting new discoveries - an illustrated talk by Paul Annear and Lesley Trotter. We meet at Teyluva Children's Centre, opposite St Day School, and all are welcome. Members free, non-members £1 (Society membership is £4 per year.)

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(Continued from page 12) Tregian and John Tregyan, both merchants, assembled in 1517 with their servants and others, naked swords at the ready, with the intention of going to Killifreth to murder Phelippa Carmynowe and her servants, but who being forewarned were able to escape in time with their lives.

The extent of Killifreth, historically, included the woods on the west, and a large part of the country between the woods and Creegbrawse Mine (where legend has it that Joseph of Arimathea came with the Christ child to trade tin,) and the areas known as Salem, Wheal Busy and Wheal Daniel. Mining records form a continuous series during the seventeenth century, revealing that Killifreth's location, like that of most Cornish mines, did not cover a specific, limited area, working different parts of the sett at different times, sometimes confined to the north-east corner, nearest to Wheal Busy, other times stretching past Hawkes Shaft to the west, or only working the northern part of Killifreth Woods. E R Bawden wrote in 1929 that Killifreth Mine 'was bounded on the north by Great Wheal Busy, on the south by Wheal Unity Wood Mine, on the west by the Gwennap-Kenwyn parish boundary, and on the east by a line running through the western side of Chacewater.' By the 1790s water drainage was facilitated by the County Adit, which had been driven into Wheal Union from Wheal Unity, via North Unity, with branches, one going west, starting just north of Davys Shaft, and one driven a long way eastwards from Trefusis towards Zion Chapel on Cox Hill. For the second half of the 19th century Killifreth was drained by means of the main branch of the County Adit through Wheal Unity and Poldice. The mine's fluctuating fortunes saw considerable quantities of tin mined between 1809 and 1823, whilst Dines states it was worked for copper between 1826 and 1860. Booms and slumps followed the typical Cornish pattern, with a sudden boom between 1870 and 1874 followed by an unexpected slump. During the 1880s it briefly occupied the list of top tin producers in Cornwall, averaging 151 tons of black tin a year during 1884-88. The end of workings came in August 1914 with the outbreak of the Great War, which was also preceded by a dramatic fall in the price of tin. The impressive remnants of several of Killifreth's engine houses remain today.

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The family concern that cares 15


St. Day Feast 2012 A few advance dates for your diaries Sunday 10th June—Songs of Praise at Methodist Church Tues 12th June Bingo at the Community Centre 7.30 pm Weds 13 th June Street Fair Market Sq at 7.00pm Sun 17th June Church Service Mass at 9.30 am Sun 17th June Church Concert Nankersey Male Voice Choir at 7.30pm Mon 18th June Feast Day procession leave School 2 p m to the playing field. Mon 18th June Feast Street Dances at 6.30 children's 7.15 adult’s dance. All those taking part in the Feast dances must adhere to our dress code, and attend at least one dance practice evening, dates of evenings will be announced later.

The Enterprise All Stars Bowls Club The Enterprise All Stars Bowls Club meets at the Enterprise Centre, Vogue and has approximately 28 members, the majority of whom are St Day residents with one or two from neighbouring villages. The club meets weekly during the summer on a Tuesday and twice a week in the winter on Tuesday and Friday from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. It is a very friendly club where age and ability is immaterial, one member for instance is registered severally sight impaired/blind Bowls are played from 2 till 3, then a break for a cup of tea and a biscuit before recommencing play again until 4 pm 16


A message from the Police and St Day Parish Council We are sure everyone is very aware of the tragic accident which took place at Greenbank just before Christmas when a young resident of St Day was unfortunately hit by a vehicle and killed whilst walking back from Redruth. We are equally sure that everyone was shocked and saddened when they heard the news. The St Day to Redruth road and the B3298 from Scorrier through Tolgullow are both very dangerous roads in our parish and we are very concerned that people should not walk along them unless it is absolutely unavoidable and even then there are alternatives. Much of the B3298 has the Coast to Coast cycle path running alongside it and this is a far safer route than walking along this busy road. Equally there is a much better alternative to the main St Day to Redruth road – the bottom road, which starts at Greenbank and comes out at Lower Ninnis, via footpath no 5, seldom has much traffic on it and is really no further. Both of these options are much safer routes and we urge everyone to use them if you have to walk to or from Scorrier or Redruth. (See road maps attached to this article). Whenever you are out walking along any road please also consider the following: Do you have to walk along this road – is there really no safer alternative? Are you walking on the correct side of the road, facing the oncoming traffic? Are you wearing bright clothing – essential at all times – and carrying a torch if it isn’t broad daylight? (Continued on page 18)

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(Continued from page 17)

And also, if you’re going to Redruth for an evening out, please arrange a lift back or get a taxi. Please don’t walk along the St Day to Redruth road in the dark, hoping someone will pick you up. It is a very dangerous road at the best of times for pedestrians, but especially in the dark. One last plea to parents – please discuss this with your children and make sure they are aware of the dangers and how best to avoid them.

Scorrier/Tolgullow Route

Redruth to St. Day route

And one last plea to drivers – please remember how dangerous these roads are and don’t drive fast along them and please look out for cyclists and pedestrians. 18


ADVANCE

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Tony Moyle Funeral Director 23, Trewirgie Hill, Redruth TR15 2TB 24 Hour Service Private Chapel of Rest Pre-payment

Tel. 01209 214883 www.tonymoylefunerals.co.uk 19


CORNWALL ENQUIRY AND INFORMATION SERVICE Unit 17, Threemilestone Industrial Estate, Truro TR4 9LD Freephone: 0800 032 2345 (or 01872 272702) E-mail: enquirycentre@cornwall.gov.uk Live Chat: Ask a librarian and get an answer live from the Libraries front page of the Cornwall Council website at www.cornwall.gov.uk Opening hours: Monday - Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm Cornwall Enquiry and Information Service is part of Cornwall Libraries, and is accessible to everyone. You don’t need to be a library member to use it. Whatever the nature of your enquiry, ring free of charge, e-mail, write to us or use “live chat” and we will provide an answer. You might want: 

a contact for a local club or evening class



an obscure piece of historical information which you can’t find online



a section from an Act of Parliament, or access to legal cases



a residential or business phone number from anywhere in the country



help with finding out how to get grant funding for an individual or group



to find help with tackling a consumer problem



to know how to borrow a book not in Cornwall stock

The Enquiry and Information Service is here to help you, and the service is free. We only charge for printing and postage, if required. We have a team of information professionals dedicated to finding an answer to your enquiry. Where we don’t have the information ourselves, we will always try to direct you to someone who does.

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News from St Day, St Day Historical & Conservation Society 23 January 2012. rd

Eric Rabjohns, local historian and author, gave a brilliant presentation of the history of the Redruth & Chasewater Railway to St Day Historical and Conservation Society at Teyluva Children's Centre in St Day, after their AGM, in autumn 2011. At their AGM Chairperson Bernadette Fallon was re-elected, as was Secretary, Mark Johnson, whilst Joanne Laing was elected as Treasurer. January brought former miner and author Allen Buckley to lecture on Killifreth Mine and Early Mining at Chacewater, the title of his latest splendid book. Mr Buckley highlighted the main characteristic of Killifreth as being its typicality of the historical development and decline of the local tin-mining industry. Never mined to great depths, it averaged 150 feet, and used second-hand pumping engines. At its peak it employed some 280 miners, producing modest tonnages of ore and modest profits. Mining probably began here in the late mediaeval period with the earliest tin bounds recorded in a will from 1517, suggesting mining was already well-established. Thereafter there are continuous references to tin-mining in this district; the ore lay at shallow depth throughout Killifreth Woods, and an examination of these and Unity Woods today reveals the extent to which the surface has been turned over in the historical search for tin. Large cassiterite crystals, the native ore of tin, were always a feature of the workings here, and fine specimens have been recovered by geologists in recent years. The mediaeval and Tudor periods were anarchic ones in Cornish tin-mining, with many unscrupulous adventurers invading tin-works to steal the produce. This was probably the cause of the violence recorded in 1517 at Killifreth, when the rightful occupier had to flee into the adjacent woods for her own safety from the unlawful intrusions into her workings of two Truro businessmen and brothers, William and Stephen Langhar, the latter of whom was a Kenwyn constable notorious for his violence. Already having stabbed to death one William Hoskin for refusing to leave a public house and assist him, he, together with his brother and Thomas Tregian and John Tregyan, both merchants, assembled in 1517 with their servants and others, naked swords at the ready, with the intention of going to Killifreth to murder Phelippa Carmynowe and her servants, but who being forewarned were able to escape in time with their lives. The extent of Killifreth, historically, included the woods on the west, and a large part of the country between the woods and Creegbrawse Mine (where legend has it that Joseph of Arimathea came with the Christ child to trade tin,) and the areas known as Salem, Wheal Busy and Wheal Daniel. (Continued on page 23)

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(Continued from page 22) Mining records form a continuous series during the seventeenth century, revealing that Killifreth's location, like that of most Cornish mines, did not cover a specific, limited area, working different parts of the sett at different times, sometimes confined to the north-east corner, nearest to Wheal Busy, other times stretching past Hawkes Shaft to the west, or only working the northern part of Killifreth Woods. E R Bawden wrote in 1929 that Killifreth Mine 'was bounded on the north by Great Wheal Busy, on the south by Wheal Unity Wood Mine, on the west by the Gwennap-Kenwyn parish boundary, and on the east by a line running through the western side of Chacewater.' By the 1790s water drainage was facilitated by the County Adit, which had been driven into Wheal Union from Wheal Unity, via North Unity, with branches, one going west,

This space or a bigger one could have advertised your group or clubs events— but nobody told us! Read on to find out how to get your group advertised for FREE! 23


We love to be indoors or explore outside Our friendly nursery welcomes children from birth to 4 years. Contact Bobby or Rachel on 01209821868 fpr details and look

a

St. Day Charity No. 1028488 Ofsted 102860

Queen’s Diamond Jubilee There will be a Public Open Meeting on Monday 27th February at 7pm in the main room of St Day Community Centre, West End to discuss celebrations in St Day for the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee. If you feel that there should be a street party or any other form of celebration on June 3rd or 4th then please come along and be prepared to lend a hand to organise the event. If you would like to help but cannot attend the meeting, please let any member of the Parish Council know and we will add your name to the list! 24


W.I. Already a month into the New Year, the tinsel tucked away, the tree recycled and hopefully we have recovered fron the goodies we enjoyed over Christmas. Since my last report we have had a quiz evening, much laughter,conferring and, dare I say, some cheating, definately not Mastermind. December we held the Christmas party , a great success , attended by about 60 members and guests. We raised th roof as we sang along to the Cutlers, refuelling mid evening from the lavish buffet. January's speaker was David Chapman, a well known local wildlife photographer. He showed us some of his work whilst entertaining us with the tricks he employs to get that one perfect shot. Quite often this involves him getting covered in mud and soaked to the skin. The beautiful pictures are testimony to hours of patience and skill. Looking ahead to the coming few months. February - General meeting and election of officers. No speaker March -

Health and Beauty with Amanda Barlow

April -

Keep Fit with Jackie

May -

Cornish Evening, members may invite guests.

We are holding a BACON BUTTY morning on March 24th Supporting the Phoenix Stroke appeal and LIving At Home. Please put this date on your calendars, come along and help these worthwhile causes plus have a cuppa and a chat. Meetings held 2nd Wednesday of each month at 7.00pm in the Church hall. Come and see us, you will be made very welcome.

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The ‘Oil Club’ helps more people save on their fuel bills Please place your orders for March delivery as soon as possible please, Residents are saving money on heating oil by having deliveries on the same day each month. By using an independent local supplier we benefited during the last winter by getting excellent service. To join in and save on your oil costs you need to order through Nigel Knight on 820441. You can also order online by emailing your details and order to stdayoilclub@gmail.com. In order to receive a discount you must place your order with Nigel, please do not phone our supplier direct, this could result in you getting a double delivery!

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Bernard Williams & Son N.A.F.D.

FAMILY FUNERAL DIRECTOR S

COMPLETE FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS PRE-PAYMENT PLANS AVAILABLE

For peace of mind ring REDRUTH (01209) 315060 28


Not so “Silly thoughts”! We have had a response to our request for “Silly Thoughts” The first from Geoff Fairman says: Hi there, Rather than throw way immaculate bottles of beer from our local breweries into the recycling bin after only a single pouring, would it not be better to set up some sort of system to get undamaged bottles back to the breweries? maybe return them to a local shop or have a special section at the recycling centre for the delivery drivers to pick up while they deliver. If this proves economic then the breweries could offer incentives to participants in this scheme which in turn would encourage people to buy more locally. I am thinking of the likes of St.Austell Ales, Sharps,Skinners, Wooden Hand, Lizard Brewery, Keltek et al. Cheers, Geoff Some of us are old enough to remember when pop companies and breweries did collect their bottles in exchange for a deposit! Who remembers the Corona Lorry? Did Jollys do the same?

Another email about Memories

We haven't lived in the village very long, just over 2 years, and when your St. Day News letter asked for memories, my wife and I and I’m sure other people often wonder what all the shops sold that are now converted to houses. Perhaps an evening with some of the older St. Day born & bred residents giving an informal recollection of how the village used to be would be a nice idea. I am sure the Comunity Centre would be the ideal venue and the WI selling tea & biscuits would make a lovely evening. Thanks, Glyn & Angela

I hope that both the Community Centre Committee and the WI and perhaps the Feast Committee will pick up on this—I agree the Community Centre would be an ideal venue for such an evening! Watch this space! 29


LOWER POLDICE COTTAGE Established 1983

Lower Poldice, St. Day TR16 5PP We offer good, old fashioned hospitality in comfortable surroundings and good food

En-suite rooms available. Off road parking, Full central heating. Internet connection Brochure available

Proprietor: Mrs Janet Ricketts Tel. 01209 820438 www.lowerpoldicecottage.co.uk 30


St Day & Carharrack Community School Since the last magazine we have celebrated the wonderful season of Christmas. This year we really found what the community part of our name stands for as most of our celebrations involved the whole of our community. We started our celebrations by taking part in the City of Lights parade in Truro. This was quickly followed by our Christmas Fayre where a splendid afternoon was had by all. The funds raised have been used to buy photography equipment for each class. Our next engagement was in Carharrack where the school choir joined with Carharrack band for an evening of music and carols. We had Christmas lunch and were joined by the senior residents of St Day & Carharrack, this was followed by carols and cake in the afternoon, when the school choir entertained everyone with a medley of Christmas music. David Taylor from Yr6 did a reading in Holy Trinity Church’s 9 Lessons and Carols. Next day saw two splendid performances in the Parish Church of our Christmas play, in which every pupil in the school took part. We raised a goodly sum for Shelterbox and the Merryn Thomas Trust. The term ended with an aerial visit from Fr Christmas who forsook his sleigh in favour of a Sea King helicopter, a visit to the pantomime in Truro and of course the traditional Christmas parties. So as you can see we did live up to the Community part of our school name.

Copy date for the next issue is 1st May 2012 31


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Do you know anyone who would like to read the Newsletter in larger print? Please get in touch with Nigel on 820441

Grant Funding Are you the Treasurer/Secretary or Chairperson of a local club or organisation?  Does your club or organisation need funding for a particular scheme? Do you know of an individual who is trying to raise funds for a particular cause or project? If you can answer ‘yes’ to any of these questions then it could be your lucky day! A local grant fund has funds available for distribution to worthy causes in St Day. For further information please contact Steve Edwards on 821829 or at kinsmans.barns@ gmail.com 

Holiday Villa in Cyprus Available to rent all the year round Just 3 minutes from the beach

www.cyprus-villa.info 01209 820441 33


Letter from the local police The Police would like to warn residents about the dangers of walking along the roads leading into St Day, especially at night. We would especially like to highlight the St Day - Redruth road as it poses a real danger to pedestrians walking back to the village. We would like to urge people to think twice before making the journey on foot during the hours of darkness. The road is fast and narrow in places and there is no street lighting, making visibility difficult. We would advise that if the journey is necessary then always wear items of reflective clothing or carry a torch, no matter how short your journey, and walk facing the direction of oncoming traffic. Better still would be to find an alternative route or arrange a lift or taxi. Stuart Church PC 6976 Neighbourhood Beat Manager Redruth South and Villages Redruth Police Station

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Parish Council News The Parish Council normally meets on the second Monday of each month, (except in August), at 7:00pm in the Community Room in Mills St.. The meetings are open to the public (unless an item has to be taken in private) and agenda item 3 is always for public participation (limited to 15 minutes). It is sometimes necessary to arrange extra meetings, often concerning planning applications. Notices of all the meetings are displayed on the notice board at least 3 days before a meeting. Minutes of meetings are displayed on the notice board and also on our web site www.stday.org Parish Councillors Pippa Bray 820446 Bobby Dyer 820021 Geoff Nankivell 820201 John Newcombe 820841 Steve Penny 820774 Lesley Trotter 820733 Vacancy Clerk to Parish Council Steve Edwards 821829 Cornwall Councillor Mark Kaczmarek 211366 Please note the Parish Council now meets in the Community Room at the bottom of Mills Street. There is car parking available in Barracks Lane. Resignation It is with regret that we have to record the resignation of George Ross due to health problems. George took a particular interest in problems with public transport, and his input to meetings will be missed. Vacancy Due to the resignation of George Ross there is a vacancy on the Parish Council, anyone who is interested in filling the vacancy should look on the Parish Council notice board for further details. The Queen’s Diamond Jubilee The Lord Lieutenant of Cornwall, Edward Bolitho has written drawing our attention to two nation wide events in which everybody is invited to participate.. The Big Lunch on Sunday 3rd June, which is being led by the Eden Project, and the Jubilee Beacons being lit on the evening of Monday 4th June. More details are available on http://www.thebiglunch.com and http://www.diamondjubileebeacons.co.uk Groups who are interested in organising these or any other form of celebrations may be able to get financial help with event insurance, marquee hire, equipment hire, supplies and entertainment and other community celebration related costs from The Cornwall Community Foundation. Guidelines and application forms are available from their website http:/www.cornwallfoundation.com The Woodland Trust is offering tree planting for communities to celebrate the (Continued on page 36)

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(Continued from page 35) Jubilee http://www.woodlandtrust.org.uk/en/jubilee-woods/getinvolved/Pages/community-tree-packs.aspx For other opportunities, you can try the Fields in Trust http://www.qe2fields.com/ and also the Sita Trust funds http://www.sitatrust.org.uk/projects/qe2fields. The Parish Council proposes holding a public meeting to discuss possible celebrations on Monday 27th February in the Community Centre at 7pm. Cornwall Community Banking is a not-for-profit, financial co-operative that offers current accounts, savings accounts and loans to people who live and/or work in Cornwall. Started in 2000 and supported by volunteers and a small professional staff, CCB has recently enjoyed significant growth as more people become aware of the benefits of joining a Cornish social enterprise. Regulated by the FSA and the Financial Services Compensation Scheme, money placed with the CCB is as safe as any high street bank or building society. When people save with the CCB it opens up the opportunity to borrow against savings at competitive rates, helping people on low incomes to avoid the risks of doorstep lenders. Their nearest office is 11a Frances Street, Truro TR1 3DN Tel 0800 055 6873 Roads The Parish Council has been successful in getting Cornwall Council to repair Trefula Hill (a further surface dressing is scheduled here for 2012), and continues to press for repairs to other potholes. Since most of the road from St.Day to Chacewater is not in our parish we have asked Chacewater Parish Council to press for repair work to be carried out, as it is widely used by our residents to travel to Truro. Mineral Tramways Trails The Mining Villages Regeneration Group has been successful in getting funding to encourage walkers and cyclists to venture off the main routes and into the villages which hopefully will bring trade to local businesses and may encourage more residents to use the trails. Routes will be signposted and a website created. Bus Services Cornwall Council has notified operators of subsidised services that the existing contracts will be terminated at the end of March. The Council is trying to get a bus stop sign at Vogue for buses coming from Redruth as at the moment it is unclear where the bus will stop The Town Clock. The Parish Council asked 4 builders to quote for the renovation work and despite all 4 saying they were interested only 1 has submitted prices. However potential funders require a number of quotations before they will consider an application and we are finding it difficult to find suitable contractors who are willing to carry out the work. Affordable Housing Sanctuary Housing held a consultation in November, which attracted considerable interest from objectors and supporters of the scheme at the end of Chyrose Road. Unfortunately the November issue of the newsletter advertising the event was delayed in printing so was not available until after the consultation. At the time of going to print the Parish Council has not seen a planning application for the site. If there is an application both sup(Continued on page 39) 36


Scorrier Christian Fellowship

SCORRIER CHAPEL (Opposite the Crossroads Lodge) ARRANGES THE FOLLOWING MEETINGS EACH SUNDAY Morning Meeting 10.00am Prayer Meeting 6.30pm Evening Meeting 7.00pm For further information please contact Tim Jenkin 01209 899009 and visit our website www.scf.org 37


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(Continued from page 36) porters and objectors to the scheme are advised to make their views known to the Planning Dept at Cornwall Council. Core Strategy Cornwall Council is in the process of preparing its Core Strategy for the next 20 years and is consulting local councils and the public until the 2nd March. It mainly covers the provision of housing and the services required by the rising population. In the Camborne Redruth Network Area it foresees a need for 6,500 houses in the urban area and 500 houses in the larger villages. As far as the villages are concerned this rate of growth is little higher than has been seen in the last 20 years. An officer of Cornwall Council has toured St.Day with members of the Parish Council looking at various sites. It is not expected that many of the sites visited will be developed, indeed it will depend on the willingness of the owners to sell the land and in the case of affordable housing the developers being able to obtain government funding. Councillors were able to stress the need for car parking provision with any proposal. Litter There will be a Litter Pick around St.Day on Saturday 25th February, meeting at the Community centre at 10am Please come along and help to keep the area around the centre of St.Day tidy. It is noticeable on Mondays that a number of black bags have been ripped open and some of the contents scattered around making an untidy mess for our street cleaner to clean up if it is within his cleaning area. Please ensure that any food waste is well wrapped in the bags and that there are no loose papers to blow around, particularly on recycling daysl Police, The police report low numbers of calls from the public, and a very low incidence of crime in the parish. Residents should report all incidents as this determines the level of policing in the parish. To contact the police for emergencies call 999 for non-emergencies call 101 (the new number ) to contact the local team leave a message on 202324 Chairman John Newcombe 820841 Clerk Steve Edwards 821829

Do you neeD help in setting out your advertisement or other entry. Give me a call, Nigel oN 01209 820441 or send an email to stdaynews@gmail.com 39


What’s New at The General Stores?

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Christmas Savings Club - free to join, for use in the shop when needed

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Milk - we only sell Rodda’s Milk sourced from farms within 30 miles of the store.

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Bread - a new range of local uncut bread delivered 5 days a week

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Lottery - you can play the Health Lottery. Match 3 numbers and win £50

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Coal - from £7.49 a bag. Logs - £3.00 a bag. Delivery available

Orders can be taken if you ring 01209 820361 40


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These things have been in St Day and Gwennap These things have been in St Day and Gwennap By Richard R Blewett Education in Gwennap and St Day at the end of the nineteenth century Scattered about all over the country previous to 1870 were numbers of schools maintained by the Church of England. Smaller numbers were established and maintained by the Wesleyan Methodists and the British and Foreign School Society. These latter were called British Schools – the modern St Agnes and Illogan schools were thus founded and maintained. Church, Wesleyan and British Schools had a share in the small grant of less than £1m for education but there was no aid from the parish rates. In 1870 a revolutionary Education Bill came before Parliament and Tories, Liberals, Church and Chapel began clamouring for their various interests – should there be a national system of publicly controlled schools? Was attendance to be compulsory? Were schools to be financed out of the rates? Who was to control the schools – the parson? Was there to be doctrinal teaching in these state-aided schools? All these questions and many more but never a word about what sort of education might be the best. The Education Act of 1870 changed the lives of vast numbers of people. It doubled the government grant to the Church Schools (but they did not become rate-aided till early in the 20th century when the ‘Nonconformist Conscience’ arose in all its vigour and many went to prison rather than pay rates for the teaching of Church doctrine). It established publicly administered schools, paid for out of the rates, where no voluntary schools existed. The governors of these schools were to be called School Boards, of varying numbers of members according to the population of the parish, and elected by manhood suffrage. About 3,000 of these School Boards were set up – one of them for Gwennap and that is the story of the schools at St Day, Lanner and Cusgarne. Until the Education Act of 1902 they were known as Board Schools. By that Act School Boards were abolished, Board Schools became Council Schools administered by a Committee of the County Council and, by the Education Act of 1944, they became known as County Primary Schools. An important clause of the 1870 Education Act was – ‘No religious catechism or religious formulary distinctive of any particular denomination shall be taught in schools which receive rate aid’ – but later we shall discover the scope of the religious knowledge that was imparted in the Board Schools. In the elections for the School Boards the ‘labouring classes’ had the right to vote for the first time in English history. The parliamentary vote did not come to them until 1884. School Board elections were often exciting contests with sometimes two opposing parties – Church and Chapel. It (Continued on page 43)

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(Continued from page 42) was not unknown that when ‘Chapel’ was in power, head teachers attended chapel and if the ‘Church’ was in control then to church they went. And this is law, I will maintain, Unto my dying day, Sir, That whatsoever King shall reign I will be the vicar of Bray, Sir. It remains now to relate the story of the arrangements made in Gwennap Parish for the establishment of the Gwennap School Board and for the building of the schools at St Day, Lanner and Cusgarne. The work fell to the Parish Vestry. Parish Councils did not commence operations until 24 years later – in 1894. On the twentieth day of October, 1870, at 11 o’clock in the morning, the Gwennap Parish Vestry met – evidently in deep concern. The members discussed fully what school accommodation was necessary to meet the requirements of the new Education Act. It was resolved that ‘this Vestry be adjourned to November 10th and in the meantime the parishioners present and others see what voluntary subscriptions can be raised for building and supporting the necessary schools’. The Vestry members were the most heavily rated people in the Parish. The ‘lower classes’ couldn’t attend a morning meeting. An Education rate was a new imposition. Besides, they evidently wished to continue the Parochial School system under the control of the Church, on a voluntary basis. So, on November 10th, they met – again at 11 o’clock in the morning, and frankly stated that ‘in the opinion of this Vestry, it is desirable, if found to be practicable, that the deficiency of school accommodation should be supplied from voluntary efforts’. The meeting was adjourned till Monday, November 21st, this time at 5pm, and ‘certain gentlemen were requested to ascertain meanwhile what the ratepayers are willing to do in aid of the erection of schools and that the vicar be asked to write to landlords to make similar enquiry’. At the next meeting on November 21st, at 5pm, all hopes of voluntary effort were finally buried and it was resolved ‘that deficiency in school accommodation be supplied by the rates’ – which meant the setting up of a School Bard for Gwennap. Application was made ‘from this Vestry to the Education Department for permission to form a School Board’. On December 08th (still 1870), this time at 6pm, the Parish Vestry met at Carharrack. The Parish was divided into 12 or more districts and canvassers were appointed to take a census of the children between 5 and 13 years. 23 canvassers were appointed. Amongst them appeared the name George Bray who was associated with Gwennap local government continuously almost until the outbreak of the 1939-45 war, as Chairman of the School Board and later the School Managers and Chairman of Gwennap Parish Council. He was a solicitor and what could be called, in justice, a parish tyrant. Members of bodies over which he presided were afraid of him and what he said became law. If I may add a personal note I ‘shut him up’ on several occasions and we became friends. In the last years of his tyrannous chairmanship of the Parish Council I sat beside him at his request to prompt him with a suitable word or the (Continued on page 46) 43


London to Paris Bike Ride Former St. Day resident, Juliette Angove is taking part in The Kidney Research London to Paris Bike Ride in June this year. Juliette is taking part in memory of her father, Richard. Richard, a former member Juliette Angove of the Rugby Club, the Feast Committee and the Men’s Institute battled kidney disease for over 25 years and sadly died last year. Juliette is seeking sponsorship for the ride. There are two ways you can support her: 1. Take a donation to Geoff or Diane at the Post Office, they will pass on the donation. 2. Using the Internet you can go to www.doitfprcharity.com/JulietteA and make an online donation. By doing so, if you are a UK taxpayer an extra 25% can be added to the donation at no extra cost to you. 44


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(Continued from page 43) end of a sentence he fumbled for in his senility. How he would laugh if he could read this appreciation of him! On January 5th, 1871, the Parish Vestry met in the Wesleyan Sunday Schoolroom at Carharrack and the canvassers reported that in the parish were 786 boys and 747 girls, total 1,533, between the ages of 5 and 13 years. The figures are mixed in the Vestry Minute Book but, judging from the names of the canvassers, it is evident that the St Day children alone numbered 527, and this does not include Carharrack. These figures show that in St Day alone nearly 60 children were born each year. At the present time (1965) the number born in St Day and Carharrack each year is about 30. But 1870 was in the period of large families and more babies were being saved from early death by advances in medical knowledge. At the same meeting a committee was appointed to consider the number of schools needed and suitable sites for them and ‘other matters connected with our educational requirements’. It is evident the Vestry was spending much time and thought on the matter. Another census was taken to make certain and on November 17th, 1873, occurs this resolution ‘that the assistant Overseer be requested to forward to the education department the result of the census of children which has just been taken and to point out that, owing to the declension of mining in the neighbourhood, the population is still rapidly diminishing and that they are therefore of opinion that additional accommodation for 923 children would be considerably above what the parish is likely, within two or three years, to require; and that, should the population at any time increase, it will be easy in time of general improvement, to provide more accommodation accordingly’. In the early part of 1870 the last section of the United Mines closed down and about a thousand workers were thrown on the ‘wings of the world’. There followed an intense emigration. This event was one of the problems the Vestry had to solve and the matter could not be unduly rushed. But on January 5th, 1874, the die was cast, the final step was taken – application was finally made to the educational department for the ‘appointment of a School Board for the Parish of Gwennap’. The schools were opened in 1878. What would have happened if the Parish Vestry had refused to cooperate in this new educational venture? In the parish of Lanlivery, with which I was associated from 1906 to 1921, the Vestry refused to build schools. So the Department of Education appointed an architect with expensive tastes. A school was built, one of the most ornate in Cornwall. All stonework of cut granite, fluted granite pillars at the entrance, an expensive tower with a bell, beautifully tiled lobby floors, a very long wall round the playgrounds topped with heavy cut granite coping stones and an ornate School House for the Headmaster on the same expensive lines.

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Camborne and Redruth Live at Home Scheme have a weekly group for people over 60 years, Tuesdays 10am until midday. Refreshments, raffle, entertainment, crafts. Mills Hall Carharrack. Please phone Diane Bruford 01209 719062 for more details. 47


HOLY TRINITY CHURCH Parish Mass with Junior Church : Sundays 9.30 a.m. Coming soon “Messy Church” for children Contacts: For weddings, funerals and baptisms Fr. Simon Bone, Vicar : 01872 822862 The Rectory, Church St, St. Day

Churchwardens: Annette Hillman 821030 Sue Manley 820187 Hall Bookings Sheila Braddon 820285

We have many varied fund raising events during the year. Please do come along and join us.

“Hold a Fish and Chip Supper to

help spinal cord injured people live full and independent lives.” Great British Fish and Chip Supper Friday 18th May Want to do something different? Want to raise money where you live or work? Want to eat Fish and Chips, while raising money for charity? Hold a fish and chip supper on Friday 18th May 2012 whilst raising awareness of spinal cord injury and supporting SIA’s information and support services. You can hold a fish and chip supper in your own home, at work or hold a larger supper at your local community centre. For more information or request a fundraising pack call Elizabeth Wright on 0845 071 4350 or email fishandchips@spinal.co.uk or visit www.spinal.co.uk/ fishandchips 48


Back to Basics I find it hard to believe that three months have passed since I first wrote in the parish newsletter to introduce myself as your new Parish Priest. I am now beginning to find my way around and I am starting to get to know many of you in the churches, school, around the town and in other capacities. We had a good first Christmas in St Day and it was great to meet a good number of you at the school nativities, carol service, carols around St Day, Christingle and Crib service on Christmas Eve and midnight Mass. With those joyous festivities behind us and already a good but distant memory we start to move towards the season of Lent as we prepare for Easter. Lent is a time when we strip away all of the frills to get back to the basics of what it means to be Christian. Lent may originally have followed Epiphany, just as Jesus’ sojourn in the wilderness followed immediately on from his baptism, but it soon became firmly attached to Easter, as the principal occasion for baptism and for the reconciliation of those who had been excluded from the Church’s fellowship for apostasy or serious faults. This history explains the characteristic notes of Lent as selfexamination, penitence, self-denial, study, and preparation for Easter. As the candidates for baptism were instructed in Christian faith, and as penitents prepared themselves, through fasting and penance, to be readmitted to communion, the whole Christian community was invited to join them in the process of study and repentance, the extension of which over forty days would remind them of the forty days that Jesus spent in the wilderness, being tested by Satan. Just as Satan tried to tempt Jesus in the wilderness, we too face many temptations in life such as power, greed, wealth etc. and this is a really good opportunity for us all to look at our own lives and what we might want to reflect on, change, take on to help others or give up over the Lenten period and really get back to basics. The sign of the cross on our foreheads made from the ash of the previous year’s palm crosses serves not only to remind us that we are dust, but also as a reminder that God has a claim on us in Baptism. We do not know all of the particulars of our final destiny in Christ but we do know that we belong to Christ, and the ashen cross is a reminder of that as well. Below is the introduction and invitation to Lent which is read at the beginning of Lent during the Ash Wednesday Service, which will be at Holy Trinity Church, St Day at 7pm on Wednesday 22nd February. “Brothers and sisters in Christ, since early days Christians have observed with great devotion the time of our Lord’s passion and resurrection and prepared for this by a season of penitence and fasting. By carefully keeping these days, Christians take to heart the call to repentance and the assurance of forgiveness proclaimed in the gospel, and so grow in faith and in devotion to our Lord. I invite you, therefore, in the name of the Church, to the observance of a Holy Lent,

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From our Cornwall Councillor Dear Residents, Some people are aware of the growing pressure put upon Cornwall Council to release the names of councillors who have received letters or even been taken to court over the non payment of council tax. Please be assured that I have always paid mine on time and do so by direct debit. Bus services Until the 2011 Local Government financial settlement the Government provided a ring-fenced grant to reimburse bus operators for providing free travel to concessionary pass holders. Cornwall’s budget from that arrangement allowed us to reimburse operators at a rate of 73.5% of the average adult single fare. Failure to have spent the ring-fenced funding on concessionary travel would have seen the remaining budget returned to the Government. From April 2011 the Government has removed the ring-fencing and reduced the budget. With budget pressures this has allowed the flexibility to reimburse operators, from 1 April 2012, at a rate of 50% of the average adult fare. This rate is still a little higher than the rate determined by the Department for Transport as being sufficient to reimburse bus operators. Where bus operators feel they can run services without subsidy they do so as commercial services, whilst still claiming reimbursement for concessionary travellers. In Cornwall there are 147 local bus services - 52 operate commercially, 31 operate with a100% Council subsidy and 64 operate with partial subsidy (that is, with some journeys being Council funded). The 540 route is a wholly subsidised service, as patronage does not make it commercially viable. To secure value for money on the subsidised bus services, the Council is required to tender for the operation of those services. The Council was aware that, by reducing the concessionary fare reimbursement rate, operators may be disadvantaged if they are held to their previously tendered subsidies so it was decided to re tender all subsidised services. Notice was given to operators that all subsidised service contracts would end on 31 March 2012 and that the ongoing tender exercise would establish the new operator on those services from 1 April 2012, giving continuity of service for bus passengers. Some operators have placed notices stating their service will end on 31 March but have not given the full (Continued on page 52)

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(From our Cornwall Councillor Continued from page 50) picture. To determine the level of services it will subsidise, Cornwall Council defines a minimum network such that public transport access is provided to as many parts of the Cornish community as is reasonably practicable. Where commercial services exist, the Council may choose to enhance that service but cannot tender a competing service. In the absence of services, the Council may provide a wholly subsidised service, like the 540 which serves the Mining Villages. Community grant funding pot As raised in my last report in the newsletter, I asked for those groups and organisations within the community to come forward if they needed some funding from my community grant funding pot. I am pleased to say that I have had an excellent response and will be supporting the applications currently submitted. I still have some funding remaining so if you know of a community based group or organisation in the villages of St Day and Lanner in need of funding for equipment or support, then please contact me on 07528 983 386 or at mkaczmarek@cornwall.gov.uk. Best wishes Cllr Mark Kaczmarek

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Village Brunch Saturday February 18th 9.30—12.30 Hosted by St. Day Methodist Church All items just 50p In aid of local causes The aim is to have the Village Brunch three times a year all on the final Saturday of half term. If you’d like to help call Linda on 01872 870256 53


Meet your Parish Councillors John Newcombe I have lived here all my life, married a local girl and have 3 grown up sons. After attending St.Day School and Redruth Grammar School, I obtained an engineering apprenticeship and continued my studies at Cornwall College eventually qualifying as a Chartered Engineer. After 11years in industry I became a college lecturer, and on taking early retirement was Senior Lecturer in Production Engineering at Cornwall College. I also have a First Class Honours Degree from the Open University. I served for over 20 years on the St. Day Community Council, and was its secretary for 14 years, which included the organising of the annual Feast Celebrations. On retirement I joined the local branch of the University of the Third Age, and served successive 3 year terms as its secretary, treasurer and chairman. In 1989 I was invited by W.J.Mills to become a trustee of the WJ Mills Cottages Trust which now owns 42 properties in St.Day including Mills St.. I subsequently became its Treasurer and Chairman. I joined the Parish council in 1995 and became chairman in 2001. I was actively involved from the start in the project to regenerate St.Day, and served as our representative on the Mining Villages Regeneration Group becoming its chairman and one of its representatives on the North Kerrier Regeneration

Community Litter Pick Saturday 25th February Meet in the back room of the Community Centre, West End at 10am

Please come along and help to tidy up St.Day 54


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St.Day’s Local Fishmonger

Local, sustainable, line caught fish a speciality. Delivered free to your door Great value Cheaper than the supermarket

Call Nick on 07545 147459 56


St.Day Newsletter