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MONDAY, JULY 19, 2010

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WATCHDOG BLASTS HANDLING OF AUTO DEALERS

Economists say recovery continues despite its slow pace NEW YORK (AP) — Economists say the U.S. recovery continued during the second quarter of this year with more businesses hiring workers and fewer cutting jobs, but the pace of growth has slowed, a new survey shows. The National Association for Business Economics said its latest survey, released today, found 31 percent of businesses added workers between April and June, the highest level in three years. And 39 percent of those surveyed say they expect to hire more workers over

DEATHS John Benes, 89, of Lake Geneva, formerly of Twin Lakes, died on Saturday at Arbor Village of Geneva Crossings in Lake Geneva. Haase-DerrickLockwood .....................A4

the next six months — the most since January 2008. Manufacturers reported the strongest increase in demand and profitability. Finance, insurance and real estate sectors saw the slowest growth. The number of respondents who think real gross domestic product will expand by more than 3 percent this year slid to 20 percent from the 24 percent who expected that rate of growth in April. But 67 percent of respondents still believe the economy will expand by more than 2 percent in 2010.

“NABE’s July 2010 Industry Survey confirms that the U.S. recovery continued through the second quarter, although at a slower pace than earlier in the year,” William Strauss, of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, said in a statement. “Industry demand increased for a fourth consecutive quarter, although at a slower pace. Price and cost pressures were contained, allowing profits to edge higher. Credit and debt issues in Europe will likely negatively impact just over a third of the surveyed firms over the

next three months.” The number of companies reporting layoffs and job cuts through attrition is down by half from a year ago and about steady with the first quarter of this year, NABE found. Meanwhile, the number of businesses hiring jumped to 31 percent from 6 percent at the same time last year, and is up from 22 percent of those surveyed at the end of the first quarter. Goods-producing companies are doing most of the hiring, with only the services sector continuing to anticipate

The new generation of local dairy farming

Pietro “Peter” Morrone, 82, of Kenosha, died on Saturday at Kenosha Medical Center. Proko ..........A4 Ruth Carol Neuens, 74, of Menomonee Falls, died on Friday. Schramka Funeral Home, Menomonee Falls .............................A4 Robert I. Reilly, 83, of Tomahawk, Wis., died on Thursday in Tucson, Ariz. Kreuger Family Funeral Home, Tomahawk ..........A4

Haylei Rai Thomas is 6 today. She enjoys reading books, playing with dolls and going to water parks.

BY DENISE LOCKWOOD

Other local birthday: Jim Barrette, 44 Scotty Mazmanian, 20 Margaret Weyrauch, 82 Check out more birthday photos in the Weekday Report at www.kenoshanews.com.

OPINIONS ● 1

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Michael Barone looks at Democrats turning against the war in Afghanistan. Carthage College professor Arthur Cyr looks at Warren Buffet and the power of a name; plus a host of your letters. Pages B4, 5

Shooting victim badly hurt Assailants tie up, rob residents; man flees

BIRTHDAYS

Haylei Thomas

layoffs, the survey said. Of the 84 NABE members from private sector and industry trade associations that responded to the latest survey, 52 percent said demand increased in the second quarter. Thirty-eight percent said it remained steady. Companies that raised prices outnumbered companies that cut them by three to one, which helped profit margins edge higher overall. However, that growth “slowed to a crawl,” as materials costs continued to rise.

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BILL SIEL

Meet Ben and Shannon Herda Kenosha County dairy farmer Ben Herda and his wife, Shannon, leave the barn after feeding the calves, followed closely by their dog, Digger. See their story on Page A2.

dlockwood@kenoshanews.com A man was found shot and injured after he sought shelter inside a neighbor’s house at 2:05 a.m. Sunday in the 6400 block of 12th Avenue. According to police, two adults and three children were inside a residence in the 6300 block of 12th Avenue when two assailants kicked in the door to the residence, tied them up and robbed them. One of the adults was shot in the hand during an altercation with the assailants. The shooting victim, whose identity has not been released, then jumped out of a second story window. Mark Clark, a neighbor who lives near where the victim was found, said he heard a gunshot, which startled him. He ran to get a baseball bat and called his neighbor upstairs, but then realized what was happening. “I heard a man running and screaming in pain,” Clark said. “He was scream-

PHOTO BY EARLENE FREDERICK

Kenosha Police note the location of a blood trail into this home, where a shooting victim sought refuge with a neighbor early Sunday morning after he was apparently shot during a home invasion robbery. The identity of the shooting victim was not released by authorities by late Sunday night. ing, ‘Help me, help me.’ He hit the fence and started stumbling. That’s when he See SHOOTING, Back page

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Blagojevich likely to testify at his trial this week CHICAGO (AP) — After promising for a year and a half to take the witness stand, Rod Blagojevich is likely to testify in his own defense at his federal corruption trial this week in a long-awaited duel of wits Rod and wills with Blagojevich federal prosecutors. Unlike in his TV interviews, Blagojevich is going to be under oath. And the grilling he gets from government attorneys about charges that he sought to sell or trade President Barack Obama’s former Senate seat

is guaranteed to be tougher than anything he faced on the talk show circuit. “Barbara Walters is not going to be cross-examining him in that courtroom,” says former Assistant U.S. Attorney Jeffrey H. Cramer, managing director and head of the Chicago office of Kroll Associates, an investigative firm.

High-risk move Taking the stand in his own defense, possibly as early as Tuesday, is a highrisk move that many lawyers warn could backfire. They say that to have any chance of winning over jurors, Blagojevich must abandon

his cocky demeanor and become the soul of humility, admitting faults and apologizing but insisting he never intended to violate the law. “He has to convince people that he knows he’s a jerk and sometimes didn’t work as hard as he should have and had a bad mouth and spent too much money on clothes and insulted the people of the state,” says Professor Leonard Cavise of DePaul University law school. “He has to not fight like the barracuda that we know he is,” Cavise adds. Federal spokesman Randall Samborn won’t say who Blagojevich’s adversary in the cross-examination duel will be. But it’s hard to imag-

ine U.S. Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald assigning that role to anyone but the trial’s tough, methodical lead prosecutor, Reid Schar.

Wiretap tapes In presenting their case, prosecutors have played numerous wiretap tapes made secretly by FBI agents in the weeks before Blagojevich was arrested in December 2008. Jurors have heard him agonizing over whether to fill the Senate seat that Obama was leaving to move to the White House with the new president’s friend, Valerie Jarrett, to appoint U.S. Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., or possibly even name himself to

the job. He has been heard saying that he sent a message to Obama and Jarrett that the seat could be hers if the incoming president would give him a Cabinet post or ambassadorship. And jurors have heard Blagojevich conferring with aides about efforts to squeeze hefty campaign contributions out of a racetrack owner, a roadbuilder and a hospital executive. Blagojevich, 53, has pleaded not guilty to scheming to get a Cabinet post, another big job or a massive campaign contribution for the Senate seat. He also has pleaded not guilty to plotting to launch a racketeering operation in the governor’s office.


Local EVENTS Learn to train your dragon Wednesday SALEM — “How to Train Your Dragon — A Viking Workshop” is set for Wednesday at Community Library, 24615 89th St., Salem. For ages 6-11, the event will be 1 to 3 p.m., celebrating the Cressida Cowell books and movie and featuring games, crafts and other activities. Registration is required by calling 843-3348.

Powerpoint lesson at library Wednesday KENOSHA — An introduction to Microsoft Powerpoint is set for Wednesday at Southwest Library, 7979 38th Ave. The free workshop is 1:30 to 3 p.m. and will cover the basics of creating and editing a slide. Seating is limited. Registration is required. Call 564-6130 to register.

WiiFun activities at libraries this week KENOSHA — WiiFun is slated for Wednesday and Friday at Kenosha Public Library branches. Hours are 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Wednesday at Northside Library, 1500 27th Ave. and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Friday at Southwest Library, 7979 38th Ave. Ages 8-12 can play a variety of games, including Mario Kart, Wii Play, Wii Sports and Guitar Hero World Tour. Ages 9 and younger must be accompanied by an adult. For more information, call 564-6150.

Relay for Life captains to meet

COUNTY MEETINGS Kenosha County meetings for the week of July 18, all in the county Administration Building, 1010 56th St., unless otherwise noted: ■ Administration Committee, 6:30 p.m. today. Resolution to approve labor agreement with Local 990 clerical workers. ■ Legislative Committee, 6:30 p.m. Tuesday. Resolution to place a public transit funding referendum on the November election ballot. ■ County Board, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday. Resolutions to approve a county debt policy and a labor agreement with the Local 168 maintenance and custodial workers. ■ County Board chairman/committee chairmen meeting, 7 p.m. Wednesday, County Center, highways 45 and 50. Sudoku: Answer to today’s puzzle, seen on page A6.

Ben Herda honors forefathers with his own hard work on the family farm BY JILL TATGE-ROZELL

jrozell@kenoshanews.com HEATLAND — Ben Herda’s burning desire to carry the family farm into the fourth generation could not be snuffed by the fact there were only 12 cows left when he took over the operation two

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years ago. To put the dire straits of the farm into perspective, consider that Herda’s great-grandfather, Bernard, whom he is named after, founded the farm on Highway 83, north of Highway 50, 102 years ago with little more. “At one point, when I was in high school, we were milking 120,” said Ben, who is 30. Following high school, Ben took work off the farm. He worked for excavation and pre-cast concrete companies. His father and older brother, both named John, mainly operated the farm, though Ben helped. “We couldn’t afford for both of us to be there,” Ben said of he and his brother. “It wasn’t large enough to support three families. I never really quit entirely. When you grow up farming, you never really leave the farm.” In 2007, Ben’s father Shannon Herda pets one of the and brother decided to farm’s calves after feeding it. call it quits. His father Ben Herda says that feeding was ready to retire and calves requires more patience his brother’s construction than he’s got, but his wife re- business had grown into ally enjoys it. a full-time endeavor. His sister, Rachael, married into another Kenosha County dairy family. Ben formed a partnership with his parents to transition its ownership.

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTOS BY BILL SIEL

Kenosha county dairy farmer Ben Herda milks his herd. Herda, 30, finds the challenges of farm work rewarding. “You are fighting the market. You are fighting the weather. There is an incredible amount of work that needs to get done. It’s a way of life. It’s a good life,” he says.

New generation on dairy farms

Sunday: In the midst of a decline indairy farming, it’s a good time to get into it.

Monday: Ben Herda adds fourth generation to 100-year-old farm.

Tuesday: Justin Daniels loves the animals he cares for as much as his family’s farm heritage.

Wednesday: Ryan and Rachael Crane return to farm

A living tribute

bearing college degrees.

For Ben, keeping the family farm in operation is a way to honor the hard work of his late relatives and to keep their dreams alive. Ben’s brother, William, was killed 12 years ago, at age 14, in a tractor accident. Ben was 18 at the time. “Our plan was to stay in business together,” he said. “There are certain things I do every day on the farm that remind me of him. When we pull the equipment out in the spring . . . he was always my sidekick. William would put air in the wagon tires and man the grease gun. Then there are jobs I wish he was here to do because I don’t like to.” He senses William’s spirit on the farm, as well as his grandpa Martin’s. The thistle he found on his tractor seat recently was the same kind his grandpa Martin would put there as a joke in the hopes one of the young whippersnappers would sit on it. “Usually we were in the way, but he would never tell us that,” Ben said of his grandfather.

Thursday: Kasey Lois knew he needed to be on the farm in kindergarten.

Friday: Despite going it alone, Joe Zinser is proud to follow in his father’s footsteps.

Dairy Farm Locations 312th Ave.

To have an event listed in the briefs, complete the form at www.kenoshanews.com/ interact/events or e-mail the information to dwalter@ kenoshanews.com. For more information, call Dave Walter at 656-6279.

Building on 102 years

Crane Dairy 83 Herda Farm

Ben said overcoming the hardships that come with dairy farming is part of what makes it so rewarding. “You have a lot of assets, the least of which is money,” he said. “You are fighting the market. You are fighting the weather. There is an incredible amount of work that needs to get done. It’s a way of life. It’s a good life.” It wasn’t a way of life for his wife Shannon, though. Ben said he knows he asked a lot when he asked her to accept the path he was taking; she took to it like grits to grease. “My wife didn’t grow up on a farm,” he said. “I couldn’t peel her away from it now.”

Future plans In two years, Ben has more than tripled the number of cows he is milking, from 12 to 45. “We’d like to milk right around 100 cows,” he said. “We’d

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Daniels Farm

Zinser Farm 45

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Lois Farm

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368th Ave.

KENOSHA — There will be a Relay For Life of Kenosha Team Captains’ Meeting on Thursday at 5:30 p.m. at The Madrigrano Auditorium of Gateway Technical College, 3520 30th Ave. Anyone interested in learning more about Relay For Life can attend. Relay For Life is an American Cancer Society event to help fight cancer. For more information, call Chris at 551-8629.

KENOSHA NEWS | MONDAY, JULY 19, 2010 | A2

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Address: 4602 Highway 83 Year founded: 1908 Acres: 140 owned, 360 rented Size of herd: 45 milking Crops: Corn, soybeans, alfalfa, wheat History: Founded by Bernard Herda, succeeded by Martin in 1947, and John in 1977. John’s sons, John and Ben, joined the operation in 2005. Ben became the principal owner in a partnership with his mother and father in 2007.

KENOSHA NEWS

like to be milking that many in four to five years.” Other plans are to expand the free-stall barn and possibly make the switch to a milking parlor. The farm is located on 500 acres — 140 owned and the rest leased. They grow a mix

of crops including corn, soybeans, alfalfa, and some wheat. About 60 percent of it is used to feed the cows and about 40 percent is cash crop. “That’s enough for one guy to try and get done,” he said, adding he does get help from family and neighbors.

Vol. 116 l July 19, 2010 l No. 272

Kenosha Public Museums offering summer camp programs for kids KENOSHA NEWS STAFF

A variety of summer camp programs are offered for children this summer at the Kenosha Public Museums. Topics in July and August range from science to dinosaurs and art. Camps are aimed at different age groups, from preschooler to teenagers. All camps require advance registration. ■ Camps for children ages 2-3 are offered from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. One adult is required to accompany every one to two children. Cost is $33 per class or $28 for Friends of the Museums. Classes include: Junior Scientist with instructor Sarah Brennan July 20-22; World of Birds taught by Brennan July 27-29; Dino Tots taught by Marybeth Zuhlke at the Dinosaur Discovery Museum Aug.

3-5, and Fur, Feathers & Scales taught by Zuhlke Aug. 10-12. ■ Camps for ages 4-6 are offered from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Cost of each three-day camp is $33 or $28 for Friends of the Museums. Classes include: Digging Dinosaurs taught by Nancy Mathews at the Dinosaur Discovery Museum July 20-22; Discovering Deserts taught by Sandy Branch July 27-29; All Things Wild & Wonderful taught by Mary Leys Aug. 3-5, and Paint, Paper, Playdough and Puppets taught by Leys Aug. 10-12. ■ Camps for ages 7-10 take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays. Cost of each camp is $70 or $65 for Friends of the Museums. Classes include: Design-ADino taught by Keith Miller

July 26-29; Spy Science taught by Zuhlke Aug. 2-5, and Kitchen Science taught by Zuhlke Aug. 9-12. ■ Classes for ages 11-15 take place from 1 to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays. Cost of each camp is $70 or $65 for Friends of the Museums. Classes include: Animals Alive taught by Sean Murphy July 19-22; Behindthe-Scenes of the Museums taught by museum staff July 26-29, and Make A Masterpiece taught by Ellen Wilson Aug. 9-12. ■ Cartooning Classes for ages 7-16 are 1 to 4 p.m. Mondays through Thursdays with instructor Bob Anderson. Cost of each camp is $70 or $65 for Friends of the Museums. Classes include: Cartooning: Cats & Dogs July 19-22, and Video Game Art Aug. 2-5.

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Kenosha News (ISSN 0749-713X) Contents copyright 2010 UNITED COMMUNICATIONS CORPORATION Periodicals postage paid at Kenosha, Wis. and additional mailing offices. Published Mon.-Sun. by the Kenosha News. *Weekend and Sunday subscriptions include the following additional issues: Homes Guide usually on the 4th Tuesday o each month. The following holidays, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve and New Years Day. Also starting in mid-August every Monday until the football season is over.

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Variably cloudy with a T-storm; High 79 ● Low 61 — Details, B8 Local Page C3

KENOSHA COMMUNITY HELPS STORM-RAVAGED FAMILY

INSIDE

TODAY

Homes Guide

TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010 Search for jobs, upload and store your résumé at Central High graduate Daryl Maday enjoying his experience as a pitcher with the Giants’ Triple-A team. Page C1

DEATHS

Trotter sentencing delayed Court jurisdiction question arises in wake of plea deal BY JILL TATGE-ROZELL

Bonnie May Hunt, 83, of Marietta, Ga., died Sunday at home........................A4 Janet M. Pobar, 92, of Racine died at Harmony in Racine. Draeger-Langendorf Funeral Home. ..............A4 Ruth M. Snyder, 85, of Wauwatosa died on July 15. ....................................A4

BIRTHDAYS Emerald “Dixie” Knudson marks his 90th birthday today. He is a retired farmer, Emerald played and Knudson coached softball for many years and enjoys tending his garden.

JOBS.KENOSHANEWS.COM

jrozell@kenoshanews.com The felony murder conviction of Kawanis N. Trotter, 16, a lesser offense than the first-degree intentional homicide charge he faced prior to reaching a plea deal, could revert his case from adult to juvenile court jurisdiction for sentencing. If that is the case, District Attorney Robert Zapf said he would ask that the conviction and the plea deal be thrown out. Trotter was up for sentencing Monday in adult criminal court for the role he played in the 2008 murder of Capri Walker, 51. Members of both the Trotter and Walker

families filled the courtroom expecting to hear Judge Wilbur Warren’s decision. However, an eleventh-hour review of the case led to questions about appropriate court jurisdiction and a decision by Warren to hold it over for a hearing and sentencing on Aug. 30. It was the first time Walker’s mother, Jackie Rudy, was able to be present in the courtroom. Walker, 51, KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY KEVIN POIRIER was found beaten to death in Kawanis N. Trotter, left, appears in court Monday next to September 2008 in her home his attorney, Valerie Karls. Trotter was scheduled to be in the 1400 block of 71st Street sentenced for his role in the murder of Capri Walker in in Kenosha. Rudy and other September 2008, but the sentencing was delayed. family members, who wore ribbons with photographs of “It has been such a long enough.” Walker, were disappointed haul,” said Rose Merwitz, Trotter was originally by the delay. charged with first-degree Walker’s cousin. “Enough is

The new generation of local dairy farming

Other local birthday: David Hamelink, 70 Celebrity birthdays: Sally Ann Howes, actresssinger, 80 Sleepy LaBeef, rockabilly singer, 75 Diana Rigg, actress, 72 John Lodge, rock musician (The Moody Blues), 67 T.G. Sheppard, country singer, 66 Kim Carnes, singer, 65 Carlos Santana, rock musician, 63 Paul Cook, rock musician (The Sex Pistols, Man Raze), 54

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E.J. Dionne Jr. writes about the conflicting views of President Obama’s attitude toward business and Eugene Robinson says the reaction to the NAACP’s resolution about racism in the tea party movement has proved the resolution was justified. Somers resident Reince Priebus is featured in today’s Wisconsin Political Stock Report. Pages B4,5

INDEX Advice Business Classified Comics Deaths Entertainment Health Local Lottery More Nation/World Opinion Region Sports TV Listings Weather

B5 C6 Section D D8 A4 D2 B1,2 Section A A6 D1 B3,6 B4,5 B6 C1-5 B8 B8

Up to the minute NEWS, WEATHER & SPORTS

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Visit our Web site: www.kenoshanews.com

Defense attorney Valerie Karls argued Monday the conviction on a lesser offense than the one Trotter was waived into adult court under could make this a case for juvenile court disposition. Karls pointed to both statutes See DELAY, Back page

Police seek two suspects in shooting BY DENISE LOCKWOOD

OPINIONS 2

Defense argument

Man shot in hand during home invasion robbery

Check out more birthday photos in the Weekday Report at www.kenoshanews.com.

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intentional homicide and armed burglary, as was his cousin, Roddee W. Daniel, and faced life in prison. Both were subsequently waived into adult court. Trotter later accepted a plea offer in exchange for testimony against Daniel, who was convicted of first-degree intentional homicide. Under the agreement, Trotter pleaded guilty to felony murder and two counts of armed burglary and faces 45 years in prison.

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BILL SIEL

Meet Justin Daniels Justin Daniels is littered with shavings during a hoof-trimming session at the Crane Dairy farm. Daniels is a Kenosha County farmer himself, a general contractor and hoof trimmer. See his story on Page A5.

dlockwood@kenoshanews.com Police have identified the victim and provided suspect information in a home invasion robbery that happened early Sunday morning. Keenun D. Hill, 33, was found shot and injured after he fled to a neighbor’s house at 2:05 a.m. Sunday in the 6400 block of 12th Avenue. According to police, two adults and three children were inside a residence in the 6300 block of 12th Avenue when two assailants kicked in the door to the home, tied them up and robbed them. Hill was shot in the hand during an altercation with one of the assailants. To get away from his attackers, Hill jumped out of his second-story window. Witnesses reported they heard Hill screaming for help.

Not life threatening

Dems ready to extend jobless benefits With 60 votes, GOP filibuster in Senate can be broken WASHINGTON (AP) — With a new face and a 60th vote for breaking a Republican filibuster, Senate Democrats are preparing to restore jobless checks for 2.5 million people whose benefits ran out during a congressional standoff over deficit spending. President Barack Obama says, “It’s time to do what’s right.” But first, Obama and his Democratic allies are pressing for maximum political advantage, blaming Republicans for an impasse that halted unemployment checks averaging $309 a week for those whose eligibility had expired. Obama launched a fresh salvo on Monday, demanding

Obama often makes it personal to illustrate his point. Page A6

that the Senate act on the legislation — after a vote already had been scheduled for today — and blasting Republicans for the holdup. “The same people who didn’t have any problem spending hundreds of billions of dollars on tax breaks for the wealthiest Americans are now saying we shouldn’t offer relief to middle-class Americans,” Obama said.

Republican response Republicans say they do favor the benefits but are insisting that they be paid for with spending cuts elsewhere in the government’s $3.7 trillion budget. After initially feeling heat when a lone GOP senator, Jim Bunning of

Kentucky, briefly blocked a benefits extension back in February, the GOP has grown increasingly comfortable in opposing the legislation. “What the president isn’t telling the American people is that many of us in the Senate are fighting to make sure our children and grandchildren aren’t buried under a mountain of debt,” said Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah. “If we are going to extend unemployment benefits, then let’s do it without adding to our record debt.” Today’s Senate voting — with Democratic newcomer Carte Goodwin of West Virginia being Carte sworn in just Goodwin in time to cast the 60th vote to break a GOP filibuster — will cap a battle of more than four months

that’s featured bad blood and a shift in sentiment among key Republicans.

A stubborn jobless rate Though the economy is said to be slowly recovering, the jobless rate remains painfully high at 9.5 percent. The Senate is likely to pass the current measure late today. The House is expected to clear it for Obama’s signature as soon as Wednesday. Two Republicans, Olympia Snowe and Susan Collins of Maine, are expected to vote with the Democrats, as they did at the end of June. The measure stalled then because the death of Robert Byrd, DW.Va., and the participation in the filibuster of Nebraska Democrat Ben Nelson left the party one vote short. With Goodwin, the Senate breakdown is 57 Democrats, 41 Republicans and two independents who normally vote with the Democrats.

Sgt. Hugh Rafferty of the Kenosha Police Department said Hill’s injuries are not life threatening, and Hill’s girlfriend, her two children and a child they had together were uninjured. Hill and his girlfriend are cooperating with the investigation. “So far we have no suspects, but we are working on possible leads,” Rafferty said. “The suspects did get away with money.” Rafferty would not divulge how much money was taken from the residence. Information about Hill’s medical condition was not available Monday evening. Both suspects are described as black males, 5-feet, 10-inches tall, and were last seen wearing black pants and white T-shirts. One of the males was about 180 pounds and the other about 220. If anyone has any information, call the Kenosha Police Department at 605-5200 or, to make an anonymous tip, call Crime Stoppers at 656-7333.


Local

KENOSHA NEWS | TUESDAY, JULY 20, 2010 | A5

Dairy Farm Locations 312th Ave.

Justin Daniels, 26, trims hooves at the Crane Dairy farm. He travels to farms throughout southeastern Wisconsin doing this chore for other farmers.

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A passion for animals Justin Daniels enjoys bringing new life into the world BY JILL TATGE-ROZELL

jrozell@kenoshanews.com ustin Daniels, a fourth-generation farmer, cares about the cows he tends to in the barn as much as he cares about continuing his family’s dairy farming heritage. “My passion is the animals,” Justin said. “Some people like driving the tractors. I like taking care of the cows and the new calves.” He said calves are born on the farm all the time and he most enjoys helping with the deliveries. “There is just something about helping bring a new life into the world that is really amazing,” he said.

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Young partner

Daniels Dairy Farm Address: 1166 240th Ave. Year founded: More than 100 years ago Number of acres: 550 total, 280 owned Size of herd: 170 milking Types of crops: 130 acres of hay, 350 acres of corn History: Farm was founded by Emil Daniels, Robert Daniels took over in 1940, Tom joined as a partner in 1974 and brothers Jerry and Dale entered the partnership in 1979. Partnership transferred to Dale, Tom, Jason (Tom’s son) and Justin (Dale’s son) in 2004. Justin left in 2005.

Justin, 26, co-owns the dairy farm with his father, Dale, and uncle, Tom. As such, he is one of the youngest dairy owners in the county. At some point he may be the sole owner. Another brother, Jordan, 20, helps on the farm and is still thinking about his future. The partners milk 170 cows on the farm founded by his grandfather Robert at the intersection of Highways 142 and 75. They also grow 130 acres of hay and 350 aces of corn. Justin said he doesn’t foresee those numbers growing. “I think it will stay about the same,” he said. “It’s manageable and you can make a living with this amount of land, labor and investment. We usually have extra (crop) to go around.” Like many farmers in the area, he would like a free stall barn with a milking parlor. He also worries about milk prices, sustainability and profitability. As the youngest partner, Justin supplements his income as a dairy cattle hoof trimmer. He travels to farms throughout southeastern Wisconsin doing this chore for other farmers.

Educated and involved Justin prefers to talk about the animals and, like most farmers, is humble to the point he doesn’t like to talk about himself. After a little persuading he’ll let you know he is as

New generation on dairy farms

Sunday: In the midst of a decline indairy farming, it’s a good time to get into it.

Monday: Ben Herda adds fourth generation to 100-year-old farm.

Tuesday: Justin Daniels loves the animals he cares for as much as his family’s farm heritage.

Wednesday: Ryan and Rachael Crane return to farm bearing college degrees.

Thursday: Kasey Lois knew he needed to be on the farm in kindergarten.

Friday: Despite going it alone, Joe Zinser is proud to follow in his father’s footsteps. educated and involved as they come. He is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin Farm and Industries short course, a two-year program that runs from November through March. “It enables farmers to start after the fall field work is done and be back on the farm before the spring field work,” he said. “In today’s dairy world you need to know about all the new technology, techniques and practices. Farming now is nothing like it was years ago.” He said the relationships and network of farmers established through the program is key to the success of the industry statewide. He, Dale and Tom are all members of the Kenosha County Farm Bureau and the Professional Dairy Producers of Wisconsin, which provides ongoing education at a conference each spring. Justin is also the president of the Kenosha County Dairy Promotion Committee, which many of the beginning farmers have taken an active role on.

Justin Daniels feeds a newborn bull, born two hours earlier, its first meal of milk from its mother. “It’s the most important meal of his life,” said Daniels, referring to the nutritious and immunity-strengthening qualities of the milk. KENOSHA NEWS PHOTOS BY BILL SIEL

What it takes “If you want to be on top of your game you should know as much as you can about the industry and do what you can to support it,” he said. Tom said he is glad to see such a committed group of young farmers in the county. “It’s great to see and I think it’s real important they get involved,” he said. “You have to be committed. It’s a lifestyle, not just a job.” While it may be a good time to buy cows, it is a difficult time to turn a profit with any kind of debt load, he said. Dairy cows were going for about $1,100 at a farm auction in Racine County last week. But milk prices are low. “Even for a (top) dairy farmer it’s break even at best right now,” he said. “It is a tough financial situation right now.” Dairy farming is an 80- to 90-hour-a-week business, Tom said. “That’s what it takes to make it,” he said.

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Very warm and humid; some sun. High 89

Low 67 — Details, B8

BETH ENGWIS WINS TREMELLING MEMORIAL RACE IN KENOSHA

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 21, 2010 Get news updates throughout the day, stories and special features at

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Teen gets life for neighbor’s murder BY JESSICA STEPHEN

Roddee Daniel, represented by attorney John Cabranes, looks back toward the gallery during his sentencing for the murder of Capri Walker. Daniel, 17, was sentenced to life in prison without the chance of asking for release.

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY KEVIN POIRIER

jstephen@kenoshanews.com Was Roddee W. Daniel’s role in his neighbor’s beating death the act of a “wild animal” or that of a wayward teenager who was born addicted to cocaine, left to fend for himself and could someday be rehabilitated? The answer, defense attorney John Cabranes argued Tuesday, would determine what sentence Kenosha County Circuit Judge Wilbur W. Warren III would give Daniel, who was convicted last month for Capri Walker’s September 2008 murder.

“There’s only one sentence I can give you,” said Warren, who ordered that Daniel must serve the rest of his life in prison, without the chance of ever asking for release. “The public has to be protected,” Warren concluded. “I, frankly, would worry that whatever age you got out, you would be inclined to do the same cold-hearted thing.”

Home burglary Jurors took nearly 2½ hours last month to find Daniel, who turned 17 last month, guilty of first-degree inten-

tional homicide and armed burglary. Daniel was 15 and his co-defendant, Kawanis N. Trotter, was 14 when they were charged as adults for the murder of Capri Walker, 51, who was killed during a September 2008 burglary. Attempts to keep the cases in juvenile court failed, although Trotter’s attorneys renewed their efforts to have his sentencing, which was set for Monday, held in juvenile court. Trotter’s next hearing was set for Aug. 30. The Kenosha boys broke into Walker’s home in the 1400 block of See SENTENCE, Back page

Missing woman found dead in pond

The new generation of local dairy farming

BY JESSICA FRYMAN

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BILL SIEL

Meet Ryan and Rachael Crane Two-month-old Adam Crane returns to his mother, Rachael, after riding inside the tractor cab with his father, Ryan, at the Crane Dairy Farm in Brighton. See their story on Page A2.

Country Thunder means business BY JON OLSON

jolson@kenoshanews.com Country Thunder begins in earnest on Thursday, and when the music finally dies a lot of money will have changed hands. It costs $65 to attend one day of the event, or $119 for the weekend. And for those who don’t plan ahead, buying at the gate will cost $75 for the day, or $140 for the weekend. But in and around Twin Lakes, many businesses have muted expectations, while admitting that in certain narrow sectors — ice, beer and KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO gasoline — they will benefit. BY BRIAN PASSINO “Last year we didn’t see The BP gas station in Twin as much as we used to,” Lakes has cowboy hats said Elaine Mattson, owner available for customers. of Twin Lakes Liquors, 204 general, “You don’t see as North Lake Ave. “It’s a big difference than it has been in many cowboy hats as you used to.” past years.” She is stocking At Manny’s Snack Shack, up on ice and beer, but, in

404 South Lake Ave., “We do order a little more, because we do get a little busier,” said co-owner April Valers. Campers come in for breakfast, she said, but in the past three years Country Thunder hasn’t helped as much as it used to. Ice, firewood, propane, disposable grills, coolers, and lawn chairs sell well at Do It Best Hardware, 470 North Lake Ave., said store manager Brian Tice. “We get a little bump, but not a tremendous one,” from Country Thunder. Similar products are sold by Walmart in Lake Geneva, said assistant manager Chris Lucas.

Cowboy hats At Twin Lakes BP, 475 North Lake Ave., the mood is a little more upbeat. “We bring in cowboy hats — we actually sell cowboy

hats during Country Thunder,” said Jenny Kubik, a cashier. “It gets pretty crazy in here — people coming in barely dressed.” While the “Thunderheads” bring in business, Kubik said country music isn’t quite her thing, and she prefers a more placid pace. “It disturbs the normal way of life,” she said. Shannon Smith, a bartender at Donovan’s Reef Sports Bar, said that during the festival, “instead of 10 people during the day, we might have 30 steady.” Last year, she said, the bar booked bands for after-parties, when the festival’s shows ended, from midnight to close at 2:30 a.m. It really brought in the crowds, but Donovan’s isn’t doing that this year. Still, the late-night urge survives. At The Beach Bar, 402 South Lake Ave., busiSee THUNDER, Back page

DEATHS Up to the minute NEWS, WEATHER & SPORTS

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Theresa K. Churas, 88, of Amherst, died Monday. Jungers-Holly Funeral Home, Amherst ......................... A4

Bertha M. “Bert” Pucker, 73, died Saturday at Grande Prairie Health and Rehab Center. Piasecki-Althaus Funeral Home ............................ A4

Lillian V. Edgerton, 87, of Twin Lakes, died Monday. Piasecki-Althaus Funeral Home ............................ A4 Catherine Marie O’Malley Mitchell, 48, of Dennis, Miss., died Tuesday at home. Deaton Funeral Homes, Red Bay, Ala. .................................... A4

See more on this story, including video clips, in the Weekday Report. Visit kenoshanews.com and click on Weekday Report button. would always put us first ... it was always us,” he said. He said she loved to dance, and was the life of the party at any family gathering. The family also remembers Morrone for her fancy Italian dishes, especially gnocchi, lasagna and manicotti, which she often made for her children. A favorite among her three sons was her chocolate cookies, for which they wish they had the recipe, but she kept those ingredients all in her head, Jack said. She also cooked spaghetti for church events at Our Lady of Mount Carmel. She was an active participant of the Women’s Auxillary Board at the church. Morrone altered clothing at Valet Cleaners in Racine for several years until the business closed a few years ago. “People would come in and request her,” Sandra Moskopf, her neighbor of 17 years, said. “They didn’t want anyone else to alter their clothes but her. She did meticulous, beautiful work.” Moskopf said her neighbor also worked hard to tend her garden of flowers, tomatoes, eggplant, parsley and other vegetables. She said the two often talked while in the yard, and Morrone was always “friendly.” “She never complained about people,” Moskopf said. “She was friendly with everyone and she just loved everybody.”

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BRIAN PASSINO

Law enforcement members work near a retention pond at the northwest corner of 18th Street and 30th Avenue where a missing woman’s body was found Tuesday.

BIRTHDAYS

Frederick W. Gotham, 88, of Burlington, died Saturday in Pleasant Prairie. Strang Funeral Home, Antioch, Ill. .. A4

James R. Kolkmann Sr., 64, of Kenosha, died Monday at this daughter’s home. Piasecki-Althaus Funeral Home ........................... A4

jfryman@kenoshanews.com A Kenosha woman was found dead in a retention pond at 30th Avenue and 18th Street on Tuesday morning. Rosetta C. “Rose” Morrone, 57, was reported missing Monday evening after she walked to a store in the area and never returned. There were no signs of foul play at the scene, police said. The woman’s neighbor said Morrone suffered from depression Rosetta and had Marrone switched medications in the last month or so. Police said the family was concerned with the woman’s disappearance because of a private matter, but would not release details. Cause and manner of death are pending autopsy results and the incident is still under investigation. A fisherman called police when he found the body floating in the pond at about 8:45 a.m. Family members were notified about an hour later. Morrone is survived by her husband, Alfonso Morrone; their three sons, Jack, Robert and John Morrone; one grandson and several other family members and friends. “She was a very loving mother, grandmother, sister, aunt and godmother,” Jack Morrone, 36, said. “She always put family first.” Jack said he remembers his mother sacrificing items she might have wanted to instead purchase her children toys or clothing. “As kids growing up, she

Andy Romanowski turns 10 today. He will be a fifth-grader at Pleasant Prairie School this fall and enjoys playing with his brother, Alex. Other local birthdays: Sadie Schuldt, 10 Celebrity birthdays: Andy Robin Williams, actor, 59 Romanowski Jon Lovitz, comedian, 53 Check out more birthday photos in the Weekday Report at www.kenoshanews.com.

INDEX Advice B5 Business B6 Class C5,6,Sec.D Comics B7 Deaths A4 Entertain D2 Food B1,2 Local Sec.A

Lottery A6 More D1 Nation/World B3 Opinion B4,5 Sports C1-4 TV Listings B8 Weather B8


Local

KENOSHA NEWS | WEDNESDAY, JULY 21, 2010 |

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Crane Dairy Location: 29320 31st St., Burlington Year founded: 1948 Number of acres: 700 Size of herd: 220 milking Types of crops: Corn, soybeans, wheat, oats, peas, alfalfa and grass hay History: Founded by Walter Crane. Bob Crane (Walter’s son) took over in the late

1960s and Rob and Ryan Crane (Bob’s sons) bought into the family business in 2006. They have increased the herd size from 10 to 220 and have made significant changes as to how they store feed. The upright silos have been replaced by bunker silos and plastic bags. Also, Rob and Ryan went to the University of Wisconsin-Madison for agriculture education.

Ryan Crane uses a tractor to compress a fresh 400-ton crop of haylage at Crane Dairy. The farm feeds 4,000 pounds of haylage per day to its herd.

From farm to college and back Crane family looks to the future with dairy operation BY JILL TATGE-ROZELL

Match made at the fair

bearing college degrees. Thursday: Kasey Lois knew he needed to be on the farm in kindergarten. Friday: Despite going it alone, Joe Zinser is proud to follow in his father’s footsteps.

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enjoy putting in a crop and watching it grow. I like the challenge.” Upon his return he was able to implement some of what he had learned at school, such as how to store feed

Fundraising car wash Saturday at First Step

TWIN LAKES — The village of Twin Lakes will host its first outdoor movie Thursday at Lance Park. The movie, “Free Willy: Escape from Pirate’s Cove” will begin at dusk. The screen will be on the Aquanuts stage, facing the newly renovated seating area. There is no admission. Families are encouraged to bring their own refreshments. No alcohol is allowed.

KENOSHA — The Kenosha County chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness will hold its annual fundraiser this weekend at Tenuta’s Delicatessen and Liquor, 3203 52nd St. Donations will be accepted beginning at 4 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. Sunday. NAMI Kenosha County is celebrating its 27th year of volunteer service for those affected with serious and persistent mental illness.

KENOSHA — A fundraising car wash is slated for Saturday. The even is 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at First Step Services, 1017 63rd St. The cost is $5. Wash and wax is $8. All proceeds will go to the First Step Services day shelter. Washes are planned the second and fourth Saturdays of each month through September. For more information, call 605-8859.

KENOSHA — Local author Daniel L. Stika will be at Biggby Coffee, 7180 75th St., Suite 100, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. He will sign his new book “When Lincoln met Wisconsin’s Nightingale.” The public is invited to chat with the author.

Accounting and accountability

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Daniels Farm

Lois Farm

See more on this story, including video clips, in the Weekday Report. Visit kenoshanews.com and click on Weekday Report button.

in a way that makes feeding more efficient. However, he said, he is just one person in the partnership, which requires a give and take of ideas.

Dairy Farm Locations

NAMI’s fundraiser set for this weekend

KENOSHA — Friends Restaurant and Deli is hosting a Relay for Life fundraiser from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. on Friday. In addition to 15 percent of all sales to be donated to Relay for Life, there will be prizes and giveaways. The restaurant is located at 7127 120th Ave.. The Relay for Life event is Aug. 6 and 7 at Bullen Middle School.

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTOS BY BILL SIEL

for as much as his family’s farm heritage.

Outdoor movie to be held in Twin Lakes

Local author to sign book on Saturday

100-year-old farm.

Four-month-old Adam Crane sits in a stroller as his parents, Ryan and Rachael Crane, feed calves.

Wednesday: Ryan and Rachael Crane return to farm

EVENTS

Relay for Life fundraiser is Friday

good time to get into it.

Monday: Ben Herda adds fourth generation to Tuesday: Justin Daniels loves the animals he cares

368th Ave.

Rachael and Ryan met at the Kenosha County Fair while showing beef cattle. They attended the next 4-H meeting together and started dating in September 1999. Both knew they had a passion for dairy farming, but also wanted to go to college. “When he decided to go to Madison, I decided not to,” Rachael said from the kitchen of their newly remodeled farmhouse, Adam on her hip. “We both wanted our own college experience.” Neither got right into farming upon graduation. Rachael took a position in banking and was working 50 to 60 hours a week. Ryan worked for a custom harvesting crew driving tractors and semi-tractor trailers. “His dad encouraged him to get experience off the farm as well,” Rachael said. But Ryan knew he wanted to farm full time. “I tried other jobs, but they were all ag-related,” Ryan said. “I just always kept coming back. I really

New generation on dairy farms

Sunday: In the midst of a decline indairy farming, it’s a

Rachael has reduced her hours at the bank and is working with Ryan’s stepmother Sue to learn how to handle the farm financials. Together, they run monthly reports, spreadsheets and income statements. “Traditionally, farmers just did that at the end of the year,” Rachael said. “We have a clearer picture of our finances now.” In addition to there being more financial accountability, Rachael said dairy farmers are also expected nowadays to show how the practices they are using are environmentally and animal friendly. Crane Dairy is part of the Foremost Farms cooperative, for example, which requires its dairy farmers be part of the Farmers Assuring Responsible Management program. “You are held accountable for what you do on the farm,” Rachael said. “You must have written procedures and protocols for what you do, for example, if an animal is sick or having a calf.” It is part of the contract Crane Dairy has with Foremost that locks in a price per pound of milk. Having a guaranteed price helps the brothers with long-term planning. While those plans do include growth, Ryan said bigger is not always better. “You don’t have to be huge to make it,” he said.

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jrozell@kenoshanews.com RIGHTON — Rachael and Ryan Crane have done everything possible to ensure the Crane dairy farm in Brighton will continue long into the future. Ryan, 28, graduated from the Dairy Herd Management program at the University of WisconsinMadison in 2002. In addition to the experience he has from working on the farm, Ryan has the knowledge of the newest tools, practices and ideas out there regarding dairy farming. In 2006, Ryan and his brother Rob, 37, who also graduated from the UW program, bought the farm from their father, Bob Crane. Rachael, 28, completed her degree in marketing at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater in 2003. That, combined with her experience in banking, bring a strong business and financial background to the operation. Ryan Crane and Rachael Herda married in 2004, joining two longstanding Kenosha County dairy families. Their son, 4-month-old Adam Ryan, is the first boy of the fourth generation born in the Crane family. His name says it all — it means Little King of the Earth. And he has already taken to riding in tractors.

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A few strong T-storms; High 85 ● Low 76 — Details, B6

HANDICAPPING SOME CANDIDATES FOR NEXT CUBS MANAGER

Sports Page C1

THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010 Research models, find your next car from local inventories at Follow the races Watch the races of the International Cycling Classic at Food, Folks and Spokes on Friday from the first race to the last on a Kenosha News Webcam. The camera will be placed at the start/finish line and will run live all day so you can watch at any time. Just go to kenoshanews. com and click on the cycling badge to get your front-row seat.

DEATHS Rosetta C. Morrone, 57, of Kenosha, died Tuesday. Proko Funeral Home ......A4 Ronald Clare Rendall, 79, of Kenosha, died Jan. 26 at Aurora Medical Center. Casey Family Options ....A4 Ralph Louis Schoenleben, 94, died Monday at Wheaton Franciscan Hospital, Racine. First United Methodist Church, Racine .............A4 Armeda M. Graziani Selin, of Rockford, Ill., died Tuesday at Fairhaven Christian Retirement Center. Olson Funeral Services, Rockford ....................................A4 Dorothy “Irene” Van Beckum, 83, of Kenosha, died Tuesday at Kenosha Medical Center. Piasecki-Althaus Funeral Home ...............A4

CARS.KENOSHANEWS.COM

Firefighters find two dead be determined by the Kenosha County Medical Examiner’s Office. Wagner said it was premature to say if the deaths were being investigated as homicides.

Pleasant Prairie officials believe fire to be suspicious BY MATTHEW OLSON the building from neighbors molson@kenoshanews.com at 12:16 p.m. Neighbors said and JOHN KREROWICZ at that time that there still jkrerowicz@kenoshanews.com might be people inside of the building. PLEASANT PRAIRIE — Pleasant Prairie firefightFirefighters arrived to find ers responding to reports heavy smoke coming from the of smoke at a residence on one-story structure, but not Wednesday afternoon found a much heat coming from the man and a woman dead inside house. Firefighters found an the house. adult male inside a bedroom The causes of their deaths in the house and an adult and the fire are still being female in a bathroom, both investigated, but police say of whom were dead. Pleasthey believe the fire to be sus- ant Prairie officials did not picious and that an accelerant release the identities of the was found near a bathroom in people. the house. Pleasant Prairie Fire Dogs found dead, too Chief Paul Guilbert Jr. said Four dogs also were found firefighters responded to 12019 dead in the house. 44th Ave. after receiving two Guilbert said the fire apcalls of smoke coming from

Neighbor saw smoke

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BILL SIEL

Pleasant Prairie Fire Chief Paul Guilbert Jr., left, and Pleasant Prairie Police Chief Brian Wagner conduct a press conference at the scene of a house fire where two people were found dead Wednesday at 12019 44th Ave. pears to have been burning for a while before the smoke was seen and the fire looks to have started near a bedroom. The cause of the fire is still being investigated, with assistance from the state fire

marshal’s office. Pleasant Prairie Police Chief Brian Wagner said an accelerant, possibly gasoline, was found and is being tested. Wagner said the cause of death for both victims would

The new generation of local dairy farming

BIRTHDAYS Shirley Barrette turns 69 today. She is retired, enjoys watching TV and going to the casinos with her

Shirley Barrette husband Paul.

Other local birthday: Angelo N. DiCello, 82 Check out more birthday photos in the Weekday Report at www.kenoshanews.com.

OPINIONS ● 1

2

3

4

5

Conservative columnist Byron York wonders how long the American public will support the war in Afghanistan, and Susan Estrich wonders how President Obama is slipping in the polls for following through on his campaign promises. Steve Lund’s column features John Cram, a former Kenosha resident credited with sparking a revival of the downtown area in Asheville, N.C. Pages B4,5

INDEX Advice Business Classifieds Comics Deaths Entertainment Lifestyle Local News Lottery More Nation/World Opinion Region Sports TV Listings Weather

B5 C6 Sec. D C7 A4 D2 B1,2 Sec. A A8 D1 B3 B4,5 A7 C1-5 B6 B6

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KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BILL SIEL

Meet Kasey Lois Kasey Lois drives a tractor to the family farm in Wheatland. He will make dairy farming his career after two more years of high school. See his story on Page A6.

Chris Saimond, who lives next door, said he returned home from jogging shortly after noon to see white smoke coming from the neighboring house and banged on the front door. He did not hear an answer or any of the dogs inside barking, but heard a television. He called 911 at about the same time as another neighbor. “It’s a very surreal situation, very sad,” Saimond said. Saimond said the neighbors kept to themselves, but would say “Hi” to him. Another neighbor, who did not give a name, said police had been called to the residence several times in recent months for domestic issues.

Senate OKs jobless payments to millions WASHINGTON (AP) — State unemployment agencies are gearing up to resume sending unemployment payments to millions of people as Congress moves to ship President Barack Obama a measure to restore lapsed benefits. After months of increasingly bitter stalemate, the Senate passed the measure Wednesday by a 59-39 vote. Obama is poised to sign the measure into law after a final House vote today. It’s a welcome relief to 21/2 million people who been out of work for six months or more and have seen their benefits lapse. Under best-case scenarios, unemployed people who have been denied jobless benefits because of a partisan Senate standoff over renewing them can expect retroactive payments as early as next week in some states. In other states, it will take longer.

Preparations under way

Judge to rule on bond in Hobbs case Zion man has been awaiting trial since 2005 in deaths of his daughter and her friend

One was missing a hoop earring. Their shoes were laid neatly near their bodies. BY JESSICA STEPHEN Hobbs, who jstephen@kenoshanews.com Lawyer sees similarities to another Illinois case. found the girls, WAUKEGAN, Ill. reportedly Page A8 Jerry Laura Krystal — A judge could decide next confessed to the Hobbs Hobbs Tobias month whether to order a crimes. HowMovie to be made about release on bond for an Illinois “It’s a most unusual case,” ever, he said he confessed beHobbs’ lawyer. Page A8 father accused of killing his Zellner said after Wednescause police beat him; police daughter and her neighborday’s hearing. have denied the allegation. hood best friend. Hobbs was charged two Previous DNA evidence “We have been actively Public defender Keith days after the girls were excluded Hobbs as a suspect, following every conceivable Grant asked Wednesday that found stabbed more than 30 but charges were pursued. lead,” Pavletic told Lake Jerry Hobbs, 39, of Zion, Ill. times near Beulah Park in Hobbs has pleaded not County, Ill., Circuit Judge be released on a signature Zion, west of Sheridan Road, guilty to first-degree murFred Foreman. bond as authorities continue der. He has been held in jail Foreman granted an exten- about two miles from the to collect evidence in the May Wisconsin border. without bond. An Oct. 6 trial 2005 deaths of Laura Hobbs, 8, sion and set an Aug. 4 hearing Laura Hobbs was stabbed is scheduled. to decide the bond issue. and Krystal Tobias, 9. 22 times, including once in Hobbs’ defense team hoped each eye. Some of the nine he would be released after Prosecutor Jeff Paveltic Why so long? wounds to her neck were so DNA evidence was matched asked for a two-week extenforceful they penetrated to In the meantime, Hobbs’ to another potential suspect. sion to conclude the state’s her spine. Tobias was stabbed family hired Chicago-area But, Zellner said, not only investigation, which has 11 times. attorney Kathleen Zellner to has Hobbs not been released, come to include re-testing The second-graders were investigate why it has taken but authorities also have reold and new evidence and found face up, side-by-side, fused to let his mother, Joann conducting interviews across nearly five years to bring fully clothed but barefoot. Hobbs’ case to trial. Hobbs, visit him. the country.

State unemployment and labor agencies have been preparing for weeks for Congress to restore jobless payments averaging $309 a week for almost 5 million people whose 26 weeks of state benefits have run out. Those people are enrolled in a federally financed program providing up to 73 additional weeks of unemployment benefits. About half of those eligible have had their benefits cut off since funding expired June 2. They are eligible for lump sum retroactive payments that are typically delivered directly to their bank accounts or credited to state-issued debit cards. The Senate continued debating the measure a full day after a GOP filibuster was defeated by a 60-40 vote. Senate rules required 30 hours of debate, but missing no opportunity to seize a political edge, Democrats attacked Republicans for not waiving them and requiring an additional day of debate.


Local

KENOSHA NEWS | THURSDAY, JULY 22, 2010 | A6

Born to farm Kasey Lois proud to join family business BY JILL TATGE-ROZELL

jrozell@kenoshanews.com HEATLAND — Kasey Lois knew from the time he started kindergarten that he wanted to be a dairy farmer when he grew up. “I came home from my first day of school and said I didn’t need to go back because I wanted to work on the farm,” said Lois, now 17. Typical distractions of youth and abundant choices available to this generation of young adults haven’t changed his mind. “I’d rather be farming,” he said. “It’s all I really know how to do.” He said most of his friends are also farmers. Some are going to college to study agriculture business. “I’m just going to jump right in,” he said. “My family has had this farm for 152 years. I want to keep it in the family name for at least 200 years.”

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KENOSHA NEWS PHOTOS BY BILL SIEL

Kenosha County dairy farmer Kasey Lois, 17, carries bales of straw out of barn storage.

New generation on dairy farms

All in the family

Lois said he is fortunate to come from a big family, which allows the work to be spread around and for people to get a break now and then. A typical day on the Lois farm begins a little after 5 a.m. when the cows are brought in to feed. Milking starts a little after 6 a.m. and takes about an hour and a half.

for as much as his family’s farm heritage. bearing college degrees.

Thursday: Kasey Lois knew he needed to be on the farm in kindergarten.

Friday: Despite going it alone, Joe Zinser is proud to follow in his father’s footsteps.

Dairy Farm Locations Crane Dairy 83 Herda Farm

Bradford 1941 The Bradford class of 1941 is having a 69-year reunion July 31. The event begins at noon at Bombay Louie’s, 2227 60th St. The deadline to register was July 15, but for more information, call Betty Bruno at 652-6639 or Elmer Schmidt at 654-4525.

Bradford 1952 The Bradford class of 1952 is planning an informal reunion for Aug. 6. The event, for both January and June graduates, begins at 5 p.m. at the Brat Stop, 12304 75th St. For more information, call Earlene Girman at 552-9764.

Bradford 1968-72 A multi-year class reunion for former Bradford students is being planned. The reunion, for those graduating 1968-72, will be Aug. 6 at Ashling on the Lough, 125 56th St. The cost

Lois Bros. Farm 142

Daniels Farm

Zinser Farm Jb 45

75 60th St.

Paddock Lake

Lois Farm 50

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Silver Lake

Kasey Lois will make dairy farming his career after two more years of high school. “I just love it,” he says. “I love the work. I love the cows. I really like driving a tractor.”

“We milk between 340 and 350 cows,” he said. Kasey said it is his responsibility to chop the hay and corn and to make the feed after school. He works on the farm until about 10 p.m. In the spring, he tills the land while most people are fast asleep. “I just love it,” he said. “I love the work. I love the cows. I really like driving a tractor.” His favorite part of the day is when he is doing his nightly chores. “I find it peaceful when I’m in the barn by

UPCOMING REUNIONS KENOSHA NEWS STAFF

100-year-old farm.

Wednesday: Ryan and Rachael Crane return to farm

312th Ave.

A typical day

good time to get into it.

Monday: Ben Herda adds fourth generation to Tuesday: Justin Daniels loves the animals he cares

368th Ave.

Kasey will have plenty of help and a strong foundation to get him started. The farm, originally 80 acres, dates back to Sept. 9, 1855. When purchased by Kasey’s parents, Andy and Lucille Lois, the farm had 39 dairy cows. See more on this Kasey’s brothstory, including ers Andy Jr. and video clips, in Gary Lois took over operation of the Weekday the farm in 1973. Report. Visit A third brother, kenoshanews. Larry, joined com and click on them in 1981. Weekday Report The partners button. now own roughly 430 acres and work about 900 acres in Wheatland and Randall. They grow about 220 acres of soybeans, 80 acres of wheat and 150 acres of corn, while milking about 100 cows. For seven years they have sold their milk to Oberweis, a milk processing company, which donated all of the milk for the dairy breakfast. “Everyone wants to see another generation of farmers stay in business here,” Lois said of the support he is getting in making this decision. “They have all worked so hard their whole lives to make it better for the next generation. It gives you goosebumps just thinking about it.” Kasey already owns a couple of his own cows and upon graduation in May 2011 he will buy into the partnership with his three brothers.

Sunday: In the midst of a decline indairy farming, it’s a

is $10 at the door. No reservations are necessary. For more information, contact Darlene Pitts Gretzinger at 551-8706, dargretz@ yahoo.com; Rhonda Rizzo at 694-1026, ritzriz@prodigy.net; or Jeff Schenning at 818-7729, schenningj@yahoo.com; or go to kenoshabradfordalumni. com.

Bradford 1975 The Bradford class of 1975 is having a 35-year reunion July 24. The event will be 5 to 10 p.m. at 262.Ultra Lounge, 5722 Third Ave. Dinner is $15 if desired; otherwise admission is free. Details can be found at www.bradford75.com or contact Rocco LaMacchia at 262-551-9892.

Tremper 1980 The Tremper class of 1980 is having an informal reunion on July 31. For more details, go to www.tremperalumni. com or contact Candy at 4562513.

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Address: 7601 368th Ave. Year founded: 1955 Acres: 430 owned, 900 worked Size of herd: 100 milking Crops: Corn, soybeans and wheat History: Founded by Andy and Lucille Lois in 1955, Andy Jr. and Gary Lois took over operation in 1973, a third brother Larry joined them in 1981

KENOSHA NEWS

myself, the work is done and the cows are quiet,” he said.

Plans for the future By 2012 or 2013, Lois hopes to have built a new barn with a free-stall milking parlor. “It’s not going to be a top-of-the-line robotic thing,” he said. “But it will be a lot easier than what we have now (a tie-stall barn in which a milking unit is carried to the animals).”

Taking on a huge debt load is not a good idea when it comes to dairy farming, he said. Lois doesn’t see farming as a risky business. “Money worries everyone, not just farmers,” he said. “Anyone could go broke.” He believes consumers are taking more of an interest in where their food products are coming from, which makes this an exciting time to be a farmer. Instead of it being a dirty job no one wants to do, it is a job that instills a sense of pride and accomplishment, he said.

Maplecrest Country Club FRIDAY GOLF SPECIALS Start your weekend with a “Friday Golf & Dine” at beautiful Maplecrest Country Club. Relax after a round with a beverage by our outdoor fire pit, then enjoy our Icelandic Cod fish fry or our open-faced Angus ribeye steak sandwich Dining 4:30 to 8 p.m. Walk-in diners are welcome. For information or reservations (recommended),

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Partly sunny, humid; a strong thunderstorm. High 90 ● Low 76 — Details, B12 Get Out Inside

SUMMER PROGRAM STAGING ‘ROMEO AND JULIET’

SPORTS

C1

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FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010 Search Kenosha’s real estate listings and map locations at

HOMES.KENOSHANEWS.COM

Heat, rain, storms won’t stop today’s Thunder, Spokes events BY JESSICA STEPHEN

jstephen@kenoshanews.com With highs of 90 possible today, Country Thunder and Food, Folks & Spokes might actually be the hottest events in Kenosha County. But, with a 50 percent chance of rain in the forecast, organizers promise they will go on rain or shine. “We don’t cancel,” said Christine VanDyke, spokeswoman with

DEATHS Ellsworth H. Pratzer, 90 of McFarland, Wis., died Wednesday at home. Casey Family Options. More information Sunday.

the Y, which is hosting the Food, Folks & Spokes event in downtown Kenosha from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Same for Country Thunder, which expects to host thousands of country music fans this weekend for its outdoor festival in Randall. Thunder organizers said they would only cancel because of lightning or if local authorities ordered an evacuation.

If the weather looks dicey, Country Thunder-goers could call the event hotline at 866-802-6418 to double-check possible closures. But, organizers said, the phone line had been backed up since the festival opened Wednesday, so visitors were better off logging on the Country Thunder website. Details will also be posted on the Kenosha News website, www.kenoshanews. com.

As for Food, Folks & Spokes, VanDyke said the heat would be the organizers’ main focus. “We’re all thinking happy thoughts,” she said. “It’s not going to rain. It’s gonna be a hot one.” With the humidity, forecaster predicted it was likely to feel close to 100 degrees today. Food, Folks & Spokes visitors can find shade under any of the tents that will be set up in Library

The new generation of local dairy farming

Leslee J. Schwandt, 64, of Kenosha, died Wednesday at home. Miller-Reesman Funeral Home, Union Grove .......................... A4 Donald F. Niedzolkowski, 70, of Kenosha, died Tuesday in a motorcycle accident. Bruch Funeral Home .......................... A4

BIRTHDAYS

Other local birthdays: Andrew Edward Sporer, 1 James Lee, 13 Celebrity birthdays: Don Imus, radio personality, 70. Woody Harrelson, actor, 49. Alison Krauss, country singer, 39. Omar Epps, actor, 37. Daniel Radcliffe, actor, 21. Check out more birthday photos in the Weekday Report at www.kenoshanews.com.

OPINIONS ● 1

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Probe in fire deaths continues BY JOHN KREROWICZ

Mary Ann Sather turns 70 today. She enjoys thrift stores, going to casinos, making jewelry and being with family.

Mary Ann Sather

Park or they can duck inside the library for a bit of air conditioning. A misting tent also will be available outside. Drinking water will be key for beating the heat, VanDyke predicted. Organizers will keep a close eye on the nearly 200 volunteers working the bicycle races. A local church also offered to let volunteers come inside for a respite from the heat.

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Eugene Robinson talks how some use race to smear President Obama, and E.J. Dionne takes an electoral dry run. Elizabeth Daghfal takes her turn as a “My Turn” columnist, and we have your letters. Page B6, 7

KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY BILL SIEL

Meet Joe Zinser Brighton dairy farmer Ernest Zinser, left, is ready to retire and hand over the farm to his son, Joe. See their story on Page A2.

jkrerowicz@kenoshanews.com Two people found dead at a Wednesday home fire have been identified as the homeowner and a female roommate. Firefighters discovered Ronald D. Black, 68, and Carol C. Lamielle, 47, in the home at 12019 44th Ave. after responding about 12:15 p.m. to reports of smoke coming from roof vents. Autopsies done Thursday by the Kenosha County medical examiner were not final, as carbon monoxide and toxicology exam results were pending, said Police Chief Brian Wagner. Police have called the fire suspicious because a container apparently containing gasoline was found in the home. Asked if the case might be a murder-suicide, Wagner said, “Everything is on the table and we’re going to go down whatever road we need to go down to come to some resolution. “But at this point, were not seeking anyone else in this matter. However, this is a complicated investigation, medically and otherwise, and that could change down the road, although I don’t anticipate it will.” Officials have been approaching the investigation as if the deaths were homicides because all possibilities must be examined, he said. “There are a number of

theories here, and we have to conduct the investigation on a worst-case scenario basis,” he said. “If at some point that’s not the case, then that’s fine.” Wagner said Black was found face down in a bedroom, where the fire apparently began. Lamielle was found in a bathtub near the container. Wagner said officers are waiting for confirmation that it had gasoline in it. Detectives are working with the state fire marshall’s office during the investigation. Wagner said investigators continued to sort through the rubble in the home searching for evidence Thursday afternoon. “In a fire scene where potential evidence has been burned, we want to sift and do a thorough job and not miss anything,” he said. Court records online show Lamielle was sentenced in Kenosha on June 24 to 10 days in jail and 18 months of probation for possession of cocaine, possession of a controlled substance and resisting. She also was sentenced in 2001 for endangering safety with a dangerous weapon, battery to officers and disorderly conduct and in 2003 for battery to an officer and resisting. There was no record online of any criminal cases for Black.

INDEX Advice Business Classified Comics Deaths Entertainment Go Local Lottery More Nation/World Opinion Region Sports TV Listings Weather

B7 B9 C5,6,D1,3-12 B10 A4 D2 B1,2 Section A A6 D1 B3-5 B6,7 B8 Section C B12 B12

Soldier schedules duty around Country Thunder BY JESSICA FRYMAN

Up to the minute NEWS, WEATHER & SPORTS

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KENOSHA NEWS PHOTO BY JESSICA FRYMAN

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U.S. Army Sgt. Blake Buchanan puts on a T-shirt from his mother Sandy Rehberg while getting a high five from an audience member at Country Thunder Thursday night. Printed on the shirt is “Sgt. Buchanan is home on leave from Afghanistan just for Country Thunder.”

jfryman@kenoshanews.com TWIN LAKES — While lightning late Thursday night might have put a scare in some visitors to this year’s Country Thunder celebration, hardly anything will stop one Kenoshan from being there. Not even duty with the U.S. Army. Sgt. Blake Buchanan, 26, scheduled his two-week leave from his tour in Afghanistan to rock out at the four-day music festival. “It’s great,” Buchanan said about the event he’s attended since he was 10 years old. “I get to have some beer, choose what I want to eat every day. I can’t complain. It’s the little things you miss when you’re

Approaching storms prevent Sawyer Brown from taking the stage. Back page. away.” Buchanan is camping out with at least 60 of his friends, some he’s known since elementary school, others he’s met at previous Country Thunders. The group takes up 15 campsites in the crowd of nearly 3,000 at the event. About 15,000 people are expected to camp throughout the weekend.

Big lineup of acts This year’s lineup fea-

tures Kenny Chesney, who headlines Sunday at 8:30 p.m. Acts leading up to the big show include Luke Bryan and Jo Dee Messina. Miranda Lambert is Saturday’s big name, with Jason Aldean and Sugarland taking the main spotlight today. Buchanan was most looking forward to Eric Church, though, who kicked off the festival Thursday night. Despite Buchanan’s enthusiasm, the grounds for the opening day’s shows were far from full. The reserved seating area was virtually empty and the lawn was not crowded. More trickled in for John Michael Montgomery See THUNDER, Back page


Local

KENOSHA NEWS | FRIDAY, JULY 23, 2010 |

A2

Like father, like son Joe Zinser ready to take over for retiring dad

Joe Zinser, a fourth-generation Brighton dairy farmer, takes a quick break during the morning milking. “It’s not the easiest thing to do in the world,” he said of farming. “But you’re going to have doubts no matter what kind of business you start. Sometimes it gets frustrating because there is a lot that is out of your control. Everyone has good days and bad days on the job, though.”

BY JILL TATGE-ROZELL

jrozell@kenoshanews.com RIGHTON — Joe Zinser said he is proud to be able to follow in his father Ernest’s muddy footprints on the family dairy farm. “This is all I’ve ever done,” Zinser, 38, said. “Once my dad realized I could reach the (equipment), I started milking. I don’t know what else I’d do.” Zinser said he likes the idea of being his own boss and his father Ernest, 71, is ready to retire. So, Zinser is leasing the land and machinery from his parents and has purchased the dairy cattle with the goal of taking over the operation started by his grandfather John in the late ’40s on 60 acres near highways 142 and 75.

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New generation on dairy farms

Sunday: In the midst of a decline indairy farming,

Worth the risk

it’s a good time to get into it.

farm bearing college degrees.

Thursday: Kasey Lois knew he needed to be on the farm in kindergarten.

Friday: Despite going it alone, Joe Zinser is proud to follow in his father’s footsteps.

Dairy Farm Locations 312th Ave.

There was a time when area farmers discouraged their chil-

for as much as his family’s farm heritage.

Wednesday: Ryan and Rachael Crane return to

Crane Dairy 83 Herda Farm KENOSHA NEWS PHOTOS BY BILL SIEL

Joe Zinser pets Lizzie, an Australian Shepherd/Brittany Spaniel mix, while mixing food for the dairy herd at the Brighton farm he works with his father, Ernest.

Zinser Farm Address: 1581 240th Ave. Founded: Late 1940s Acres: 230

Herd size: 44 History: Founded by John Zinser, ownership tranferred to Ernest in 1965, in transition to Joe Zinser.

See more on this story, including video clips, in the Weekday Report. Visit kenoshanews.com and click on Weekday Report button.

142

Daniels Farm

Zinser Farm Jb

368th Ave.

Dad likes decision

100-year-old farm.

Tuesday: Justin Daniels loves the animals he cares

Ernest grew the farm from 18 cows to 44 cows and added on to the barn in the ’60s. “I would like to get a little bigger,” Joe said. However, he has no brothers with which to share the workload and getting much bigger would require employees. It also means he is tied to the farm 24/7, 365 days a year. Because he will be the sole farmer, he does not have time to take another job to create supplemental income. “It’s not the easiest thing to do in the world,” he said of farming. “But you’re going to have doubts no matter what kind of business you start. Sometimes it gets frustrating because there is a lot that is out of your control. Everyone has good days and bad days on the job, though.” On the farm, those bad days involve trouble with feed conveyors, broken hoses, flat tires, broken belts and bad weather, for example. “It’s usually when you think it’s all lined up and ready to go,” he said. “Mother Nature can destroy you.” The toll farming can take on a body and how long he will be able to keep it up weigh on his mind. But, even with these stressers, Zinser said farming is worth the trouble. There is also a benefit to being the sole owner. When a partnership is formed, it can be difficult to get everyone to agree, he said.

Monday: Ben Herda adds fourth generation to

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Paddock Lake

Lois Farm 50

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Silver Lake

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dren from farming and said they wouldn’t wish a farmers life on anyone. But Ernest said he never regretted being a farmer and is pleased his son wants to continue the heritage. “I’m glad he would like to be farmer,” Ernest said. “It’s hard, but it’s still a nice lifestyle.”

He said he will do what he can to help with the transition. “My advice is, don’t go too deep into debt to start with,” he said. “Farming is uncertain and prices vary.” The younger generation realizes the farm is also the retiring generations bread and butter — their retirement account — and is appre-

EVENTS

ciative of the sweat equity that went into it. Part of the reason the older generation did without certain luxuries was to ensure there was something to leave behind. Zinser said it is important to him that his parents’ needs are met through this process. “If it wasn’t for their hard work there would be no farm to carry on,” he said.

Vol. 116 l July 23, 2010 l No. 276

Carthage to host early childhood expert

Invasive species workday is Saturday

Pulera to host Relay fundraiser Saturday

Rummage sale benefits Komen walk

KENOSHA — The Center for Children’s Literature at Carthage College will host early childhood expert Professor Harlan Hansen on July 30. Hansen will speak on how parents and caregivers can help children develop crucial skills for school success. The adults-only presentation is at 10 a.m. in Hedberg Library’s Niemann Media Theatre. There is no charge. Refreshments will be served. Hansen is a professor emeritus of early childhood education and elementary school classroom management and discipline at the University of Minnesota. He and his wife, Ruth, wrote the book “Lessons for Literacy: Promoting Preschool Success.” He will advise parents, caregivers and professionals who work with young children. For more information, call John Stewig, director of the Center for Children’s Literature, at 262-552-5480.

BRISTOL — Pringle Nature Center, 9800 160th Ave., Bristol is holding an Invasive Species Workday from 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday. Everyone is invited to help combat European Buckthorn, Multi-Flora Rose, and many more invasive plants. Bring your own work gloves; tools will be provided.

KENOSHA – Pulera Cancer Fighters are having their fourth annual car wash, bake, craft and raffle sale from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday at the Southport Financial Center, 7027 Green Bay Road. All proceeds benefit Kenosha Relay for Life.

RACINE — A team of walkers for the 60-mile Susan G. Komen Walk for the Cure is holding a rummage sale from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday. All proceeds from the sale will go to fight breast cancer. The is at 5526 Windward Drive in Racine, south of 16th Street east of Highway 31.

Bookmobile to be at HarborMarket KENOSHA — The Kenosha Public Library Bookmobile will make a Kid Stop at HarborMarket from 10:30 a.m. to noon Saturday. The Bookmobile will be parked near the Kenosha Public Museum. Join Children’s Services and the Bookmobile for fun summer activities during HarborMarket. Bookmobile will be at HarborMarket on Saturdays until Aug. 28 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Birdbath activity at Bong Saturday BRIGHTON — Bong Recreation Area sponsors two programs Saturday: ■ 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.: “Baths for Birds.” Make a leaf concrete bird bath using a sand casting technique. Pre-register and pay the $15 fee by calling 262-878-5600 or stopping at the Entrance Station. Meet at the Visitor Center. ■ 7 p.m. to 8 p.m., “Scales & Slime.” Stomp in the swamp to discover reptiles and amphibians. Be prepared to drive. Meet at the Visitor Center.

Sudoku: Answer to today’s puzzle, seen on page A6.

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Siel #24 Photo Essay