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KNEON

—Welcome to the sixth issue celebrating the dreams of a realist, the euphoria of uncertainty and the general haziness that comes with the limbo that is not quite reality. Featuring Netsky, Aaron Feaver, Linus Lohoff, Pelle Lannefors and more.

6 Dreamer


Masthead KNEON The magazine about creative youth est. 2010 | Winter 2013 now issue 06

Founder & Editor-In-Chief

Victoria Jin victoria@kneon-magazine.com

Arts Editor

Julia Karpova julia@kneon-magazine.com

Advertising Enquiries

victoria@kneon-magazine.com

Layout and Art Direction Victoria Jin

Contact

info@kneon-magazine.com www.kneon-magazine.com www.facebook.com/kneonmag All content Š 2010-2013 KNEON Magazine

Left cover Daniel Lehenbauer ft. Rory Torrens @ Elite mgmt Right cover Pelle Lannefors ft. Therese Fischer

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photo, Lukasz Wierzbowski

CONTRIBUTORS


Issue 06 Photographers

Thanos Poulimenos, Anya Holdstock, Lukasz Wierzbowski, Pelle Lannefors, Amie Milne, Aaron Feaver, Marta Bevacqua, Nick Wei, Daniel Lehenbauer, Polina Karpova, Yuji Watanabe, Victoria Jin, Linus Lohoff, Andrew Kalashnikov, Valentina Vallone, David Cortes, Lena Kholkina, Leanne Surfleet, Roberta Pirisino

Thanks to

Efi Ramone, Christos Vourlis, Ilias Wia, Evan Baul, Adele Sanderson, Olimpia Liberti, Jimmy Guo, Josefina Zarmen, Philip Fohlinw, Rasmus Signeul Punsvik, Minna Ingren, Rebecca Vitartas, Kate Blainey, Giles Cook, Camilla Bresci, Aliana Moss, Francesca Brazzo, Brooke Neilson, Antonio Barros, Olivier Malicki, MayloO, Mariona Bodinier, Christine Simonian, Eugenia Loli, Francisca Pageo, Thomas Spieler, Frederica Giovannone, Daisy Calleja, Jessica Wu, Lauren Kestner, Larissa Chivlikli, Irene Ghillani, Prisca Maizzi, Michele di Palo, Umi Serra

Pelle Lannefors AGE 29 HOMETOWN Stockholm OCCUPATION Photographer EDUCATION Gamleby Fotoskola, Magazine & Advertising photography (Småland), Kul-

turama School of Preforming Art (Stockholm) DREAMER I dream about the finding the perfect, magic light TELL US ABOUT YOUR WORK IN THIS ISSUE The Stratification shoot was one of the most amazing shoots I’ve had. The model Therese had so much positive energy, and the team deserves a massive thanks; I always love working with them. Also, my baby sister and her boyfriend came to watch me shoot for the first time, and brought some great wine WEBSITE www.lannefors.com Portrait of Pelle by Anna Katarina Larsson

Anya Holdstock AGE 25 HOMETOWN London OCCUPATION Photographer EDUCATION Art at Moscow Art Lyceum, Illustration at Central St Martins TELL US ABOUT YOUR WORK IN THIS ISSUE Inspired by Zlata @ IMG who’s got the

looks of Eva Green (The Dreamers) the story was shot on a private island in the middle of December THREE THINGS YOU WANT TO DO TODAY Casting for a LFW show, editing a look book for RIYKA and bathing my dog Mishka WEBSITE www.anyaholdstock.com


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR photo, Leanne Surfleet


Dear Reader, Welcome to sixth issue of KNEON. This one features a refreshed set of young collaborating artists, a new pair of home bases – London and Edinburgh –, and another theme, ‘Dreamer’. A friend recently posted one of those morale cartoons up on Facebook. It showed two men digging underground, trying to find diamonds. One man is turning back from the path he was shovelling through, dejected from his mission. Yet, from a side view, we see a vast ocean of diamonds just an inch away from his head; just one more shovel and he would have discovered splendour, but he has already given up. The same picture shows a second man shovelling parallel above him, who is ferociously – almost manically – shovelling towards the same direction as the first. Except there is no sign of his slowing down: sweat drops are left in his wake (you know, as cartoons do) while his eyes flash with determination. Obviously, he’s not slowing down soon, and obviously he will reach that goal. And he will triumph. Dreams: states in which we imagine ourselves to be in in an ideal future? Is it connected to our reality in any way? Julia and I spoke to musicians, artists and photographers; all ages, all places, all languages. We asked about their imaginations and their dreams at night, and it seemed like we were getting the same answers: have one overwhelming wish, a dream, and stick to it. However, while a cartoon figure would never feel fatigue or tunnel claustrophobia, we’re nevertheless (just) human, and a constant single-minded focus would tire anyone out. Sometimes, I wake up and all I want to do is belly flop back onto my bed, pull up the covers with my feet sticking out and watch non-stop episodes of Big Bang Theory (don’t worry, Christine, I will start watching Suits soon, I promise). If dreaming helps us with motivation for the future, then maybe a couple more hours of snoozing will polish up my CV a little bit... Victoria Jin Editor-in-chief and founder


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lukasz untitled Interview Victoria Jin All photos, Lukasz Wierzbowski


“I don’t like putting titles to my photos...


...I want to make them open for any kind of interpretation.” First of all, who is Lukasz Wierzbowski? Tell us a bit about yourself. A slightly neurotic guy with camera in shaky hands. I’m just trying to do what I love and so far it’s going well.

How old do you feel? I’m 29 and I feel like it. I never really paid much attention to the date of my birth and I stopped celebrating it when I was 15. I just feel good about myself without ever thinking about my age.

Where are you right now? I currently live in Wroclaw where I moved to study psychology. I kinda sunk into the welcoming atmosphere of the city, which is filled with amazing people. Over the last 8 years so many things happened and Wroclaw was a sort of witness to it all. I feel a very strong bound with places I see.

Would you rather be some-

place else? If so, where? I’m not sure about moving someplace else at the moment but I would definitely love to travel more. I fell in love with places rather quickly and it’s always exciting to discover new surroundings. I could imagine myself living in New York or Berlin.

What excites you the most about a new shoot? The unknown. I never plan my sessions in advance as working on the spot is way more exciting. The connection between me, the model and the surrounding is all I really need.

How do you prepare for a shoot? What is the whole 'before' process? The whole process is very simple. I get in touch with a model, we pick a place for the shooting, pick out clothes, go to the location and start shooting. I don’t like making precise plans in advance.


by the amount of photos that float around the internet.

What do you want the viewer of one of your photos to feel like? I want to have an emotional impact, a story to which anyone can rely to in a way. I don’t like putting titles to my photos, I want to keep ready for any kind of interpretation.

What's the best thing about life? The ability to love people.

Given the chance to change lives with someone else, who would it be? I could definitely change places with David Attenborough, I would like to see of the amazing places he visited.

“I want to have an emotional impact, a story which anyone can relay to in a way.”


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What's a good life ideology to live by? Karma always comes back to you.

This issue is themed 'Dreamer' what does this mean to you? Existing in two realities.

What is your biggest dream for the future right now? I have no idea what the future will bring but I’m excited to find out.

Have you ever had a reoccurring dream? If so, can you describe it? I dream everyday. Each time the dream story is different but there are some motives that come back in a slightly different form like jumping into the air as a spaceman, walking on the moon or driving by blossoming orchards.


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“I feel a very strong bond with places I see.�


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« What I love most is to travel and see these people that are united by music. It’s really beautiful. «


Netsky [pronounced ‘Net-skye’] is a solo act by Boris Daenen, Belgium’s most notable drum and bass export since 2009. After signing up with Hospital Records and releasing two consecutive albums, one white-hotter than the last, Daenen has seen a vertical rise to fame through his smooth style that combines instrumentals with vocals; liquid to the ears, absolutely essential H2O for the body. KNEON caught up with the 23 year-old before his set at Liquid Rooms Edinburgh.

netsky interview Victoria Jin camera assistant, Christine Simonian

Who is Netsky? And who is Boris? That’s a good first question. I’m a musician; I’ve been making drum and bass for around seven years, I guess. Before that I was into a lot of Deep House and Techno. I’ve always been enjoying a lot of music, a lot of Rock, Reggae, Soul from my dad’s background.

How old do you feel? It depends. I still feel 23, but if I’m tired I can feel quite old sometimes.

They say you learn something

new everyday; do you learn something new at every set? I tend to learn a lot more with the live band sets, than with the DJ sets, since I’ve been doing that for quite a while. There are still a lot of interesting things you can learn with DJ sets, but for me, learning to be a performer is the next step. I never really dreamt of doing this as a kid; I never wanted to be in the spotlight, to be on stage, a little dance and grabbing the mic; that’s a big learning curve for me.

This time yesterday what were you doing?


KNEON I was at a Goose concert in Belgium. They’re a really cool band, very popular in Belgium.

Speaking of gig-sets: what was the most memorable set you were ever at? One of the sets I’ll never forget is a Gentleman [German Reggae artist] show in Brussels as well, which was one of the first shows I’ve ever been to. It was great, and the first time I really went into a club environment, so it was very memorable.

Does your audience ever differ drastically? Yeah, every territory has their own rules. We were just touring in South Korea, and that’s a different world. We played this live gig with all these Korean pop and electro DJs. The first three minutes we started playing, everyone was like ‘What are they doing, we’ve never heard this before’. But then everyone just went wild. It was a great show and a great crowd who reacted to something entirely new. That couldn’t really happen anywhere in the world, I think.

Where is somewhere you haven’t performed yet but you really want to? I really want to go to South America, especially Brazil.

me just getting signed to a label, and working on the fan base, not experimenting overly much because they might not like it. But I was much more comfortable with the second album, being what I want to be. It’s very fun to feel like you can do way more than what people expect of you.

You’ve cited High Contrast as an influence. I love him and I still love his music. When I started listening to drum and bass, he was the only person mixing melodic with musical, and that’s why he’s the first of drum and bass for me. He’s what inspired me to get into it: I love the energy, incorporating melodies with organic instruments instead of just electro.

What role do vocals play in your tracks? Sometimes I finish a track that’s instrumental, and something’s missing. Vocals add so much more personality to a track, it makes it more emotional. Adding lyrics takes it to another level, I think. You can really express yourself in this human way.

What are the major perks of touring? I just love meeting new people. I’ve seen the world upside down. It reminds me every second of how far away from home I am. What I love most is to travel so much and see these people that are united by music. It’s really beautiful. It’s a reunion, back- and front-stage.

Your second album ‘2’ is so different from anything you did before. Every track has its own unique personality. A lot of DJs tend to conform to one sound to be more recognizable as an artist. What do you think about that?

This issue is themed ‘Dreamer’. What is a dream you’ve had constantly in your sleep?

Oh great, thank you! I definitely had a very different mentality with the second album. The first one was

I can only remember nightmares to be honest. I’ve been having this one where I go on stage, and everything

www.netskymusic.com

is just not working. I’m just standing there, resorting to playing a guitar.

What is was a childhood dream of yours? I always wanted to be a pilot.

Sander Van Doorn [issue 4] said that some years ago, kids wanted to become pilots when they grew up, but now they just want to be DJs. How do you think the whole phenomenon developed? Yes, and more importantly, how can you become a DJ different from the rest? Because back in the day, DJing was really cool - and it still is, but now people don’t really appreciate it or think about it as much. And it got so big in the last few years. And everybody is DJing today. Everybody. There’s so much new software and new ways you can play songs, sometimes you look at it and it’s not the art it used to be, where people got big record boxes, hand picked all the vinyl and went to the shop Monday or Friday. It was very passionate. And I’m not whining about it either, I’ve always been an electro DJ as well, but it’s changed a lot. And I think DJs now really have to have their own personality on stage, make this great music, or even have these cool outfits. It’s moved more into the show business, instead of just making records.

What are some last words you want to put out there? I’m happy to be here, and I’m really looking to the festivals this summer and everything, planning a lot for the UK. To everyone who is coming tonight, thank you!

—VJ


LINUS LOHOFF for

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full of layers

KNEON

Three collage artists. A compare and contrast. WHERE Here. WHEN Now.

WHO WHAT


EUGENIA LOLI Who is Eugenia Loli? A soldier in pajamas! More seriously, I’ve actually taken the Jung/MyersBriggs personality test and I’m an INFP type: Highly intuitive, peaceful, with a very strict and well-defined value system (that I defend vigorously), and with a single purpose in life: the betterment of society. I’m an idealist; a believer in humanity.

strange happening in a surreal, parallel-universe world. I do hope that people find my work strange, and make them think for a while. For most of my artworks, there are deeper meanings behind them. I’m not that big on creating “pretty” artworks, although sometimes I cave in.

This is quite an over-asked question, but whose work inspires you the most, and why? That would be Kieron “Cur3es” Cropper. He’s the master of uncomfortable surreal collages. He’s very experimental, very fresh, always trying to put something new on the table. Bryan “GlassPlanet” Olson is another big influence of mine.

If you could live in any age, which would you pick?

No more than what I have to be. The last thing I’d want is to be needy and sick, a weight for everyone else. I’m not afraid of death.

I think that the time between 19501990, the baby-boomer time, was the Golden Age of the Western Civilization – so far, that is. Everything just became bigger at that time, plentiful. Of course, we’re paying for this wastefulness now, but if you happened to live at that time in a Western industrial country, it wasn’t too bad of a deal. I don’t really have a wish to live in any other time as a woman, because I’m sure it wasn’t that much fun to be a female before the 1950s.

Where do you feel the most comfortable?

The best thing that’s ever happened to you?

At home, and in pajamas. I’d say, 95% of my artworks were created while in pajamas.

Meeting my husband. He’s an amazingly smart guy, very sweet. He changed my life. He’s extremely supportive of my art, and he insists that I don’t compromise, and I don’t become “commercial”. All of my art-

How old do you want to be?

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Tell us about your artwork. What are you trying to create; what kind of mood do you try to instill in your viewers? It depends on the artwork. But the main mood I try to pass on is an uncomfortable one, showing something


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works are licensed under the various Creative Commons licenses, and are free for personal use (and some of them are free for commercial usage too).

acquired knowledge of collage with me, got inspiration like a sponge by other surreal vintage collage artists via Tumblr, and voila. I haven’t been able to stop doing collages ever since.

How did you get to where you are today in terms of artwork and ca- I don’t think I ever thought of myself as an reer? Did you expect this of your- artist before, although I was sketching & self when you were younger? drawing rather obsessively when I was a I started in the technology field, as a programmer. Then, I became a tech journalist for a popular online tech magazine. In 2007 I left that world behind me, and moved on to filmmaking. The whole collage thing started only last April, after I had finished an animated-collage music video for indie musician John Maus. I just took this newly

kid. But it helped that last year I was able to fix my long-lasting health problems by changing my diet to gluten-free (even if I’m not a celiac!). It was possibly the main reason why my creativity flourished so suddenly. I was able to feel alive again after 10 years of bad health.


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FULL NAME

Francisca Pageo Casanova AGE

Twenty-nine

FRANCISCA PAGEO TELL US ABOUT YOUR WORK.

I use to work around intuition. My method is simple yet abstract. I love to create in a pacific mood, specially listening to ambient & drone music.


WHERE ARE YOU CURRENTLY BASED?

I live in Murcia, Spain

WORDS TO LIVE BY:

Books. Music. Nature. Love.

cargocollective.com/misspaq


THOMAS SPIELER for

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This is so Cynical, Mr. Addams Photographed by Daniel Lehenbauer Models, Sadie Pinn @ Select Model Management,

Rory Torrens @ Elite Model Management Makeup, Francesca Brazzo Hair, Brooke Neilson using Bumble & Bumble

MAKEUP: ILLAMASQUA WHITE BASE FOUNDATION, WHITE PRESSED POWDER, NAIL VARNISH IN BAPTISTE & CREATION


BLACK EMBELLISHED DRESS - YAYA YANG


SHIRT AND COAT, MIUNIKU, TROUSERS BY ALL SAINTS


BLACK EMBELLISHED DRESS - YAYA YANG


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JACKET – BEYOND RETRO, WHITE SHIRT – ALL SAINTS | BLACK TROUSERS – COS MEN


BOY: JACKET – BEYOND RETRO, WHITE SHIRT – ALL SAINTS, BLACK TROUSERS – COS MEN GIRL: SHEEP SKIN JACKET AND PENCIL SKIRT - YAYA YANG TIGHTS – WOLFORD


WHITE SHIRT, BLACK AND WHITE CARDIGAN AND TASSEL TROUSERS BY TERRI LEIGH


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GIRL: CAPE COAT - RACHEL MCLEAN, WHITE SHIRT – UNIQLO, BLACK TROUSERS – H & M, TASSEL LOAFER – RUSSELL & BROMLEY BOY: BLACK JACKET AND TROUSERS  – BEYOND RETRO, WHITE SHIRT – RALPH LAUREN, TASSEL LOAFER – RUSSELL & BROMLEY


BLACK SILK SCARF & SKIRT – JAMES HOCK, NETTED JACKET – LANVIN, HEAD PIECE - ANNA DELLO RUSSO


WHITE SHIRT AND BLACK COAT – MIUNIKU, BLACK TROUSERS- ALL SAINTS


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t h i s melancholy of mine Photographed by Thanos Poulimenos Make Up, Efi Ramone Hair, Christos Vourlis Styling, Ilias Wia Photo Assistant, Evan Baul Styling Assistant, Korina Model, Susan @ VivianC models


Celebrity skin ELR Maria Tagalou Paschalio Jewels by Pricles Kondylatos Headpiece by Ilias Wia


Elemental Child

Photographed by Aaron Feaver Model, Shannon Roxanne Hair and Makeup, Aliana Moss


Ksubi mesh tank, Cue silk organiza skirt


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Interviews & artist portraits

Julia Karpova

PLAY YOUNG SMILE


The Best of British edition Dialogues with three upcoming talented young guns. Photo by Alice Joiner


Joiner

alice elizabeth joiner | 19
| british via london

Alice

Alice Joiner has focused on developing an informed and critically aware practice, which has awakened her fascination with the ‘female voice’. Experimenting with a range of materials and approaches has helped her to concentrate on emphasizing unique and powerful concepts within each line of enquiry. Through film, photography, drawing and painting, she has focused on elements of self-portraiture and translating the amorphous psychological being into a solid mass.


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YOUNG ARTIST FEATURE

What do you think is most important as a young aspiring artist? To be ambitious and spontaneous, but above all to be honest with yourself. I think that you should really put yourself out there and take each opportunity that comes to you because it could ultimately lead to something incredible.

When did you decide to study art and how? I was always drawing but it wasn’t until I was attending my previous school that I began considering what work I could produce without the limitations of space and time. I have also known a lot of older artists who went on to Art College a year or two before me, and seeing how their lives’ changed was enough for me to want to apply.

What themes are emerging in your work? There are definitely elements of the female voice and figure that have always been present but I am only just acknowledging them. There is also a combination of dissatisfaction, obsessive line movement and passive aggression.

You study at CSM, can you tell us a bit about that? I have learnt so much throughout my Foundation Course here, most importantly to be myself. I have also met some incredible people.

You cite Francesca Woodman as one of your artistic influences, can you tell us why?


YOUNG ARTIST FEATURE

She combines a sense of emotional turbulence with physical dissatisfaction beautifully. I admire the way she has treated the figure and used it as a tool to draw our attention to our surroundings and the ways in which it reflects the psychological. Above all, she has inspired me with confidence to present my own self-portraits, eliminating the fear of what others think. I am able to appreciate my own vulnerability and sensitivity and use it in a powerful way thanks to artists such as Francesca Woodman.

to be a part of the exhibition. There was something really comforting and supportive working with six other artists who are all in the exact same position. I am always amazed at how one space can be entirely transformed into a gallery; it worked perfectly with the pieces exhibited. Transporting my work has become an element that I now always have to consider because it is in increasing in scalefor the exhibition I had about 30 stainless steel spheres and pompoms to install!

A lot of your work features two You recently exhibited your work very important subjects to you, in south London (RAW exhibition), your best friend and your mother can you comment on this experi- Is there a reason for that? ence? I am so grateful for having been asked

They are two of the most important and beautiful people in my life. I could just sit


KNEON and stare at them all day. I suppose I see a lot of myself within these two subjects and applying something integral and personal to another subject allows me to view my approach from a different perspective. My mum is the most comfortable subject I have ever photographed, she becomes entirely unaware of the lens and it allows me to express to the viewer exactly what I see in the every day: her natural beauty and comfort within her own body.

camera for my source material. When taking photographs, you always use an analogue camThe theme of this issue is era, why? ‘dreamer’, do you consider The chemical change and method of yourself as one? exposing light is hugely important to me. It becomes something physical and there is an added value to the timeless negative. Analogue is also very delicate and honest and I am able to manipulate the lasting image manually as opposed to selecting an effect on the digital camera. I never have and never will use a digital

I am always talking about my dreams, even though it bores everyone to death, but I am so fascinated by the ability of our minds. I wouldn’t say I was a dreamer but I do believe that you can make anything a reality if you work hard enough at it.


samuel will| 19
| british via south east london

Sam

Living and working in London, Samuel Miles Will works trans-medially to explore the relationship between artist, space and viewer. Her is one of two co-founders of the RAW art group, designed to give young artists still in arts education a platform to showcase their work.

Will


I was born and raised in South East London, which plays a huge part of who I am. To those who know their way around, SE is definitely the place to be at the moment. The art scene in places like Peckham and Brixton is so exciting because it’s still finding its feet and there are so many amazing things going on. I work at a theatre in Peckham called The Last Refuge that is in this old warehouse space next to the Bussey Building. It’s tucked away on this seedy industrial estate but it’s a place that is run with such integrity and professionalism. It’s hidden gems like that that make SE so inspiring - I honestly wouldn’t want to live anywhere else.

the beginning. My approach to creating art has always been very intuitive rather than intellectual; by that I mean I create work for very personal reasons and my pieces are always self-referential as opposed to working as a device to comment about art or society at large. Prior to the course, I was very insecure about that fact as I felt people were expecting more intellect from my artwork and I found myself forcing grandiose concepts onto them as a way to fulfill what I thought other people wanted from my work. But the last couple of months have really allowed me to solidify an approach that comes very naturally to me, but that I previously thought was quite inadequate within the framework of an art institution.

How has studying at CSM changed your work?

Who are your artistic influences and why?

Even though I’ve only been at CSM for a couple of months now, I’ve realised how little I understood about my own practice at

People often wince when I admit that Tracey Emin is thematically a huge influence on my work as I think she’s become this

Tell us a bit about yourself

YOUNG ARTIST FEATURE


KNEON vilified poster girl for the self-indulgence of contemporary art. I think it’s sad that she’s not taken seriously as an artist by a lot of people because her early work was truly groundbreaking and she was a genuine maverick. She also has this beautifully perceptive technical skill that people often overlook, and personally I think it’s exciting to return to craft processes as we’re in this precarious position today where art might loose all sense of technical skill. If you were to ask me who my favourite artist was, I would have to say Phyllida Barlow as I think visually her installations are stunning, but also her approach to creating art is similar to mine in that we both create objects of physicality that simply exist in a space and don’t rely on concepts to legitimise them.

What are you trying to communicate through your work? To be honest, and this is going to sound very inartistic of me, I’m not really trying to convey anything particularly profound or deep with my work as that’s not why I make art. Creating work about my own experiences and emotions is a cathartic way for me to invest in or expunge things I want to elevate or deal with. The durational aspects of my performances for example are merely a way for me to test my artistic integrity and explore my own role within my work. There was one piece where I made a cake, a Raspberry Victoria Sponge, and I basically set myself the challenge to eat the whole thing. About three quarters of the way in I was sick but in order to complete my artistic pursuit I had to keep eating. It was a pretty grim experience but to me it was encouraging to see that I can actually push my own boundaries for my art. I could bullshit to you and pretend it was about society’s relentless obsession with consumption or how the individual has been damaged by the dismal economic times or something, but truthfully, it was really just about me, me, me. Oh God I must sound so self-obsessed.

Can you tell us a bit about your piece ‘Fucking Sinister Obsessive Weirdo’? It’s a quote someone I was vaguely involved with said to me during quite a toxic conversation, and I was a bit like, “oh fuck, is he right…?” and the words stayed with me for quite a while. So the idea behind this piece was to reproduce the quote in something aggressively cheerful that worked against the malicious context of the words to reflect my unhealthy obsession with repressing my emotions and pretending that “EVERYTHING IS FINE…” which is something I think we all do on some level. Also, I feel like the offering of flowers has become such an empty gesture now as they apply to every and any kind of occasion – weddings, funerals, that kind of thing, and don’t really say anything in themselves, so I guess I thought that using flowers was a way to disassociate myself from the words.

What can’t you live without? Knitting needles and Nando’s.

What do you plan on doing after the foundation course? Me and a friend set up this organisation called RAW last year that’s designed to give young artists still in arts education a platform to showcase their work, and we curated a show in Peckham just before Christmas which was an amazing experience, so we want to put together another exhibition as soon as we’ve finished. In summer I’m interrailing across Eastern Europe and hopefully finishing at the Venice Biennale. But then after that I want to get on with my education and do my fine art BA.

The theme of this issue is ‘dreamer’, do you consider yourself to be one? I’m definitely not a doer so I guess yeah, I am. But then who doesn’t like to dream big?


ÂŤCreating work about my own experiences and emotions is a cathartic way for me to invest in or expunge things I want to elevate or deal with.Âť


Alexander

James Nicholls Nineteen | British via Croydon, London Alexander James Nicholls centers his practice on the performative elements of everyday actions and their relationship to both historical and contemporary lifestyles. He looks at how social processes, normalities, and repeated events or occurrences can mould an individual’s social identity: blurring the lines between male and female, inside and outside, object and action, life and art. In his work he represents and reflects upon social fragilities, uncertainties and complications using a series of recurring objects, materials and processes that become synonymous with actions to challenge, chance and affirm identity.


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How has CSM influenced your work and working style? Studying alongside likeminded artists and designers has been crucial to my artistic development; I frequently have used my fellow students to facilitate documentation and presentation of my performance works. At CSM, I have been able to explore the relationship between the institution and the public realm, which I find captivating.

How is your personal image reflected in your work?

In my practice I try and explore how social processes, norms, and repeated events or occurrences mold an individuals’ social identity: blurring the line between male and female, object and action, life and art. I represent and reflect upon social fragilities, uncertainties and complications using a series of recurring objects, materials and processes, which become synonymous with actions to challenge, change or affirm identity. However, my work does not look so much at the personal image as the boundaries of social conventions in relation to presentation of the self and the other.

You’ve incorporated red lipstick in a lot of your work, can you tell us a bit about that? I suppose I could be considered a Lipstick Feminist. I am interested in exploring traditional concepts of femininity, socially established gender roles, objectification of the body, and sexual power. The red lipstick is identity, appearance, humanity and society. There is a 1945 diary extract written by Colonel Mervin Willett Gonin on the liberation of BergenBelsen, held the Imperial War Museum archives, which I have found extremely poignant:


“It was shortly after the British Red Cross arrived, though it may have no connection, that a very large quantity of lipstick arrived. Women lay in bed with no sheets and no nightie but with scarlet red lips, you saw them wandering about with nothing but a blanket over their shoulders, but with scarlet red lips. At last someone had done something to make them individuals again, they were someone, no longer merely the number tattooed on the arm. At last they could take an interest in their appearance. That lipstick started to give them back their humanity.”

You’re a performance artist primarily, how did you first start making live art? I have been working live art for a couple of years now; one of my first performances was a response to a 2006 ‘Untitled’ sculpture by the German artist Isa Genzken. I began by making live art in response to existing artworks, trying to reinterpret and re-present them using the body. As a young teenager, one of the first pieces of performance art which really captivated me was Ana Mendieta’s ‘Blood and Feathers’ (1974) which I proceeded to watch maybe a dozen times until


the gallery closed; upon seeing this work it was confirmed to me that I wanted to pursue performance art.

With performance art, documentation allows artworks to have a life beyond existing as memory, meaning that works can be re-presented in publication or in exhibition.

The outcomes of your work are recorded on film or as photographs – can you tell us why? I know that Marina Abramovic is a great influence to you, would you ever consider going When working with live art, documentation imperatively to the same extremes as she often does, in your has to run alongside the conception and execution of work? artworks. Whether through the written word, still-image, video or audio recordings, objects or installation, I almost always capture each performance in multiple dimensions.

Marina Abramovic is one of the most eminent performance artists; in her exploration of the limits of the


body and capabilities of the mind she is mesmerizing and seemingly fearless. I don’t think I have every really considered my limits: I suppose they change from minute to minute, day to day. I don’t think I want to re-perform Abramovic’s ‘Rhythm 0’ just yet and place myself in a position where an audience member could fire a bullet at me; but equally who knows what the future holds!

Where do you see yourself in 5 years? Living in London, making art, and wearing red lipstick.

You recently did a live performance at an exhibition in London, can you comment on this experience? I presented my interactive cleansing performance ‘Those That Wish To Be Clean, Clean They Will Be. And Those That Wish To Be Foul, Foul They

Will Be. Remember.’ in RAW at The Last Refuge, which was a wonderful experience. In the piece I washed the hands, and brushed the teeth of members of the public. The piece was presented for 14 hours over two days and was physically demanding, but the willingness of viewers to interact with the piece and their subsequent responses to the experience was very successful. It was great to be able to present this live work publically; it really assisted the performances’ aim of breaking down the boundaries of public and private space, professional and personal interaction.

The theme of this issue is Dreamer, do you consider yourself as one? “We are such stuff As dreams are made on, and our little life Is rounded with a sleep.” - The Tempest: Act IV, Scene I.


Photographed by Nick Wei HAIR & MAKEUP, CLAUDINE CHO STYLING, RONALD DONALDIO MODEL, MEISHA B @ CLICK PATTERN, WILLIAM BRANTON


MEISHA TOP EMONDA, SHORTS ICEBERG

MOD L PROFIE LE

BROOKS

Age 19

3 things no one knows about you I’m fluent in Japanese, I study

mechanical engineering and I love to make stop-motion animation (big Tim Burton fan)

and travel to experience different cultures. Hopefully, I can book some great campaigns in the near future and learn more about styles around the world

Scouted while shopping to attend an open call and was signed on the same day.

What’s your favourite track at the moment? ‘Empty’ by

A reoccurring dream in your sleep? Either I think I’m already

3 things you did today.

Tell us about your biggest dream at the moment, for the future. I’d really love to see where

When did you start modelling? When I was 16 How were you discovered?

Went to robotics lab, dance practice, and attended a magazine launch party

Lianne Le Havas

my modelling career can take me,

awake and I’m late for something, or that something I’m doing is taking way too long. It’s so stressful! Thankfully when I wake up, I realize that my life is a lot less complicated. Ha!


baby

butterfly

sugar

Photographed by

Anya Holdstock MODEL, ZLATA @ IMG | HAIR & MAKE UP, ADELE SANDERSON USING LOREAL PROFESSIONAL AND MAC | STYLIST, OLIMPIA LIBERTI


Top by Raffaele Ascione, PVC Shorts by Jane Bowler, stylist’s own socks.


Top and skirt by Raffaele Ascione


PVC dress by Jane Bowler


KNEON


Top by Raffaele Ascione, Cardigan by Le Lis Blanc, Vintage trousers, Shoes by All Star, Accessories by Broken Fab


PVC dress by Jane Bowler


Sequin dress and lace trousers by Raffaele Ascione


Silk chemise by Peter Twiss, Lace trousers by Raffaele Ascione


Pleated top by Martina Spetlova, Sequined dress (worn as a skirt) by Goldie, Shoes by COS


Barbie goes Sport. Photographed by Roberta Pirisino Styling, Irene Ghillani & Prisca Maizzi Post production & art, Michele di Palo Model, Cecile @ 2morrow models Make up & hair, Umi Serra


Ellena Gallen tee, Adidas shorts, H&M leggings, Invicta vintage backpack, H&M socks, Diadora vintage shoes, helmet bike costumized by stylist


visor H&M, bodysuit American Apparel, stylist’s own tank, skirt Ellesse


vintage polo, Nike shorts, Topshop socks, Peter Jensen for B Store shoes


vintage 50’s swim bonnet, Wesc tee, bodysuit American Apparel, leggings stylist own, shoes Adidas


Jeremy Scott for Adidas sweatshirt, H&M shorts, Topshop socks, Nike shoes


Jeremy Scott for Adidas sweatshirt, Primark headband, Vintage 80’s leggings, H&M socks, Nike shoes


Vintage headband, Diesel tee, Stylist’s own shorts, H&M socks, Converse All Star shoes


the wall

Photographed by Marta Bevacqua Styling, Camilla Bresci Model, Ellen Pinaffi @ Elite Model


PHOTOGRAPHED BY PELLE LANNEFORS FEATURING THERESE FISCHER STYLING, JIMMY GUO BEAUTY, JOSEFINA ZARMEN HAIR, PHILIP FOHLINW PHOTO ASSISTANT, RASMUS SIGNEUL PUNSVIK STYLING ASSISTANT, MINNA INGREN

STR ATI FIC AT


KNEON

Shirt, Wood Wood. Blazer, Inwear.


White shirt, BACK by Ann-Sofie Back. Suede jacket, Tommy Hilfiger. Leopard printed calfskin coat, Joseph. Lace Gown, BLK DNM.


Top, Rodebjer. Faux-fur coat (tied around waist), Esprit. Silver jeans, Club Monaco. Gloves, Joseph. Necklace, Maria Nilsdotter. Resin cuff, Sif Jakobs. Shoes, Deichmann.


Sequined bustier, Bik Bok. Mohair cardigan, Blk Dnm. Belt, stylists own. Silk trousers, Ida Johansson. Ring and necklace, This Old Dark Machine. Shoes, Deichmann.


Dress, Gant. Coyote-fur parka, Joseph. Trousers, H&M. Shoes, Dr. Martens. Fingerless gloves, Josefin Strid.


KNEON

Blouse, Blk Dnm. MacramĂŠ sweater, Hope. Coat, Stylein. Printed shirt (tied around waist), Bruuns Bazar. Trousers, Josefin Strid. Elk-tooth pendant, This Old Dark Machine. Rings, Efva Attling.


Shearling jacket, BLK DNM. Leather gilet, Jeans Company. Wool-blend jacket, Rodebjer. Sequined gown, By Malene Birger.


KNEON

Shirt and jacket: Silent by Damir Doma. Tasseled skirt, H&M. Leather trousers, Alice + Olivia. Shoes, Deichmann. Ankle cuffs, H&M. Ring and bangle, Maria Nilsdotter.


n째 100


KNEON

polina karpova Interview Victoria Jin All photos, Polina Karpova


How old are you? 20!

What age would you want to be, ideally? Always 18, this is a turning point when you become legal age and you still do not understand it.

This issue is the ‘Dream’ issue. Describe to us a dream you’ve had in the past. My dreams are unstable, they often change. One time I dreamt that my photos were understood by all people but now I understand that it’s impossible. In the past I wanted to be loved, but now that dream has become a reality, followed by absolute bliss and happiness. True happiness, which makes to create and move on.

Are you more a dreamer or a realist? It’s an interesting and hard question for me because I adore realism art (paintings of 19 century) and meanwhile I can’t imagine my life and art without a dream. In one word, I want to achieve in my photos synthesis of reality and dream, or rather a dream that becomes reality.

What’s the best thing about imagination? It is a fantasy, which allows you to select from the crowd through art.


Your photos feature girls in almost fictional settings and expressionist poses. What mood are you trying to capture? What mood are you trying to create? First of all, to show the audience my environment, and my understanding of beauty. The combination of native wildlife and human nature, which can transform into a variety of images, from the classical to the most ridiculous. It’s all a fantasy, of which I spoke in the previous question.


Tell us about what it feels like to photograph someone. Is it objective? Personal? Intimate? I do not like commercial photography, it cannot be considered voluntary art that touches the feelings. In my photos you can often see my favorite model, Yaroslava, I believe in her appearance mixed some children’s innocence and true womanhood. She’s not a professional model, but such liveliness and of course I did not observe any one person. Some people say that we look alike to her, like a sister. And perhaps this awareness of external similarity to it yields results in our pictures. It’s very personal. Very.


KNEON

What are you currently working on? Now I’m in search of new images and new locations for photos. Also I waiting for the first snow for entering the plein air :)

What motivates you to shoot? What makes you confident in your vision in a sea of photographers? I’m pretty shy person, and the photo spread my wings and gives the images speak and not the word that I speak a little. I live in Kharkov, which is recognized as the capital of the Ukrainian photographer art. However, the abundance of photographers in my city is divided into two parts, or it is a sad social photography (post-Soviet influence, homeless people, dirt and so on) and second-class glamour. Such a limited number of genres, the abundance of mediocrity in the local photographic community, the lack of artistic vision pushes me to go further.

Tell us about your teen years - what were you like? huh, I was a complete autistic, I had no friends or company, most of my free time at home where she studied fashion magazines involuntarily (my mom was a model designer), then at 16 my father gave me an amateur camera Sony, and my lonely adolescence officially ended)

What is your ultimate dream right now? To be recognized at the time. I’ve never been abroad, I dream to travel the world. Dream to become a citizen of a world.


LINUS LOH www.linuslohoff.com


HOFF

KNEON


Tell us about yourself: Who is Linus Lohoff? I am a design student from Germany fascinated with all kind of visuals.

How old do you want to be? I like my age. I'm 27.

When did you realise that photography was your medium? When I was 17-18 years old. I got an

old Nikon FE SLR from my dad and after watching through the photos after developing them I thought: That's it! Love!

What kind of mood do you try to create in your images? There is not a certain mood I try to create: it always depends on what I am photographing and for what purpose. When it comes to my personal work i am much into people. I am enjoying to just go out with someone to

a beautiful place and know him or her "photographilly". Through the lenses you look at the other one in a different way. But during these sessions you also get this connection. There is a dialog happening. A conversation that influences the mood of the person, influences you, and - in the end - also the picture you've done in this precise moment. I am pulling the trigger when I create a mood through conversations with the other. So I am catching a moment of emotion that is more than just a capture. It can turn


out silent and pure or expressive and loud.

What do you want the viewer of your images to feel like? Fascinated and surprised. All my pictures are frozen moments I thought that it was worth to catch. If the viewer is sharing with me the fascination of that moment in one photo, then I am more than happy.

During a shoot, while taking a

snap, what are you thinking? Shooting people I am letting my instinct create. Maybe I am thinking less and feeling more in these sessions. Which in the end turns out always much better. To go with the flow of your intuition. For other pictures like stills or landscapes or pictures in which I am suggesting an idea the composition is the most important for me. In this case, I like clear, straight and minimalistic imagery.

Your images have been used as the cover of books and records - what do you think is the most important thing about cover/ merchandise imagery? Does it have to stand out more, or be a certain way? I guess it should be eye-catching. But also related to the content of the artist, idea or medium. It is always better to have a strong imagery which is related to the content of the artist than only visually appealing.


Tell us about yourself as a child. What did you get up to? I am half brazilian. And I grew in a town there called Recife located near the beach. There are existing a lot of photos of me as a child playing at the beach, swimming at the beach, sleeping at the beach, eating at the beach, doing whatever at the beach. After traveling a lot and living in a lot of places I found out that the only place on earth I am feeling like home is the beach. If you look through my photoset you will find a lot of photos showing the horizon, the ocean or water and, yes you know it, the beach!

The next issue's theme is 'Dreamer' - tell us about your biggest dream for the future at the moment. Right now I am doing my final project in my communication design study path. It will be an iPad magazine with focus on photography. This is the thing that I want to finish and that I want to turn out really good. So that's the dream for right now. The biggest one? Next year I want to move to Italy. I hope I can settled down there easily. So I am dreaming that everything will get fine and good for next year's big change in my life!

In terms of dreams during sleep, has there ever been one reoccurring dream over and over in the past? If so, what was it? Me in front of the professor and the audience trying to explain my shitty final project! But in real, I think that everything will be alright!

Do you think it's better to be a dreamer or a realist, fully grounded in what's possible. In terms of money: be the realist! For everything else you can dream for.

Last words? Cherish the past, live the present, dream the future!


KNEON


♼ JULIAN www.julianzigerli.com


still shot by lukasz wierzbowski

♼ ZIGERLI


still shot by lukasz wierzbowski


You may say I’m a dreamer... Photographed by Polina Karpova Location, Rmilov-Centre, Kharkov Hair, Nico & Simone Toniandguy Rome Model, Kmodels agency


but


i’m


not


the


only


one.


PROJECT - BLACK LINEN COAT
RYNSHU - BLACK VISCOSE/SELK/CUPRA PANTS

a b o

n° 100


anything b u t ordinary Photographed by Yuji Watanabe Styling, Antonio Barros Hair, Olivier Malicki Make up, MayloO Make up assistant, Marion Bodinier

Model, Lindia Judickaite, Adrien Fichelle (Major Models)


QUASIMI BLACK LONG SLEEVE SHIRT, 
QUASIMI WHITE COTTON SUIT JACKET
, QUASIMI BLACK COTTON 3/4 TROUSERS


LÉA PECKRE BLACK SHORT JACKET


LUTZ WHITE SILK COTTON LONG DRESS, 
QUASIMI BLACK LONG SLEEVE SHIRT
, JUUN J. BLACK JACKET


LÉA PECKRE BLACK LONG JACKET “CRÈPE”


RYNSHU COTTON/SILK BLAZER
, RYNSHU COTTON/SILK PANTS
, Y. PROJECT BY YOHAN SERAFTY BLACK SHIRT WITHOUT SLEEVES
, Y. PROJECT BY YOHAN SERAFTY BLACK BOOTS


LEANNE SURFLEET for

KNEON www.leannesurfleet.com


by David Cortes featuring Caroline Onder at Re:Quest styling, Jessica Wu, makeup and hair Lauren Kestner

So chilled

JACKET BY H&M VEST BY DARK HEARTS DRESS BY UYE SURANA BRALETTE BY UYE SURANA BOOTS BY ASOS


LEFT: DRESS BY A.OK JACKET BY NIKIBIKI BRALETTE BY UYE SURANA BOOTS BY MOSSIMO JACKET BY KENT DENIM BLOUSE BY CIDENZI MORI JEANS BY MAX FOWLES BOOTS: MODEL'S OWN.


TOP BY ZARA | PANTS BY ZARA | MODEL'S OWN COAT | MODEL'S OWN BOOTS


JACKET BY KENT DENIM, BLOUSE BY CIDENZI MORI, BOOTS BY ASOS


ANDREW KALASHNIKOV

www.andrewkalash.com

Model is Yana Popova @ LMA, makeup and hair by Natali Smirnova | Leather jacket by Liza Odinokikh


KNEON


MICHAEL CANITROT Complementing the best in musical production with fashion and lifestyle: that’s the philosophy of Michael Canitrot, the fresh new dandy on the New French Electro block. With a debut album coming out in 2013, DJing for the world’s most luxury brands (think Cartier, D&G, Prada and Versace), and running his own international club night ‘So Happy in Paris?’, everything seems to be going as smooth as the instrumental melodies in his tunes, that are oh so Parisian. Interview Victoria Jin


‘IT’S A CLUBBING VISION WITH A

MIX OF YOUTH AND LOVE’


KNEON Tell us about yourself: who is Michael Canitrot? I m a DJ and producer from Paris. Also the creator of the « So, Happy in Paris ? » parties.

When did you fall in love with the decks? Since i’m 10. I had two ghetto blasters in my room, and it was my official school to be a DJ!

When did you realise that music was your medium? First because music is my main passion. And also when I suddenly realized that musician is much better than postman to catch some girls!

Tell me about your club night ‘So Happy in Paris?’ what is the philosophy behind it and what kind of people do you see there?

“So, Happy in Paris?” is a musical party concept which symbolizes Paris’ glam and chic. We always put a lot of effort in marrying music with visuals and astonishing our fans with the most complete ambiance : the crowd, the artists, the music, the visuals, the interior design of the venues we use… It’s a clubbing vision with a mix of youth and love – straight-forward and simple. For the crowd is very hype and trendy orientated. All the people who like music & fashion. 

Your first single Leave Me Now is coming out soon. Can you tell us a bit about the process of putting it together? I wanted to create a pop-rock

song re-worked with my club and electronic touch. The challenge was to be efficient in clubs but also nice to listen to in your car.

Nowadays, there are so many upcoming young DJs; every two people is a selfproclaimed DJ. How has the scene changed since you entered it?  Technic is a thing, and talent another one. For me the new technical means give us the potential to be more creative. But because a lot of people want to be DJ at the moment, we need to be more and more vigilant about the quality of production and mixes. I would say that I’m very happy to live my life looking forward to everything the future can bring to us, so I keep a positive mind about these evolutions. 

Describe your sound in 3 words Made in Paris

If your music were to be used in a movie soundtrack, which movie would it be? Pulp Fiction

Speaking of soundtracks you’ve played for luxury brands such as Cartier and Versace - how does DJing for a fashion crowd differ from a broader one? Do you ever have to tune things down/up? It’s very different than handling a proper House DJ set in a club for sure. I have to be more eclectic, I need to create an atmosphere with differents genres. The most important is to keep a constant

top-notch quality of mixes and surprise them… Because fashion people are probably the most demanding persons you can find.

Tell us about yourself as a child. What did you get up to? I wanted to be a soccer player but I didn’t have the right physical condition for that apparently! The next issue’s theme is ‘Dreamer’ - tell us about your biggest dream for the future at the moment. Still making music and seize the day, living at 100% everyday. For 2013, I have an album project, and I really hope it will be a succes.

In terms of dreams during sleep, has there ever been one reoccurring dream over and over in the past? If so, what was it? You know this one, when you see yourself at school but wearing your pyjamas… It’s a very strange sensation! 

Do you think it’s better to be a dreamer or a realist, fully grounded in what’s possible. A mix between both I suppose… Realistic during the day and dreamer when the sun goes down.

Last words? Thanks for the interview! I always try to give you my best and provide some good moments to all of you ! So follow me, listen to my music and let’s have some nice times together in clubs!


imagine this. Photographed by Lena Kholkina Model, Kristina D @ Aquarelle Models Makeup & hair , Larissa Chivlikli


headband DIY, bra Topshop


t-shirt Tommy Hilfiger, headscarf vintage


love delirium

Photographed by Valentina Vallone Styling, Frederica Giovannone Hair, Nico & Simone Toniandguy Rome Make up, Daisy Calleja


Lover slip as top, Sass and Bide bra, Zara skirt, Shakuhachi shirt dress


a s l i g h t element of isolation. Photographed by Amie Milne Model, Elodie Russell @ Chadwick Models Fashion, Rebecca Vitartas Beauty, Kate Blainey @ Unsigned mgmt using MAC Assistant, Giles Cook Still shot, Aaron Feaver


KNEON

Zara Pants, Nesh Bra


Zara dress


KNEON

Sparkle and Fade lace bra, ASOS wishbone necklace Opposite page: Lover dress


This page Flannel feather skirt, American Apparel top, Maslo Jewelry bracelet Opposite page Akira dress


A.OK

Cidenzi Mori

Goldie

Akira

Club Monaco

H&M

Alice + Olivia

Converse

Hope

All Saints

COS

Iceberg

American Apparel

Cue

Ida Johansson

Ann-Sofie Back

Dark Hearts

James Hock

Anna Dello Russo

Diesel

Jane Bowler

ASOS

Dr. Martens

Jeans Company

Beyond Retro

Efva Attling

Jeremy Scott for Adidas

Bik Bok

Ellena Gallen

Josefin Strid

BLK DNM

Ellesse

Joseph

Broken Fab

Esprit

Julian Zigerli

Bruuns Bazaar

Gant

Ksubi

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www.shopgoldie.com www.hm.com www.hope-sthlm.com www.iceberg.com www.idajohansson.com www.jameshock.co.uk www.janebowler.co.uk www.jeanscompany.nl www.adidas.com

www.josefinstrid.com www.joseph.co.uk www.julianzigerli.com www.ksubi.com

shot by lukasz wierzbowski

STOCKISTS


Lanvin

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Le Lis Blanc

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Wesc

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Y. Project by Yohan Serafty www.yproject.fr

Zara

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KNEON —Welcome to the sixth issue celebrating the dreams of a realist, the euphoria of uncertainty and the general haziness that comes with the limbo that is not quite reality. Featuring Netsky, Aaron Feaver, Linus Lohoff, Pelle Lannefors and more.

6 Dreamer

KNEON MAGAZINE #6 'Dreamer'  

Welcome to the sixth issue celebrating the dreams of a realist, the euphoria of uncertainty and the general haziness that comes with the lim...

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