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issue — 04

Summer ‘12

BACK TO BASICS 1


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Photo by HANNAH-MARIE HEPOLA

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KARA LOUISE BOSHOFF Photographed by TORNE VELK 3


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Masthead KNEON The magazine about creative youth est. 2010 Spring & Summer 2012 Issue #4 Editor-In-Chief & Creative Director Victoria Jin Photographers Natasha Chiesa Kuryi, Clarens Tyson, HannahMarie Hepola, Torne Velk, Sara Meister, Tom Price, Phil-Simon Buendia, Rhyan Santos, Marius Uhlig, Anna Arrayo, Charlotte Rutherford, Victoria Jin, Yves Krier, Glaza Kinski, Sam Tiefenrausch, Aimee Han, Aimee Han, Agnieszka Chabros, Yves Krier

Thanks to Julia Karpova, Eric Kinyua, Lara Garcia Diaz, Paulina Moldovan, Drew Ressler, Raffaela Loebl, Toby Andrews, GetIn PR, Fabian Speier, Lukas Wichtmann, Robyn Gburek, Yelena Buck, Jake Gallagher, Tracey Woodhouse, Natalie Bignell, Ella Plevin, Letizia Cafasso, Tully Walter, Victoria Martin, Sinead Hargreaves, Samantha Miller, Simon Winkelmueller, Stefano Agabio, Ben Giles, William Branton, Amir Reza, Rouzbeh Moradi

Advertising enquiries: victoria@kneon-magazine.com Contact info@kneon-magazine.com www.kneon-magazine.com www.facebook.com/kneonmag All content Š 2012 KNEON Magazine On the covers

Photographed by Bradford Gregory Left: model is Coley Brown at DNA NY 4


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STEFANO AGABIO for

KNEON www.everythingisanumber.com 5


photographed by RHYAN SANTOS

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www.kneon-magazine.com 6


WHAT’S INSIDE ISSUE 04

Pearls Like These page 16

Plain White Tee page 36

The Haute Pursuit page 50

Mike Bailey Gates page 24

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Ben Giles page 30

Hege Aurelie Badendyck

M12

White Hot

Nedra Chachoua

page 48

page 42

page 54

page 64

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WHAT’S INSIDE ISSUE 04

Porter Robinson

Tomorrowland Festival

Parklife Festival

The Bloody Beetroots

Rebecca & Fiona

John Digweed

Sander Van Doorn

Aurielle Roundsaville

page 76

page 96

page 102

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page 92

page 82

page 100

page 98

page 104

Luisa Lange page 112


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Joanna Zhou page 113

Behind The Lens

Boys Like You page 120

page 114

Foreign Stills page 126

Rain Dogs page 146

Do on yousunday? have plans page 132

In the Light of Day

Metropolis page 138

Nudity page 162

page 154

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Letter from the editor

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t seems like nowadays everyone is building up their identities (creative or otherwise), businesses and relationships on a plane that doesn’t really exist. Unless the Internet evolved into some kind of additional dimension while I tied my ponytail. Drew Barrymore’s character in that movie ‘He’s Just Not That Into You’ mourns the old-fashioned ways: “People don’t just meet organically

anymore. If I want to make myself more attractive to the opposite sex, I don’t go get a new haircut – I update my profile. That’s just how it is.” When we talked to Sir Bob Cornelius Rifus at Tomorrowland, he displayed a similar attitude: “People just don’t have the fucking time for anything anymore.” How did this all happen?

Photo by MARGARETE JIN 10


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Letter from the editor

This fourth issue of KNEON is about this, well, issue. It’s about stripping away the extraneous, leaving what is bare and natural, setting up limitations that will eventually free us; it’s about travelling and getting to know this real and beautiful world. It’s also about learning to balance what is available to us, which can open doors to more possibilities. This magazine, for instance, would not be possible without this phenomenon. So this issue is kind

of a review of every digital amenity that is available to us while appreciating the natural things in life that are not tainted. I hope you enjoy this fourth issue - my favourite by far to this date. VICTORIA JIN

Editor-In-Chief

Photo by HANNAH-MARIE HEPOLA 11


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-Back to Basics-

MINIMALISM IS NOT THE LACK OF SOMETHING, IT’S THE PERFECT AMOUNT OF SOMETHING —Nicholas Burroughs

12 Photo by NATASHA CHIESA KURYJ


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Contributors rhyan santos Age 19

Home is Los Angeles Current location Cerritos Occupation Photographer Education Third year in college! ‘Back to Basics’ It reminds me of Christina Aguilera for some reason ahaha, but for me it is the foundation to anything that we do with our lives What do you enjoy doing? I like hanging out with friends and family - the people I usually photograph. Cruising on my penny board; road trips and exploring; writing; being nice to people www.rhyansantos.com

lara garcia diaz

Home is Barcelona, Spain Current location Vienna, Austria Occupation Stylist; blog contributor for FN magazine, Blend magazine and 12th festival for Fashion and Photography’s blog; PR for Meshit’s capsule collection; working for Wood Wood Education I studied Fine Arts in the University of Barcelona specializing in video and new media. ‘Back to Basics’ I first think of less is more; every fashion piece can be redefined by its owner. Sometimes the best outfits come from an original combination of different garments with plain basics. For me it’s an invitation to review basics in a new way. What do you enjoy doing? Reading on the beach while drinking a mojito, going to sleep without putting on the alarm after a really stressful week, meeting my best friends for a beer discussing the last gossips in town www.lara-garcia.net

anna arrayo

Age 27 Hometown Barcelona Current location Galicia Occupation Photographer, but I used to translate films. Education Translation & Interpreting, Graphic & Web design ‘Back to Basics’ For me it is timeless, organic, pleasant and cozy. What you enjoy doing I love spending the weekends out of the city whenever I have the chance, relaxing, laughing and basically enjoying the good company. I like walking and find out new interesting corners I hadn’t noticed before. I love to take out my camera and wait to see the results www.annaarroyo.com

phil-simon buendia

Age 24 Home is A dark room with loud, repetitive music Current Location Manchester Occupation I spend a lot of time in planes and trains as part of my day job as a consultant. But at all other hours of the day I am plotting away at the global takeover of afromullets, a collective of like-minded individuals and friends pursuing their creative agendas in whatever form or medium possible. Education I graduated with a degree in Political Science and Economics from the University of Manchester ‘Back to Basics’ Henry David Thoreau’s journey into the woods in 1854 sum this up nicely. www.salon.io/phil

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Alice Aufray

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by Clarens Tyson featuring Alice Aufray

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MICHAEL BAILEY GATES Looking at MICHAEL BAILEY GATES’ photographs, you are transported into a utopia where folklore is historical fact. Combing the nostalgic feeling of childhood with imaginary worlds, the scenes orchestrated create a wow-effect. KNEON caught up with the 19 year-old from Rhode Island about his recent relocation to New York City, his aspirations for the future and what he thinks about The Hunger Games.

Who is Mike Baily Gates? A boy with a long name. How old do you think you are? 21 What are you currently working on? I’m currently in the middle of moving back to New York City. Actually, I’m on the bus right now waiting to go. I’ve been focusing a lot on color lately, and how it affects the hierarchy of objects and memories. I’ve been traveling for the past month or so, and have been thinking a lot about the style of things lately, and how everything is categorized by colors. I’m excited to get back to New York and shoot more; to be able to work. You’re only 19, yet you’ve produced

an incredible amount of beautiful imagery. What motivated you to go out and shoot so much? What made you so confident about your vision? When I was younger I used photography to take photos of sets I built for plays I liked to write. I started taking photos of the countryside in New England, and slowly the two slowly merged together with my interest in fashion. I am lucky enough that I found what I love to do at such a young age, but I’ve worked hard to make sure that it’s what I get to keep doing. I love telling, and hearing stories. Photography is a medium that people are attracted to, because they believe in it. A photograph is a piece from a reality. That idea is exciting to me. I can tell lies, and create new people. I’m confident in the idea that people believe in my photographs, and are attract-

ed to the stories they build from them, and that’s why I love working. What kind of story are you trying to tell through your photos? It really depends on the narrative for the shoot. I think I’ve reached a point in my life where the theme of fantasy is starting to feel distant to me. I’m not as interested in it as I used to be, which is sad because I used to be very attracted to it. I feel older, and childhood feels very distant to me now. It is harder for me to think the way I used to. The stories I have been thinking of lately are more realistic. But, I don’t want to set limits to a style of a story I like to tell. I want to be able to constantly changing and evolving as I grow up, and I know my work with change with me. You use the word ‘utopic’ to describe 25


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your works. Do you wish you were living in the worlds you portray? I don’t think I would want to live in the worlds I imagine. Both realities are very important to me. I like borrowing from each one, and finding inspirations to work with. Everyone creates realities for themselves, and they are very important to have, but at the same time there is a lot of utopic moments in this world that are worth being here for. What’s the ideal utopic world for you? My ideal utopic world is working all day on a photo shoot at the studio, coming home to dinner with my boyfriend, and falling asleep while he reads a book. That’s perfect to me. Some of your photos actually reminded me of the book series, the Hunger Games, with youth in revolt living freely in the wild and battling some authority. What do you think of the series? I loved the Capitol, I thought they were hilarious. They reminded me of pompous Jean Paul Gaultier characters, and the highclass society they lived in was so bizarre. I haven’t actually read the books, but thought the movie was entertaining. Harry Potter or the Hunger Games? Harry Potter, always. Tell us about your childhood. What were you like as a kid? Any funny stories? My grandma was an antique dealer, and my parents were both school teachers. I lived in an old colonial house in a small New England town. I loved winter, and I liked to run away a lot. Once I ran away naked during 26


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I DON’T LIKE PEOPLE TO KNOW MY REAL AGE, BECAUSE I DON’T LIKE USING IT AS A CRUTCH a blizzard one night, and my mother ran outside after me. I love that memory, it makes me feel like a kid again. What do you think is the best about youth? Thinking about the future. A lot of young creatives have the peter pan effect – they don’t want to grow older, since they think a young age makes their work that much more significant. What do you think about this? I don’t think age is an important idea. I don’t like people to know my real age, because I don’t like using it as a crutch. What are you working on right now? Making a studio space. I’m on my way to moving into a garden apartment in Brooklyn. I’m hoping to make a natural light studio in the garden space, also a small vegetable garden. You grew up in Rhode Island but recently moved to New York City. What’s the biggest difference between the two cities apart from size? Do you miss home? Rhode Island is where I was born, but New York feels like a hometown. I love the culture of New York, and how they don’t try to hide things that are ugly or unconventional. I’m proud of the artists here, and of my friends. Everyone is living a life they are proud of, and have the courage to do what they want. I miss the feeling of home, but I am happy in New York. What’s next for you? I arrive in New York in 3 hours. From there I’m not really sure. ■ 29


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BEN GILES “My collages are stills from films that will never exist” interviewed by VICTORIA JIN artwork by BEN GILES 30


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Ben Giles’ collages combining photographs and newspaper clippings from various eras have found their place on album covers, posters for bands such as the Mystery Jets, and have been a reblog-sensation on the internet. We caught up with the 19-year-old London-based art student about what makes an artwork, his preference of music over art (he is also in a band called Cassetto), and where he sees himself ideally in a decade. VICTORIA JIN—Who Is Ben Giles? BEN GILES—That is a good question. I’m still figuring that one out. VJ—This issue of KNEON is themed ‘Back to Basics’. What does this translate for you? BG—Stripped away, raw, going home, the foundation, plain, messy, pure, originality, origins, and beginnings. VJ—Growing up, what or who influenced your interest in art? BG—My dad and my sister were always artistic, drawing and painting around the house, so I guess it had an impact on me – I wanted to join in and create

my own. I was always creative as a child, whether painting or making huge Lego skyscrapers; I had a very active imagination. I never liked art at school, I hated drawings peppers and hockey sticks, but the more freedom I got the more I enjoyed it. VJ—When did you decide that you wanted to be an artist full time? BG—Over the last 6 - 8 months VJ—Do you think formal education in art is necessary? BG—I think it is important until a certain age, as it allows children to explore their creativity. It’s certainly as important as other lessons, science for example, not everyone will grow up and want to become an

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I AM NEVER FULFILLED WITH WHAT I HAVE ALREADY CREATED; I JUST HAVE TO KEEP GOING

artist, and not everyone will want to grow up and study biology or physics and follow that path. This is a strong generalization but I think the possibilities for both should be available from a young age. VJ—What have you learned since studying Fine Art full time that you would never have learned otherwise? BG—Anything can be art, and studying art means you can go home a lot too. VJ—You’re only nineteen and have created an impressive body of work. What motivates to create as you do? What drives you? BG—The compulsion in me wants to create as much as I possibly can while retaining a quality in what I do, I hate to think that age has restrictions on the ability for an artist to create work: what are you waiting for, it isn’t given to you. I want to achieve as much as I possibly can without having a definitive aim. I am never fulfilled with what I have already created; I just have to keep going.  VJ—What do you wish to convey through your collages? BG—My collages are stills from films that will never exist. Or a book without any words. It’s up to the viewer to explore the context and story. Life, death, parallel worlds, lost possibilities, and dreams all play a part in the worlds I portray, there is an overall juxtaposition between joyfulness and sadness that battles throughout my work. I want people to want to look at a piece for a while 32

and ask questions about it; I want it to make people smile and to sicken them. A good collage relies on the quality of the images used and a depth in the meaning behind it. VJ—What do you think is most important as a young aspiring artist? BG—The time, space and freedom to do whatever you want, keeping your options open and working extremely hard. VJ—What kind of work do you want to do more of in the future? BG—Keep working on sculptural work, and work on some interactive video/sound pieces. VJ—Tell us about your band, Cassetto. BG—Cassetto is an alternative/Math/ Indie band taking influence from bands like This Town Needs Guns, Colour, Foals, Neu, Chevreuil, and Battles. We aim to record as much as possible, it’s very DIY, we’ve done everything ourselves, and everyone has a part in the song writing process. We’re very honest with each other and we just want to make music we enjoy and play it to those that enjoy it too. VJ—Your artwork has been used as on the cover of albums and EPs. Which artist or band would you love to design an album cover for? BG—Battles. It would be amazing. Although doing something ridiculous like Lady Gaga’s album artwork would be hilarious. VJ—Which do you prefer creating –

music or art? BG—Music over art; it’s something I can really emote to and feel, although the process of creating music and art are equal to me. Music is something I get excited about. VJ—What did you do yesterday? BG—Work, carried and chipped wood all day, then band practice with a few beers. VJ—Proudest moment? BG—Still waiting, although seeing people buy the posters I designed for Mystery Jets at their gig was a good feeling. VJ—Plans for the future? BG—Kingston University, producing music and artwork.

keep

VJ—What’s the last song you listened to? BG—Volcano! - Fighter VJ—Where do you see yourself ideally in ten years? BG—A large amount of people feeling and emoting to the work I create without the possibility of indifference; being included in shows and galleries and putting a couple on; maintaining a working relationship with a band or two while working on my own music; hopefully content with my personal and working life. ■ www.cargocollective.com/bengiles


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“The starting point for every outfit was the basic white t-shirt. I played with it, combining and redefining its meaning, trying to create urban and fresh results” —stylist LARA GARCIA DIAZ on the styling concept for this shoot 36


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—style feature—

plain white tee styled by lara garcia diaz photographed by sara meister concept by victoria jin hair & makeup paulina moldovan models cem & paulina at tempomodels special thanks kasa schild & wood wood 37


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t-shirt American Apparel button up shirt Gitman trousers Wood Wood socks American Apparel shoes Common Projects

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t-shirt American Apparel tank top Meshit trousers Meshit x Daliah Spiegel socks American Apparel cap Wood Wood shoes Grenson


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t-shirt American Apparel Button up top Wood Wood trousers Wood Wood socks H&M cap Wood Wood shoes Common Projects 39


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body suit American Apparel t-shirt American Apparel sunglasses H&M necklace H&M necklace New Yorker vintage platform sandals ASOS 40


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t-shirt American Apparel tie Forever 21 swim suit American Apparel socks Intimissimi platform sneakers ASOS

jeans jacket Benetton Vintage t-shirt American Apparel swim suit American Apparel necklace Forever 21 cap American Apparel 41


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HEGE hege KNEON interviews the fashion

editor of “Costume,” Norway’s biggest lifestyle magazine HEGE AURELIE BADENDYCK photo RENATE TORSETH

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photo by phil oh www.streetpeeper.com

VICTORIA JIN—Did you always know you wanted to work in fashion? HEGE AURELIE BADENDYCK— As a child I loved to dress up. I remember my first red, patent shoes. I was so happy I slept with them on for several nights. Recently I found a birthday card I wrote to my dad when I was about five. It said “I love you very much but you don´t know how to dress”. So, I guess I´ve always had an interest for fashion. I´ve worked in the industry since I was 15. VJ—What are your tasks as the fashion editor? HAB—I have the responsibility for the editorials, and other big shoots that we do, as well as trend guides and shorter interviews. At Costume Norway we are only two people working

on fashion so we do literally everything. VJ—What did you study at university? HAB—I actually studied social anthropology, North American studies and history of religion at university. I´ve always been very fascinated by the fact that more or less all our habits and the way we live our lives are culturally determined. What is logical to us could be total craziness to others. I think my education is a great tool in my work. VJ—How did growing up in Norway influence your interest in fashion? HAB—Norway is a sports nation. To dress in a nice way is considered silly for many Norwegians. It´s not a necessity and therefore its not seen as

something serious. You dress practical here, with a proper weather jacket and sneakers. I´ve always loved fashion, and I think my interest in fashion runs partly out of a reaction to the Norwegian mentality and partly to travelling a lot. Norwegians are very sober, so for me to have lived in Spain for a while, as well as Guatemala, taught me to loosen up: to dare, to dance, to follow my heart. It sounds extremely superficial, but it´s true. VJ—What is the biggest misconception that people have about your job? HAB—Haha! The are so many! The less knowledge you have about something or someone, the easier you judge. I think many people believe I have a job where I mainly get dressed up, go to VIP parties, and spend a lot of time shopping. Most of my friends 43


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costume norway april 2012. photographer mikael schulz styling hege aurelie badendyck model johanna jonsson 44


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costume norway march 2012 photographer andreas kock styling hege aurelie badendyck model hanneli mustaparta are in one way or another related to the field I work in so they know how it is. I noticed that as soon as my family started reading about me in the Norwegian media, they started giving me compliments and started asking. That was quite strange to me, as I had been working hard for so long, but it was some coverage in the media that interested them, not my work. VJ—Your workdays probably vary a lot from each other, but what would a typical day look like for you? HAB—Yes, they do vary a lot and it’s quite hectic. There’s always a meeting, and there’s always an article I have to finish, but I always prioritize the more

creative parts of my work like planning cover shoots, editorials or other big shoots. From time to time I do interviews, mainly with international designers. I love the research part of my job. We’re a great team so there’s always a lot of discussions and everyone is engaged in the whole process. VJ—If you could put together a dream team for a photo shoot, who would you choose? And where would would it be? HAB—Right now, I think it would be photographer Lachlan Bailey. I think his style is refreshing and sexy. I would choose a timeless and classical model like Karmen Pedaru or Daria Werbowy in front of the camera. And who

wouldn’t want Val Garland for make up? I love the Californian light, and the highlands of Guatemala. And I think Moscow would be an interesting place to shoot. VJ—What distinguishes a ‘stylist’ from someone who is ‘stylish’? HAB—To me a great stylist is able to transform pieces and collections into something emotional, into a story, and manage with a creative mind to surprise and communicate something that reflects the time we live in. VJ—What does Back to Basics translate for you, style-wise?

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hege’s wardrobe

essentials

illustrated by GRACE LEE

“a personal piece of jewellry”

“great black heels”

HAB—I grew up surrounded by the hip hop culture and played basketball with the guys. To me Back to Basics indicates a period of time where a special kind of life style determined what I wore and how I wore it, not any trends: true street style! VJ—What has been a highlight in your career so far? HAB—I always love to go to the fashion weeks, especially Paris there’s always so much fun. The 46

“black biker jacket”

Louis Vuitton AW12/13 show was amazing. I started to cry during the show, as so many others. I love meeting up and coming designers. I first met Erdem one and a half years ago. That was very inspiring. VJ—If you weren’t working in fashion, what would you be doing? HAB—I dreamt of becoming a photographer for a long time, but instead I started dating one, so I feel I have the best of both worlds now!

VJ—What are you working on right now? HAB—I’m planning an editorial for the October issue, organizing a shoot in New York, making an autumn trend report for this August issue and I’m also a part of designing a collection in collaboration with a Norwegian high street chain, which will be released in November. ■


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costume norway april 2012. photographer mikael schulz styling hege aurelie badendyck model johanna jonsson 47


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Designer Spotlight

M12 GOLBAN RODICA and PEPERIGEANU OANIA are the creative drive behind M12, a young design label from Romania. They represent a new wave of young, ambitious and talented designers fresh out of design school, with perseverance, a meticulous eye for detail and an overwhelming love of clothes. KNEON interviewed the two innovates about their passion and natural instinct to create. IT WAS A POINT OF COINCIDENCE Our first studio address was located in apartment number “M12”. When we moved to a new location, it was the same number. APPARELS WITH A TWIST We are presenting a ready-to-wear line with a conceptual focus. Hopefully, twenty years from now, people will still be able to wear the cuts that we are designing today. Our creations will give the owner a heightened awareness of their own beauty; they are “nice girl” clothes with a hint of badass-ness that shows itself through cuts and wide stitches. FROM AN IDEA TO A MATERIAL Sometimes we get inspired by a nightmare, other times a daydream; there are random visions in our imagination, like an archive of things we’ve seen, heard, smelled or felt. These then develop into a material for the next collection. Ideas then flow during the creative process with materials, techniques, and silhouettes. Single pieces then evolve into a whole collection. THE ROMANIAN FASHION INDUSTRY It’s developing in a very chaotic way. There was a boom of designers in the last decade, but Romania still remains a small player in the fashion industry at large. There is no real competition amongst local designers. The fashion education needs some refreshing and the media should be more open. 48

SS 2012 Lookbook

BREAKING INTO FASHION REQUIRES A LOT MORE THAN JUST A DEGREE IN DESIGN Great designers didn’t succeed due to the formal education they received – it’s something else, something that marked them as unique, a sort of raw talent. Of course, a good background is vital in any career, providing you with knowledge, skills and confidence. NEVER COMPROMISE ON YOUR FASHION CHOICES Often, it really is the first look that counts, so always be confident. We can control the way others see us through our choice of clothing. “BACK TO BASICS” IS A RESPONSE TO EXCESS This new customer sees clothing as a necessity and approaches a simplified lifestyle fulfilled with basic garments, timeless accessories and a ‘classy’ attitude. It’s always the most basic outfit that feels the most polished and puttogether. Each wardrobe should have versatile pieces that are and always will be “in”: a little black dress, a classic black suit, a pair of blue jeans, and a unisex white t-shirt or shirt-dress. WE DEFINITELY DON’T WANT TO “OVERWASH” OUR BRAND We dream of a young designer team, expanding as much as possible, and to have more recognition worldwide. But we want to keep it fresh and exclusive by creating unique products or limited numbers of pieces. ■


photographed by DALIAH SPIEGEL

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meshit # SPRING/SUMMER 2013 — WWW.MESHIT.AT

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Style feature

WHENEVER I DRESS, I ALWAYS ASK MYSELF, “DOES THIS SERVE A PURPOSE?” IF IT DOESN’T, I LEAVE IT OUT. VANESSA HONG (28) is a Canadian writer and blogger behind The Haute Pursuit, currently based in Beijing. Her style is the epitome of clean sophistication, featuring staple basics with intricate accessories. KNEON talks to the internet style icon about her inner hippie, how your environment can completely change your attitude towards style, and her wardrobe resolutions for 2013.

Interview VICTORIA JIN

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ALEXANDER WANG Liya heels

ON HER MOVE TO BEIJING LAST YEAR. “I think my style has become more utilitarian.

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STAPLE WARDROBE PIECES THIS SUMMER. “Summer in Beijing often means 40 degrees Celsius days (sometimes hotter). I live in my cut offs, worn-in tshirts and chucks.” TIPS FOR SHOPPING EFFICIENTLY TO BUILD UP A STRONG WARDROBE. “For me, it means investing in things that matter: quality jeans, handbags and shoes. I add a few items per season that are ‘trendy’, but not over the top.”

LESS IS MORE. “Whenever I dress myself, I always ask myself, does this serve a purpose? If it doesn’t, I leave it out.” I LOVE SECOND HAND SHOPPING. Whether Ebay, Etsy, or my neighbourhood salvation army. In Beijing, I shop a lot on China’s version of eBay called TaoBao FIRST FASHION MEMORY? “My grandmother’s Chanel 2.55s” OVERDRESSING OR UNDERDRESSING? “Underdress. Always.” STYLE RESOLUTIONS. “I’d like to buy a really architectural bag so I can wear basics and still look put together. I’d like to start making some custom leather pieces for myself like overalls.”■

VINTAGE lace onesie, VINTAGE leather pants, VANESSA MOONEY studded bracelet, VINTAGE cuff, LA DAMA Claw bracelet

MY FASHION IDENTITY HAS BEEN A PROGRESSION. I don’t think I’ve ever really looked exactly the same at any point in my life. I think environment has a lot to do with it. I’ve dabbled in a lot of things, but now I’ve moved into a very minimalistic phase. I think it’s much more challenging to dress in a few shades versus patterns. Shape is very important, so are small details.

Beijing has a very post-apocalyptica, thirdworld-cum-first-world feel to it. Practicality is very important for every day dressing. I’ve become a much more pragmatic shopper. I also wear sturdier fabrics that can withstand the elements. Everything is more streamlined now, not so much junk going on.”

Wearing sheer dress from TAOBAO, ZARA boyfriend blazer, YESSTYLE leather shoes, sunglasses from TAOBAO

I’M THROUGH AND THROUGH A WEST COAST GIRL. I think I have more east coast sensibilities when it comes to music, fashion and culture but deep down I’m a hippie. I love to read, cook and work out. I’m pretty nuts for anything holistic. That’s my new thing.


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wearing YESSTYLE sweater, FOREVER 21 faux leather shorts, ALEXANDER WANG Liya High Heel Pumps 53


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white hot beanie by JIL SANDER and the rest MARK & JULIA

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WHITE HOT by Victoria Jin with styling by Erelle Model is the stunning KIRA at Tempomodels

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dress by ACNE

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Nedra Chachoua interview VICTORIA JIN

photos ANNA-SOPHIE BERGER

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KNEON 2012 NEDRA CHACHOUA

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collection musa paradisiaca


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“MUSA PARADISIACA” IS A KIND OF SELFPORTRAIT The encounter of two worlds is projected onto a white canvas. It’s about the contrast between the summers in Tunisia, which are associated with ease and an unnamed love for nature, and the urban everyday Vienna – two places that could not be more diverse. With this collection I returned to this special place and its associated mood of my childhood. portrait RENÉ SAAM

THERE IS A LOT OF POTENTIAL IN THE VIENNA FASHION INDUSTRY The fashion scene in Vienna is small, but there are some very interesting designers. I love Vienna as a city, especially in the summer; everything is relaxed. But of course I’d like to gain work experience abroad, for example in Tokyo or Paris and then come back and start business in Vienna.

Nedra Chachoua, with roots in Tunisia but her heart in Vienna, is a leading protagonist in the recent graduates of the University of Applied Arts here in the Mozart-capital. Her banana-fresh and thoroughly international collection proved her to be intricate in her planning to the last detail and able to combine comfort with uniqueness. IT STARTED WITH DIY-TENDENCIES AT AGE 13 I knew exactly how to mix things together, for example in a collage or even in my outfits. Then I started to make handcrafted stuff like embroideries with beads and sequins. These works took a lot of time and although I am a very impatient person, I loved doing these kinds of things. Somehow I found a way to express myself with fashion and then one thing led to another... THE BIGGEST CHALLENGE SO FAR HAS BEEN CREATING A COLLECTION THAT I AM PERSONALLY SATISFIED WITH It is very important to me to design clothes that I, as a designer and costumer, would personally wear. I must be able to identify myself in every piece.

AZZEDINE ALAIA’S INDIVIDUALISTIC APPROACH TOWARDS FASHION IS INSPIRING I like that he only holds fashion shows when he has something to show, on his own schedule. He is known for his independence and passion for discreet luxury and he doesn’t care about the image of his brand. He just wants to create fashion. MY NEW COLLECTION MUSA PARADISIACA REALLY FITS INTO KNEON’S THEME “BACK TO BASICS” When I think about my collection it is back to the roots, back to the things that I really like, back to me…back to basics. I WOULD LOVE SEEING A COMPLETE STRANGER WEARING ONE OF MY PIECES For example in the subway station or at a party. And then of course I would be very interested in which kind of person the wearer is. AFTER FINISHING A COLLECTION, YOU HAVE TO START A NEW ONE It’s a process of getting empty and getting filled up again and again. This process is fascinating and beautiful, but sometimes it could be very frustrating too. At this point, never allow yourself to give up. ■ 67


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I WOULD LOVE SEEING A COMPLETE STRANGER IN THE SUBWAY STATION OR AT A PARTY WEARING ONE OF MY PIECES

I would love seeing a “

complete stranger

in the subway station or at a party wearing one of my pieces” 71


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Photographed by TORNE VELK

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The Electro Wunderkind

POR RO

Porter Robinson’s singular drive to create and envelope himself in music has taken him from a thirteen-year-old producing with Sony ACID emulating sounds from video games at home, to now touring worldwide and working with the electro elite of the world: David Guetta, Tiesto, Deadmau5, Skrillex and A-Track to name a few. KNEON caught up with the energetic nineteen-year-old before his first Vienna show at the Ottakringer Brewery, and talked about his musicalperfectionism, the importance of the drop, and the wildfire concept of YOLO.

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Porter Robinson VJ—What do you want your fans to come out of this show feeling like? PORTER ROBINSON—I want them to have a memorable experience. I recently did Coachella and the biggest decision I had to make there was whether I wanted to make a perfect experience for the crowd, where I play all hits and they go crazy the whole time – but every DJ can do that, and every DJ does do that – or to create something unique and memorable; perhaps not as effective, but that will last in your mind. At the set tonight, you’ll hear me play some stuff that’s off the wall and not as aggressive or harsh or as dramatic as it could be, but makes you go, woaa, that’s a weird sound. VJ—How important is the drop? PR—It’s an important point that particularly emphasizes on the dance floor. But I also want people to care about other parts of the music and not just wait for this one moment. That’s what a lot of electro and dubstep DJs already know: these audiences that just wait and wait, then it comes and they dance for three seconds and then they’re bored again. The harder you release it, the more quickly they get tired of it, I think. Which is why I’m becoming more of a fan of these more understated longer compositions. VJ—Like ‘Language’ PR—Yeah, exactly. Language is not about the moment; it’s about the whole story.

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to my fans, – as something they won’t reject – and still something I feel satisfied about. My biggest song so far is ‘Say My Name,’ the first song I released. Over the years I’ve probably made three or four songs that were similar to that, and I never put them out because I didn’t want to get stuck in this stagnation. A lot of my musical peers are frustrated because their fans just expect this one sound they can rave in. VJ—Saying that, what do you want your next sound to be like? PR—I tour most of the year, but I recently took a two-month break to go home and try to write music. I wrote Language in the first week, and it was my favorite thing I ever did, by far. You know, not the best drop as we talked about before, but musically my favorite thing I’ve ever wrote, and I just couldn’t write anything else for the rest of the two months. I sometimes describe it as a paralyzing effect, where I can’t move forwards until it gets amazing. I think it does hurt me at times. VJ—So you’re a perfectionist in terms of your music? PR—Yeah yeah, absolutely. It’s funny, as I’ve released stuff from the past that, looking back on, I totally regret. Two years ago, I released all this glitchy bass music; I was so obsessed with writing these hyper complicated songs, that I lost a sense of rhythm in musicality. I did a remix of Heiko & Maiko’s Wer Ist Sie – it was soo bad.Also, I have a song called ‘I’m on Fire,’ and it’s one of my biggest ones.

VJ—Since getting signed with Skrillex’s label, OWSLA, do you feel pressured to keep producing hits?

VJ—That’s one of my favorites, actually.

PR—I think every artist feels the need to write hits, but at the same time most want to keep their artistic integrity in tact. I’ve basically tried to find the sound that is both pleasing

PR—See? I totally regret that. I would change things in that song. I like the vocal – it’s catchy – but the drop verges on random. So I would change some things.

VJ—This issue of KNEON is themed ‘Back to Basics’ - what does that translate for you, musically? PR—Basically trying to discover and abuse these perfect rhythms. One person who I think does that amazingly is a French techno artist, Gesaffelstein, who does weird evilsounding techno, but it’s in between the sound of industrial rugged techno and effective electro. I think that’s a brilliant example of the future of dance music. It’s stripped down to what’s most important with interesting sound design, effective sounds and rhythms. That’s just brilliant music. I’ll play a bit of him tonight. VJ—How do you strike the balance between too much and the perfect amount when producing? PR—When you’re writing, you’re stuck in the studio for thirty hours, so you tend to lose perspective on whether something is random or not. To strike that balance, it means I have to work effectively and maybe more quickly than I’m used to; capitalize on a good idea as opposed to putting five hundred hours into this song. VJ—You’ve been touring for a year now. What have been the craziest moments, good and bad? PR—Well, the craziest bad moments I can’t really say, because I’d be tattling on other superstars. I’ve done headline tours with Skrillex and Tiesto; those guys are experienced musicians, experienced with parties, and things get wild. They’re still the most professional in the industrial, but they do party. There have been some wild moments for me. I was not ready to party that hard yet. I was eigh— [At this point, Porter stops himself with a laugh]


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Porter Robinson at Coachella 2012

IT’S NOT ABOUT THE MOMENT; IT’S ABOUT THE WHOLE STORY

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I HAVE FAITH IN MY PERSPECTIVE ON THIS SCENE TO KEEP THE MOMENTUM

Oh man, I probably shouldn’t say this. My mom reads all my interviews. VJ—How about the good moments? PR—Hmm good moments, I’d say Coachella Weekend Two this year was my best dj experience ever. We premiered my new production – I have a new visuals guy who goes by the name of ‘Ghost Dad’ and he’s made all these progressive, very hipster-y pseudo-vintage content, and it looks so awesome and unique. And my favorite part about it, is that my new visual direction doesn’t look like electronic music, which is so important to me. VJ—What do you do apart from producing? PR—Nothing – I just produce and dj. VJ—If I were to bump into you in the grocery store, what would you be most like carrying? PR—A bunch of bananas. I’m a vegetarian and I’m also a very picky eater, which is a bad combination. So I just eat a shitload of bananas. And lots of pizza. VJ—What’s a huge turn-off for you about people in general? PR—There’s a certain anti-pop mentality that I find so frustrating. Something gains popularity and within three days, people will do a 80

full 180 on it. For example, ‘YOLO’ [you only live once]? I think that’s a pretty harmless philosophy, which came out and got very popular. Within three days people were like, ‘Stop saying YOLO,’ and I’m like, ‘Why? You’re just trying to shit on a popular thing’. There are a lot of artists whose careers get fucked over because they do something amazing, achieve massive success very quickly, and the mainstream decides that they’re uncool for precisely that reason. I think it’s a detrimental mentality that we punish the people who do something that resonates with the general population. VJ—What can’t you live without? PR—My dog. She’s a petite basset griffon vendeen – half terrier, half basset hound. She’s four. VJ—Team Edward or Jacob? PR—Clearly team Edward. Because he’s the most popular one, right? And I have to side with the popular things, since I can’t take on the antipop thing VJ—Team Jacob’s more popular with the girls PR—Okay, then Team Jake! I need to side with whatever the most popular thing is. And that’s like a manifestation of exactly what I’m talking about, which is that you shit on whatever the mainstream thing is. And the mainstream thing now is

shitting on the mainstream. So…I’m the worst [he smiles, then continues with a straight face] Big Rebecca Black fan here… ‘Friday’? VJ—What’s the question you’re sick of being asked at interviews? PR—I hate complaining about this, because even having an interview – most people don’t even get to do that. I’m very privileged. But people are like ‘What’s it like being nineteen and touring the world?’ You read any of my interviews and there’s the answer to that question. Like, what am I supposed to say? ‘It’s extra good!’ or, ‘It sucks.’ No, it’s the same experience as anyone else. But it’s something I would never complain about unless asked, so – very privileged, I love my life. VJ—Where do you see yourself in five years? PR—Well, five years ago I would’ve seen myself in college. So in five years, who knows where it’ll go. But I hope to be able to continue to tour and to continue to write music. Without being cocky, I have faith in my perspective on this scene to keep the momentum. I hope to keep doing this. www.porterrobinsonofficial.com


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Porter Robinson

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—Tomorrowland 2012

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27/7/2012 Elation. Purpose. A sense of pleasant doom. These are the sensations that waft over me as I get off the plane from VIE to BRU. The next three days will see me roaming the grounds of the Belgian town of Boom, mothership to Tomorrowland – one of the biggest electronic dance festivals in the world. My expectations are high, but even last year’s elaborate Aftermovie doesn’t truly prep me for the intricate sets I’ll see, the openminded people I’ll meet, and the general overwhelming sense of non-reality I’ll bask in – enough to last until next year’s dosage. Celebrating its youthful eighth birthday this year, Tomorrowland is revered and considered legendary by artists and fans alike. Everyone knows that this is where EDM dreams come true. Say the name and anyone remotely acquainted with the scene with mutter a ‘wow’ or ‘dope’ – or any other monosyllabic expressive really. Alternatively, I’ve been talking to some very non-eloquent people. The statistics could speak for themselves: Over two million people turned away the day ticket sales opened in April; 84

some 180,000 tickets gone within moments; and over a hundred million clicks on the first day. Big ups to promoters ID&T. However, the whole experience extends far beyond the numbers. Every inch of De Schorre National Park is decorated, bridges adorned with flowers, the Tomorrowland mantra everywhere (“Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery, today is a gift”), gourmet food and drink that will make you a king at stomach, and so much energy engulfing you that Redbull simply becomes an option. I’m in the press area, waiting for an interview I scheduled with an act. A commotion. I turn to look. A twenty-something in a light blue shirt with his white snapback on backwards passes me. He is smiling good-naturedly at a hoard of people as they hold cameras and microphones. My contact-glad eyes widen in surprise (although ‘gob smacked’ is probably more appropriate in this situation). It’s Avicii, the 22-year-old Swede that has become a legend on dance floors worldwide, whose hit ‘Levels’ has catapulted him into the electro elite. He goes up a flight of stairs and the group of journalists disappears after him. A dust of stunned silence settles after his disappearance – I was just an ET-hand-gesture away from one of the most hyped DJs of the moment.


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—Tomorrowland 2012

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IT’S A NEVER-ENDING ROM-COM MOMENT BETWEEN ARTIST AND FAN

There are some similar fangirl-omg moments, but I want to take this out to where the party really is at. Walking across the fairy-tale-like grounds through crowds of thousands from over 75 countries (China and Austria represent), I head to the main stage, a natural amphitheater that can only be described as a sensation. Infinite acres stretch out from the pedestal DJ setup at the front, reaching out into a plain covered by a wooden platform (protecting the nature of the grounds), then ascending upwards until the hill reaches two platforms overlooking pretty much everything. To look down from there must be a fraction of the satisfaction and amazement the artist must feel as he or she caters towards the most divine musical fantasies of the tens of thousands below. And, oh boy, do our dreams come true – over and over. A more mainstream example is Swedish House Mafia’s set, which hovers between breathtaking and heartbreaking and is easily the peak point – or at least one of the peak points – of the weekend. Maybe it’s the well-publicized secret rumor that they’re breaking up, or maybe it’s the ash of my neighbor’s cig blowing into my eyes: either way, I feel a tightening in my throat as Axwell serenades the crowd: We are just three guys who like to make music. We never thought we would stand here and play before a crowd like you guys here tonight. So we really want to take the opportunity to thank you for this amazing journey and this experience. Thank you. You are our legends. You are our heroes. I promptly break out the pool of tears I save for Toy Story 3. They ask of everyone to kneel, and of course we obey, shivering and waiting in euphoria until they instruct us to jump in unison; glow sticks are thrown into the crowd and of course we mercilessly strain our arms for the next hour to wave them non-stop to this trio of legends – Axwell, Angello and Ingrosso – to say goodbye, to say thank you for bringing us choones that will go into EDM history. As Coldplay’s ‘Paradise’ leads into a spectacular drop, fireworks and confetti explode from the fairy bookcase setup, and the crowd goes crazier than ever. It’s a never-ending rom-com

moment between artist and fan. Equally dramatic is Steve Aoki’s set at the Dim Mak stage. He vigorously shakes up bottles of champagne, and sprays them onto cleavages of bikini-clad girls and bare-chested herculean boys. The rest he pours into his mouth but spritzes out again – he doesn’t seem to drink himself. His two-hour set continues with a plate of spaghetti and cake disappearing into the crowd, as well a surprise appearance by Lil Jon. Sticky but oh so fun. While trying to get to another stage to see another favourite I prioritized (mercilessly choosing out of 400 great acts across the weekend plus trying to withstand the come-ons of your comrades is a serious test of willpower), I’m hit by a strong sense of unity between every single person at the festival. Maybe it’s a combination of the fictional surroundings, the beach dress code, and extraordinary audio and visual sensations that reverberate through every inch of grass; but youth and youth merge together to form one fused and dynamic audience; international differences eradicated by an overwhelming love of dance music. Caitlin, a girl from Sydney, tells me she spent over four thousand dollars on these three days, but brushes it aside nonchalantly, saying, “This is an experience that will last my whole life. It’s worth it”. And what an experience. During any set, you look around, and you only see elated faces – the absolute contentment is palpable. It’s like the faces of those background characters in Disney films when the hero and heroine finally get together and Captain Hook whips out his piano skills. A happy ending? More like the beginning. A Miss Universe for festivals? Tomorrowland wins with a garland of forget-menots around her neck.

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—Tomorrowland 2012

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—Parklife 2012

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THE GREEN FIELDS WERE REDUCED INTO A COLD BROWN SLUDGE FROM ALL THE RAIN, ALCOHOL AND OTHER LIQUID MATTER

One (very) rainy weekend in early June, I took the 142 bus down Oxford Road to get to Platt Fields Park where thousands gathered for the Parklife festival for their dosage of too much alcohol, illegal substances (classes A to C present), rain, regret and above all quality music all day, every day. As the song by The JAMS correctly says ‘It’s Grim Up North’, I had my expectations rightly set so there were no surprises as the green fields were reduced into a cold brown sludge from all the rain, alcohol and other liquid matter. Let me paint you a picture of the overall vibe and jump straight in. I was shovelling curry down my throat after marinating my liver in a pool of beer and Jägermeister all day when I talked to three guys who were debating on whether or not to see Justice and who else they could go see, when one suggested: “Let’s just do a shit-load of Ketamine and take it from there.” So yeah, standard operating procedure really. Both days, we nearly missed the 5pm last entry deadline by gaming in the pre-game (you get me?). We had to fight through the wellington clad, snapback cap wearing, Navajo pattern covered crowds to make it just in time for our complimentary pat-down by the police. Safety first as they say. We arrived in time to catch the full Daedelus set where he exhibited his skills as a true live performer with the help of his ‘Monome’ a minimalist musical interface made of wood, electronics and back-lit buttons. It was a crying shame that the stage did not allow him to setup ‘Archimedes’ an innovative live setup consisting of 24 94

gyrating mirrors and an array of lights to amplify the sensory experience of the show (the heads of the guys on ket would have easily exploded). We then nipped-out for some pies, chips and mushy peas. British ambrosia. It was there that I met Tasha, a DJ/Promoter for Neighbourhood, in London’s Plastic People who was enjoying a plate of chips with a dollop of mushy peas. She has a monthly show on Rinse FM which I was locked into whilst writing this. We chatted about music and tried my luck in getting to the artist area. Knowing the odds, I thought it wouldn’t hurt to ask. After she headed backstage just before the Ben UFO set (who she was touring with) I witnessed the indescribable images that resembled José Saramago’s “Blindness” due to the massive queues and blockages in the Portaloos; I had to watch as a young girl had succumbed to the stronger urges of her bladder and just let it all out (that’s code, dummy) with no shame or care in the world right next to a group of intoxicated lads that were filling-up the pissoirs. Yet another colourful festival picture. Trying to erase this out of my memory I headed back to the stage to catch the Ben UFO set. Ben UFO remains very high in my books since I caught his b2b with Bok Bok at Exit last year. This time around he was exchanging b2b musical blows with Pearson Sound, who both rep the mighty Hessle Audio Soundsystem. I was glad to see them being supported by Manchester’s own MC Chunky who

always manages to get the party going without getting in the way of the music as most MCs tend to do. Instead he compliments it with his unique and always positive attitude. Up next was AraabMuzik who has risen to fame of his mastery of the MPC2500. I was involved in the middle of a heated debate over Araab’s performance on the night by two self-proclaimed ‘greatest fans’. The guy next to me was extremely upset and disappointed at the show urging that Araab was better than that. On my other side, a girl was of the exact opposite opinion and also very vocal about this too. But honestly, from a guy that is known for pressing buttons super fast, what else would you expect. Maybe next time, some variation to showcase his skills as a real producer and a person that can press buttons at lightning speed. But hell, what do I know. At this point memory fades. I remember Chunky throwing beers into the crowd during the Jackmaster set and me getting one along with the evidence of what had ensued caught on 35mm film. This however, will remain in the archives to keep my reputation intact. In fact, the next thing I remembered was getting woken up on the bus and then waking up the next day to do it all over again. Which I may add is a great feeling; to have a chance to go all-out for another 24 hours. Party on, Wayne.


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I WAS THAT SHY GUY WHO DIDN’T WEAR ALL THAT TRENDY STUFF 96

www.thebloodybeetroots.com


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Sir Bob Cornelius Rifus

THE BLOODY BEETROOTS With the enigma venom mask constantly hiding his true identity and the ‘1977’ tattoo peaking out from his black outfit, Sir Bob Cornelius Rifo is a leader, a believer, and a pretty damn good musician. Performing at Tomorrowland 2012 with his FX Tommy Tea, he took some time out to answer some not-so-music-related questions.

Interview

VICTORIA JIN

What does the mask change about your personality? The mask helps me become more mad. If I were to be in a film, I’d probably be the fake hero. This interview is being conducted on pen and paper. Is there anything from the past you miss that has become diminished today? The time to think. Everyone is so fucking busy these days. You call them, ‘Hey want to grab dinner tonight?’ ‘Nope, i’m busy’. ‘How about tomorrow?’ ‘I’m busy too’. No one has any time anymore. We used to read books, now it’s only wikipedia and Facebook. Do you think that’s because of the internet?

Yeah I do. I think everyone’s caught up with things that don’t really matter. We have to find more time for life these days. All the clothes for The Bloody Beetroots are exclusive collaborations with Vendetta. Are there any fashion memories from when you were a teen? When I was young, I was that shy guy who didn’t wear all that trendy stuff. I remember everyone wore those ugly Timberlands…those yellow and huge shoes. I just couldn’t get myself to become part of the ‘trend’. So I was that guy who didn’t wear any stylish brands. If I were to bump into you in the grocery store, what would you be carrying?

Probably strawberry yoghurt. But I’m Italian, so I spend most of my time at cafes. Do you talking about the punk revolution is relevant these days? I don’t think it is. What I’m interested in is collaborating with others, but there are so many fake DJs out there now in the EDM scene. Like Paris Hilton. What the fuck. Did you see her customized setup? What’s next for the Bloody Beetroots? I really want to create a transition between old school and new school, highlighting the best of the old, and finding the essential key that made it work.

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Tomorrowland ‘12

REBECCA & FIONA With poise on their 90s platform boots, the stunning Swedish DJ-duo FIONA FITZPATRICK and REBECCA SVHEJA talk to KNEON at Tomorrowland festival about their first album [I Love You, Man], what it’s like to be girls in the EDM scene, and their staple pieces while touring.

What’s your impression of Tomorrowland so far? Fiona Fitzpatrick—We’ve never been, and we got here straight from the airport so we haven’t seen anything, but we’re going to try to get into the vibe. Rebecca Svheja—The Belgian beer is really good though! Since ‘The Luminary Ones’ came out in 2010, what has been another milestone in your career? RS—Definitely working with Kaskade on ‘Turn It Down’. Other than that, the release of our first album [I Love You, Man was released in 2011] is our biggest thing since. What has been the response so far? RS—It’s been great! We really had no idea it would become so big…it’s just us making music on our first album. We’re just really happy that people like it. Your music is so light-hearted and free…how do you strike the balance 98

between a track that’s too pop and one that has enough of your vibe to be still respected in the EDM scene? RS—It’s hard – sometimes you just really want to write pop melodies. It’s a combination of the beats, the vocals, and the lyrics. We to love mix them. Now onto the more visual aspect of your music – you both obviously love to dress up. What do you think about fashion? RS—We dress comfortably and cheaply. It’s our image, it’s our world – and it’s very affordable. Can you describe the Rebecca & Fiona world? RS—Lots of beers, guys, and house. FF—Yeah we love hanging out with guys. The whole business is pretty much guys too. Saying that, there are so few girl DJs out there, actually less than thirteen at Tomorrowland. Do you ever feel pressured because you are girls? FF—Actually, it’s pretty much the

opposite way around. It’s easier to get attention. People look up, see girls and are impressed. Sometimes it gets hard because they are prejudiced and don’t think we can produce. RS—But that’s for us to shake off – we don’t let any of their opinions affect us. When guys go on tour, all they need is a couple t-shirts and shorts, but us girls we need our whole ‘kit’. What are some things you can’t live without on tour? RS—Our Buffalo shoes [Rebecca waves towards their feet, which is adorned with platform sneakers probably a little taller than my head… potential ankle destroyers]. They’re not so dangerous, just when we walk out of cars it gets a little difficult. Other than that, we bring a lot of skirts and dresses; and Fiona likes her hair spray and – of course – lots of makeup!

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Tomorrowland ‘12

For over fifteen years he’s been trancing up the dance floor, hailed by many as one of the most talented and sincere artists in the dance and electro house scene. JOHN DIGWEED was the first official DJ to hold residency at the legendary Twilo nightclub in New York, and is now producing and touring while running a record label with fellow DJ Nick Muir. KNEON caught up with the inspiring personality at Tomorrowland Festival 2012.

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THE SPECTACLE OF CLUBBING IS SO MUCH BIGGER NOW. IT’S NOT JUST FIVE HUNDRED PEOPLE - IT’S TENS AND THOUSANDS

VJ—When people start talking about your work, the words ‘Consistency’ and ‘Legendary’ always come up. Do you think the former has led to the latter? JOHN DIGWEED—It’s all about longevity, isn’t it? People come to see you play and over the years you collect a fan base based on your sound. If you go to a restaurant and you don’t enjoy the meal, you might go back and give them another try. But if you keep going back and they don’t get better, there are other restaurants. Same with DJs out there. People come to see you and you need to give them a good time. VJ—You’ve been producing and DJing for a long time now - is each show still exciting and unique? JD—It’s actually getting better and better because over the years there have been more improvement on production, plus the spectacle of clubbing is so much bigger now. It’s not just five hundred people…it’s tens and thousands. VJ—Saying that, there’s been a huge DJ boom. Every second person I meet is a DJ or a producer. Why and how do you think this happened?

bands and pop stairs. Since the early 2000s there’s been an increase in DJ culture. And with the technology now, you don’t have to go to a record store and buy tons of music. You release your own tracks, go out and play them. It’s really exciting as well, because if we just stayed the same it would be so boring. Facebook, Twitter and social media sites also make putting music out there so much easier - it’s the new age. You can be more creative in the terms that you market yourself now, as opposed to ten years ago; it wasn’t so easy to get yourself known. But now, one youtube video and you’re a sensation overnight. It’s down to hype as well as talent. VJ—One last question: What is the most important thing you’ve learned throughout all these years? JD—I’d say remember the people on the way up the same way you do on the way down. Because at the end of the day, if you’re nice to everyone and not just an asshole making good music, you won’t be reduced to tickets you sell.

www.johndigweed.com

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A friendly hand shake, a lot of smiles. The sunshine that is SANDER VAN DOORN. He’s enthusiastic, a man obviously passionate about what he does and where he is. KNEON had a chat with resident DJ at Judgement Sunday in Ibiza who is currently voted the 16th best DJ in the world.

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WHEN I WAS YOUNGER, I WANTED TO BE A FIGHTER PILOT, BUT TODAY IT’S LIKE “I WANT TO BE A DJ”

VJ—Hey Sander, how are you feeling today? SANDER VAN DOORN—Pretty good actually. Had a pretty busy weekend, Sunrise festival [Poland] on Friday, went all the way to England for Global Gathering. I had no sleep at all, but I’m doing good! VJ—Are you Tomorrowland?

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about

SVD—I’m really excited, I’ve seen this festival blow up in just a couple of years. It’s cool because it’s a mix of Belgian people and people from abroad as well. Definitely a really good atmosphere. VJ—Let’s talk about your record label, Doorn Records. How did it all begin? SVD—I think it started around 3-4 years ago. It was for my own music, and all of a sudden I got all these tracks from young producers, which I really liked. So I started to do some A&R work, which I love to do as well. It’s kind of like being a guide to young talents. And that’s how it’s gotten to where it is right now. VJ—Saying that, is there anyone who’s new and upcoming that we should be keeping tabs on? SVD—Yes actually, I just released

a new track, together with Julian Jordan. He’s sixteen years old, still in school, he’s very intelligent, and he had some fresh sounds, so we started collaborating on ‘Kangaroo’ which is going off the roof right now. VJ—For you, what does a young producer have to have in order to attract your attention? SVD—Definitely their own style. Some people think that’s hard because there are so many people and sounds out there, but it’s actually pretty possible. Julian certainly has his own style. I like fresh new sounds that have this new input. But yeah that’s what I look for - people thinking outside the box. VJ—There are so many young DJs out there. Everyone is mixing, putting up their tracks; everyone is calling themselves a DJ now. How do you think this came about? SVD—It’s becoming this new profession. When I was younger, I wanted to be like a fighter pilot but today it’s like ‘I want to be a DJ’. And it’s possible! The technology’s there. Download a few songs for a program and you start producing… so I think that’s how it was triggered. It’s amazing to see what happened in the last few years. It’s always good to find a lot of young talents; it means

there’s a good future for the industry. VJ—And the industry is moving extremely fast. Do you think it’s going in a good direction? SVD—I know a lot of people say fast runners are dead runners. But in this case, the foundation was there already five years ago. So I think the next couple of years are going to be very interesting. VJ—There are some non-music related questions: If you were a drink, what would you be? SVD—Champagne. I like to party! VJ—Punk or Rock? SVD—Punk VJ—Bald or dreadlocks? SVD—Definitely bold. Dreadlocks get messy.

www.sandervandoorn.com

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AURIELLE A certain free whimsicality comes with the angelic voice that is AURIELLE ROUNSAVILLE. Based in Williamsburg Brooklyn and Los Angeles, she was just recently featured on the third season of Glee doing background singing and dancing. Now she’s finishing up her debut EP in New York City. KNEON caught up with the inspired young talent about her aspirations and dreams over email, while talented photographer Rhyan Santos photographed her in LA. photographed by RHYAN SANTOS

Who is Aurielle Rounsaville? I am a free spirit and lover of old things. I love how artists like Lana Del Rey and Katy Perry are bringing back an older feel to the music industry. I’m obsessed with the 50s and 60s, specifically the movie ‘Mermaid’ and everything that Cher was in. I feel so blessed to be able to go after my dreams in full force and see them pay off. How old do you feel? I feel 20 some days and 27 others. I feel like aging is a beautiful thing because if you’re smart, you really start to learn from your past and your mistakes. That makes you who you are in the long run. I don’t think I’d be able to handle some of the things happening to me right now a few years ago.

Where is home? Home is Atlanta, Georgia where my family is. I grew up in a smaller town with a very simple way of living that hasn’t changed. Currently home is split time between New York City (Williamsburg and Brooklyn) and Los Angeles, CA (Franklin Village) What are you currently working on? I am currently preparing for the release of my first music video for my song Close your eyes next month, and getting ready to spend the summer in NYC finishing writing and recording my first full EP! I’m trying to make it really personal & show who I am through it so I’m taking my time, and New York is my favorite place in the world. I hope to do some traveling this summer too. 105


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As a musician, what has been your proudest moment so far? My performance scene in my music video, which I co-produced. I owe thanks to the director, Naomi Christie and my choreographer Stephen Jones, for all the hours and late nights going over and over the routine. For those who are unacquainted with your music, can you describe what you sound like? My sound is definitely changing as I am. I am growing and feeling life more these days. I would say the music video I’m working on is very vibe-y and emotional; the music I write now stems from a very personal place and I’m being honest and true to it. Some of my biggest inspirations now are Drake, Frank Ocean, The Weekend, Old Sade and old Nelly Furtado tunes.

How important is music for you? Music is so important for me because it makes a difference in life. Life is hard and being able to relate to others through music really gets you through the rough patches. I hope that people relate to experiences in their lives through my music. My dad listened to Fleetwood Mac and Sade during my mom’s and his divorce, and my mom played Carly Simon every time we went to the beach. Those artists will always be my favorites because I can go back to those times in my life through them. They’ll never fade. What kind of movie do you think your music could play soundtrack to?

Ryan Gosling – that should be every girl’s answer! What’s the best thing about being young? The best thing about being young is making mistakes and having fun discovering who you really are. It’s an amazing process. What’s next for you? I leave Los Angeles in two weeks to stat a summer of traveling! First stop: Atlanta to spend time with my family, then hopefully Toronto for the first time, and then New York City! It’s hot but so much fun.

A movie about a crazy girl feeling her way through life. Who would play your love interest in a movie?

www.soundcloud.com/auriellexo www.twitter.com/auriellemusic

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Lilian Uhlig by Marius Uhlig

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PLAY YOUNG SMILE

A collection of bright lights, a smattering of upcoming talents in photography, fashion, art and music: KNEON Magazine interviews a series of young creatives who have their visions plugged in and dreams perched in front of them on the treadmill. And they’re running fast.

*a series originally started by Anna Hugo in the ‘Playtime’ issue

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LUISA LANGE shoe designer

I WAS A SHOE ADDICT BUT SOON GOT BORED OF ALL THE AVAILABLE STYLES So I started to add details using Swarovski gems, studs and so on. After time, people came to me and asked where the shoes came from. Then when I was 18 I gave this project a name - Lulu Clogs. NOBODY WAS WEARING THE CLOG - THIS WAS BEFORE YSL AND CHANEL REDESIGNED THE WHOLE CONCEPT I like it for the comfort; you can wear them everyday, no matter if it’s in the morning to university or in the evening to go out to a club. THE PR IS SO IMPORTANT You have to present yourself, and you need help, because you don’t have all the contacts to get into magazines. There’s a time when you have to build a team around you. It’s better when everyone has a specific job, rather you do it all by yourself. You have to figure out what you do best and then that’s your part. I was lucky that I started this with my boyfriend, and he did everything that has to do with the computer and finances.

I LOVED WORKING FOR WUNDERKIND, THE YOUNG BRAND BY WOLFGANG JOOP It was in a wonderful old villa about an hour away from Berlin. The atmosphere was homey, and it was a big wonderful house directly by the sea. And every floor was a different part of the company: one floor for the sales, another for fittings, and so on. I put together fabric books and worked on orders for the different stores. THE BEST THING ABOUT DOING THIS IS MEETING INDEPENDENT AND CREATIVE PEOPLE MY AGE I come from a private school where they looked all the same, so the best thing was to see other people be different and true to themselves. IN SOME YEARS, I SEE MY FIRST CLOTHING COLLECTION I hope I can find a lot of creative people to work with in a team, to help Lulu Vibes. The brand is not just for me; it’s to share with a lot more people, and I hope to build up a family around Lulu Vibes.

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graphic designer

JOANNA ZHOU 27-year-old Joanna Zhou is the creative brain behind MAQAROON, a design brand that extends into fashion, gifts, blogging and social media. The talented designer who lists Central Saint Martins and Chelsea School of Art in London as her education was recently awarded a € 17K creative grand from the Vienna Business Agency.

ON CSM AND CHELSEA SCHOOL OF ART IN LONDON What I found most useful was the strong emphasis on concept. We weren’t allowed to proceed with a brief until we came up with an idea that was interesting or unexpected. IT’S WELL KNOWN THAT JOBS IN THE DESIGN WORLD ARE GIVEN BASED ON PORTFOLIO AND NOT ACADEMIC DEGREES but I feel that having formal training is extremely useful for personal development. University was a very competitive but exciting environment where you’re taught to be humble, self-disciplined and learn how to deal with the often ambiguous definitions of success and rejection within design. THE MOST COMMERCIAL PROJECTS ARE OFTEN THE MOST SHALLOW It seemed ‘creativity’ was

being pushed aside for financial gain or triedand-tested models. So I decided the only way to gain complete creative freedom is to create a place for myself. ESSENTIAL WORK TOOLS A 0.3mm mechanical pencil, Faber Castell putty rubber, black Staedtler fineliners and of course, my loyal Macbook Pro and Wacom Intuos tablet. I DON’T CONSIDER MYSELF AN ACTIVIST BUT I HAVE STRONG VIEWS AGAINST INTOLERANCE, DISCRIMINATION AND RIGHT WING POLICIES So I consciously try to use my work to promote diversity in a positive manner. I love designing things that make people smile and which bring some some fun and positivity to the world

www.maqaroon.com

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RUKES Drew Ressler aka

Age 31 Occupation DJ photographer Hometown Massapequa Park, NY Location West Hollywood, CA

I BOUGHT A CAMERA JUST AS AN EXCUSE TO GO OUT TO THE CLUB SCENE AND MEET PEOPLE A lot of DJs thought I had a good eye for photography and urged me to continue to work on it. After dealing with taking pictures of way too many drunk people at clubs, and discovering that I liked the difficulty of getting good shots of the musicians themselves, I decided to switch to just photographing DJs 100%. THE ONLY BREAKS I USUALLY HAVE ARE TO EAT, SLEEP AND TRAVEL Usually I wake up, respond to emails - although having an assistant helps now, since she takes care of the many tours/gigs I have to cover - work on any photo galleries, then head to a gig to take more pics. Especially on touring, I pretty much work constantly. When I’m not shooting, I’m working on a gallery. 114

ONE OF THE BEST JOBS I’VE HAD WAS SHOOTING SWEDISH HOUSE MAFIA They were playing for a completely sold out Madison Square Garden. SOMETIMES I RUN INTO TOUR MANAGERS THAT THINK EVERY TIME I PRESS A BUTTON, MY CAMERA TAKES A PERFECT PICTURE So if I take four pictures, they immediately go “Ok, you got your pictures, move on!” There are a lot of settings for every little environmental change, which with club/event lighting, changes constantly. After I take all the pics, it also takes a long time to sort through them and make them “perfect” from the RAW files, so that alone usually takes more time than actually shooting at a gig. I USED TO WORK IN THE VIDEO GAME INDUSTRY I would probably

www.rukes.com

still be doing that if I never tried out photography. IF I WERE A DRINK, I’D PROBABLY BE WATER WITH SOME INVISIBLE POISON IN IT I’m just there, quiet and unassuming, but if you fuck with me, you’re dead. THE LAST THING I WANT TO DO IS FALL IN THE TRAP WHERE MY MERCHANDISE IS MORE POPULAR THAN MY PHOTOGRAPHY I want to make some basic merch - t-shirts, stickers - nothing too crazy. My new website is up, which I love. Also of course working on a lot more tours, a partnership with SOL REPUBLIC and a huge photo exhibit of my work at the W Hotel in Times Square coming up the end of August through September!


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TIEFENRAUSCH Samuel Colombo aka

Age 23 Occupation Event and DJ photographer Hometown Bologna, Italy Location Vienna, Austria

MY NICKNAME “TIEFENRAUSCH” TRANSLATES INTO ‘THE ECSTASY OF BASS’ That’s quite spot on actually, since I see myself in the bass music scene a lot. IT WAS JUST A WAY OF GOING OUT FOR FREE AT FIRST Then I took it seriously only a year ago, thinking how to make it into an actual product that you can actually sell to promoters. SOMEONE INTO DRUM AND BASS VISITING VIENNA DEFINITELY HAS TO CHECK OUT A MAINFRAME NIGHT It’s the first Saturday of each month. Another one would be Future Beats, second Saturday of the month at Flex. A BIG DREAM OF MINE IS TO SHOOT THE BURNING MAN IN NEVADA. It’s amazing. Also: a Fabric night in

London, and – getting bigger – Glastonbury festival, and Tomorrowland Festival. PEOPLE THINK EVENT PHOTOGRAPHERS MAKE A LOT OF MONEY: BULLSHIT. [Another misconception is] that it’s an easy job – and it actually is: it is an easy job to go into a club and take pictures of wasted people who don’t really care in the moment. But if you want to capture something memorable for the artist, for the promoters, and for the people in the crowd – for them to look at a shot think ‘Wow, that was wicked’ - if you want do that, it’s really not that easy. I WAS IN THE ARMY, AND I WOULD LOVE TO SHOOT IN A WAR ZONE Not because I’m after excitement or danger, but I think it’s a challenging

assignment, and also it’s just very emotional what goes on on both sides. I’d love to go down to Afghanistan and shoot there. MY BIGGEST INSPIRATION IS MY DAD He doesn’t really do art himself, he is an antiques trader, repairing old stuff and selling it. He has such a cool working attitude, doesn’t really rant, but works harder than anyone I’ve ever known, and I’ve met a lot of hardworking people. And he’s cool about it: “I enjoying working so much, because I chose something that I like”. And I did choose something that I like, and since I started doing it, I haven’t really stopped for a single second.

www.facebook.com/tiefenrauschphotography

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NAKED FISH photographed by SAM TIEFENRAUSCH 116

interview VICTORIA JIN

With a unique name that makes you go, “naked what?” Philipp Pichler (22) and Sebastian Keerl (24) are Austria’s latest upcoming DJ duo. Both were swimming in the Austrian dubstep and electro scene as regulars for some time, but it was only a half year ago that they decided team up. KNEON caught up with the dyanamic duo, who recently just played to a crowd of 6000+ at Beatpatrol festival.


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Who is Naked Fish? Sebastian Keerl—Just two guys making music and doing their best Philipp Pichler—We met over a year ago and we both had our single projects. After half a year, we thought, why not, let’s do this together. SK—For me, I always wanted to get on stage and do music. For Philipp, he was already on stage for a couple of years. So it wasn’t like a sudden snap and we were on. It was quite a stepby-step thing, I think. PP—We both had our independent projects before, so we knew what we wanted to do for Naked Fish. How did you get into electronic music? PP—I was 14 or 15, heard some electronic music on the TV. I didn’t know artists were making music like that. A friend sent me a couple of tracks, and I had them on my phone and listened to them nonstop for a whole week. Two year later, I had only been listening to electro music, and at seventeen I started DJing. What/who are your influences?

SK—Artists we knew already, who we liked and listened to. But also other people who told us, ‘We really like what you’re doing.” Which do you prefer - producing or performing? PP—I would say performing, because you’re getting feedback for what you’ve done at home. What do you think right before you go on stage. Are you nervous? PP—Not really

were totally freaking out PP—We started at 8 PM, there were 4-5000 people. We came on stage, everyone screamed but no one knew who we were…so that was kind of funny What makes a good live set? SK—The music PP—The weather

people,

the

club..The

What other DJs or producers inspire you?

SK—We look forwards to it!

SK—We have different tastes in artists

PP—There was one show where I was really nervous. We didn’t really know each other. I was playing after Flux Pavillon, it was in a club called Fluc in Vienna. The club usually hosts around 500 people, but that night there were around 1,500. I was standing there, Flux Pavillion was there, no one really knew me.

PP—Yeah it depends if this artist is a DJ, producer or both. There are good DJs and good producers; it’s rare when someone can do both things well. One of the best sets I saw was Captain Crunch from the UK. Cool guys doing crazy things. Kill the Noize and DJ Fresh are also great producers.

SK—Another time was before Example. We had a show before him and we just had 30 minutes to play, but five minutes before our set we

www.nakedfishofficial.com

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Mathias Hartmann by Yves Krier 118


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No extraneous styling. Just boys and their tanks and tees and h2o.

boys like you

by Marius Uhlig

Models Florian Dziuballe, Maximilian MĂźller, Tobias Fricke, Mogen BrattstrĂśm Assistants Fabian Speier, Lukas Wichtmann, Robyn Gburek Nature photo Hannah-Marie Hepola Interview Victoria Jin 120


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EVERYONE CAN GO BUY A CANON 1D WITH SOME NICE LENSES FOR A FEW THOUSAND EUROS, BUT THIS DOESN’T MAKE A GOOD PHOTOGRAPHER

I STARTED TAKING PHOTOS WHEN I WAS FIFTEEN When I meet a person that seems interesting, I want to their photos. My drive is this continuous desire to show these people to the world as I see them, to influence how the people I photograph appear to the viewer. That’s what I love about photography. A BIG CITY ALWAYS GIVES YOU MORE POSSIBILITIES When I was twelve, we moved to Braunschweig, a city with 250.000 inhabitants, two hours away from Berlin. I think that this city is responsible for the fact that I am a photographer today – without this city, I would have gone to high school like everyone else, and probably studied engineering or economics. A PICTURE HAS A COMPLETELY DIFFERENT IMPACT ON EVERY VIEWER When I take a portrait of my girlfriend on my bed, five minutes before I have to leave for Hannover Airport to go back to the UK for another month without her, then it is a sad picture for me. The viewer doesn’t know anything about it, so the image probably creates a completely different atmosphere in his mind. I want to give the power of judging and discussing an image to the viewer. YOU CAN ONLY BECOME A PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER IF YOU UNDERSTAND LIGHT If you know how to absorb, reflect, use

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it in the ways you need it for your picture - understanding light is the basis for photography. I mean, everyone can go buy a Canon 1D with some nice lenses for a few thousand Euros, but this doesn’t make a good photographer. I have some friends around Europe who own a compact digital camera and take better pictures than I do, just because they understand every single part of their equipment, subjects and surroundings. WHAT DRIVES ME TO WORK SO MUCH IS THE FACT THAT I STILL DON’T HAVE A REAL “SIGNATURE” IN MY WORKS I want people to see any of my photographs and think, “Oh, Marius Uhlig took this one!” without seeing my name under it. I want to show my parents and surrounding that I can make a living from photography. I know I’ll have to work hard for this, but I think it’s worth it. A PHOTOGRAPHER WHO I REALLY LOVE IS CHADWICK TYLER I think he is the master of deep and disturbing portrait and editorial photography. I also get inspired by suburban districts. I can’t really tell you why, but they give me the feeling of emptiness, like a white empty room. IT SOMETIMES DOESN’T MATTER HOW GOOD YOU ARE It’s just about the people you know and how you treat them. You could be the best photographer in the world, as long as you don’t have anyone to support

you or give you the chance to improve your skills, you are basically worthless. Today’s photography doesn’t sit in galleries or books anymore. It survives because of the internet and its ubiquitous presence. Having a good website and web presence is very important. ADOLESCENT ORIGINALLY WAS A DJDUO CONSISTING OF MY BEST FRIEND AND ME thought it would be a good idea to teach my friend how to DJ. It was really cool playing together, we got some really nice bookings, had a fun time together, but as you can imagine, a duo never works out when one halve is overseas. So I kept the name Adolescent and continued doing my thing while he kept playing in our hometown. THIS ISSUE OF KNEON IS THEMED ‘BACK TO BASICS… I think of Richard Avedon’s series “In The American West”. He traveled through the western parts of the United States, with a just large format camera and a white blanket. He took very clean and sharp portraits of every part of society in front of this clean background, using only natural light. ■

www.mariusuhlig.com


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Foreign Stills

by Anna Arrayo

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Shadows dancing on the summer land

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Way too far.

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He said I’d rule the world.

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Felt like fainting.

www.annaarrayo.com

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DO YOU HAVE ANY PLANS ON SUNDAY? Photographed by

RHYAN SANTOS

Starring

STEPHANIE ANGULO AND CY VASQUEZ

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by Charlotte Rutherford with styling by Natalie Bignell

Dress Maker YELENA BUCK Hair JAKE GALLAGHER Makeup TRACEY WOODHOUSE 138


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All dresses are HANDMADE for the shoot, shoes from TOPSHOP

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rain dogs

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by Glaza Kinski with styling by Ella Plevin & Letizia Cafasso featuring the lovely Ella Plevin


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black hoodie C.A.M. black jeans LEVI’S black bra H&M 147


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Jeans Jacket VINTAGE Blue sweater H&M Black skirt VINTAGE

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Gold Sweater Stripes dress

H&M ASOS

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Gold Sweater H&M Stripes dress ASOS

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IN THE LIGHT OF DAY

by Aimee Han with styling by Tully Walter

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Model TESS @ Volta Makeup VICTORIA MARTIN


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blazer APOM shirt STYLISTS OWN155


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top and skirt APOM necklace VINTAGE 157


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dress ADRIAN BRESSANUTTI necklace 158 VINTAGE shoes DR MARTENS


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dress HANNAH FAULL shirt APOM shoes MIDAS

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Photographed by AGNIESZKA CHABROS Styling by SINEAD HARGREAVES Model HOLLY JANE at Viviens Model Hair & makeup by SAMANTHA MILLER

NUDITY KNEON

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Ivory lace shirt MINA & KATUSHA 70’s boots SHEILA VINTAGE 163


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Ivory lace shirt MINA & KATUSHA 70’s boots SHEILA VINTAGE

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shirt REVERIE MOD silk shorts SHEILA VINTAGE

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Joplin pants PENNY ANNE Lace crop top AMERICAN APPAREL 70’s platform SHEILA VINTAGE

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STOCKISTS

Adrian Bressanutti Alexander Wang www.alexanderwang.com/ American Apparel www.americanapparel.net/ APOM apom.com/ ASOS www.asos.com/ Benetton www.benetton.com/ Common Projects www.commonprojects.com/ Dr. Martens www.drmartens.com/ Forever 21 www.forever21.com/

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Grenson www.grenson.co.uk/ Gwaan H&M www.hm.com La Dama www.shopladama.com/ Levi’s www.levistrauss.com/ Mark & Julia markandjulia.com/ Mercura mercuranyc.com/ Meshit www.meshit.at Midas www.midasshoes.com.au/ Nedra Chachoua

www.nedrachachoua.com New Yorker www.newyorker.com/ Sheila Vintage sheilavintage.webs.com/ Topshop www.topshop.com/ Vanessa Mooney www.vanessamooney.com/ Wood Wood http://woodwood.dk/ Yelena Buck http://yelenabuck.com/ Zara http://www.zara.com/


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issue—04—back to basics

Summer ‘12

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KNEON MAGAZINE #4 'Back to Basics'  

Welcome to our fourth issue! www.kneon-magazine.com

KNEON MAGAZINE #4 'Back to Basics'  

Welcome to our fourth issue! www.kneon-magazine.com