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Presented By Ryerson University and nacpilDESIGN ASC 620 Systems Integration Comprehensive Design Section 1 Design Lead: Kevin Nacpil Financials: Pierce and Pierce Prepared For TORONTO MUSEUM CORPORATION 60 Wellington St. Toronto, Ontario April 14 2011


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION EXPLORATION OF A CITY DESIGNING A BUILDING OF EXPERIENCES A FACE OF THE FUTURE, TO TELL THE PAST RESEARCH ANALYSIS SITE AREA PRECEDENTS SITE PHOTOS VISTAS AND VIEWS ZONING BY-LAWS AND AMENDMENTS

BUILDING ANALYSIS NET AND NON-NET ASSIGNABLE AREAS BUILDING ON SITE SUN ANALYSIS STREET INTEGRATION BUILDING VIEWS CIRCULATION HVAC & MECHANICAL STRUCTURE MUSEUM CIRCULATION EGRESS & ESCAPE FIRE SEPARATION

BUILDING DESIGN SITE PLAN ELEVATION FLOOR PLANS ROOF PLANS REFLECTED CEILING PLANS SECTIONS DETAIL DRAWINGS RENDERINGS FINANCIALS GANTT CHART PROFORMA AND FINANCIALS


INTRODUCTION The Toronto Museum Corporation (TMC) has concluded the review of the predesign and feasibility report and wishes to proceed with the construction of the museum project. The request was made to continue with an up-scale, sophisticated and neighborhood appropriate, mixed-use project that will include a retail/commercial space included with the museum. The design and exhibition of the museum will be focused around the one hundred carefully selected artifacts done by the curators and associate staff of the museum. These artifacts will showcase the history; experiences and ideas that have helped shape Toronto’s heritage and its people of today. The comprehensive design process of the museum will be broken down into several sections outlining each aspect of design to date. This includes, building plans, exploration of a building façade, construction drawings, a pro-forma document complete with financials, statements and revenue generation. This design report is a complete document that will be passed on to the owners as a reference guide in continuing the project as stated. The document will also outline a review of a study completed last year on global winter cities similar to

Toronto and relevant to the project. The importance of the winter cities review was to better understand particular cities and its surrounding context, how they have adapted to their environment and also how their environment has shaped who they are today. The in depth study was completed by nine research groups at Ryerson University focusing on urban design and city planning. Discoveries and conclusions on winter cities will have a tremendous impact on the museums form, context and relationship to the St Lawrence Neighborhood, which is the focus of our site. After the brief overview of winter cities, the topic will transcend into a similar report but will analyze the St. Lawrence Neighborhood in downtown Toronto. As a long standing important part of Toronto’s rich culture, the St Lawrence Neighborhood plays an integral part in tourist, nightlife and city living in such world-class city as Toronto. Following the St. Lawrence site analysis, the short essay based on studies, reviews and criticism are also included and will be outlined in great detail in order to understand the final design of the Toronto Museum Corporation. The section will also include the study of the surrounding area of the St. Lawrence

Neighborhood and its surrounding areas. A brief summary of the particulars including zoning, and development by-laws, limitations of the site, along with all constraints and encumbrances will be also addressed for city building purposes. The document will further detail and explain the design parti of the Toronto Museum. This will include the site approach, urban design analysis, and formal expression in the building design. The design philosophy along with theoretical justifications will be shown with graphic images along with complimenting text in order for the reader to fully understand the thought development process. Systems integration and detailing of specific elements found within the building will also be shown to give a closer look on how the building while function and join together with other elements. Scale of materiality and tectonics will be addressed for reasons of having two exposed facades on two major streets in neighborhood. We at are Nacpil Design are proud to provide you with what is six months of hard work, research and discoveries that we have enjoyed discovering.


Cities Studied included (Left to Right): Tromso Stockholm Quebec City St. Petersburg Opposite Page: Rykjavik Salzburg Sapporo Ljubljana Anchorage.


EXPLORATION OF A WINTER CITY For the purposes of studying a success of a winter city, we have gone through and defined what a winter city actually is. Winter cities have certain traits that define its appropriateness. They: experience anywhere from four or more months out of the year and, which have temperatures below 0째C. They also include a minimum annual snowfall of 30cm and there is at least one day per season that has only 4 hours of daylight. When processing through the analysis of a winter city it must be understood that the inhabitants experience four distinct seasons. The city must be able to adapt and respond to all seasons based on certain infrastructure and development along with its native building policies. The citizens featured within the city are provided with comfort during the harsh winters and outdoor social opportunities that relate with their winter surroundings to keep up with its ability to ensure that the best features of each region are met at its fullest potential. Cities in winter climates have flourished all over the world as time has progresses. These cities face the harsh cold winds of winter along with much snowfall and cold temperatures. The isolated environments of cities that are embraced in these types of regions shape the people inhabiting it. These features create communities that are separated from each and had to rely on their own people and resources surrounding them for support. In dealing with the harsh environments, the people have become resilient and self-reliant in order to survive. They have earned their right to stay on the land they have made their mark in each individual city. The engagement of their home is strictly based on their surroundings. They have now adapted a new form of design and architecture that is vernacular to their region. To have a successful winter city, you must incorporate many aspects of its surround environment in order to adapt to a particular culture and attitude. The infrastructure must be able to support a vibrant and livable environment despite the negative effects of the winter. That includes: the cold temperatures, high winds and heavy snowfall.


DESIGNING A BUILDING OF EXPERIENCES

The Toronto Museum Corporation has been given the opportunity to design and create a building that will not only hold the artifacts of the people who have inhabited the city for hundreds of years, but will relive those stories to describe to patrons visiting the museum. Because the building will not only be a museum, it will serve for main functions other than gallery spaces. Such spaces will include: a ground floor cafĂŠ, a rooftop patio, adjustable spaces for special events such as weddings, corporation functions and social gatherings. Although the museum will hold these artifacts, the museum layout is specifically designed in order to accommodate various functions reachable at certain levels for public and private uses. The museum can be sectioned off so that it can keep public and private galleries left in solitude. The ground floor is a very important feature of the museum because it relates directly to a human scale and connects to the nearby pedestrians wishing to enter in random fashion to use the cafĂŠ, restaurant or pay a trip to the museum. During the warmer months the windows found on the south east corner are able to open so that it can give a heightened sense of relationship to the street levels and main intersection. The ground floor also features a multi-storey atrium that is connected with floors two to five in order to have a vertical connection. The second floor is a public space in which multi-various functions can be held in the educational spaces and workshops for school, communities and other social events. The beginning of the gallery spaces is located in the middle so that it can shed sunlight away from the transparent sides of the building. The hanging

installation is found here and across the multi-level floors that once again create the vertical connection. The 3rd floor features the museums public lounge. This can be used for corporate events, social and private banquets and also be used as the preparation area for wedding services provided by the museum. The two storey theatre is also found here on this level. The bottom floor of the theatre is features on the north side along with the theatre break out space and adjacent video gallery. This video gallery can be used for many media functions. A storage space and south booth is also featured in the 150 seat theatre. Presentations, videos, movies and so forth are all available here in the museum that can gather many groups of people for public service events. On the 4th floor, located on the southeast corner are additional gallery spaces. The galleries themselves were spread open on each floor so that exploration was to be encouraged for museum visitors. A small gallery space is also found on the west side which also features a removable wall for various arrangements. Through this whole time, visitors can connect with each other verbally and visually through the main atrium providing a different view each time. The 5h floor combines the functions of the gallery spaces and restaurant rooftop. The restaurant kitchen and dining area are both located in close proximity to each other. Washrooms can also be found here on the floor and additional

dining areas are found one floor above on the open area dining patio. During the warmer months, patrons and employees can visit the green roof as well as enjoy the nice view the 20m+ heights provide. This view can be startling because of the dramatic perspective you can immerse yourself by capturing the entire St. Lawrence Market horizons. The top floor is where all the offices and employees will be located. All necessary rooms for positions will have an office provided for them. A staff change room is located her as well as a boardroom, lunch room and employee lounge. The rooftop office area is perfect in terms of receiving daylight and separating the public versus private functions of the building. All floors are accessible through elevators and egress stairs found on each end of the building. There is also the main circulation stairs that are found in the same area as the previous in order to make this easier for the patrons. Each main circulation stair provides a seating area as well as adequate daylight for the main atrium. The building access paths are easily visible without any confusion in the event of a disaster or fire. Each floor is properly equipped with fire separators, regulation barriers and proper, easy to access egress stairs. Each floor is except the ground floor is four meters in height with the ground floor is a mandatory height of 4.5m.


A FACE OF THE FUTURE, TO TELL THE PAST

Designing the Face The façade of the museum building is one that had careful attention and research tended to. Because the site is adjacent to two major city streets, the façade of the building had to cater to both sides and for the main reason that it was to be a starting point in any direction traveling north or west. The purpose was also to create such a building that did not turn its back away from such an important intersection of the neighborhood. The façade of the building includes several materials that were carefully chosen to best illustrate the building, the surrounding environment and also best exemplify the museums design in nature. After researching many materials and testing various elements together coupled with the site analysis done by research teams, Nacpil Design has chosen glasses, triangular metal panels and concrete as the main design materials used for the building. Interior materials are also mentioned in greater detail for areas such as gallery spaces, atriums, restaurant/café and so forth. The façade of the building is translucent along the southeast corner to bring transparency to the building and intersection. The spaces found inside the building are public spaces used by any patron of the museum as well as for public events on or off museum hours. The gallery spaces are placed away from the museum near the centre where it becomes a more personal feeling experiencing and learning about the artifacts. Circulation through the building is also kept separate from gallery spaces and public functions so that disturbance of the museum experience is felt on a quiet more personal level. The Ontario

brick, which is native to the surrounding environment is a building material found on the rear side of the building (hidden) at the ends along the adjacent edges of neighboring buildings in order to give a transition of movement from one material to another. The ground floor is also kept as open as possible to show a more transparent visual flow coming from any direction and any street toward the museum. The ground floor is a very important feature of the museum because it relates directly to a human scale and connects to the nearby pedestrians wishing to enter in random fashion to use the café, restaurant or pay a trip to the museum. The strong diagonal lines create movement with flow in both directions. The diagonals continue on both sides of the façade, so that no matter where you are standing you can see the continuity of the lines to propel you in each direction. Being at such a critical point of the intersection it was important that a connection like these lines would allow you to give you a direct vision up Church St. and down Wellington St. E. There is glass found on the elevations and on main floor (but not apparent in the renderings). The outer lines also frame the building. Like it was to frame the artifacts selected by the curators to be displayed. The lines also point toward the main corner of the intersection. Unlike the buildings paying tribute to the corner, the museum does not chamfer in any way, thus the lines bow to the center in order to respect its importance in the intersection.


RESEARCH ANALYSIS Site Area Map Precedents Site Photos Views & Vistas Zoning, By-Laws and Amendments


SITE AREA

The St. Lawrence Area The St Lawrence Neighborhood as mentioned before is located on the more eastern side of Toronto. The major streets of this area are Church St travelling north, Front St and Wellington St. travelling east and west. The Flatiron building located across the Toronto Museum is the pinnacle division of Front St and Wellington in which begins a quick trip on the one-way street of Wellington St. E. Views and vistas located here are in fact prominent and have been known to be the face of many post cards found in Toronto souvenir stores. Other notable areas are the St. Lawrence Market, popular for its fresh seafood each day, the Eaton Centre mall which is just a 10 minute walk as well as George Brown College on King St East. David Crombie Park is also just located to the east with other housing developments currently growing at an incredible rate for the area.

The new site for the Toronto Museum Corporation will be located at 60 Wellington St E. in the the St Lawrence Neighborhood. The site is found a busy main intersection of the area with such notable buildings as: the Gooderham Building (Flatiron), St Lawrence Market and the King Edward Hotel. Prominent vistas of the downtown core can be seen facing west. The busy corridor accomodates traffic in all directions flowing in and out.


PRECEDENTS To understand what a museum is and how it will function as a building and as a centre piece of the St. Lawrence Neighborhood, Nacpil Design had to undergo extensive research in other museums currently built. This allows us to further analyze the buildings functions, relationships, display spaces, building performance and purpose. Some of the key museums studied include: AGO in downtown Toronto, Gardiner Museum in Toronto, the Art Gallery of Hamilton, Scottsdale Museum of Fine Art and the Museum of Modern Art (MOMA) in New York City. Although they ranged in various sizes and types of galleries, the purpose was to investigate how the display spaces were displayed, financial viability due its size and context, as well as revenue generation through various facets of the building including the gift shop and online services.


SITE PHOTOS


VIEWS & VISTAS

The Toronto Museum Corporation will be at the centre of one of the main intersections of the area. That provides the museum with as much exposure as possible. This way the museum can gather attention from afar, create interest as one would walk, drive or cycle by its path. Because the Gooderham Building already creates interest because of its shape, the Toronto Museum will also and most likely be captured in many photos, postcards, internet sites and public interest because of its interesting faรงade. Both the south and east faรงades will surely stand out from the neighboring brick facades currerntly found within the area. The views found on the left hand side provide the most notable views one would experience when passing by the Toronto Museum.


ZONING, BY-LAW AND AMENDMENTS

Based on the 1989 zoning set forth by the city of Toronto, the maximum allowed building height for the southeast corner of Church St. and Wellington St is a maximum of 30.1m at the souteast corner. The rest of the building cornersis allowed a maximum height of 26.5m. The southeast corner as mention before must have a cylindrical form equal to a 3.5min radius with a 0 - 3.0m distance from the curb lines of Church St. and Wellington St. The maximum building area for the site is not to exceed 30.5m by 19.5m wide. The ground floor must be a minimum of 4.5m in height. Anything built above that may be to the discretion of the design team wishing to build. The image to the side will illustrate visually, the requirements and limitations of the site. Any amendments wishing to exceed any of the above provisions must file an Amendment form to the city of Toronto in order to proceed with the project at hand. For our purpose, the Toronto Museum Corporation will be at a height of 28.5m and therefore wishes to process with an amendment in order to build the extra 2m. Such form will be provide to the City of Toronto prior to construction.


BUILDING ANALYSIS Building on Site Sun Analysis Street Integration Interior Views Pedestrian & Vehicular Circulation HVAC & Mechanical Structure Museum Circulation Egress and Escape Fire Separation


BUILDING ON SITE


SUN ANALYSIS

6:58 AM

3:30 PM

9:26 AM

5:30 PM

12:30 PM

7:30 PM


INTERIOR VIEWS

CIRCULATION & ROOM LAYOUT

Interior View of Lounge Area

Above: Vehicular Circulation into Building into the back. Main pedestrian entrance in the front. Below: Room layout breakdown

PRIVATE RESTAURANT

GALLERY

GALLERY

PUBLIC Restaurant View

PRIVATE PUBLIC

REST AURANT

PUBLIC

THE ATRE THE ATRE GALL ERY

PRI VATE


HEATING PATHWAY 1:400

6th FLOOR 5th FLOOR

4th FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

3th FLOOR

3th FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR 4th FLOOR

5th FLOOR

6th FLOOR

SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

HEATING AND COOLING PATHWAYS


COOLING PATHWAY

6th FLOOR

1:400

HEATING AND COOLING PATHWAYS

5th FLOOR

4th FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

3th FLOOR

3th FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR 4th FLOOR

5th FLOOR

SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

6th FLOOR


STRUCTURAL PROVISION

COLUMN PLACEMENT

40cm FLOOR SLAB

MUSEUM CIRCULATION

STRUCTURAL SUPPORT WALLS

GF

2F

3F

4F

5F

6F


EGRESS & ESCAPE ROUTES TYPICAL FLOOR ESCAPE ROUTE The museum features exits on each side of the building that adheres to the Ontario Building Code (OBC). The exits are no more than half of the diagonal length of the building which is the required minimum. Easy access on each floor is never blocked off, as well there are several other modes of egress such as two elevators and main circulation stairs found beside the interconnected floor space.

6F

5F

4F

3F

2F

GF

4th FLOOR


FIRE SEPARATION

GROUND FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

3rd FLOOR

COMPARTMENTS WITH FIRE PROTECTION Each floor and zoned area is protected by a fire protection seal in order to contain fire so that patrons are able to escape out of the building with adequate time. Each material specifically is chosen not only as an aesthetic quality but also with a very high fire rating. Dotted red lines on each floor plan are outlined to give you a better indication which areas are fire protected. Areas that are not fire protected are still retardant on flames due to its open gap. Fire stairs are 100% complete and protection from fires and built in such a way that easy escape is done without the need of second guessing. FIRE PROTECTION

4th FLOOR

5th FLOOR

6th FLOOR

FIRE EXTINGUISHER LOCATION


BUILDING DESIGN Site Plan Elevations Basement Plan Ground Floor Floors 2 - 6 Roof Plan Sections Detail Drawings


SITE PLAN 1:200

CHURCH ST. The location of the site is featured along one of the main intersections of the St. Lawrence Neighborhood. This main location marks the start of a journey straight into downtown via Wellington St. E and forms a vista of tall buildings along its course. The journey up north will take up into the Ryerson University campus along with an intersection into Dundas Street East. The Gooderham Building also known as the Flatiron Building is directly located south of the Toronto Museum found within the main intersection. The Toronto Museum Corporation will use up all available land in building the building. Part of the design and focus of the driving idea was on become a keystone between the streets of Church and Wellington, but bring a dramatic facade of a new and modern building. The rooftop patio has a protected roof covering that continues from the south and east faรงades. Exposure to natural sunlight is exposed to the south to maximize daylight. The opening of the green roof area is also seem from above in which employees or patrons can use on warmer days. All mechanical equipment can be found here on the roof as well. Access to the equipment is through the freight elevator.

WELLINGTON ST. E


SOUTH ELEVATION 1:200

CHURCH ST.


EAST ELEVATION 1:200

FRONT ST E.

WELLINGTON ST. E


BASEMENT PLAN 1:200

PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS SPACIAL DISTRIBUTION

A2

PUBLIC GALLERY EMPLOYEE

CIRCULATION EGRESS B1

GFA CALCULATION Total Area (98.5f x 64f) = 6297 sq/f GF = 5405 sq/f

A1

FLOOR TO FLOOR RELATIONSHIP 6F 5F 4F 3F 2F GF B1

BASEMENT 1


FLOOR PLAN 1:200

PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS A2

SPACIAL DISTRIBUTION

A2

PUBLIC GALLERY EMPLOYEE

CIRCULATION EGRESS GF

2F

GFA CALCULATION Total Area (98.5f x 64f) = 6297 sq/f GF = 5403 sq/f

A1

A1

FLOOR TO FLOOR RELATIONSHIP 6F 5F 4F 3F 2F GF

GROUND FLOOR

2nd FLOOR

2F = 4876 sq/f


FLOOR PLAN 1:200

PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS A2

SPACIAL DISTRIBUTION

A2

PUBLIC GALLERY EMPLOYEE

CIRCULATION EGRESS 3F

4F

GFA CALCULATION Total Area (98.5f x 64f) = 6297 sq/f 3F = 453.68 sq/f

A1

A1

FLOOR TO FLOOR RELATIONSHIP 6F 5F 4F 3F 2F GF

3rd FLOOR

4th FLOOR

4F = 399.16sq/f


FLOOR PLAN 1:200

PROGRAMMATIC ANALYSIS A2

SPACIAL DISTRIBUTION

A2

PUBLIC GALLERY EMPLOYEE

CIRCULATION EGRESS 5F

6F

GFA CALCULATION Total Area (98.5f x 64f) = 6297 sq/f 5F = 445.68 sq/f

A1

A1

FLOOR TO FLOOR RELATIONSHIP 6F 5F 4F 3F 2F GF

5th FLOOR

6th FLOOR

6F = 217.32 sq/f


ROOF PLAN 1:200

ROOF PLAN

FLOOR TO FLOOR SECTION A2

1:25


SECTION 1:200

A1

A2


DETAIL DRAWINGS AND CONNECTIONS PARAPET INSULATION WOODEN NAILER

373

ROOF FLASHING GRAVEL STOP ROOF MEMBRANE WOODEN CANT

154

SEPARATION LAYER PRIME ROOF BOARD

60

301

CAP SHEET HEAT WELDED CAP

BRICK VENEER

63

AIR SPACE RIGID INSULATION CMU BLOCK BRICK TIE

200

620

75

CONTINUOUS VAPOUR BARRIER

CONCRETE ROOF DECK CAST IN PLACE ANCHOR

90

ROOF PARAPET DETAIL 1:5

25

75

123

ROOF PARAPET AXONOMETRIC 1:5


DETAIL DRAWINGS AND CONNECTIONS

ABOVE: CURTAIN WALL CONNECTIOIN DETAIL 1:5 LEFT: WINDOW CONNECTION AT MULLION DETAIL 1:5 ABOVE: WINDOW JAMB AT WALL INTERFACE 1:5 RIGHT: ANCHORED BRICK VENEER WALL COMPONENTS 1:5

TMC 2 - Window Jamb at wall interface

TMC NEW 1 - 25mm 1600 Sloped Glazing (Kawneer)


HORIZONTAL EXPANSION JOINT

STONE STILL

BRICK EXTRUDED DETAIL

PLAN / SECTION / ELEVATION OF EXPANSION JOINT WALL DETAIL 1:5

METAL FURRING WITH FLOOR TRIM TOP OF SLAB

BRICK VENEER AIR SPACE SHELF ANGLE WEEP HOLE W/ DRIP EDGE SEALANT WITH BACKER ROD AND NEOPRENE FOAM HORIZONTAL EXPANSION JOINT VAPOR BARRIER WITH FLASHING RIGID INSULATION CMU BACKUP STEEL STUDS GYPSUM BOARD

VERTICAL EXPANSION JOINT

BRICK VENEER 25mm AIR SPACE RIGID INSULATION VAPOR BARRIER CMU BACKUP STEEL STUDS GYMSUM BOARD METAL FURRING

BRICK TIE


DETAIL DRAWINGS AND CONNECTIONS

EXPANSION JOINT FILLER INSULATION RETAINER

SECTION OF EXPANSION JOINT WALL DETAIL 1:5

BRICK VENEER BRICK TIE 25mm AIR SPACE RIGID INSULATION HORIZONTAL REINFORCING JOINT VAPOR BARRIER LOOPED AROUND JOINT CMU BACKUP STEEL STUDS GYPSUM BOARD


FINANCIALS Gantt Construction Plan Proforma 2011


KEVIN NACPIL PROJECT SCHEDULE

ASC620 - SECTION 1 INTEGRATION STUDIO I

TASK

COMPLEX BUILDING PROJECT - SCHEMATIC DESIGN (TORONTO MUSEUM CORPORATION) SOFT DEADLINE

APR

SAT

SUN

5

6

7

8

9

*

10

SAT

11

12

13

SUN **

14

15

16

17

18

19

SAT ***

20

SUN

21

22

DUE DATE 3:00pm

23

TASK % COMPLETED

TITLE PAGE INTRODUCTION TABLE OF CONTENTS APPENDIX / BIBLIOGRAPHY

9 TH 9 TH 19 ST 21 ST

0% 0% 0% 0%

MAIN COMPONENTS DIAGRAM NET ASSIGNABLE SPACES PG. FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMING PROGRAM SIZE RELA. DIAGRAM SPATIAL RELATIONSHIP DIAG. CIRCULATION FLOW CHART

13 TH 15 TH 18 TH 19 TH 12 TH 14 TH

0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%

SITE ANALYSIS TEXT WRITING BUBBLE DIAGRAMS

12 TH 14 TH 9 TH

0% 0% 0%

PRELIMINARY DRAWINGS MODEL DESIGNING SITE MODEL SKETCHUP

19 TH 21 ST 21 ND

0% 0% 0%

RENDERING

22 ND

0%

ZONING BLOCKING AND STACKING AMENDMENTS

20 TH 20 TH 20 TH

0% 0% 0%

FINANCIALS PROFORMA INCOME STATEMENT BALANCE SHEET MORTGAGE CALCULATOR

21 ST 22 ND 22 ND 20 TH 20 TH

0% 0% 0% 0%

LAYOUT DESIGN BURN CD

20 TH 23 RD

5% 80%

(PROPOSED MUSEUM SITE)

NOTES

* 4 MILESTONES MUST BE ACHIEVED BY NOV 10 ** 8 MILESTONES MUST BE ACHIEVED BY NOV 14 *** 15 MILESTONES MUST BE ACHIEVED BY NOV 20

MILESTONE ACHIEVED SOFT DEALINE PAST DUE


TMC - Comprehensive Design & Systems Integration