Issuu on Google+

BULLETIN

rubensbulletin KONINKLIJK MUSEUM VOOR SCHONE KUNSTEN ANTWERPEN

Jg. 4, 2012

1


BULLETIN

RUBENSBULLETIN 4e jaargang, 2012 Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen Copyright © 2012: KMSKA en de auteurs All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any other information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Coördinatie Valérie Herremans Eindredactie Paul van Calster

Beeldverantwoording/Photographic Acknowledgements De beeldrechten voor deze publicatie berusten bij de collecties die het werk in bezit hebben, met uitzondering van de hieronder vermelde specifieke copyrights. All works of art are reproduced by kind permission of the owners. Specific acknowledgements are listed below. Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, Rijksprentenkabinet p. 10 Antwerpen, KMSKA pp. 3, 5, 19, 51, 58, 62 Antwerpen, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet pp. 12, 16, 20, 23, 83 Brussel, Koninklijk Instituut voor het Kunstpatrimonium, ACL pp. 78, 88, 89 Edinburgh, National Galleries of Scotland p. 79 Hamburg, Kunsthalle, Graphische Sammlungen p. 83 Kopenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst p. 81 Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts pp. 35–37, 39, 40, 42 Londen, The British Museum, Department of Prints and Drawings pp. 65, 79 Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum p. 67 Oxford, Ashmolean Museum p. 63 Parijs, Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts graphiques p. 65 Potsdam, Stiftung Preußische Schlösser und Garten Berlin-Brandenburg, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie pp. 70, 72–73, 74, 84, 85, 88, 89 Sint-Petersburg, Hermitage p. 62

Triumph in Antwerp. Rubens’s oil sketch 2 The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo  (II)  Ank Adriaans-van Schaik Zelfstandig kunsthistoricus Jordaens and the Rubens Descent from the Cross in Lille 34 Nico Van Hout Conservator Oude Kunst, KMSKA Christus en de ongelovige Thomas. Iconologische opmerkingen bij enige afbeeldingen van na de Reformatie Alexander Mossel Zelfstandig kunsthistoricus, Amsterdam

50

Rubens en Brueghel, bondgenoten in de slag om de gordel van Ares Christine Van Mulders Wetenschappelijk onderzoeker, KMSKA

70


BULLETIN

RUBENSBULLETIN 4e jaargang, 2012 Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen Copyright © 2012: KMSKA en de auteurs All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording or any other information storage or retrieval system, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. Coördinatie Valérie Herremans Eindredactie Paul van Calster

Beeldverantwoording/Photographic Acknowledgements De beeldrechten voor deze publicatie berusten bij de collecties die het werk in bezit hebben, met uitzondering van de hieronder vermelde specifieke copyrights. All works of art are reproduced by kind permission of the owners. Specific acknowledgements are listed below. Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum, Rijksprentenkabinet p. 10 Antwerpen, KMSKA pp. 3, 5, 19, 51, 58, 62 Antwerpen, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet pp. 12, 16, 20, 23, 83 Brussel, Koninklijk Instituut voor het Kunstpatrimonium, ACL pp. 78, 88, 89 Edinburgh, National Galleries of Scotland p. 79 Hamburg, Kunsthalle, Graphische Sammlungen p. 83 Kopenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst p. 81 Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts pp. 35–37, 39, 40, 42 Londen, The British Museum, Department of Prints and Drawings pp. 65, 79 Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum p. 67 Oxford, Ashmolean Museum p. 63 Parijs, Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts graphiques p. 65 Potsdam, Stiftung Preußische Schlösser und Garten Berlin-Brandenburg, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie pp. 70, 72–73, 74, 84, 85, 88, 89 Sint-Petersburg, Hermitage p. 62

Triumph in Antwerp. Rubens’s oil sketch 2 The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo  (II)  Ank Adriaans-van Schaik Zelfstandig kunsthistoricus Jordaens and the Rubens Descent from the Cross in Lille 34 Nico Van Hout Conservator Oude Kunst, KMSKA Christus en de ongelovige Thomas. Iconologische opmerkingen bij enige afbeeldingen van na de Reformatie Alexander Mossel Zelfstandig kunsthistoricus, Amsterdam

50

Rubens en Brueghel, bondgenoten in de slag om de gordel van Ares Christine Van Mulders Wetenschappelijk onderzoeker, KMSKA

70


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Triumph in Antwerp Rubens’s oil sketch The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo  (II) Ank Adriaans-van Schaik Introduction In 1638 Rubens made an oil sketch representing the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo (figs. 1, 2). It resulted from a commission by the Antwerp city council and was related to the victory of the Spanish armies over the Dutch troops in the Battle of Kallo.1 Rubens’s oil sketch is, in fact, a design, combining the depiction of a triumphal allegory and the construction plan of a chariot. This chariot was destined to be one of the floats in the annual procession, the Ommegang. The central question that arises is to what extent Rubens’s inventio of the triumphal chariot was rooted in the pictorial tradition of Antwerp festive ceremonies. We shall first take a look at the earliest representations of the triumphal chariot in the Low Countries and at the pictorial tradition of the triumphal chariot as a political allegory during the Eighty Years War. After that the focus will be on the personifications of virtues in Rubens’s design and the representation of maritime creatures in traditional Antwerp imagery. Finally, Rubens’s baroque chariot will be compared with earlier examples of triumphal imagery in Antwerp.

See ‘Triumph in Antwerp’, my contribution to the last issue of Rubensbulletin (Adriaans-van Schaik 2011). The present contribution, which focuses on the iconography of Rubens’s oil sketch, is the sequel to that article. It is based on my research preceding the documental presentation ‘Rubens Revealed. Victory on a Roll. Oil sketch for the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo’ (Museum Rockoxhuis, Antwerp, 2012) and on chapter 4 of my master thesis, ‘Rubens’s oil sketch The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo. Ancient triumph and Antwerp festive tradition’ (Utrecht University, 2011). 1 

Fig. 1 Peter Paul Rubens, The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, 1638, KMSKA. Detail

3


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Triumph in Antwerp Rubens’s oil sketch The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo  (II) Ank Adriaans-van Schaik Introduction In 1638 Rubens made an oil sketch representing the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo (figs. 1, 2). It resulted from a commission by the Antwerp city council and was related to the victory of the Spanish armies over the Dutch troops in the Battle of Kallo.1 Rubens’s oil sketch is, in fact, a design, combining the depiction of a triumphal allegory and the construction plan of a chariot. This chariot was destined to be one of the floats in the annual procession, the Ommegang. The central question that arises is to what extent Rubens’s inventio of the triumphal chariot was rooted in the pictorial tradition of Antwerp festive ceremonies. We shall first take a look at the earliest representations of the triumphal chariot in the Low Countries and at the pictorial tradition of the triumphal chariot as a political allegory during the Eighty Years War. After that the focus will be on the personifications of virtues in Rubens’s design and the representation of maritime creatures in traditional Antwerp imagery. Finally, Rubens’s baroque chariot will be compared with earlier examples of triumphal imagery in Antwerp.

See ‘Triumph in Antwerp’, my contribution to the last issue of Rubensbulletin (Adriaans-van Schaik 2011). The present contribution, which focuses on the iconography of Rubens’s oil sketch, is the sequel to that article. It is based on my research preceding the documental presentation ‘Rubens Revealed. Victory on a Roll. Oil sketch for the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo’ (Museum Rockoxhuis, Antwerp, 2012) and on chapter 4 of my master thesis, ‘Rubens’s oil sketch The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo. Ancient triumph and Antwerp festive tradition’ (Utrecht University, 2011). 1 

Fig. 1 Peter Paul Rubens, The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, 1638, KMSKA. Detail

3


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Rubens’s oil sketch of 1638 Rubens staged the allegory on the victory at Kallo on a triumphal chariot in the shape of a ship whose mast was replaced by an enormous trophy; the boat shape refers to Felicitas or Happiness. The military trophy consists of armour, standards, banners and armorial bearings, taken as spoils from the enemy. Affixed above them are a laurel wreath, flags, Habsburg coats of arms, a cardinal’s hat, a golden crown and, at the top, a laurel tree. The text on two scrolls explains the origin of the war booty; it reads: ‘de gallis capta fugatis’ (Seized from the fleeing French) and ‘caesis detracta batavis’ (Seized from the defeated Dutch). The two Victory figures on either side of the trophy symbolize the triumph. The glory of the victory is underscored by the presence of two personifications of Fama (Fame) with trumpets. The text to the right of the trophy reads: ‘Inde vaenen vande Trompetten van Fama’, ‘victor io’ and ‘io triumphe’ (In the banners of the trumpets of Fama; Long live the victor; Long live the triumph). It was with these acclamations that, in antiquity, Roman conquerors were hailed during their triumphal entries. Guiding the chariot is Providentia Augusta (Imperial Providence or Prudence), who is identified by the inscription next to her head. Providentia Augusta, who symbolizes the foresight of the Spanish king, wears a laurel wreath as a symbol of victory; she is depicted with two faces, one looking forward to the future and the other looking back to the past. She is modelled on Prudentia (Prudence or Wisdom), one of the Cardinal Virtues. On the ground beside her is a flaming grenade. Behind her, on a raised platform, kneel the city maidens of Antwerp and Saint-Omer, identified by the inscriptions – Antverpia and Audomarus [Sanctus] – above their heads. Both wear a crenellated crown. Antverpia’s is decorated with a wreath of roses and she is dressed in the city colours of Antwerp, red and white. The city maiden of Saint-Omer, in a yellow cloak, rests her hand on a heraldic shield. The stance and gestures of the city maidens appear to express their joy at the victory gained. The personifications of Virtus (Virtue, as well as Valour and Re­solve) and Fortuna (Fortune, as well as Coincidence or Luck) stand at the stern of the ship. They, too, are connected to the triumph: Virtus, symbolizing 4

Fig. 2 Peter Paul Rubens, The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, 1638, KMSKA

5


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Rubens’s oil sketch of 1638 Rubens staged the allegory on the victory at Kallo on a triumphal chariot in the shape of a ship whose mast was replaced by an enormous trophy; the boat shape refers to Felicitas or Happiness. The military trophy consists of armour, standards, banners and armorial bearings, taken as spoils from the enemy. Affixed above them are a laurel wreath, flags, Habsburg coats of arms, a cardinal’s hat, a golden crown and, at the top, a laurel tree. The text on two scrolls explains the origin of the war booty; it reads: ‘de gallis capta fugatis’ (Seized from the fleeing French) and ‘caesis detracta batavis’ (Seized from the defeated Dutch). The two Victory figures on either side of the trophy symbolize the triumph. The glory of the victory is underscored by the presence of two personifications of Fama (Fame) with trumpets. The text to the right of the trophy reads: ‘Inde vaenen vande Trompetten van Fama’, ‘victor io’ and ‘io triumphe’ (In the banners of the trumpets of Fama; Long live the victor; Long live the triumph). It was with these acclamations that, in antiquity, Roman conquerors were hailed during their triumphal entries. Guiding the chariot is Providentia Augusta (Imperial Providence or Prudence), who is identified by the inscription next to her head. Providentia Augusta, who symbolizes the foresight of the Spanish king, wears a laurel wreath as a symbol of victory; she is depicted with two faces, one looking forward to the future and the other looking back to the past. She is modelled on Prudentia (Prudence or Wisdom), one of the Cardinal Virtues. On the ground beside her is a flaming grenade. Behind her, on a raised platform, kneel the city maidens of Antwerp and Saint-Omer, identified by the inscriptions – Antverpia and Audomarus [Sanctus] – above their heads. Both wear a crenellated crown. Antverpia’s is decorated with a wreath of roses and she is dressed in the city colours of Antwerp, red and white. The city maiden of Saint-Omer, in a yellow cloak, rests her hand on a heraldic shield. The stance and gestures of the city maidens appear to express their joy at the victory gained. The personifications of Virtus (Virtue, as well as Valour and Re­solve) and Fortuna (Fortune, as well as Coincidence or Luck) stand at the stern of the ship. They, too, are connected to the triumph: Virtus, symbolizing 4

Fig. 2 Peter Paul Rubens, The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, 1638, KMSKA

5


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

military power, wears a helmet and holds a sword and a thunderbolt; Fortuna is the symbol of fortune, her inconstancy comparable to that of the wind that puffs up her garment. With her hand resting on a ship’s rudder, she likewise represents safe passage. At the foot of the trophy are three seated prisoners of war, who represent the Dutch and French Fig. 3 Gillis Hendricx and Hieronymus Cock, taken prisoner after the victories at The Ship Victoria, or The Ship of State and ‘Plus Kallo and Saint-Omer. Ultra’, 1559, etching and engraving The triumphal chariot is dec­orated with festoons and swirling ornaments ending in lobe-like motifs. Sea creatures, such as the dolphin with a putto astride its back and the triton blowing his conch shell, ride the waves and appear to be guiding the ship, referring to the victory on the river Scheldt and its banks. The shaft of the chariot disappears into the gaping maw of a fire-spewing sea monster. Placed above the ship’s stern is the coat of arms of Antwerp, with the double eagle over the city walls and the outspread hands. Antwerp’s commission of the design for a triumphal car can be seen as a form of city propaganda, the design being a token of loyalty to the Spanish governor, whose order to repel an attack on Antwerp had had such a successful outcome.

upon the death of King Ferdinand of Aragon, he was asked to design a triumphal chariot for the memorial procession in Brussels.2 He also accompanied Philip of Burgundy to the ceremonies.3 No visual source of the chariot is known. However, the design has been reconstructed, based on the various contemporary eyewitness accounts.4 The sym­bol­ ism of the funeral chariot was that of a triumph by con­quest, showing a trophy, pieces of armour and Ferdinand’s coats of arms. In the middle of the platform the king himself was represented by a statue of a warrior in antique armour brandishing a sword. On the rear end of the car was the king’s vacant throne. Scheller has indicated traces of Gossart’s in­ven­tion in the colossal float of Charles V’s funeral procession in Brussels (1558; fig. 3). The general content of the float and the empty throne seem to have been taken directly from its predecessor. Charles V’s funeral float in the form of a ship, referred to as the ‘Ship Victoria’ or the navis triumphalis, survived into the seventeenth century, featured in the Joyous Entry of Archduke Albrecht in Brussels (1596) and played an important role in the Procession of Our Lady of the Zavel in honour of Archduchess Isabella in 1615.5 Both Albrecht Dürer’s Small Triumphal Car ordered by Maximilian I and Gossart’s funeral car were designed in the year 1516. Yet it is unlikely that the artists have influenced one another. Both chariots seem to have been created independently as an individual interpretation of the triumph, inspired by the same classical visual language. In Northern European art, the idea of a triumphal procession became a framework for allegorical and moralistic admonition. The con­ cept of the triumph inspired by Petrarch’s fourteenth-century poem Trionfi and translated into a Christian moralistic idiom, fused Italianate style with

Triumphal chariots in the Low Countries Jan Gossart (1478–1532) designed a funeral car that belongs to the earliest triumphal chariots created north of the Alps. After starting his career as a guild member in Antwerp, Gossart went into the service of Philip of Burgundy, Admiral of Zeeland and illegitimate son of Duke Philip the Good. In this capacity he joined Philip of Burgundy’s diplomatic delegation to Rome in 1508–09. Gossart was one of the first artists to introduce the art of the Italian Renaissance in the Netherlands. In 1516, 6

King Ferdinand of Aragon was the grandfather of the future emperor Charles V. In the absence of the dead body, the triumphal carriage was the climax of the procession. Blockmans and Donckers 1999, pp. 90–91. 3  Ainsworth et al. 2010, pp. 11–12. 4  Mensger (2002, p. 106 n. 20) refers to contemporary reports of the funeral by Remy Dupuis and Gerardus Geldenhauer. 5  Scheller (1983, p. 236) refers to Denis van Alsloot’s painting of the Procession of Our Lady of the Zavel, The Triumph of Isabella (1616; Victoria and Albert Museum, London, inv. 5928–1859), commemorating the 1615 procession, which shows an image of the float. 2 

7


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

military power, wears a helmet and holds a sword and a thunderbolt; Fortuna is the symbol of fortune, her inconstancy comparable to that of the wind that puffs up her garment. With her hand resting on a ship’s rudder, she likewise represents safe passage. At the foot of the trophy are three seated prisoners of war, who represent the Dutch and French Fig. 3 Gillis Hendricx and Hieronymus Cock, taken prisoner after the victories at The Ship Victoria, or The Ship of State and ‘Plus Kallo and Saint-Omer. Ultra’, 1559, etching and engraving The triumphal chariot is dec­orated with festoons and swirling ornaments ending in lobe-like motifs. Sea creatures, such as the dolphin with a putto astride its back and the triton blowing his conch shell, ride the waves and appear to be guiding the ship, referring to the victory on the river Scheldt and its banks. The shaft of the chariot disappears into the gaping maw of a fire-spewing sea monster. Placed above the ship’s stern is the coat of arms of Antwerp, with the double eagle over the city walls and the outspread hands. Antwerp’s commission of the design for a triumphal car can be seen as a form of city propaganda, the design being a token of loyalty to the Spanish governor, whose order to repel an attack on Antwerp had had such a successful outcome.

upon the death of King Ferdinand of Aragon, he was asked to design a triumphal chariot for the memorial procession in Brussels.2 He also accompanied Philip of Burgundy to the ceremonies.3 No visual source of the chariot is known. However, the design has been reconstructed, based on the various contemporary eyewitness accounts.4 The sym­bol­ ism of the funeral chariot was that of a triumph by con­quest, showing a trophy, pieces of armour and Ferdinand’s coats of arms. In the middle of the platform the king himself was represented by a statue of a warrior in antique armour brandishing a sword. On the rear end of the car was the king’s vacant throne. Scheller has indicated traces of Gossart’s in­ven­tion in the colossal float of Charles V’s funeral procession in Brussels (1558; fig. 3). The general content of the float and the empty throne seem to have been taken directly from its predecessor. Charles V’s funeral float in the form of a ship, referred to as the ‘Ship Victoria’ or the navis triumphalis, survived into the seventeenth century, featured in the Joyous Entry of Archduke Albrecht in Brussels (1596) and played an important role in the Procession of Our Lady of the Zavel in honour of Archduchess Isabella in 1615.5 Both Albrecht Dürer’s Small Triumphal Car ordered by Maximilian I and Gossart’s funeral car were designed in the year 1516. Yet it is unlikely that the artists have influenced one another. Both chariots seem to have been created independently as an individual interpretation of the triumph, inspired by the same classical visual language. In Northern European art, the idea of a triumphal procession became a framework for allegorical and moralistic admonition. The con­ cept of the triumph inspired by Petrarch’s fourteenth-century poem Trionfi and translated into a Christian moralistic idiom, fused Italianate style with

Triumphal chariots in the Low Countries Jan Gossart (1478–1532) designed a funeral car that belongs to the earliest triumphal chariots created north of the Alps. After starting his career as a guild member in Antwerp, Gossart went into the service of Philip of Burgundy, Admiral of Zeeland and illegitimate son of Duke Philip the Good. In this capacity he joined Philip of Burgundy’s diplomatic delegation to Rome in 1508–09. Gossart was one of the first artists to introduce the art of the Italian Renaissance in the Netherlands. In 1516, 6

King Ferdinand of Aragon was the grandfather of the future emperor Charles V. In the absence of the dead body, the triumphal carriage was the climax of the procession. Blockmans and Donckers 1999, pp. 90–91. 3  Ainsworth et al. 2010, pp. 11–12. 4  Mensger (2002, p. 106 n. 20) refers to contemporary reports of the funeral by Remy Dupuis and Gerardus Geldenhauer. 5  Scheller (1983, p. 236) refers to Denis van Alsloot’s painting of the Procession of Our Lady of the Zavel, The Triumph of Isabella (1616; Victoria and Albert Museum, London, inv. 5928–1859), commemorating the 1615 procession, which shows an image of the float. 2 

7


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

imagery derived from the work of Hieronymus Bosch.6 Petrarch’s poem describes six victories of the personifications of Love, Chastity, Death, Fame, Time and Faith. Each personification triumphs over the preceding one and in the end Faith conquers them all. Early representations of the allegorical religious triumph in the Low Countries can be found in tapestry series and stained glass. The Antwerp artist Pieter Coecke van Aelst (1502– 1550), for instance, made cartoons for a series of tapestries representing the Triumphal Chariot of Lust, the Triumph of Venus (c. 1532–33) and he designed the Triumph of Faith, an example of a moralized triumph for stained glass (c. 1550).7 Engraved versions of moralized themes appeared in Antwerp in the second half of the sixteenth century. Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s Triumph of Time and Triumph of Death were engraved and published by Philip Galle in 1574. Such prints had a major impact on the artistic imagery, representing and disseminating the new visual language. In Antwerp however, the motif of the triumphal chariot gained popularity in the civic parade of the Ommegang as well as in prints. The prints and drawings of the ancient triumph and its revived images originating in the Italian Renaissance had come north through travelling artists. Rubens, after his training in Antwerp, had spent several years in Italy and Spain. Returning to Antwerp in 1608, he took home a large number of copies, drawings and sketches.8 But even before that, he must have come into contact with Italian Renaissance imagery. Taking into consideration that his second teacher, Adam van Noort (1562–1641), was involved as one of the major painters in the decorations for the Joyous Entry of Archduke Ernest of Austria in 1594, it seems plausible that Rubens by that time was familiar with allegorical imagery.9 The greater part of

the allegorical figures on the stages and arches of Ernest’s entry had been designed by Marten de Vos (1532–1605) according to the descriptions and instructions in Cesare Ripa’s Iconologia (1593).10 Rubens’s third and last teacher Otto van Veen (1556–1629) painted a series of religious triumphs, depicting Christ and the personifications of religious principles riding on a triumphal chariot.11 Van Veen was a learned painter, a real pictor doctus, who had been to Italy, where he studied the art of antiquity and the Renaissance. His classicism was inspired by Raphael. His religious triumphs seem to have had an impact on Rubens, and more in particular on his Eucharist series, in which Rubens depicted three scenes staging the Church, Catholic Faith and Divine Love on triumphal cars.12 In contrast to his predecessors who focused on the religious dogma, Rubens brought new life into the genre by conveying the religious message through an abundance of decoration.13

Pinson 2007, pp. 203, 204. Pieter Coecke van Aelst, The Triumph of Faith, c. 1550, stained glass, diam. 28.5 cm, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. 8  Rubens owned five reduced copies after Andrea Mantegna’s cycle of the Triumphs of Caesar. He combined two of them in his Roman Triumph (National Gallery, London). Three copies are in the collection of the Národní galerie, Prague. See Antwerp 2004, pp. 224–27. 9  Rubens had been trained as a painter in the workshops of Tobias Verhaecht in 1591, Adam van Noort in 1592 and continued his training at the workshop of Otto van Veen in 1594–95.

Triumphal chariots as political allegories related to the Eighty Years War The visual allegory of the triumphal chariot had been used in the conflict between the Southern and the Northern Netherlands during the Eighty Years War (1568–1648). The Pacification of Ghent, a peace treaty aimed at restoring unity among the Seventeen Provinces and dealing with future religious clashes by negotiation, was signed by the States General on 8 November 1576. It was ratified on 12 February 1577 by the Perpetual Edict, signed by the new governor Don Juan in agreement with Philip II. These démarches gave rise to an optimism that was expressed in the Triumph of Peace of 1577, an engraving by one of the Wierix brothers after Willem van

6  7 

8

Mielke 1970, pp. xii–xiii. The series of Triumphs by Otto van Veen – Triumph of Verbum Dei and Ecclesia Dei; Triumph of Fides and Caritas; Religious Triumph; and Triumph of Ecclesia Christi, with Universitas Successio and Vetustas – is in the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Bamberg. See De Poorter 1978, p. 200 and figs. 71–74. 12  De Poorter 1978, p. 204. 13  Ibid., p. 209. 10  11 

9


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

imagery derived from the work of Hieronymus Bosch.6 Petrarch’s poem describes six victories of the personifications of Love, Chastity, Death, Fame, Time and Faith. Each personification triumphs over the preceding one and in the end Faith conquers them all. Early representations of the allegorical religious triumph in the Low Countries can be found in tapestry series and stained glass. The Antwerp artist Pieter Coecke van Aelst (1502– 1550), for instance, made cartoons for a series of tapestries representing the Triumphal Chariot of Lust, the Triumph of Venus (c. 1532–33) and he designed the Triumph of Faith, an example of a moralized triumph for stained glass (c. 1550).7 Engraved versions of moralized themes appeared in Antwerp in the second half of the sixteenth century. Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s Triumph of Time and Triumph of Death were engraved and published by Philip Galle in 1574. Such prints had a major impact on the artistic imagery, representing and disseminating the new visual language. In Antwerp however, the motif of the triumphal chariot gained popularity in the civic parade of the Ommegang as well as in prints. The prints and drawings of the ancient triumph and its revived images originating in the Italian Renaissance had come north through travelling artists. Rubens, after his training in Antwerp, had spent several years in Italy and Spain. Returning to Antwerp in 1608, he took home a large number of copies, drawings and sketches.8 But even before that, he must have come into contact with Italian Renaissance imagery. Taking into consideration that his second teacher, Adam van Noort (1562–1641), was involved as one of the major painters in the decorations for the Joyous Entry of Archduke Ernest of Austria in 1594, it seems plausible that Rubens by that time was familiar with allegorical imagery.9 The greater part of

the allegorical figures on the stages and arches of Ernest’s entry had been designed by Marten de Vos (1532–1605) according to the descriptions and instructions in Cesare Ripa’s Iconologia (1593).10 Rubens’s third and last teacher Otto van Veen (1556–1629) painted a series of religious triumphs, depicting Christ and the personifications of religious principles riding on a triumphal chariot.11 Van Veen was a learned painter, a real pictor doctus, who had been to Italy, where he studied the art of antiquity and the Renaissance. His classicism was inspired by Raphael. His religious triumphs seem to have had an impact on Rubens, and more in particular on his Eucharist series, in which Rubens depicted three scenes staging the Church, Catholic Faith and Divine Love on triumphal cars.12 In contrast to his predecessors who focused on the religious dogma, Rubens brought new life into the genre by conveying the religious message through an abundance of decoration.13

Pinson 2007, pp. 203, 204. Pieter Coecke van Aelst, The Triumph of Faith, c. 1550, stained glass, diam. 28.5 cm, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. 8  Rubens owned five reduced copies after Andrea Mantegna’s cycle of the Triumphs of Caesar. He combined two of them in his Roman Triumph (National Gallery, London). Three copies are in the collection of the Národní galerie, Prague. See Antwerp 2004, pp. 224–27. 9  Rubens had been trained as a painter in the workshops of Tobias Verhaecht in 1591, Adam van Noort in 1592 and continued his training at the workshop of Otto van Veen in 1594–95.

Triumphal chariots as political allegories related to the Eighty Years War The visual allegory of the triumphal chariot had been used in the conflict between the Southern and the Northern Netherlands during the Eighty Years War (1568–1648). The Pacification of Ghent, a peace treaty aimed at restoring unity among the Seventeen Provinces and dealing with future religious clashes by negotiation, was signed by the States General on 8 November 1576. It was ratified on 12 February 1577 by the Perpetual Edict, signed by the new governor Don Juan in agreement with Philip II. These démarches gave rise to an optimism that was expressed in the Triumph of Peace of 1577, an engraving by one of the Wierix brothers after Willem van

6  7 

8

Mielke 1970, pp. xii–xiii. The series of Triumphs by Otto van Veen – Triumph of Verbum Dei and Ecclesia Dei; Triumph of Fides and Caritas; Religious Triumph; and Triumph of Ecclesia Christi, with Universitas Successio and Vetustas – is in the Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Bamberg. See De Poorter 1978, p. 200 and figs. 71–74. 12  De Poorter 1978, p. 204. 13  Ibid., p. 209. 10  11 

9


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Haecht.14 Peace is seated on a triumphal chariot, accompanied by Agreement while Charity is holding the reins. The chariot is drawn by three mules, indicating the slow pace of the peace process. Under the wheels a bunch of weapons and the personification of Envy are to be crushed. Self-Interest tries in vain to stop the progress of 4 Elias van den Bossche, Allegory on the Peace. The Seventeen Provinces Fig. Treaty Negotiations between Spain and the kneel to welcome Peace. In the Northern Netherlands, c. 1609, etching, Amsterdam, background allegories rep­re­sent Rijksmuseum various aspects of the political situation in the Netherlands. Unfortunately, the positivity voiced by this print was soon to be shattered by the political reality. More than thirty years later, the Twelve Years’ Truce (1609–21) gave new cause for optimism. The allegorical print by Elias van den Bossche presents a triumphal car carrying the personifications of Pax (Peace), Iustitia (Justice), Misericordia (Compassion), Veritas (Truth) and of the Seventeen Provinces. The triumphal car is riding down to the Archdukes Albrecht and Isabella, seated on the left, suggesting that peace was at hand (fig. 4).15 Both images express the hope for peace at a crucial moment in the civil war that divided the Nor­thern and the Southern Neth­er­lands. This belief in the res­toration of peace appears again in Rubens’s Tri­umphal Chariot of Kallo of 1638. The war had brought about the closing of the river Scheldt and the decline of the city’s com­merce overseas. The victory at Kallo once again streng­thened optimism about the recovery of the city’s prosperity. Rubens’s design for the chariot differs from the prints by Wierix

and Van den Bossche by its dramatic staging of the allegorical figures and by the rich decoration of scrolls, waves and sea creatures.

14  15 

10

See Tanis and Horst 1993, pp. 114, 115. See Dlugaiczyk 2005, p. 335.

Antwerp maritime allegories and the Chariot of Neptune The images of sea creatures that once decorated ancient sarcophagi had been rediscovered by Renaissance artists and reached Antwerp through engravings and drawings. A frieze depicting the Gods of the Sea designed by Bernard van Orley (1488–1541) applied as a decoration in the tapestry series of the Hunts of Maximilian (c. 1530) can be considered as an early Northern example, where the sea creatures typically found a place in a decorative context.16 In Antwerp, however, maritime symbolism had a special function in expressing the bond between the city, the river and the passage to the sea. A case in point is the monumental Antwerp City Hall (1561–65). The avant-corps of the façade presents an iconographic programme of three coats of arms, three statues, two sea centaurs and two obelisks (figs. 5, 6). The two sea centaurs fighting dangerous creatures, as yet unaware of the disastrous consequences of the future closing of the city’s passage to the sea, symbolize Antwerp’s supremacy in the overseas trade. The sea centaur, or ichthyocentaurus, is a fabulous creature with the head and torso of a human and the forequarters of a horse, whose body ends in the Fig. 5 Antwerp City Hall, avant-corps of the façade, 1561–65 Fig. 6 Sea Centaur, detail of the façade of Antwerp City Hall, 1561–65

16 

Balis 1992, p. 119.

11


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Haecht.14 Peace is seated on a triumphal chariot, accompanied by Agreement while Charity is holding the reins. The chariot is drawn by three mules, indicating the slow pace of the peace process. Under the wheels a bunch of weapons and the personification of Envy are to be crushed. Self-Interest tries in vain to stop the progress of 4 Elias van den Bossche, Allegory on the Peace. The Seventeen Provinces Fig. Treaty Negotiations between Spain and the kneel to welcome Peace. In the Northern Netherlands, c. 1609, etching, Amsterdam, background allegories rep­re­sent Rijksmuseum various aspects of the political situation in the Netherlands. Unfortunately, the positivity voiced by this print was soon to be shattered by the political reality. More than thirty years later, the Twelve Years’ Truce (1609–21) gave new cause for optimism. The allegorical print by Elias van den Bossche presents a triumphal car carrying the personifications of Pax (Peace), Iustitia (Justice), Misericordia (Compassion), Veritas (Truth) and of the Seventeen Provinces. The triumphal car is riding down to the Archdukes Albrecht and Isabella, seated on the left, suggesting that peace was at hand (fig. 4).15 Both images express the hope for peace at a crucial moment in the civil war that divided the Nor­thern and the Southern Neth­er­lands. This belief in the res­toration of peace appears again in Rubens’s Tri­umphal Chariot of Kallo of 1638. The war had brought about the closing of the river Scheldt and the decline of the city’s com­merce overseas. The victory at Kallo once again streng­thened optimism about the recovery of the city’s prosperity. Rubens’s design for the chariot differs from the prints by Wierix

and Van den Bossche by its dramatic staging of the allegorical figures and by the rich decoration of scrolls, waves and sea creatures.

14  15 

10

See Tanis and Horst 1993, pp. 114, 115. See Dlugaiczyk 2005, p. 335.

Antwerp maritime allegories and the Chariot of Neptune The images of sea creatures that once decorated ancient sarcophagi had been rediscovered by Renaissance artists and reached Antwerp through engravings and drawings. A frieze depicting the Gods of the Sea designed by Bernard van Orley (1488–1541) applied as a decoration in the tapestry series of the Hunts of Maximilian (c. 1530) can be considered as an early Northern example, where the sea creatures typically found a place in a decorative context.16 In Antwerp, however, maritime symbolism had a special function in expressing the bond between the city, the river and the passage to the sea. A case in point is the monumental Antwerp City Hall (1561–65). The avant-corps of the façade presents an iconographic programme of three coats of arms, three statues, two sea centaurs and two obelisks (figs. 5, 6). The two sea centaurs fighting dangerous creatures, as yet unaware of the disastrous consequences of the future closing of the city’s passage to the sea, symbolize Antwerp’s supremacy in the overseas trade. The sea centaur, or ichthyocentaurus, is a fabulous creature with the head and torso of a human and the forequarters of a horse, whose body ends in the Fig. 5 Antwerp City Hall, avant-corps of the façade, 1561–65 Fig. 6 Sea Centaur, detail of the façade of Antwerp City Hall, 1561–65

16 

Balis 1992, p. 119.

11


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

serpentine tail of a fish.17 Motifs of water crea­tures frequently appeared in Antwerp prints, paintings and festive decorations from the sixteenth century onwards. The illustrated books commem­or­ ating the Joyous Entries are a useful source for the analysis of Antwerp maritime imagery.18 The six­teenth- and seventeenthcentury prints reveal that the theme of the Fig. 7 Pieter van der Borcht, city’s relation to the sea had been expressed Chariot of Neptune, 1599, engraving, Antwerp, Museum Plantin-Moretus/ in the Antwerp festive tradition time and Prentenkabinet again. The prints of stages and arches and prints of the Ommegang cars decorating the Antwerp streets and squares during the various Joyous Entries display a vast spectacle of allegorical images. Part of this imaginary world consisted of marine creatures such as sea and river gods, whales, tritons and dolphins. The whale already had had a long career as a symbol of Antwerp maritime power. Thanks to its popularity as a companion to Jonah in medieval mystery plays, the whale gained an important place in the Antwerp Ommegang.19 Due to Renaissance influences its company became mythological instead of biblical. The Whale was carrying either Neptune, or Oceanus referring to the desired restoration of Antwerp maritime power on the oceans.20 In the Joyous Entry of 1582 the whale guided by Neptune accompanied a maritime tableau vivant

staging Scaldis (River Scheldt), Merchandise and Navigation, symbolizing the Antwerp overseas trade. Twelve years later, in the entry of 1594, the whale carrying Oceanus was placed next to the Stage of the Liberation of the Scheldt at the Sint-Jansbrug. The Chariot of Neptune, or the Cur­rus triumphalis Neptuni, pre­ sented to Albrecht and Isabella at their Joyous Entry (1599), announced the leg­end about the future victory of the Arch­dukes on the sea (fig. 7).21 Neptune and Amphitrite were pre­­­sented on a chariot drawn by two hip­ po­ campi with putti riding astride.22 The chariot is preceded by mermaids modelled on medieval examples who comb their long hair and look in convex mirrors, and surrounded by tritons who blow their conches.23 Neptune and Am­phi­trite them­selves are seated on a throne under a canopy supported by two dolphins, while fishes are dangling down from the can­opy’s frame. Balis indicated that from 1599 onwards, the Chariot of Neptune participated in the annual Ommegang and left traces in the visual arts.24 He pointed to the various representations of the Sea Triumph of Neptune and Amphitrite by Frans Francken II (1581–1642).25 Francken’s sea chariot of Neptune and Amphitrite with its crowned canopy and dangling fishes, has obviously been derived from the Antwerp festive float, the Currus triumphalis Neptuni. It is clear from the number of copies, in which Francken relied on the same repertoire of sea creatures in various arrangements around Neptune’s chariot, that sea gods were a popular theme in seventeenth-century Antwerp.  Around the same time Rubens carefully studied the sea creatures. He owned a drawing after Cornelis Bos representing a frieze with Neptune and his retinue that he retouched thoroughly, so much so that experts disagree on the status of the sheet: is it or is it not to be considered an

Sea centaurs are often referred to as tritons who, however, have no horse legs. Balis 1992, p. 115. Le triumphe d’Anuers, faict en la susception du Prince Philips, Prince d’Espaign[e], Antwerp 1550; La ioyeuse & magnifique entrée de monseigneur Françoys, fils de France, et frere unicque du roy, par la grace de Dieu, duc de Brabant, d’Anjou, Alençon, Berri, &c. en sa tres-renommée ville d’Anvers, Antwerp 1582; Johannes Bochius, The Ceremonial Entry of Ernst, Archduke of Austria, into Antwerp, June 14, 1594 (= Descriptio publicae gratulationis, spectaculorum et ludorum, in adventu sereniss. principis Ernesti archiducis Austriae, ducis Burgundiae, comitis Habspurgi, aurei velleris equitis, Belgicis provinciis a regia majestate catholica praefecti), engravings by Pieter van der Borcht, after designs by Marten de Vos; to which is added a suppl. of plates from the royal entry of Albrecht and Isabella, Antwerp, 1599, Antwerp 1595, reprint New York 1970; Jan Caspar Gevartius, The Magnificent Ceremonial Entry into Antwerp of His Royal Highness Ferdinand of Austria on the fifteenth day of May, 1635, reprint ed. 1642, Antwerp 1971. 19  McGrath 1975, p. 181. 20  Ibid., p. 182. 17 

18 

12

Ibid. The hippocampus, a sea monster, half horse and half fish, whose body ends in a serpent’s tail, drew Neptune’s chariot. Richard Barber and Anne Riches, A Dictionary of Fabulous Beasts, Woodbridge 1996, p. 83. 23  The medieval type of mermaid is described in Balis 1992, p. 123. 24  Balis 1992, p. 124. 25  See e.g. Frans Francken II, Triumph of Neptune and Amphitrite, oil on panel, 53.7 × 74.1 cm, Braunschweig, Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum. See also Balis 1992. 21 

22 

13


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

serpentine tail of a fish.17 Motifs of water crea­tures frequently appeared in Antwerp prints, paintings and festive decorations from the sixteenth century onwards. The illustrated books commem­or­ ating the Joyous Entries are a useful source for the analysis of Antwerp maritime imagery.18 The six­teenth- and seventeenthcentury prints reveal that the theme of the Fig. 7 Pieter van der Borcht, city’s relation to the sea had been expressed Chariot of Neptune, 1599, engraving, Antwerp, Museum Plantin-Moretus/ in the Antwerp festive tradition time and Prentenkabinet again. The prints of stages and arches and prints of the Ommegang cars decorating the Antwerp streets and squares during the various Joyous Entries display a vast spectacle of allegorical images. Part of this imaginary world consisted of marine creatures such as sea and river gods, whales, tritons and dolphins. The whale already had had a long career as a symbol of Antwerp maritime power. Thanks to its popularity as a companion to Jonah in medieval mystery plays, the whale gained an important place in the Antwerp Ommegang.19 Due to Renaissance influences its company became mythological instead of biblical. The Whale was carrying either Neptune, or Oceanus referring to the desired restoration of Antwerp maritime power on the oceans.20 In the Joyous Entry of 1582 the whale guided by Neptune accompanied a maritime tableau vivant

staging Scaldis (River Scheldt), Merchandise and Navigation, symbolizing the Antwerp overseas trade. Twelve years later, in the entry of 1594, the whale carrying Oceanus was placed next to the Stage of the Liberation of the Scheldt at the Sint-Jansbrug. The Chariot of Neptune, or the Cur­rus triumphalis Neptuni, pre­ sented to Albrecht and Isabella at their Joyous Entry (1599), announced the leg­end about the future victory of the Arch­dukes on the sea (fig. 7).21 Neptune and Amphitrite were pre­­­sented on a chariot drawn by two hip­ po­ campi with putti riding astride.22 The chariot is preceded by mermaids modelled on medieval examples who comb their long hair and look in convex mirrors, and surrounded by tritons who blow their conches.23 Neptune and Am­phi­trite them­selves are seated on a throne under a canopy supported by two dolphins, while fishes are dangling down from the can­opy’s frame. Balis indicated that from 1599 onwards, the Chariot of Neptune participated in the annual Ommegang and left traces in the visual arts.24 He pointed to the various representations of the Sea Triumph of Neptune and Amphitrite by Frans Francken II (1581–1642).25 Francken’s sea chariot of Neptune and Amphitrite with its crowned canopy and dangling fishes, has obviously been derived from the Antwerp festive float, the Currus triumphalis Neptuni. It is clear from the number of copies, in which Francken relied on the same repertoire of sea creatures in various arrangements around Neptune’s chariot, that sea gods were a popular theme in seventeenth-century Antwerp.  Around the same time Rubens carefully studied the sea creatures. He owned a drawing after Cornelis Bos representing a frieze with Neptune and his retinue that he retouched thoroughly, so much so that experts disagree on the status of the sheet: is it or is it not to be considered an

Sea centaurs are often referred to as tritons who, however, have no horse legs. Balis 1992, p. 115. Le triumphe d’Anuers, faict en la susception du Prince Philips, Prince d’Espaign[e], Antwerp 1550; La ioyeuse & magnifique entrée de monseigneur Françoys, fils de France, et frere unicque du roy, par la grace de Dieu, duc de Brabant, d’Anjou, Alençon, Berri, &c. en sa tres-renommée ville d’Anvers, Antwerp 1582; Johannes Bochius, The Ceremonial Entry of Ernst, Archduke of Austria, into Antwerp, June 14, 1594 (= Descriptio publicae gratulationis, spectaculorum et ludorum, in adventu sereniss. principis Ernesti archiducis Austriae, ducis Burgundiae, comitis Habspurgi, aurei velleris equitis, Belgicis provinciis a regia majestate catholica praefecti), engravings by Pieter van der Borcht, after designs by Marten de Vos; to which is added a suppl. of plates from the royal entry of Albrecht and Isabella, Antwerp, 1599, Antwerp 1595, reprint New York 1970; Jan Caspar Gevartius, The Magnificent Ceremonial Entry into Antwerp of His Royal Highness Ferdinand of Austria on the fifteenth day of May, 1635, reprint ed. 1642, Antwerp 1971. 19  McGrath 1975, p. 181. 20  Ibid., p. 182. 17 

18 

12

Ibid. The hippocampus, a sea monster, half horse and half fish, whose body ends in a serpent’s tail, drew Neptune’s chariot. Richard Barber and Anne Riches, A Dictionary of Fabulous Beasts, Woodbridge 1996, p. 83. 23  The medieval type of mermaid is described in Balis 1992, p. 123. 24  Balis 1992, p. 124. 25  See e.g. Frans Francken II, Triumph of Neptune and Amphitrite, oil on panel, 53.7 × 74.1 cm, Braunschweig, Herzog Anton Ulrich-Museum. See also Balis 1992. 21 

22 

13


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

original Rubens drawing?26 An interesting detail of the drawing is Neptune’s chariot ending in the head of a sea monster, which is reminiscent of the Chariot of Kallo ending in the figure of a triton. It seems that in depicting sea creatures, both Rubens and Frans Francken II have been influenced by visual sources, such as the Ommegang floats, the decorations of previous Antwerp Joyous Entries and the printed illustrations in commemorative books. Maritime allegories had been staged as early as 1549 on the occasion of the Joyous Entry of Prince Philip II. Here Amphitrite, flanked by two river gods, is riding a dolphin and holding an anchor on top of the Genevan Arch. The ten feet tall river god Scaldis seated in a golden boat twice as long and accompanied by tritons blowing their conches decorated the Triumphal Arch of the City. Negotiatio and Mercuria accompanied by representations of the trades were presented on a platform above. According to the text in the commemorative book, Antverpia is supposed to be seated in the boat.27 However, in the print illustrating the text only Scaldis seems to be present in the boat. It seems plausible, therefore, that Antverpia was acted out as a life character, while the print may have been made after the structure of the arch. In that case the life figure of Antverpia must have been much smaller than the ten foot figure of Scaldis, which according to McGrath and Balis would have been a statue.28 The river god Scaldis in chains as a tableau vivant was presented to Archduke Ernest at the Sint-Jansbrug in 1594. On the archduke’s arrival, the nymphs untied the bonds that held the river and suddenly the river god Scaldis poured out a quantity of water from his urn. The scene expressed the optimistic belief that the new governor would at once reopen the river Scheldt and restore the city’s commerce.29 The Ship, one of the Ommegang cars brought in by the guild of the merchants, had been placed close to the Stage of Scaldis and represented the rich fruits of the overseas trade.

According to Bochius’s description of the entry, the sailors of The Ship raised the sails in order to prepare the voyage, because the ship of the Antwerp commerce was to cross the seas once more, in order to let the urn of the river god flow again.30 Five years later the allegory of Oceanus and Thetis, presented to the Archdukes Albrecht and Isabella at the SintJansbrug, alluded to the liberation of the river Scheldt as well. The gods of the waters, reclining on urns, from which issued water and wine, again symbolized the passage to the sea. The image of Albrecht and Isabella being crowned with garlands of seaweeds by Neptune and Amphitrite on top of the stage, referred to the expectation that these new governors would restore Antwerp’s maritime power. According to McGrath, Rubens must have remembered the stages of the 1594 and the 1599 entries, when he designed his Stage of Mercury for the Joyous Entry of Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand in 1635.31 However, in 1635 Rubens did take another approach in designing the decoration at the Sint-Jansbrug. Though he used some of the former imagery, instead of depicting a hopeful liberation of the river Scheldt, he confronted Ferdinand with the decline of commerce as a negative consequence of the blockade. Rubens designed the Stage of Mercury as a heavily rusticated triple portico, resembling the portico of his house on the Wapper. The large central canvas, Mercury Departing from Antwerp, executed by Theodoor van Thulden (1606–1669) after Rubens’s design, is now lost, but Van Thulden’s etching of the stage has been preserved (fig. 8). The three arches were decorated with the following subjects: Mercury Departing from Antwerp in the centre, Abundance and Wealth to the left, and Poverty to the right.32 Mercury Departing from Antwerp depicts the moment when the god of commerce, holding a caduceus and a purse in his upraised hand, is about to leave. One of the two winged putti tries to prevent him from leaving by clutching at his mantle. Scaldis, seated on a pile of nets, is slumbering while his feet are fettered in irons and his left arm is resting on an urn that

After Cornelis Bos, retouched by Rubens, Frieze with Neptune in a chariot drawn by two seamonsters with tritons playing conch shells and horns and sea nymphs, Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts Graphiques, inv. 20.275. See Belkin 2009, vol. 1, pp. 183–84. 27  McGrath 1975, p. 184. 28  Balis 1992, p. 120. 29  Martin 1972, p. 179; Von Roeder-Baumbach 1943, p. 166. 26 

14

Transcription of Bochius in McGrath 1975, p. 182. ‘Rubens a dû certainement se souvenir de ces décorations antérieures, quand il a créé son chefd’œuvre allégorique du Départ de Mercure.’ McGrath 1975, p. 183. 32  Van Thulden’s etching (fig. 8) shows an expansion of Rubens’s first design. Two more niches have been added and probably the stage was executed like that. 30  31 

15


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

original Rubens drawing?26 An interesting detail of the drawing is Neptune’s chariot ending in the head of a sea monster, which is reminiscent of the Chariot of Kallo ending in the figure of a triton. It seems that in depicting sea creatures, both Rubens and Frans Francken II have been influenced by visual sources, such as the Ommegang floats, the decorations of previous Antwerp Joyous Entries and the printed illustrations in commemorative books. Maritime allegories had been staged as early as 1549 on the occasion of the Joyous Entry of Prince Philip II. Here Amphitrite, flanked by two river gods, is riding a dolphin and holding an anchor on top of the Genevan Arch. The ten feet tall river god Scaldis seated in a golden boat twice as long and accompanied by tritons blowing their conches decorated the Triumphal Arch of the City. Negotiatio and Mercuria accompanied by representations of the trades were presented on a platform above. According to the text in the commemorative book, Antverpia is supposed to be seated in the boat.27 However, in the print illustrating the text only Scaldis seems to be present in the boat. It seems plausible, therefore, that Antverpia was acted out as a life character, while the print may have been made after the structure of the arch. In that case the life figure of Antverpia must have been much smaller than the ten foot figure of Scaldis, which according to McGrath and Balis would have been a statue.28 The river god Scaldis in chains as a tableau vivant was presented to Archduke Ernest at the Sint-Jansbrug in 1594. On the archduke’s arrival, the nymphs untied the bonds that held the river and suddenly the river god Scaldis poured out a quantity of water from his urn. The scene expressed the optimistic belief that the new governor would at once reopen the river Scheldt and restore the city’s commerce.29 The Ship, one of the Ommegang cars brought in by the guild of the merchants, had been placed close to the Stage of Scaldis and represented the rich fruits of the overseas trade.

According to Bochius’s description of the entry, the sailors of The Ship raised the sails in order to prepare the voyage, because the ship of the Antwerp commerce was to cross the seas once more, in order to let the urn of the river god flow again.30 Five years later the allegory of Oceanus and Thetis, presented to the Archdukes Albrecht and Isabella at the SintJansbrug, alluded to the liberation of the river Scheldt as well. The gods of the waters, reclining on urns, from which issued water and wine, again symbolized the passage to the sea. The image of Albrecht and Isabella being crowned with garlands of seaweeds by Neptune and Amphitrite on top of the stage, referred to the expectation that these new governors would restore Antwerp’s maritime power. According to McGrath, Rubens must have remembered the stages of the 1594 and the 1599 entries, when he designed his Stage of Mercury for the Joyous Entry of Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand in 1635.31 However, in 1635 Rubens did take another approach in designing the decoration at the Sint-Jansbrug. Though he used some of the former imagery, instead of depicting a hopeful liberation of the river Scheldt, he confronted Ferdinand with the decline of commerce as a negative consequence of the blockade. Rubens designed the Stage of Mercury as a heavily rusticated triple portico, resembling the portico of his house on the Wapper. The large central canvas, Mercury Departing from Antwerp, executed by Theodoor van Thulden (1606–1669) after Rubens’s design, is now lost, but Van Thulden’s etching of the stage has been preserved (fig. 8). The three arches were decorated with the following subjects: Mercury Departing from Antwerp in the centre, Abundance and Wealth to the left, and Poverty to the right.32 Mercury Departing from Antwerp depicts the moment when the god of commerce, holding a caduceus and a purse in his upraised hand, is about to leave. One of the two winged putti tries to prevent him from leaving by clutching at his mantle. Scaldis, seated on a pile of nets, is slumbering while his feet are fettered in irons and his left arm is resting on an urn that

After Cornelis Bos, retouched by Rubens, Frieze with Neptune in a chariot drawn by two seamonsters with tritons playing conch shells and horns and sea nymphs, Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts Graphiques, inv. 20.275. See Belkin 2009, vol. 1, pp. 183–84. 27  McGrath 1975, p. 184. 28  Balis 1992, p. 120. 29  Martin 1972, p. 179; Von Roeder-Baumbach 1943, p. 166. 26 

14

Transcription of Bochius in McGrath 1975, p. 182. ‘Rubens a dû certainement se souvenir de ces décorations antérieures, quand il a créé son chefd’œuvre allégorique du Départ de Mercure.’ McGrath 1975, p. 183. 32  Van Thulden’s etching (fig. 8) shows an expansion of Rubens’s first design. Two more niches have been added and probably the stage was executed like that. 30  31 

15


BULLETIN

Fig. 8 Theodoor van Thulden, The Stage of Mercury, etching in Gevartius, Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi, Antwerp 1642

has run dry. Another putto tries in vain to loosen his fetters. The crown of reed and the fish beside Scaldis on the floor, refer to the river Scheldt in the background. A pleading Antverpia is holding one hand to her breast, pointing at Mercury, whom she cannot stop. Antverpia is kneeling next to an unused anchor, an upturned boat and a sleeping sailor, all symbols of the loss of activity on the river. The decorations above the central panel represent the good old times, when the boats on the river did have free entrance to the sea. An image of Oceanus, the god of the waters, with the globe of the world on his head adorns the central arch. Dolphins spouting jets of water represent the eastern and western seas. Neptune and Amphitrite are on the top of the stage next to a ship’s mast, he holding a trident and a rudder and she holding a cornucopia and a ship’s prow. The rudder symbolizes good Navigation and the bow of the ship represents Felicitas, or happiness. On both sides of Oceanus’s head, the water gushing from urns held by putti symbolizes the free running water of the river Scheldt. Abundance and Wealth, to the left 16

BULLETIN

of the central panel, point at the prosperity of the past, whereas Poverty, on the other side, represents the city’s present decline. The expanded niches display the allegorical figures of Comus and Industria. The god of revelry, Comus, standing in the niche next to Abundance, reinforces the image of prosperity, while next to Poverty, her daughter Industria emphasizes the loss of wealth and Antwerp’s turning to the manufacturing of cloth and other goods, after the closing of the Scheldt.33 If we compare Rubens’s design for the Stage of Mercury to the preceding stages, it is obvious that he borrowed motifs from the Antwerp tradition. However, he changed the mermaids, the herms with fish-like tails and the dolphins of the earlier decorations into more decorative and more playful sea creatures. And instead of the monsters which were held in check by the sea centaurs on the City Hall (figs. 5, 6), Rubens gave his sea centaurs on top of the stage the more festive attributes of the conch and the standard. Some of the sea creatures so well-known in Antwerp’s pictorial tradition, such as the dolphins and the triton, appear once again in Rubens’s design of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, decorating the sides and the back of the chariot. The Chariot of Antverpia The allegory symbolizing the bond between Antwerp and its river has a long tradition. The city maid Antverpia surrounded by river gods, symbolizing the prosperity of the city, can be found as an illustration in Guic­ciar­dini’s Descrittione di tutti I Paesi Bassi (Antwerp 1567).34 Abraham Jans­sen’s Scaldis and Antverpia (1609)35 repre­sents the personification of the river Scheldt as the city’s main source of prosperity while he offers Antver­ pia several fruits with which she fills the cornucopia. The pic­ture symbol­ izes Antwerp’s op­ti­mism at the beginning of the Twelve Years’ Truce.

Martin 1972, pp. 180, 181. L. Guicciardini, Descrittione di tutti I Paesi Bassi …, Antwerp 1581. 35  Panel, 174 × 308 cm, KMSKA, inv. 212. 33 

34 

17


BULLETIN

Fig. 8 Theodoor van Thulden, The Stage of Mercury, etching in Gevartius, Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi, Antwerp 1642

has run dry. Another putto tries in vain to loosen his fetters. The crown of reed and the fish beside Scaldis on the floor, refer to the river Scheldt in the background. A pleading Antverpia is holding one hand to her breast, pointing at Mercury, whom she cannot stop. Antverpia is kneeling next to an unused anchor, an upturned boat and a sleeping sailor, all symbols of the loss of activity on the river. The decorations above the central panel represent the good old times, when the boats on the river did have free entrance to the sea. An image of Oceanus, the god of the waters, with the globe of the world on his head adorns the central arch. Dolphins spouting jets of water represent the eastern and western seas. Neptune and Amphitrite are on the top of the stage next to a ship’s mast, he holding a trident and a rudder and she holding a cornucopia and a ship’s prow. The rudder symbolizes good Navigation and the bow of the ship represents Felicitas, or happiness. On both sides of Oceanus’s head, the water gushing from urns held by putti symbolizes the free running water of the river Scheldt. Abundance and Wealth, to the left 16

BULLETIN

of the central panel, point at the prosperity of the past, whereas Poverty, on the other side, represents the city’s present decline. The expanded niches display the allegorical figures of Comus and Industria. The god of revelry, Comus, standing in the niche next to Abundance, reinforces the image of prosperity, while next to Poverty, her daughter Industria emphasizes the loss of wealth and Antwerp’s turning to the manufacturing of cloth and other goods, after the closing of the Scheldt.33 If we compare Rubens’s design for the Stage of Mercury to the preceding stages, it is obvious that he borrowed motifs from the Antwerp tradition. However, he changed the mermaids, the herms with fish-like tails and the dolphins of the earlier decorations into more decorative and more playful sea creatures. And instead of the monsters which were held in check by the sea centaurs on the City Hall (figs. 5, 6), Rubens gave his sea centaurs on top of the stage the more festive attributes of the conch and the standard. Some of the sea creatures so well-known in Antwerp’s pictorial tradition, such as the dolphins and the triton, appear once again in Rubens’s design of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, decorating the sides and the back of the chariot. The Chariot of Antverpia The allegory symbolizing the bond between Antwerp and its river has a long tradition. The city maid Antverpia surrounded by river gods, symbolizing the prosperity of the city, can be found as an illustration in Guic­ciar­dini’s Descrittione di tutti I Paesi Bassi (Antwerp 1567).34 Abraham Jans­sen’s Scaldis and Antverpia (1609)35 repre­sents the personification of the river Scheldt as the city’s main source of prosperity while he offers Antver­ pia several fruits with which she fills the cornucopia. The pic­ture symbol­ izes Antwerp’s op­ti­mism at the beginning of the Twelve Years’ Truce.

Martin 1972, pp. 180, 181. L. Guicciardini, Descrittione di tutti I Paesi Bassi …, Antwerp 1581. 35  Panel, 174 × 308 cm, KMSKA, inv. 212. 33 

34 

17


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Antverpia had appeared on stage in the ceremonial entries since Prince Philip’s (1549). Welcoming the new sovereign was her role in the ceremony from 1582 onwards. She even climbed down from her throne to recite a Latin poem of wel­ come to the new governor in the 1599 and 1635 entries. Traditionally, Ant­ verpia was seated on a trium­ p hal car, the Fig. 9 Chariot of the Alliance, Joyous Entry of François d’Alençon, Duke of Anjou, 1582, etching in La ioyeuse Currus trium­phalis.36 She was [et] magnifique entrée de monseigneur Francoys, etc., waiting for François d’Alençon, Antwerp 1582 Duke of An­jou, in front of the city gate, dressed in the red and white colours of the city and seated on the Chariot of the Alliance (fig. 9). She was holding a laurel branch and wearing a crown of the same as symbols of the victory over the Spanish tyranny. The city’s vir­tues were expressed by Reli­gion, dressed as a sibyl, Justice, holding a bal­ance and a sword, and Concordia. Twelve years later, when the city of A ­ ntwerp was again under the rule of the Spanish king, Antverpia welcomed the new governor Archduke Ernest and offered him a laurel wreath as a symbol of loyalty to the Spanish ruler (fig. 10). This time the Spanish coat of arms decorated the Triumphal Chariot in addition to the arms of Antwerp resting at Antverpia’s feet. Loyalty, symbolized by the dog on her shield, and Religion with a cross and a book, accompanied her on the chariot, together with the personifications of Obedience, Respect, Remembrance of the Charity and Kindness, the latter depicted with a standard showing a heart held by two hands.37 The virtues were flanked by two men in Roman costume wielding

standards that displayed the Penates crowned with the arms of Antwerp.38 The flowers of the branch of golden lil­ ies that Antverpia offered to Al­brecht and Isabella in 1599 were dec­orated with white enamel, and the heart sur­ rounded by golden flames in its calyx according to Bocchius sym­ bol­ ized pure affection (figs. 11, 12).39 Rubens considered the staging of live actors in tableaux vivants to be out­dated. According to John Rupert Mar­tin, the tableau vivant had been gen­­ erally discarded in favour of a purely pictorial mode of decoration and Rubens would certainly not have been inclined to revive such archaism.40 In all his designs for the Joyous Entry of Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand, he re­ placed the live figures with painted alleg­ories. The traditional ceremony Fig. 10 Pieter van der Borcht, Triumphal of the time-honoured Cur­rus trium­ Chariot, 1595, etching, KMSKA, Print Room pha­­lis from which Ant­ ver­ pia de­ s­ cended to welcome the new governor was the only decorative object in the route staging live people. Concerned by the increasing decline of the city, Rubens transformed Antverpia’s traditional representation of loyalty and prosperity. Mercury Departing from Antwerp (1635) confronted the new governor with a desperate personification of the city. Kneeling in a subordinate pose, her

Mielke 1970, p. xv. The Remembrance of the Charity (or Beneficii recordatio) was symbolized by an image of Androcles and the Lion on her shield. 36  37 

18

The Penates were worshipped as protectors of the individual household and as protectors of the Roman state. Offerings might be food, wine or incense, and more rarely, blood sacrifices. The state as a whole worshipped the Penates Publici. This state cult played a significant role as a focal point of Roman patriotism and nationalism. 39  Huet and Grieten 2010, pp. 155, 156. 40  Martin (1972, p. 44) refers to Von Roeder-Baumbach 1943. 38 

19


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Antverpia had appeared on stage in the ceremonial entries since Prince Philip’s (1549). Welcoming the new sovereign was her role in the ceremony from 1582 onwards. She even climbed down from her throne to recite a Latin poem of wel­ come to the new governor in the 1599 and 1635 entries. Traditionally, Ant­ verpia was seated on a trium­ p hal car, the Fig. 9 Chariot of the Alliance, Joyous Entry of François d’Alençon, Duke of Anjou, 1582, etching in La ioyeuse Currus trium­phalis.36 She was [et] magnifique entrée de monseigneur Francoys, etc., waiting for François d’Alençon, Antwerp 1582 Duke of An­jou, in front of the city gate, dressed in the red and white colours of the city and seated on the Chariot of the Alliance (fig. 9). She was holding a laurel branch and wearing a crown of the same as symbols of the victory over the Spanish tyranny. The city’s vir­tues were expressed by Reli­gion, dressed as a sibyl, Justice, holding a bal­ance and a sword, and Concordia. Twelve years later, when the city of A ­ ntwerp was again under the rule of the Spanish king, Antverpia welcomed the new governor Archduke Ernest and offered him a laurel wreath as a symbol of loyalty to the Spanish ruler (fig. 10). This time the Spanish coat of arms decorated the Triumphal Chariot in addition to the arms of Antwerp resting at Antverpia’s feet. Loyalty, symbolized by the dog on her shield, and Religion with a cross and a book, accompanied her on the chariot, together with the personifications of Obedience, Respect, Remembrance of the Charity and Kindness, the latter depicted with a standard showing a heart held by two hands.37 The virtues were flanked by two men in Roman costume wielding

standards that displayed the Penates crowned with the arms of Antwerp.38 The flowers of the branch of golden lil­ ies that Antverpia offered to Al­brecht and Isabella in 1599 were dec­orated with white enamel, and the heart sur­ rounded by golden flames in its calyx according to Bocchius sym­ bol­ ized pure affection (figs. 11, 12).39 Rubens considered the staging of live actors in tableaux vivants to be out­dated. According to John Rupert Mar­tin, the tableau vivant had been gen­­ erally discarded in favour of a purely pictorial mode of decoration and Rubens would certainly not have been inclined to revive such archaism.40 In all his designs for the Joyous Entry of Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand, he re­ placed the live figures with painted alleg­ories. The traditional ceremony Fig. 10 Pieter van der Borcht, Triumphal of the time-honoured Cur­rus trium­ Chariot, 1595, etching, KMSKA, Print Room pha­­lis from which Ant­ ver­ pia de­ s­ cended to welcome the new governor was the only decorative object in the route staging live people. Concerned by the increasing decline of the city, Rubens transformed Antverpia’s traditional representation of loyalty and prosperity. Mercury Departing from Antwerp (1635) confronted the new governor with a desperate personification of the city. Kneeling in a subordinate pose, her

Mielke 1970, p. xv. The Remembrance of the Charity (or Beneficii recordatio) was symbolized by an image of Androcles and the Lion on her shield. 36  37 

18

The Penates were worshipped as protectors of the individual household and as protectors of the Roman state. Offerings might be food, wine or incense, and more rarely, blood sacrifices. The state as a whole worshipped the Penates Publici. This state cult played a significant role as a focal point of Roman patriotism and nationalism. 39  Huet and Grieten 2010, pp. 155, 156. 40  Martin (1972, p. 44) refers to Von Roeder-Baumbach 1943. 38 

19


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

the outstretched arms and hands of the personification of Roma, and the gestures of Belgica in the Advent of the Prince on the one hand and Antverpia in the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo on the other hand. This suggests that Antverpia’s outstretched hands are to be considered a gesture of welcome, a symbol of the city of Antwerp welcoming Ferdinand, the conqueror of Kallo.44 The virtues in the allegory of Kallo

Figs. 11–12 Chariot of Antverpia, 1599, etching, Antwerp, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet

gestures expressing helplessness, Antverpia seems to be begging the god of commerce to stay. Three years later, however, after the victory at Kallo, the optimism returned and Rubens depicted Antverpia as a proud and glorious woman. She is riding on a festive chariot, guided by Providentia Augusta accompanied by Virtue and Fortune, while the Victories and Fama symbolize the triumph benefiting the city. As a gesture of welcome Antverpia’s outstretched arms and hands resemble Belgica’s attitude as she welcomes Prince Ferdinand in the Advent of the Prince.41 In connection to this gesture it may be interesting to point to Scipio Welcomed outside the Gates of Rome, the copy of a drawing by Giulio Romano which was extensively retouched by Rubens (private collection).42 The original drawing was one of Giulio’s tapestry designs for the Scipio cycle, woven for François I in the early 1530s. According to Jeremy Wood, Giulio Romano added the figure of Roma, who welcomes the triumphal procession into the city.43 A remarkable relationship may be noticed in particular between

Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi, pp. 11a–b. Martin 1972, pp. 46–49. Sale London (Sotheby’s), 1 September 2008, lot 16. Wood 2010, p. 350. 43  Wood 2010, p. 339. 41 

42 

20

Traditionally, personifications of virtues representing the qualities of the sovereign and/or the city were displayed on the temporary structures of Joyous Entries. Accordingly, the figures of Providentia Augusta, Virtus and Fortuna staged on the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, personify the virtues related to the victor of Kallo. Rubens had incorporated a personification of Providence as Providentia Regis three years before, in one of the decorations of the Arch of Ferdinand. She was holding a large globe balanced on the post of a rudder and wearing a diadem with an all-seeing eye. Martin points to the fact that the far-seeing eye as an emblem of Providence appears to have been invented by Rubens, who applied it to Providentia on the Arch of Philip as well.45 It is remarkable that three years later Rubens replaced the emblem by the Janus head he borrowed from Prudence. In view of the political situation, it may have been deemed essential to keep an eye on the past. The combination of the orb and rudder as attributes conveys the idea of direction or guidance for the entire world. Martin indicates that both attributes appear on a coin of Titus with the legend ‘Providentia Augusta’. The coin shows Vespasian and Titus holding between them a globe over a rudder.46 Providentia

Martin (1972) suggests that Antverpia’s outstretched hands might be a pun on the name of the city (the ‘ant’ in Antwerpen sounds like ‘hand’). In fact, the two hands in the city’s coat of arms refer to the legend of its origin, according to which the giant Antigoon, who exacted a toll from all river travellers (and cut off their hands if they failed to pay), was slain by the hero Brabo, who cut off the giant’s hand and threw it in the Scheldt. 45  Martin 1972, p. 162. 46  Martin (1972, p. 113) refers to H. Mattingly, Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, II 44 

21


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

the outstretched arms and hands of the personification of Roma, and the gestures of Belgica in the Advent of the Prince on the one hand and Antverpia in the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo on the other hand. This suggests that Antverpia’s outstretched hands are to be considered a gesture of welcome, a symbol of the city of Antwerp welcoming Ferdinand, the conqueror of Kallo.44 The virtues in the allegory of Kallo

Figs. 11–12 Chariot of Antverpia, 1599, etching, Antwerp, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet

gestures expressing helplessness, Antverpia seems to be begging the god of commerce to stay. Three years later, however, after the victory at Kallo, the optimism returned and Rubens depicted Antverpia as a proud and glorious woman. She is riding on a festive chariot, guided by Providentia Augusta accompanied by Virtue and Fortune, while the Victories and Fama symbolize the triumph benefiting the city. As a gesture of welcome Antverpia’s outstretched arms and hands resemble Belgica’s attitude as she welcomes Prince Ferdinand in the Advent of the Prince.41 In connection to this gesture it may be interesting to point to Scipio Welcomed outside the Gates of Rome, the copy of a drawing by Giulio Romano which was extensively retouched by Rubens (private collection).42 The original drawing was one of Giulio’s tapestry designs for the Scipio cycle, woven for François I in the early 1530s. According to Jeremy Wood, Giulio Romano added the figure of Roma, who welcomes the triumphal procession into the city.43 A remarkable relationship may be noticed in particular between

Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi, pp. 11a–b. Martin 1972, pp. 46–49. Sale London (Sotheby’s), 1 September 2008, lot 16. Wood 2010, p. 350. 43  Wood 2010, p. 339. 41 

42 

20

Traditionally, personifications of virtues representing the qualities of the sovereign and/or the city were displayed on the temporary structures of Joyous Entries. Accordingly, the figures of Providentia Augusta, Virtus and Fortuna staged on the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, personify the virtues related to the victor of Kallo. Rubens had incorporated a personification of Providence as Providentia Regis three years before, in one of the decorations of the Arch of Ferdinand. She was holding a large globe balanced on the post of a rudder and wearing a diadem with an all-seeing eye. Martin points to the fact that the far-seeing eye as an emblem of Providence appears to have been invented by Rubens, who applied it to Providentia on the Arch of Philip as well.45 It is remarkable that three years later Rubens replaced the emblem by the Janus head he borrowed from Prudence. In view of the political situation, it may have been deemed essential to keep an eye on the past. The combination of the orb and rudder as attributes conveys the idea of direction or guidance for the entire world. Martin indicates that both attributes appear on a coin of Titus with the legend ‘Providentia Augusta’. The coin shows Vespasian and Titus holding between them a globe over a rudder.46 Providentia

Martin (1972) suggests that Antverpia’s outstretched hands might be a pun on the name of the city (the ‘ant’ in Antwerpen sounds like ‘hand’). In fact, the two hands in the city’s coat of arms refer to the legend of its origin, according to which the giant Antigoon, who exacted a toll from all river travellers (and cut off their hands if they failed to pay), was slain by the hero Brabo, who cut off the giant’s hand and threw it in the Scheldt. 45  Martin 1972, p. 162. 46  Martin (1972, p. 113) refers to H. Mattingly, Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, II 44 

21


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Augusta on the triumphal chariot differs from the traditional Prudence because Rubens changed the usual old man’s face looking backwards, into the face of a young person. Providentia Augusta might be a Rubens invention. Within the restricted scope of this study, I did not find any other comparable example of Providentia with these two faces. Rubens owned a drawn copy of Raphael’s Prudentia in the Stanze della Segnatura and retouched it thoroughly, enlarging the sheet in the process. The reworked drawing is now in the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh. According to Wood, the drawing is so distinctive and close to Raphael’s style that it must have come from his workshop.47 The seated Providentia Augusta on the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo resembles Raphael’s Prudentia: her arm holding a whip is comparable in pose to Prudentia’s right arm in the drawing after Raphael. The personifications Virtus and Fortuna, placed on the stern of the naval chariot, connect the victory at Kallo to strength and fortune. Analyzing the allegory on the victory at Kallo, it is important to grasp the full implication of the word virtus or virtue. Mielke describes ‘virtue’ as a central concept of the ancient world and later of the Renaissance and Baroque age. The concept of virtue meant a fusion of all the manly qualities in which excellence of character and intellect is matched by physical strength and courage.48 Hercules can be considered the perfect representative of virtue in this sense. Rubens intensively studied the Farnese Hercules. He made many drawings after the antique statue and chose Hercules as a model for the strongest, most solid and masculine form of the human body, embodied by the Christian hero Samson or by St Christopher.49 According to the combination of good-naturedness, strength and courage, Rubens’s depiction of the allegorical figure of Virtue with helmet and sword on the triumphal chariot probably refers to the victor of Kallo as a ‘virtuous hero’.50

On Roman coins, Virtus is a feminine fig­ure, her gown draped over her shoulder leav­ ing one breast bare, yet she symbolizes man­ liness and courage. Traditionally, Virtus was depicted in the company of Honos (Honour), who bears the horn of plenty. There is a notable similarity be­ tween Rubens’s Virtue on the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo and his drawing of Virtue and Honour in the Museum PlantinMoretus, Antwerp (fig. 13).51 Rubens’s drawing of Virtue and Honour refers to the ancient Roman Temple of Honos and Virtus. In this drawing Rubens depicted Virtue holding her attributes, the lance and a Fig. 13 Peter Paul Rubens, Virtue and Honour, drawing, short sword or parazonium, similar to the Virtus Antwerp, Museum Plantinin the Roman temple and on Roman coins. Moretus/Prentenkabinet In Antwerp, Virtue and Honour had been displayed before as flat painted wooden figures placed on top of the Porta Caesarea or Sint-Jorispoort, flanking Brabo, the legendary founder of the town, as decoration for the Joyous Entry of Archduke Ernest in 1594. The fact that Virtue stepped on the globe of Fortune meant that it was completely independent of blind and ignorant change, and that material prosperity and honour would follow inevitably in its wake.52 The same type of Virtus, but con­structed in the round, was standing at the very top of the Florentine Arch. The figure of true Religion showing Ernest the Temple of Virtue and Honour was depicted on the rear side of the arch. Contrary to a long-time tradition, Rubens replaced Honour with Fortune as Virtue’s companion, apparently to suggest that the courage of Virtue was related to chance or good luck at the battle of Kallo. Fortune’s dress is puffed up by the wind and her hand is resting on a rudder. She

(London 1930) and to the Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi, citing the coin. 47  Wood 2010, p. 152. 48  Mielke 1970, p. xv. 49  Muller 2004, pp. 20–21. 50  Elizabeth McGrath pointed out to me that in the allegory of Ferdinand as Hercules on the last arch of the 1635 Joyous Entry, Ferdinand is destined for the temple of Virtue and Honour. Three years

22

later, the triumphal chariot implies that, with his victory at Kallo, Ferdinand has reached it. 51  Van der Meulen 1994, vol. 1, fig. 38. 52  Mielke 1970, p. xv.

23


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Augusta on the triumphal chariot differs from the traditional Prudence because Rubens changed the usual old man’s face looking backwards, into the face of a young person. Providentia Augusta might be a Rubens invention. Within the restricted scope of this study, I did not find any other comparable example of Providentia with these two faces. Rubens owned a drawn copy of Raphael’s Prudentia in the Stanze della Segnatura and retouched it thoroughly, enlarging the sheet in the process. The reworked drawing is now in the National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh. According to Wood, the drawing is so distinctive and close to Raphael’s style that it must have come from his workshop.47 The seated Providentia Augusta on the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo resembles Raphael’s Prudentia: her arm holding a whip is comparable in pose to Prudentia’s right arm in the drawing after Raphael. The personifications Virtus and Fortuna, placed on the stern of the naval chariot, connect the victory at Kallo to strength and fortune. Analyzing the allegory on the victory at Kallo, it is important to grasp the full implication of the word virtus or virtue. Mielke describes ‘virtue’ as a central concept of the ancient world and later of the Renaissance and Baroque age. The concept of virtue meant a fusion of all the manly qualities in which excellence of character and intellect is matched by physical strength and courage.48 Hercules can be considered the perfect representative of virtue in this sense. Rubens intensively studied the Farnese Hercules. He made many drawings after the antique statue and chose Hercules as a model for the strongest, most solid and masculine form of the human body, embodied by the Christian hero Samson or by St Christopher.49 According to the combination of good-naturedness, strength and courage, Rubens’s depiction of the allegorical figure of Virtue with helmet and sword on the triumphal chariot probably refers to the victor of Kallo as a ‘virtuous hero’.50

On Roman coins, Virtus is a feminine fig­ure, her gown draped over her shoulder leav­ ing one breast bare, yet she symbolizes man­ liness and courage. Traditionally, Virtus was depicted in the company of Honos (Honour), who bears the horn of plenty. There is a notable similarity be­ tween Rubens’s Virtue on the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo and his drawing of Virtue and Honour in the Museum PlantinMoretus, Antwerp (fig. 13).51 Rubens’s drawing of Virtue and Honour refers to the ancient Roman Temple of Honos and Virtus. In this drawing Rubens depicted Virtue holding her attributes, the lance and a Fig. 13 Peter Paul Rubens, Virtue and Honour, drawing, short sword or parazonium, similar to the Virtus Antwerp, Museum Plantinin the Roman temple and on Roman coins. Moretus/Prentenkabinet In Antwerp, Virtue and Honour had been displayed before as flat painted wooden figures placed on top of the Porta Caesarea or Sint-Jorispoort, flanking Brabo, the legendary founder of the town, as decoration for the Joyous Entry of Archduke Ernest in 1594. The fact that Virtue stepped on the globe of Fortune meant that it was completely independent of blind and ignorant change, and that material prosperity and honour would follow inevitably in its wake.52 The same type of Virtus, but con­structed in the round, was standing at the very top of the Florentine Arch. The figure of true Religion showing Ernest the Temple of Virtue and Honour was depicted on the rear side of the arch. Contrary to a long-time tradition, Rubens replaced Honour with Fortune as Virtue’s companion, apparently to suggest that the courage of Virtue was related to chance or good luck at the battle of Kallo. Fortune’s dress is puffed up by the wind and her hand is resting on a rudder. She

(London 1930) and to the Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi, citing the coin. 47  Wood 2010, p. 152. 48  Mielke 1970, p. xv. 49  Muller 2004, pp. 20–21. 50  Elizabeth McGrath pointed out to me that in the allegory of Ferdinand as Hercules on the last arch of the 1635 Joyous Entry, Ferdinand is destined for the temple of Virtue and Honour. Three years

22

later, the triumphal chariot implies that, with his victory at Kallo, Ferdinand has reached it. 51  Van der Meulen 1994, vol. 1, fig. 38. 52  Mielke 1970, p. xv.

23


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

seems to emphasize that luck is dependent on a tail wind blowing in the right direction. Considering that both the heroic attack and a stroke of luck, or a tail wind, had played a role in the battle on the river Scheldt and its banks, the symbolism seems to be appropriate for the victory at Kallo.

his tapestry design of the Triumph of the Church from the Eucharist series (Prado, Madrid). Comparing the traditional prototype of the Triumphal Chariot of Antverpia to Rubens’s sketch for the chariot of Kallo, it is obvious that the earlier Antwerp examples differ from Rubens’s design, with regard to the style of the design and the staging of the figures. The traditional Antwerp triumphal chariot staged the allegorical figures in a rather schematic way, placing the figures in a row, just standing there to represent the virtue concerned without taking on a meaningful pose. The personifications are recognizable by their name on a scroll or by their attributes. Comparing the personifications on the stages and arches for the entry of CardinalInfante Ferdinand in 1635 to the preceding ones, Rubens has transformed the motionless allegorical personifications into lively figures enacting the allegory as a theatre play. Rubens modified the concept of an ancient triumph into a festive float three years later, in designing the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, by mingling personifications and maritime symbolism, well known in the Antwerp pictorial tradition, and transformed them into a new lively allegory expressing the optimism about the city’s expected revival.

Baroque splendour Werner Weisbach extolled Rubens’s design for the Chariot of Kallo and praised the fact that Rubens transformed the classical triumph fit for court circles into a chariot confronting the crowds with an example of baroque splendour.53 Comparing the design to former Antwerp triumphal chariots, some distinctive features of Rubens’s chariot illustrate this baroque style. The whole scene seems to come to life thanks to the dynamic movement of the car, the dramatic and direct expression of emotion of the city maidens and the triumphant joy of the Victories. Standing on the chariot, the figures seem to be about to move, while their pose and broad gestures resemble the style of theatre or opera. The display of the chariot can be considered a Theatrum Mundi metaphor, reflecting the theatrical aspects of the seventeenth-century visual arts. The concept refers to the action and emotion of the figures as well as to the convincing rendering of cloth and skin textures. The palette of bright colours and handling of paint might also be regarded as a baroque feature contributing to intensity and immediacy. The exuberant decoration of the chariot with the scrolls, shells, festive banners, laurels and rose garlands even surpasses in its richness Rubens’s reworked Triumph of Scipio Africanus (private collection),54 and Weisbach 1919, p. 150: ‘So hat der festliche Trionfo hier im Norden, wenn zwar für höfische Kreise berechnet, so doch auch auf weitere Massen mit dem barocken Pomp seiner vor aller Augen gestellten überwältigenden Prachtentfaltung ausgewirkt.’ 54  Anonymous drawing after Giulio Romano, retouched by Rubens, Scipio Welcomed outside the Gates of Rome, pen and wash, chalk, private collection (Wood 2010). Rubens’s collection included quantities of drawings after the designs by Giulio Romano (1499–1546), probably from the latter’s studio in Mantua. Among these were 21 large copies after the triumph of a Roman emperor for the Camera degli Stucchi of Palazzo Te in Mantua and three copies after the small cartoons for the great series of tapestries on the life of Scipio Africanus that were woven for François I of France. Wood indicates a parallel between these groups of copies after Romano and 53 

24

Conclusion Considering the tradition of depicting triumphal chariots in the Nether­ lands, Gossart’s design of a memorial chariot at the death of King Ferdinand of Aragon was the first of its kind in the Low Countries. The triumphal float of the Ship Victoria, participating in the memorial procession in Brussels after the death of Charles V, partly reminiscent of the descriptions of Gossart’s design, was a chariot taking the form of a ship. Two prints about the conflict between the Northern and the Southern Netherlands depict a triumphal chariot illustrating the expectation of peace. The above survey of the pictorial tradition leads to the conclusion that in both its boat shape Mantegna’s Triumphs. The copy of the tapestry design depicting Scipio Welcomed outside the Gates of Rome was very extensively retouched by Rubens (Wood 2002, p. 16; Wood 2010, pp. 336–40).

25


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

seems to emphasize that luck is dependent on a tail wind blowing in the right direction. Considering that both the heroic attack and a stroke of luck, or a tail wind, had played a role in the battle on the river Scheldt and its banks, the symbolism seems to be appropriate for the victory at Kallo.

his tapestry design of the Triumph of the Church from the Eucharist series (Prado, Madrid). Comparing the traditional prototype of the Triumphal Chariot of Antverpia to Rubens’s sketch for the chariot of Kallo, it is obvious that the earlier Antwerp examples differ from Rubens’s design, with regard to the style of the design and the staging of the figures. The traditional Antwerp triumphal chariot staged the allegorical figures in a rather schematic way, placing the figures in a row, just standing there to represent the virtue concerned without taking on a meaningful pose. The personifications are recognizable by their name on a scroll or by their attributes. Comparing the personifications on the stages and arches for the entry of CardinalInfante Ferdinand in 1635 to the preceding ones, Rubens has transformed the motionless allegorical personifications into lively figures enacting the allegory as a theatre play. Rubens modified the concept of an ancient triumph into a festive float three years later, in designing the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo, by mingling personifications and maritime symbolism, well known in the Antwerp pictorial tradition, and transformed them into a new lively allegory expressing the optimism about the city’s expected revival.

Baroque splendour Werner Weisbach extolled Rubens’s design for the Chariot of Kallo and praised the fact that Rubens transformed the classical triumph fit for court circles into a chariot confronting the crowds with an example of baroque splendour.53 Comparing the design to former Antwerp triumphal chariots, some distinctive features of Rubens’s chariot illustrate this baroque style. The whole scene seems to come to life thanks to the dynamic movement of the car, the dramatic and direct expression of emotion of the city maidens and the triumphant joy of the Victories. Standing on the chariot, the figures seem to be about to move, while their pose and broad gestures resemble the style of theatre or opera. The display of the chariot can be considered a Theatrum Mundi metaphor, reflecting the theatrical aspects of the seventeenth-century visual arts. The concept refers to the action and emotion of the figures as well as to the convincing rendering of cloth and skin textures. The palette of bright colours and handling of paint might also be regarded as a baroque feature contributing to intensity and immediacy. The exuberant decoration of the chariot with the scrolls, shells, festive banners, laurels and rose garlands even surpasses in its richness Rubens’s reworked Triumph of Scipio Africanus (private collection),54 and Weisbach 1919, p. 150: ‘So hat der festliche Trionfo hier im Norden, wenn zwar für höfische Kreise berechnet, so doch auch auf weitere Massen mit dem barocken Pomp seiner vor aller Augen gestellten überwältigenden Prachtentfaltung ausgewirkt.’ 54  Anonymous drawing after Giulio Romano, retouched by Rubens, Scipio Welcomed outside the Gates of Rome, pen and wash, chalk, private collection (Wood 2010). Rubens’s collection included quantities of drawings after the designs by Giulio Romano (1499–1546), probably from the latter’s studio in Mantua. Among these were 21 large copies after the triumph of a Roman emperor for the Camera degli Stucchi of Palazzo Te in Mantua and three copies after the small cartoons for the great series of tapestries on the life of Scipio Africanus that were woven for François I of France. Wood indicates a parallel between these groups of copies after Romano and 53 

24

Conclusion Considering the tradition of depicting triumphal chariots in the Nether­ lands, Gossart’s design of a memorial chariot at the death of King Ferdinand of Aragon was the first of its kind in the Low Countries. The triumphal float of the Ship Victoria, participating in the memorial procession in Brussels after the death of Charles V, partly reminiscent of the descriptions of Gossart’s design, was a chariot taking the form of a ship. Two prints about the conflict between the Northern and the Southern Netherlands depict a triumphal chariot illustrating the expectation of peace. The above survey of the pictorial tradition leads to the conclusion that in both its boat shape Mantegna’s Triumphs. The copy of the tapestry design depicting Scipio Welcomed outside the Gates of Rome was very extensively retouched by Rubens (Wood 2002, p. 16; Wood 2010, pp. 336–40).

25


BULLETIN

and concept as an allegory of peace Rubens’s oil sketch of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo was anticipated by sixteenth-century examples. Prints in the illustrated accounts of Antwerp Joyous Entries show a range of various allegorical figures as decorations of the stages and arches. Many of the Antwerp allegories had been inspired by Renaissance art that came from Italy by prints and drawings. Rubens obviously adapted the Antwerp pictorial tradition, mingling the Antwerp imagery with his knowledge of antiquity and turning the conventional motifs into new inventions. The sea centaurs designed by Rubens on the top of the Stage of Mercury would seem to be an adaptation of the sea centaurs on the façade of the Antwerp City Hall, traditionally symbolizing the interdependence of Antwerp’s commerce and its passage to the sea. The mythological sea creatures, popular subjects in seventeenth-century Antwerp, reappeared in the decorations for the Joyous Entry of the Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand (1635) and the design of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo (1638). The carved aquatic decorations of the triton, the dolphin and the water symbols on the design for the chariot of Kallo that refer to the battle on the river, may be seen as an allusion to the traditional Antwerp issue of reopening the passage to the sea. Regarding Antverpia’s traditional modest representation of loyalty, Rubens transformed her into a vibrant character, by casting her in a principal role as the triumphant city maiden. Contained in the pictorial tradition, Rubens’s oil sketch of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo can be classified as a specific Antwerp allegory of triumph.

BULLETIN

Bibliography Adriaans-van Schaik 2011 A. Adriaans-van Schaik, ‘Triumph in Antwerp. Rubens’s oil sketch The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo’, Rubensbulletin, 2011, pp. 40–65. Ainsworth et al. 2010 M. Ainsworth (ed.), Stijn Alsteens, Nadine M. Orenstein, Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures; Jan Gossart’s Renaissance; The Complete Works, New York 2010. Antwerp 1957 Ommegangen en blijde inkomsten te Antwerpen (exh. cat. Museum voor Folklore, Antwerp), 1957. Antwerp 2004 K. Lohse Belkin and F. Healy, A House of Art. Rubens as Collector (exh. cat. Rubenshuis, Antwerp), 2004. Arents 1950 P. Arents, ‘Pompa introitus Ferdinandi: bijdrage tot de bibliografie van en over Rubens’, De gulden passer 27 (1949), 2/4. Reprint Antwerp 1950, pp. 81–347. Balis 1992 A. Balis, ‘Het Lot van Antwerpen. Halfmenselijke Zeewezens in de Kunst der Nederlanden van de Middeleeuwen tot de Barok’, in A. Balis (ed.), Van Sirenen en Meerminnen (exh. cat. Galerie CGER, Brussels), 1992, pp. 112–31. Baudouin 1972 F. Baudouin, De eeuw van Rubens, Antwerp 1972. Belkin 2009 K. Lohse Belkin, Copies and Adaptations from Renaissance and Later Artists: German and Netherlandish Artists (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XXVI, 1), 2 vols., London 2009. Blockmans and Donckers 1999 W. Blockmans and E. Donckers, ‘Self-Representation of Court and City in Flanders and Brabant in the Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Centuries’, in W. Blockmans and A. Janse (eds.), Showing Status. Representation of Social Positions in the Late Medieval Low Countries, Turnhout 1999, pp. 81–111.

26

27


BULLETIN

and concept as an allegory of peace Rubens’s oil sketch of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo was anticipated by sixteenth-century examples. Prints in the illustrated accounts of Antwerp Joyous Entries show a range of various allegorical figures as decorations of the stages and arches. Many of the Antwerp allegories had been inspired by Renaissance art that came from Italy by prints and drawings. Rubens obviously adapted the Antwerp pictorial tradition, mingling the Antwerp imagery with his knowledge of antiquity and turning the conventional motifs into new inventions. The sea centaurs designed by Rubens on the top of the Stage of Mercury would seem to be an adaptation of the sea centaurs on the façade of the Antwerp City Hall, traditionally symbolizing the interdependence of Antwerp’s commerce and its passage to the sea. The mythological sea creatures, popular subjects in seventeenth-century Antwerp, reappeared in the decorations for the Joyous Entry of the Cardinal-Infante Ferdinand (1635) and the design of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo (1638). The carved aquatic decorations of the triton, the dolphin and the water symbols on the design for the chariot of Kallo that refer to the battle on the river, may be seen as an allusion to the traditional Antwerp issue of reopening the passage to the sea. Regarding Antverpia’s traditional modest representation of loyalty, Rubens transformed her into a vibrant character, by casting her in a principal role as the triumphant city maiden. Contained in the pictorial tradition, Rubens’s oil sketch of the Triumphal Chariot of Kallo can be classified as a specific Antwerp allegory of triumph.

BULLETIN

Bibliography Adriaans-van Schaik 2011 A. Adriaans-van Schaik, ‘Triumph in Antwerp. Rubens’s oil sketch The Triumphal Chariot of Kallo’, Rubensbulletin, 2011, pp. 40–65. Ainsworth et al. 2010 M. Ainsworth (ed.), Stijn Alsteens, Nadine M. Orenstein, Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures; Jan Gossart’s Renaissance; The Complete Works, New York 2010. Antwerp 1957 Ommegangen en blijde inkomsten te Antwerpen (exh. cat. Museum voor Folklore, Antwerp), 1957. Antwerp 2004 K. Lohse Belkin and F. Healy, A House of Art. Rubens as Collector (exh. cat. Rubenshuis, Antwerp), 2004. Arents 1950 P. Arents, ‘Pompa introitus Ferdinandi: bijdrage tot de bibliografie van en over Rubens’, De gulden passer 27 (1949), 2/4. Reprint Antwerp 1950, pp. 81–347. Balis 1992 A. Balis, ‘Het Lot van Antwerpen. Halfmenselijke Zeewezens in de Kunst der Nederlanden van de Middeleeuwen tot de Barok’, in A. Balis (ed.), Van Sirenen en Meerminnen (exh. cat. Galerie CGER, Brussels), 1992, pp. 112–31. Baudouin 1972 F. Baudouin, De eeuw van Rubens, Antwerp 1972. Belkin 2009 K. Lohse Belkin, Copies and Adaptations from Renaissance and Later Artists: German and Netherlandish Artists (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XXVI, 1), 2 vols., London 2009. Blockmans and Donckers 1999 W. Blockmans and E. Donckers, ‘Self-Representation of Court and City in Flanders and Brabant in the Fifteenth and Early Sixteenth Centuries’, in W. Blockmans and A. Janse (eds.), Showing Status. Representation of Social Positions in the Late Medieval Low Countries, Turnhout 1999, pp. 81–111.

26

27


BULLETIN

Bochius 1595 J. Boch, Descriptio publicae gratulationis, spectaculorum et ludorum, in adventu sereniss. principis Ernesti archiducis Austriae … an MDXCIII, XVIII Kal. Julias, aliisque diebus Antverpiae editorum; cui est praefixa De Belgii principatu a Romano in ea provincia imperio ad nostra usque tempora brevis narratio; cum carmine Panegyrico in ejusdem principis Ernesti; accessit denique Oratio funebris in archiducis Ernesti obitum …. / omnia a Joanne Bochio conscripta, Antwerp 1595. Bochius 1970 J. Bochius, The Ceremonial Entry of Ernst, Archduke of Austria, into Antwerp, June 14, 1594 = Descriptio publicae gratulationis, spectaculorum et ludorum, in adventu sereniss. principis Ernesti archiducis Austriae, ducis Burgundiae, comitis Habspurgi, aurei velleris equitis, Belgicis provinciis a regia majestate catholica praefecti, engravings by Pieter Van der Borcht, after designs by Marten de Vos, Antwerp 1595; and a suppl. of plates from the royal entry of Albrecht and Isabella, Antwerp 1599. Reprint, introd. by Hans Mielke, New York 1970. Burckhardt 1990 J. Burckhardt, The Civilisation of the Renaissance in Italy, with a new introduction by Peter Burke and notes by Peter Murray, London 1990. De Hond, De Koomen et al. 2003 J. de Hond (ed.), A. de Koomen et al., Monsters & fabeldieren: 2500 jaar geschiedenis van randgevallen (exh. cat. Noordbrabants Museum, ’s-Hertogenbosch), 2003. Delen 1930 A. J. J. Delen, Iconographie van Antwerpen, Brussels 1930. De Poorter 1978 N. De Poorter, The Eucharist series, 2 vols. (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, II), Brussels 1978. Dlugaiczyk 2005 M. Dlugaiczyk, Der Waffenstillstand (1609–1621) als Medienereignis: politische Bildpropaganda in den Niederlanden, Münster 2005. Held 1980 J. S. Held, The Oil Sketches of Peter Paul Rubens, A Critical Catalogue, 2 vols., New Jersey 1980.

28

BULLETIN

Huet and Grieten 2010 L. Huet and J. Grieten, Nicolaas Rockox 1560–1640, Burgemeester van de Gouden Eeuw, Antwerp 2010. Jaffé, McGrath et al. 2005–06 D. Jaffé, E. McGrath et al., Rubens: a master in the making (exh. cat. National Gallery, London), 2005. Lille 2004 A. Brejon de Lavergnée, Rubens. Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts 6 mars-14 juin 2004 (exh. cat. Palais des Beaux-Arts, Lille), 2004. Martin 1972 J. R. Martin, The Decorations for the Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XVI), London 1972. McGrath 1975 E. McGrath, ‘Le déclin d’Anvers et les décorations de Rubens pour l’entrée du Prince Ferdinand en 1635’, in J. Jacquot and E. Konigson, Les Fêtes de la Renaissance, III, Quinzième colloque international des études humanistes, Paris 1975, pp. 173–86. Mensger 2002 A. Mensger, Jan Gossart: die niederländische Kunst zu Beginn der Neuzeit, Berlin 2002. Mielke 1970 H. Mielke, ‘Ceremonial Entries and the Theatre in the Sixteenth Century’, in J. Bochius, The Ceremonial Entry of Ernst, Archduke of Austria, into Antwerp, June 14, 1594, New York 1970, pp. vii–xxiii. Muller 2004 J. M. Muller, ‘Rubens’s Collection in History’, in Antwerp 2004, pp. 11–85. Neefs 1635 H. Neefs, ‘Corte uutlegginghen ofte by-voeghsel vanden gheheelen triumph-wegh ghemaeckt ende ghestelt ter eeren des doorluchtichsten prince cardinael Ferdinandus Infante van Hispanien op sijn blijde incomste binnen de stadt van Antwerpen den 17. april 1635 …’, Antwerp 1635. Pinson 2007 Y. Pinson, ‘Moralised Triumphal Chariots. Metamorphosis of Petrarch’s Trionfi in Northern Art’, in I. Alexander-Skipnes, Cultural Exchange between the Low Countries and Italy (1400–1600), Turnhout 2007, pp. 203–23.

29


BULLETIN

Bochius 1595 J. Boch, Descriptio publicae gratulationis, spectaculorum et ludorum, in adventu sereniss. principis Ernesti archiducis Austriae … an MDXCIII, XVIII Kal. Julias, aliisque diebus Antverpiae editorum; cui est praefixa De Belgii principatu a Romano in ea provincia imperio ad nostra usque tempora brevis narratio; cum carmine Panegyrico in ejusdem principis Ernesti; accessit denique Oratio funebris in archiducis Ernesti obitum …. / omnia a Joanne Bochio conscripta, Antwerp 1595. Bochius 1970 J. Bochius, The Ceremonial Entry of Ernst, Archduke of Austria, into Antwerp, June 14, 1594 = Descriptio publicae gratulationis, spectaculorum et ludorum, in adventu sereniss. principis Ernesti archiducis Austriae, ducis Burgundiae, comitis Habspurgi, aurei velleris equitis, Belgicis provinciis a regia majestate catholica praefecti, engravings by Pieter Van der Borcht, after designs by Marten de Vos, Antwerp 1595; and a suppl. of plates from the royal entry of Albrecht and Isabella, Antwerp 1599. Reprint, introd. by Hans Mielke, New York 1970. Burckhardt 1990 J. Burckhardt, The Civilisation of the Renaissance in Italy, with a new introduction by Peter Burke and notes by Peter Murray, London 1990. De Hond, De Koomen et al. 2003 J. de Hond (ed.), A. de Koomen et al., Monsters & fabeldieren: 2500 jaar geschiedenis van randgevallen (exh. cat. Noordbrabants Museum, ’s-Hertogenbosch), 2003. Delen 1930 A. J. J. Delen, Iconographie van Antwerpen, Brussels 1930. De Poorter 1978 N. De Poorter, The Eucharist series, 2 vols. (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, II), Brussels 1978. Dlugaiczyk 2005 M. Dlugaiczyk, Der Waffenstillstand (1609–1621) als Medienereignis: politische Bildpropaganda in den Niederlanden, Münster 2005. Held 1980 J. S. Held, The Oil Sketches of Peter Paul Rubens, A Critical Catalogue, 2 vols., New Jersey 1980.

28

BULLETIN

Huet and Grieten 2010 L. Huet and J. Grieten, Nicolaas Rockox 1560–1640, Burgemeester van de Gouden Eeuw, Antwerp 2010. Jaffé, McGrath et al. 2005–06 D. Jaffé, E. McGrath et al., Rubens: a master in the making (exh. cat. National Gallery, London), 2005. Lille 2004 A. Brejon de Lavergnée, Rubens. Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts 6 mars-14 juin 2004 (exh. cat. Palais des Beaux-Arts, Lille), 2004. Martin 1972 J. R. Martin, The Decorations for the Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XVI), London 1972. McGrath 1975 E. McGrath, ‘Le déclin d’Anvers et les décorations de Rubens pour l’entrée du Prince Ferdinand en 1635’, in J. Jacquot and E. Konigson, Les Fêtes de la Renaissance, III, Quinzième colloque international des études humanistes, Paris 1975, pp. 173–86. Mensger 2002 A. Mensger, Jan Gossart: die niederländische Kunst zu Beginn der Neuzeit, Berlin 2002. Mielke 1970 H. Mielke, ‘Ceremonial Entries and the Theatre in the Sixteenth Century’, in J. Bochius, The Ceremonial Entry of Ernst, Archduke of Austria, into Antwerp, June 14, 1594, New York 1970, pp. vii–xxiii. Muller 2004 J. M. Muller, ‘Rubens’s Collection in History’, in Antwerp 2004, pp. 11–85. Neefs 1635 H. Neefs, ‘Corte uutlegginghen ofte by-voeghsel vanden gheheelen triumph-wegh ghemaeckt ende ghestelt ter eeren des doorluchtichsten prince cardinael Ferdinandus Infante van Hispanien op sijn blijde incomste binnen de stadt van Antwerpen den 17. april 1635 …’, Antwerp 1635. Pinson 2007 Y. Pinson, ‘Moralised Triumphal Chariots. Metamorphosis of Petrarch’s Trionfi in Northern Art’, in I. Alexander-Skipnes, Cultural Exchange between the Low Countries and Italy (1400–1600), Turnhout 2007, pp. 203–23.

29


BULLETIN

Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi J.C. Gevartius, The magnificent ceremonial entry into Antwerp of his Royal Highness Ferdinand of Austria on the fifteenth day of May, 1635, Antwerp 1971. Reprint of Jean Gaspard Gevaerts, Pompa introitus honori serenissimi principis Ferdinandi Austriaci Hispaniarum infantis … a S.P.Q. Antverp. decreta et adornata … ann. MDCXXXV / arcus, pegmata, iconesque à Pet. Paulo Rubenio inventas et delineatas inscriptionibus et elogiis ornabat, libroque commentario illustrabat Casperius Gevartius; accessit Lavrea Calloana eodem auctore descripta, Antverpiae: apud Ioannem Meursium, Antwerp 1642. Pray Bober and Rubinstein 1986 P. Pray Bober and R. Rubinstein, Renaissance Artists and Antique Sculpture: A Handbook of Sources, London 1986. Prims 1927 F. Prims, ‘Rubens’ Antwerpen geschiedkundig en economisch geschetst’, in F. Prims et al., Rubens en zijne eeuw, Antwerp 1927, pp. 47–52. Prims 1949 F. Prims, ‘De Antwerpsche Ommeganck op den vooravond van de beeldstormerij’, Mededeelingen van de Koninklijke Vlaamsche Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schoone Kunsten van België, Antwerp and Utrecht 1949, pp. 5–21. Saunders Magurn 1955 R. Saunders Magurn (transl. and ed.), The letters of Peter Paul Rubens, Cambridge, Mass., 1955. Scheller 1983 R. W. Scheller, ‘Jan Gossart’s Triomfwagen’, in A.-M. Logan (ed.), Essays in Northern European Art Presented to Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann on his Sixtieth Birthday, Utrecht 1983, pp. 228–236. Tanis and Horst 1993 J. R. Tanis and D. R. Horst, Images of Discord: A Graphic Interpretation of the Opening Decades of the Eighty Years’ War – De tweedracht verbeeld: prentkunst als propaganda aan het begin van de Tachtigjarige Oorlog, Bryn Mawr 1993. Thøfner 2007 M. Thøfner, A Common Art: Urban Ceremonial in Antwerp and Brussels during and after the Dutch Revolt, Zwolle 2007.

30

BULLETIN

Triumphelijcke incomst … 1881 Triumphelijcke incomst van den doorluchtighen ende hooghgheboren Aertshertoge Matthias binnen Brussele, 18 Januarij 1578, samengesteld door de Maskerade-Commissie Utrecht, Utrecht 1881. Vandenbroeck 1981 P. Vandenbroeck, Rondom plechtige intredes en feestelijke stadsversieringen, Antwerpen 1594–1599–1635 (exh. cat. KMSKA), 1981. Van der Meulen 1994 M. van der Meulen, Copies After the Antique, 3 vols. (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XXIII), London and New York 1994. Van de Velde and Vlieghe 1969 C. Van de Velde and H. Vlieghe, Stadsversieringen te Gent in 1635, voor de Intrede van de Kardinaal-Infant, Ghent 1969. Van Hout and Balis 2010 N. Van Hout and A. Balis, Rubens Unveiled. Notes on the Master’s Painting Technique, Antwerp 2010. Van Marle 1971 R. van Marle, Iconographie de l’art profane au Moyen Age et à la Renaissance et la décoration des demeures, New York 1971. Vervaet 1990 J. Vervaet (ed.), P. P. Rubens: Paintings – Oil Sketches. Catalogue Royal Museum of Fine Arts: documental presentation [KMSKA], Antwerp 1990. Vienna and New York 2004 Peter Paul Rubens (exh. cat. Albertina, Vienna; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York), 2004. Vlieghe 1998 H. Vlieghe, Flemish Art and Architecture 1585–1700, New Haven 1998. Vlieghe 2008 H. Vlieghe, ‘De voorgeschiedenis tot 1816’, in L. de Jong (ed.), Het Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen. Een geschiedenis 1810–2007, Antwerp 2008, pp. 12–28. Von Roeder-Baumbach 1943 I. von Roeder-Baumbach, Versieringen bij blijde inkomsten gebruikt in de Zuidelijke Nederlanden gedurende de 16e en 17e eeuw …, Antwerp 1943.

31


BULLETIN

Pompa Introitus Ferdinandi J.C. Gevartius, The magnificent ceremonial entry into Antwerp of his Royal Highness Ferdinand of Austria on the fifteenth day of May, 1635, Antwerp 1971. Reprint of Jean Gaspard Gevaerts, Pompa introitus honori serenissimi principis Ferdinandi Austriaci Hispaniarum infantis … a S.P.Q. Antverp. decreta et adornata … ann. MDCXXXV / arcus, pegmata, iconesque à Pet. Paulo Rubenio inventas et delineatas inscriptionibus et elogiis ornabat, libroque commentario illustrabat Casperius Gevartius; accessit Lavrea Calloana eodem auctore descripta, Antverpiae: apud Ioannem Meursium, Antwerp 1642. Pray Bober and Rubinstein 1986 P. Pray Bober and R. Rubinstein, Renaissance Artists and Antique Sculpture: A Handbook of Sources, London 1986. Prims 1927 F. Prims, ‘Rubens’ Antwerpen geschiedkundig en economisch geschetst’, in F. Prims et al., Rubens en zijne eeuw, Antwerp 1927, pp. 47–52. Prims 1949 F. Prims, ‘De Antwerpsche Ommeganck op den vooravond van de beeldstormerij’, Mededeelingen van de Koninklijke Vlaamsche Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schoone Kunsten van België, Antwerp and Utrecht 1949, pp. 5–21. Saunders Magurn 1955 R. Saunders Magurn (transl. and ed.), The letters of Peter Paul Rubens, Cambridge, Mass., 1955. Scheller 1983 R. W. Scheller, ‘Jan Gossart’s Triomfwagen’, in A.-M. Logan (ed.), Essays in Northern European Art Presented to Egbert Haverkamp-Begemann on his Sixtieth Birthday, Utrecht 1983, pp. 228–236. Tanis and Horst 1993 J. R. Tanis and D. R. Horst, Images of Discord: A Graphic Interpretation of the Opening Decades of the Eighty Years’ War – De tweedracht verbeeld: prentkunst als propaganda aan het begin van de Tachtigjarige Oorlog, Bryn Mawr 1993. Thøfner 2007 M. Thøfner, A Common Art: Urban Ceremonial in Antwerp and Brussels during and after the Dutch Revolt, Zwolle 2007.

30

BULLETIN

Triumphelijcke incomst … 1881 Triumphelijcke incomst van den doorluchtighen ende hooghgheboren Aertshertoge Matthias binnen Brussele, 18 Januarij 1578, samengesteld door de Maskerade-Commissie Utrecht, Utrecht 1881. Vandenbroeck 1981 P. Vandenbroeck, Rondom plechtige intredes en feestelijke stadsversieringen, Antwerpen 1594–1599–1635 (exh. cat. KMSKA), 1981. Van der Meulen 1994 M. van der Meulen, Copies After the Antique, 3 vols. (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XXIII), London and New York 1994. Van de Velde and Vlieghe 1969 C. Van de Velde and H. Vlieghe, Stadsversieringen te Gent in 1635, voor de Intrede van de Kardinaal-Infant, Ghent 1969. Van Hout and Balis 2010 N. Van Hout and A. Balis, Rubens Unveiled. Notes on the Master’s Painting Technique, Antwerp 2010. Van Marle 1971 R. van Marle, Iconographie de l’art profane au Moyen Age et à la Renaissance et la décoration des demeures, New York 1971. Vervaet 1990 J. Vervaet (ed.), P. P. Rubens: Paintings – Oil Sketches. Catalogue Royal Museum of Fine Arts: documental presentation [KMSKA], Antwerp 1990. Vienna and New York 2004 Peter Paul Rubens (exh. cat. Albertina, Vienna; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York), 2004. Vlieghe 1998 H. Vlieghe, Flemish Art and Architecture 1585–1700, New Haven 1998. Vlieghe 2008 H. Vlieghe, ‘De voorgeschiedenis tot 1816’, in L. de Jong (ed.), Het Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen. Een geschiedenis 1810–2007, Antwerp 2008, pp. 12–28. Von Roeder-Baumbach 1943 I. von Roeder-Baumbach, Versieringen bij blijde inkomsten gebruikt in de Zuidelijke Nederlanden gedurende de 16e en 17e eeuw …, Antwerp 1943.

31


BULLETIN

Watanabe-O’Kelly 1992 H. Watanabe-O’Kelly, Triumphal Shews. Tournaments at German-speaking Courts in their European Context 1560–1730, Berlin 1992. Weisbach 1919 W. Weisbach, Trionfi, Berlin 1919. Wisch and Scott Munshower 1990 B. Wisch and S. Scott Munshower (eds.), ‘All the world’s a stage …’, Art and Pageantry in the Renaissance and the Baroque; Part 1, Triumphal Celebrations and the Rituals of Statecraft, Pennsylvania 1990. Wood 2002 J. Wood, Rubens drawing on Italy, Edinburgh 2002. Wood 2010 J. Wood, Rubens Copies and Adaptations from Renaissance and Later Artists: Raphael and his School (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XXVI, 2), London 2010.

32

BULLETIN


BULLETIN

Watanabe-O’Kelly 1992 H. Watanabe-O’Kelly, Triumphal Shews. Tournaments at German-speaking Courts in their European Context 1560–1730, Berlin 1992. Weisbach 1919 W. Weisbach, Trionfi, Berlin 1919. Wisch and Scott Munshower 1990 B. Wisch and S. Scott Munshower (eds.), ‘All the world’s a stage …’, Art and Pageantry in the Renaissance and the Baroque; Part 1, Triumphal Celebrations and the Rituals of Statecraft, Pennsylvania 1990. Wood 2002 J. Wood, Rubens drawing on Italy, Edinburgh 2002. Wood 2010 J. Wood, Rubens Copies and Adaptations from Renaissance and Later Artists: Raphael and his School (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XXVI, 2), London 2010.

32

BULLETIN


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Jordaens and the Rubens Descent from the Cross in Lille Nico Van Hout In the wake of the famous Descent from the Cross in Antwerp Cathedral (1611–14), Rubens produced a number of Descents for churches in Lille (after 16 October 1616),1 Kalisz, Poland (c. 1619),2 Saint-Amand-les-Eaux (c. 1620),3 Arras (two paintings, c. 1620),4 Lier  5 and Saint-Omer (1621–22).6 Several of these altarpieces were commissioned by the Capuchins in the Southern Netherlands. Because of the high costs, this artistic ‘package deal’ caused quite a stir with the head of the order in Rome, Paolo da Cesena. In a letter of 10 March 1617, he complained that ‘for Cambrai an image has been ordered to be made by a famous painter, which is worth 400 ducats, without other ornaments. Another one is present being made for Lille, for the same price and maybe larger still; another one for Antwerp, almost of the same value …’ 7 But despite the admonitions of their bookkeepers, the Capuchins

Canvas, 425 × 295 cm, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts, inv. P.74. See Jaffé 1989, no. 433; Judson 2000, no. 48, pp. 192–94, fig. 166. Painted for the Capuchins at Lille. 2  Panel, transferred to canvas, 320 × 312 cm, formerly in Kalisz (Poland), St Nicholas. See Judson 2000, no. 53, pp. 203–04. Bought by Piotr Zeromski for Ladislas IV (?) of Poland. Burnt on 17 December 1973. 3  Canvas, 338 × 194 cm, Valenciennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts, inv. 46.1.15. See Jaffé 1989, no. 275; Judson 2000, no. 52, pp. 201–03, fig. 173. After the French Revolution stored in the church of St Géry from 1803 to 1886 and then acquired by the museum. 4  (1) Canvas, 280 × 205 cm, Arras, St Jean Baptiste. See Judson 2000, no. 54, pp. 204–05, fig. 176.    (2) Canvas, 264 × 186 cm. Presented in 1650 to St Géry, Arras, by Jean Widebien of Arras and his wife Marie de Douai; Arras Cathedral since 1792; destroyed in the First World War. See Judson 2000, no. 56, p. 207. 5  Canvas, 297 × 200 cm, St Petersburg, Hermitage, inv. 471. See Jaffé 1989, no. 435; Varshavskaya and Yegorova 1989, pp. 73–77; Judson 2000, no. 55, pp. 205–07, fig. 180. Painted for the Capuchins in Lier. 6  Canvas, c. 400 × 300 cm, Saint-Omer, Cathédrale Notre-Dame. See Judson 2000, no. 57, pp. 207–09, fig. 181. Presented to the Cathedral by Canon Camicel in December 1623. 7  ‘Che si è fatta fare un’ imagine da un famoso pittore per il luogo di Cambray, che vale quattrocento ducati, senza altri ornamenti. Un’ altra se ne fà hora per il luogo di Lilla, del mismo prezzo e forse maggiore. Un altra per il luogo d’Anversa, quasi del medesimo valore.’ See P. Hildebrand, ‘Rubens chez les Capucins. Un témoignage de 1617’, Études franciscaines XLVII (1935), pp. 726–29. 1 

Fig. 1 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross (detail), Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

35


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Jordaens and the Rubens Descent from the Cross in Lille Nico Van Hout In the wake of the famous Descent from the Cross in Antwerp Cathedral (1611–14), Rubens produced a number of Descents for churches in Lille (after 16 October 1616),1 Kalisz, Poland (c. 1619),2 Saint-Amand-les-Eaux (c. 1620),3 Arras (two paintings, c. 1620),4 Lier  5 and Saint-Omer (1621–22).6 Several of these altarpieces were commissioned by the Capuchins in the Southern Netherlands. Because of the high costs, this artistic ‘package deal’ caused quite a stir with the head of the order in Rome, Paolo da Cesena. In a letter of 10 March 1617, he complained that ‘for Cambrai an image has been ordered to be made by a famous painter, which is worth 400 ducats, without other ornaments. Another one is present being made for Lille, for the same price and maybe larger still; another one for Antwerp, almost of the same value …’ 7 But despite the admonitions of their bookkeepers, the Capuchins

Canvas, 425 × 295 cm, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts, inv. P.74. See Jaffé 1989, no. 433; Judson 2000, no. 48, pp. 192–94, fig. 166. Painted for the Capuchins at Lille. 2  Panel, transferred to canvas, 320 × 312 cm, formerly in Kalisz (Poland), St Nicholas. See Judson 2000, no. 53, pp. 203–04. Bought by Piotr Zeromski for Ladislas IV (?) of Poland. Burnt on 17 December 1973. 3  Canvas, 338 × 194 cm, Valenciennes, Musée des Beaux-Arts, inv. 46.1.15. See Jaffé 1989, no. 275; Judson 2000, no. 52, pp. 201–03, fig. 173. After the French Revolution stored in the church of St Géry from 1803 to 1886 and then acquired by the museum. 4  (1) Canvas, 280 × 205 cm, Arras, St Jean Baptiste. See Judson 2000, no. 54, pp. 204–05, fig. 176.    (2) Canvas, 264 × 186 cm. Presented in 1650 to St Géry, Arras, by Jean Widebien of Arras and his wife Marie de Douai; Arras Cathedral since 1792; destroyed in the First World War. See Judson 2000, no. 56, p. 207. 5  Canvas, 297 × 200 cm, St Petersburg, Hermitage, inv. 471. See Jaffé 1989, no. 435; Varshavskaya and Yegorova 1989, pp. 73–77; Judson 2000, no. 55, pp. 205–07, fig. 180. Painted for the Capuchins in Lier. 6  Canvas, c. 400 × 300 cm, Saint-Omer, Cathédrale Notre-Dame. See Judson 2000, no. 57, pp. 207–09, fig. 181. Presented to the Cathedral by Canon Camicel in December 1623. 7  ‘Che si è fatta fare un’ imagine da un famoso pittore per il luogo di Cambray, che vale quattrocento ducati, senza altri ornamenti. Un’ altra se ne fà hora per il luogo di Lilla, del mismo prezzo e forse maggiore. Un altra per il luogo d’Anversa, quasi del medesimo valore.’ See P. Hildebrand, ‘Rubens chez les Capucins. Un témoignage de 1617’, Études franciscaines XLVII (1935), pp. 726–29. 1 

Fig. 1 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross (detail), Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

35


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Fig. 3 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, modello, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

Fig. 2 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

36

37


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Fig. 3 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, modello, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

Fig. 2 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

36

37


BULLETIN

as well as other religious orders must have been confident about the fact that Rubens was a brand that guaranteed delivery and value for money. Inevitably, such a vast commission must have put extra pressure on the production in the Rubens studio. Apart from the aforementioned Descents, many more large-scale pictures were created under the master’s direction between 1616 and the early 1620s.8 For Rubens, his assistants and his subcontractors it certainly was a challenge to produce half a dozen new variations on the same theme – a group of people supporting a lifeless body – and it would not be easy to equal, let alone to surpass, the Descent in Antwerp, which had made his reputation. Taking the workload into ac­count, it seems more than likely that Rubens had to leave not only the execution of the compositions to assistants, but their invention too, as I previously tried to demonstrate in a case study on the Coup de Lance in Antwerp.9 This view on Rubens and teamwork is also argued in the present contribution, which deals with the creative process that led to the Descent from the Cross in Lille (fig. 2). As with some other major Rubens paintings, surprisingly few pre­liminary studies can be connected with the altarpiece in the Palais des Beaux-Arts. We know of the painted modello (fig. 3) in the same mu­ seum, which formulates the division between lights and shadows of the composition.10 In addition, two model drawings by Rubens have been linked with the painting. The first one, a study for St John the Evangelist in Rotterdam, shows a naked man from the back.11 A second one, a drawing in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is thought to be a sketch for Nicodemus, who is standing on the lower part of the ladder on the right of the picture.12

For a list of altarpieces painted by the Rubens studio before 1620, see Van Hout 2011, appendix II, pp. 32–35. 9  See Van Hout 2011. 10  Panel, 54.5 × 41.5 cm, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts, inv. P.66. See Judson 2000, no. 48a, pp. 194–95. That the Rubens drawing in Rennes (Burchard and d’Hulst 1956, no. 71, pp. 118, 119, fig. 71) was a preparatory study for the altarpiece in Lille, as propounded by d’Hulst 1974, does not seem very plausible. 11  Nude Man partially seen from the back, black chalk with white highlights, on bluish grey paper, 280 × 262 mm; Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, inv. V.26; Judson 2000, no. 48b, p. 196. 12  Man turned to the left and holding a piece of drapery, black chalk with white highlights on brownish paper, 435 × 337 mm; London, Victoria and Albert Museum, inv. Dyce 523; Judson 2000, no. 48c, 8 

38

BULLETIN

For the 1610s it is taken as a standard scenario that Rubens pre­ pared the modelli for his compositions by one or more quick­ ly drawn pen sketches. A good example of this prac­ tice can be seen in the genesis of the altar wings of the Descent in Antwerp. The conception of the Visitation on the left wing started with three pen studies on a large sheet, followed by two oil sketches.13 The Presentation in the Temple on the right wing was planned in two pen studies on one sheet and in an oil sketch.14 It is assumed that such a pen drawing by Rubens for the Lille Descent originally existed, but did not survive. In this con­text we have to men­ tion a pen sketch by Jordaens of a Descent, which Roger-A. d’Hulst con­ sid­ered to be a free copy after the Lille altarpiece (fig. 4).15 The sketch certainly renders the scheme of that composition,

Fig. 4 Jacob Jordaens, The Descent from the Cross, pen and wash, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

pp. 196–97: ‘Burchard has suggested that this study might possibly be for the figure (Nicodemus) standing on the lower part of the ladder on the right in the Lille Descent. Whether or not this is the case is highly debatable, as there are many differences between the drawing, the modello and the altarpiece. The greatest difference is the placement of the shroud, which falls over the figure’s right shoulder in the two paintings and over his left in the drawing.’ 13  Studies for the Visitation, 265 × 360 mm, Bayonne, Musée Bonnat, inv. 1438; Held 1959, no. 27, pl. 33; Held 1986, no. 71, pl. 72. For the related oil sketches in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Strasbourg and the Courtauld Institute in London, see Held 1980, nos. 356 and 357, pls. 352 and 353. 14  Studies for the Presentation in the Temple, 214 × 142 mm, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, inv. 52.214.3; Held 1959, no. 28, pl. 34 and fig. 50; Held 1986, no. 72, pl. 73. Studies for the Presentation in the Temple, 242 × 237 mm, London, Courtauld Institute, Princes Gate Collection, inv. D.1978.PG.56; Held 1959, under no. 28; Held 1986, no. 72, pl. 73. For the related oil sketch in the Courtauld Institute, see Held 1980, no. 358, pl. 354. 15  Pen and brown ink and brown wash over black chalk, 195 × 123 mm, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts, inv. W3272; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A40, p. 133; III, fig. 45.

39


BULLETIN

as well as other religious orders must have been confident about the fact that Rubens was a brand that guaranteed delivery and value for money. Inevitably, such a vast commission must have put extra pressure on the production in the Rubens studio. Apart from the aforementioned Descents, many more large-scale pictures were created under the master’s direction between 1616 and the early 1620s.8 For Rubens, his assistants and his subcontractors it certainly was a challenge to produce half a dozen new variations on the same theme – a group of people supporting a lifeless body – and it would not be easy to equal, let alone to surpass, the Descent in Antwerp, which had made his reputation. Taking the workload into ac­count, it seems more than likely that Rubens had to leave not only the execution of the compositions to assistants, but their invention too, as I previously tried to demonstrate in a case study on the Coup de Lance in Antwerp.9 This view on Rubens and teamwork is also argued in the present contribution, which deals with the creative process that led to the Descent from the Cross in Lille (fig. 2). As with some other major Rubens paintings, surprisingly few pre­liminary studies can be connected with the altarpiece in the Palais des Beaux-Arts. We know of the painted modello (fig. 3) in the same mu­ seum, which formulates the division between lights and shadows of the composition.10 In addition, two model drawings by Rubens have been linked with the painting. The first one, a study for St John the Evangelist in Rotterdam, shows a naked man from the back.11 A second one, a drawing in the Victoria and Albert Museum, is thought to be a sketch for Nicodemus, who is standing on the lower part of the ladder on the right of the picture.12

For a list of altarpieces painted by the Rubens studio before 1620, see Van Hout 2011, appendix II, pp. 32–35. 9  See Van Hout 2011. 10  Panel, 54.5 × 41.5 cm, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts, inv. P.66. See Judson 2000, no. 48a, pp. 194–95. That the Rubens drawing in Rennes (Burchard and d’Hulst 1956, no. 71, pp. 118, 119, fig. 71) was a preparatory study for the altarpiece in Lille, as propounded by d’Hulst 1974, does not seem very plausible. 11  Nude Man partially seen from the back, black chalk with white highlights, on bluish grey paper, 280 × 262 mm; Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, inv. V.26; Judson 2000, no. 48b, p. 196. 12  Man turned to the left and holding a piece of drapery, black chalk with white highlights on brownish paper, 435 × 337 mm; London, Victoria and Albert Museum, inv. Dyce 523; Judson 2000, no. 48c, 8 

38

BULLETIN

For the 1610s it is taken as a standard scenario that Rubens pre­ pared the modelli for his compositions by one or more quick­ ly drawn pen sketches. A good example of this prac­ tice can be seen in the genesis of the altar wings of the Descent in Antwerp. The conception of the Visitation on the left wing started with three pen studies on a large sheet, followed by two oil sketches.13 The Presentation in the Temple on the right wing was planned in two pen studies on one sheet and in an oil sketch.14 It is assumed that such a pen drawing by Rubens for the Lille Descent originally existed, but did not survive. In this con­text we have to men­ tion a pen sketch by Jordaens of a Descent, which Roger-A. d’Hulst con­ sid­ered to be a free copy after the Lille altarpiece (fig. 4).15 The sketch certainly renders the scheme of that composition,

Fig. 4 Jacob Jordaens, The Descent from the Cross, pen and wash, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts

pp. 196–97: ‘Burchard has suggested that this study might possibly be for the figure (Nicodemus) standing on the lower part of the ladder on the right in the Lille Descent. Whether or not this is the case is highly debatable, as there are many differences between the drawing, the modello and the altarpiece. The greatest difference is the placement of the shroud, which falls over the figure’s right shoulder in the two paintings and over his left in the drawing.’ 13  Studies for the Visitation, 265 × 360 mm, Bayonne, Musée Bonnat, inv. 1438; Held 1959, no. 27, pl. 33; Held 1986, no. 71, pl. 72. For the related oil sketches in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in Strasbourg and the Courtauld Institute in London, see Held 1980, nos. 356 and 357, pls. 352 and 353. 14  Studies for the Presentation in the Temple, 214 × 142 mm, New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, inv. 52.214.3; Held 1959, no. 28, pl. 34 and fig. 50; Held 1986, no. 72, pl. 73. Studies for the Presentation in the Temple, 242 × 237 mm, London, Courtauld Institute, Princes Gate Collection, inv. D.1978.PG.56; Held 1959, under no. 28; Held 1986, no. 72, pl. 73. For the related oil sketch in the Courtauld Institute, see Held 1980, no. 358, pl. 354. 15  Pen and brown ink and brown wash over black chalk, 195 × 123 mm, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts, inv. W3272; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A40, p. 133; III, fig. 45.

39


BULLETIN

rather than any other Rubens or Jordaens Descent. The friends of the Lille museum bought this drawing from a Mrs Bostrom in London in 1963. The earlier provenance history of the drawing is un­known.16 To my knowledge, its authorship by Jordaens has never been chal­lenged. In fact, the curvilinear pen handling and the ap­plication of wash is quite similar to Jor­ daens’s compositional study of The High Priest Refusing Joachim’s Offering in Ottawa, made around the same time.17 More ques­tionable is the status of this pen sketch. Is it merely a drawn copy? Why then is it loosely underdrawn with black chalk? Moreover, the number of differences between the drawing and the altarpiece are more substantial than noticed at first sight. Christ’s left arm in the pen sketch is not Fig. 5 Peter Paul Rubens, supported by the man on top of the right The Descent from the Cross, ladder as in the altarpiece, but is lying next to Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts. his body. In the altarpiece, the helper on top of Detail of fig.  2 the ladder on the left is grabbing the shroud with his left arm. In the drawing, the same man is stretching out his right arm and is leaning his head much more forward. Standing on the same ladder, the accomplice in shadow is positioned higher up in the drawing than in the picture. In the canvas, the man sitting on top of the ladder to the right holds Christ’s lifeless arm, whereas in the drawing he rests his arm on his bended knee. The Magdalene in the drawing occupies less space. Finally, it should be noted that the outlines of the shroud in the pen sketch are undefined and even unresolved. On the basis of these obser­

Information kindly provided by Mrs Cordélia Hattori of the Cabinet des Dessins in Lille. Pen and brush and brown ink over black chalk, 244 × 146 mm, Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, inv. 9983; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A36; III, fig. 40. d’Hulst dates this sketch for an unknown composition around 1617. 16 

BULLETIN

Fig. 6 Jacob Jordaens, Two studies of an old woman, Nancy, Musée des Beaux-Arts

vations one is tempted to categorize the pen sketch as a first draft for a composition, rather than an imitation of one. Jordaens is not just copying here. He is searching for a satisfactory design. This would imply that Jordaens was – at least partly – involved in the creative process preceding the Lille Descent. On the left side of the Lille altarpiece is an elderly woman, rendered in profile (figs. 1 and 5). This figurante is present in the pen sketch by Jordaens, but is missing in Rubens’s modello. Her face mirrors the right head in a double head study by Jordaens in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in

17 

40

41


BULLETIN

rather than any other Rubens or Jordaens Descent. The friends of the Lille museum bought this drawing from a Mrs Bostrom in London in 1963. The earlier provenance history of the drawing is un­known.16 To my knowledge, its authorship by Jordaens has never been chal­lenged. In fact, the curvilinear pen handling and the ap­plication of wash is quite similar to Jor­ daens’s compositional study of The High Priest Refusing Joachim’s Offering in Ottawa, made around the same time.17 More ques­tionable is the status of this pen sketch. Is it merely a drawn copy? Why then is it loosely underdrawn with black chalk? Moreover, the number of differences between the drawing and the altarpiece are more substantial than noticed at first sight. Christ’s left arm in the pen sketch is not Fig. 5 Peter Paul Rubens, supported by the man on top of the right The Descent from the Cross, ladder as in the altarpiece, but is lying next to Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts. his body. In the altarpiece, the helper on top of Detail of fig.  2 the ladder on the left is grabbing the shroud with his left arm. In the drawing, the same man is stretching out his right arm and is leaning his head much more forward. Standing on the same ladder, the accomplice in shadow is positioned higher up in the drawing than in the picture. In the canvas, the man sitting on top of the ladder to the right holds Christ’s lifeless arm, whereas in the drawing he rests his arm on his bended knee. The Magdalene in the drawing occupies less space. Finally, it should be noted that the outlines of the shroud in the pen sketch are undefined and even unresolved. On the basis of these obser­

Information kindly provided by Mrs Cordélia Hattori of the Cabinet des Dessins in Lille. Pen and brush and brown ink over black chalk, 244 × 146 mm, Ottawa, National Gallery of Canada, inv. 9983; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A36; III, fig. 40. d’Hulst dates this sketch for an unknown composition around 1617. 16 

BULLETIN

Fig. 6 Jacob Jordaens, Two studies of an old woman, Nancy, Musée des Beaux-Arts

vations one is tempted to categorize the pen sketch as a first draft for a composition, rather than an imitation of one. Jordaens is not just copying here. He is searching for a satisfactory design. This would imply that Jordaens was – at least partly – involved in the creative process preceding the Lille Descent. On the left side of the Lille altarpiece is an elderly woman, rendered in profile (figs. 1 and 5). This figurante is present in the pen sketch by Jordaens, but is missing in Rubens’s modello. Her face mirrors the right head in a double head study by Jordaens in the Musée des Beaux-Arts in

17 

40

41


BULLETIN

Fig. 7 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts. Detail of fig. 2: Maria Cleophas

Fig. 8 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, modello, Lille, Palais des BeauxArts. Detail of fig. 3: Maria Cleophas

BULLETIN

Nancy (fig. 6).18 That same profile is recognizable in paintings produced by the Rubens studio in the early 1620s, such as the Adoration of the Shep­herds in Neuburg an der Donau,19 the Adoration of the Shepherds in Soissons,20 and Tomyris and Cyrus in the Louvre.21 These observations and the fact that there is a drawn copy of this profile head in the Copenhagen Print Room may suggest that the Nancy oil study or a copy of it was part of the Rubens cantoor until the 1620s.22 The same elderly woman, seen from other angles, can be observed in Jordaens’s own paintings, namely in The Daughters of Cecrops Finding Erichthonius of 1617 in Antwerp,23 and in his Satyr and Peasant in Brussels from about 1620–21. A frontal view of her physiognomy is also preserved in a Jordaens drawing in the Antwerp Print Room.24 In the modello for the Lille Descent, Maria Cleophas shows her grief by the gesture of her right hand, while on the altarpiece, her hand is omitted and her face is looking up in a three-quarter position (figs. 7 and 8). On closer inspection, it can be observed that the angle of view and the tilt of her head closely resemble – albeit in reverse – those of the model on the right in Two studies of a young man (fig. 9) in the Shickman Collection (currently stored at the Metropolitan Museum in New York).25 It should not come as a surprise that this youthful tronie was borrowed for both male and female characters. Up till now, this study was considered an autograph work by Rubens, but the viscous paint substance, the strong plasticity and the orange flesh tones with their dark shadows rather seem to point to Jordaens.26 Jordaens seems to have used the tronie for the fisherman in the right foreground of the Calling of St Peter at St James in

Two studies of an old woman, panel, 63 × 63 cm, Nancy, Musée des Beaux-Arts, inv. 203. Jaffé 1989, no. 536, c. 1619–20. 20  Soissons Cathedral; Jaffé 1989, no. 675; c. 1621–22. 21  Jaffé 1989, no. 666; McGrath 1997, no. 4, pp. 33–37. McGrath dates the picture to c. 1625. 22  Copenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst. See Ottawa 1968–69, no. 133, p. 152; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A52; III, fig. 59; d’Hulst 1982, p. 103, fig. 70. 23  KMSKA, inv. 842. 24  Antwerp, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, inv. 718, 360 × 270 mm; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A37. 25  Held 1980, no. 446; Jaffé 1989, no. 405. 26  The Shickman sketch was attributed to Jordaens by Arnout Balis in an oral communication. After having examined this head study at the Metropolitan Museum in 2011, I can only share his view. 18 

19 

Fig. 9 Peter Paul Rubens (here attributed to Jacob Jordaens), Two studies of a young man, Shickman Collection (on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

42

43


BULLETIN

Fig. 7 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, Lille, Palais des Beaux-Arts. Detail of fig. 2: Maria Cleophas

Fig. 8 Peter Paul Rubens, The Descent from the Cross, modello, Lille, Palais des BeauxArts. Detail of fig. 3: Maria Cleophas

BULLETIN

Nancy (fig. 6).18 That same profile is recognizable in paintings produced by the Rubens studio in the early 1620s, such as the Adoration of the Shep­herds in Neuburg an der Donau,19 the Adoration of the Shepherds in Soissons,20 and Tomyris and Cyrus in the Louvre.21 These observations and the fact that there is a drawn copy of this profile head in the Copenhagen Print Room may suggest that the Nancy oil study or a copy of it was part of the Rubens cantoor until the 1620s.22 The same elderly woman, seen from other angles, can be observed in Jordaens’s own paintings, namely in The Daughters of Cecrops Finding Erichthonius of 1617 in Antwerp,23 and in his Satyr and Peasant in Brussels from about 1620–21. A frontal view of her physiognomy is also preserved in a Jordaens drawing in the Antwerp Print Room.24 In the modello for the Lille Descent, Maria Cleophas shows her grief by the gesture of her right hand, while on the altarpiece, her hand is omitted and her face is looking up in a three-quarter position (figs. 7 and 8). On closer inspection, it can be observed that the angle of view and the tilt of her head closely resemble – albeit in reverse – those of the model on the right in Two studies of a young man (fig. 9) in the Shickman Collection (currently stored at the Metropolitan Museum in New York).25 It should not come as a surprise that this youthful tronie was borrowed for both male and female characters. Up till now, this study was considered an autograph work by Rubens, but the viscous paint substance, the strong plasticity and the orange flesh tones with their dark shadows rather seem to point to Jordaens.26 Jordaens seems to have used the tronie for the fisherman in the right foreground of the Calling of St Peter at St James in

Two studies of an old woman, panel, 63 × 63 cm, Nancy, Musée des Beaux-Arts, inv. 203. Jaffé 1989, no. 536, c. 1619–20. 20  Soissons Cathedral; Jaffé 1989, no. 675; c. 1621–22. 21  Jaffé 1989, no. 666; McGrath 1997, no. 4, pp. 33–37. McGrath dates the picture to c. 1625. 22  Copenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst. See Ottawa 1968–69, no. 133, p. 152; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A52; III, fig. 59; d’Hulst 1982, p. 103, fig. 70. 23  KMSKA, inv. 842. 24  Antwerp, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet, inv. 718, 360 × 270 mm; d’Hulst 1974, I, no. A37. 25  Held 1980, no. 446; Jaffé 1989, no. 405. 26  The Shickman sketch was attributed to Jordaens by Arnout Balis in an oral communication. After having examined this head study at the Metropolitan Museum in 2011, I can only share his view. 18 

19 

Fig. 9 Peter Paul Rubens (here attributed to Jacob Jordaens), Two studies of a young man, Shickman Collection (on loan to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York)

42

43


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Antwerp (c. 1616).27 Nevertheless, the tronie also appears as St John the Evangelist on the left wing of Rubens’s Adoration of the Magi in Mechelen (c. 1616–19).28 In Rubens’s modello for the painting in Lille, the corpse of Christ visually merges with the white shroud, as it did in the Antwerp Descent. Through this masterly solution the viewer’s attention is focused on the centre of the drama. A deep fold in the shroud casts a sharp-edged shadow that links the stretched arm of the man on the upper left via Christ’s dead body to the leg of St John and the ladder on the lower right. In this way, a striking diagonal is created, resulting in a triangular composition. The modello already hints at the intended colour scheme of the draperies, in line with convention. The simplicity of composition and the focus on drama as expressed in the modello was abandoned in the altarpiece. These observations support the hypothesis that Jordaens actually made the first design and that Rubens adapted it in his modello, after which Jordaens put the old woman in again and got away with it. The fact that the artistic brainstorming session was resumed in a masterful Rubens modello and the existence of two model drawings by Rubens in preparation of the altarpiece do not exclude a participation by Jordaens in the process of invention. By omitting the shadowed fold in the shroud, Rubens’s powerful diagonal was interrupted. The eyes of the viewer are distracted from the tragedy by the boldly coloured draperies of the protagonists. Under his red cloak, St John is wearing an olive-green tunic. Wearing a simple yellow garment in the modello, Mary Magdalene seems rather overdressed in the altarpiece, where she is given a sumptuous attire in yellow silk and pink lining, covering a light purple-blue dress. This mother-of-pearl outfit is rather out of place and reduces the impact of the main subject of the altarpiece. The rich purple drapery and yellow turban of Nicodemus are

overly present. The reintroduction of the elderly woman on the left could be called quite unnecessary too. All these deviations from the original con­cept must have been decided by Jordaens, an artistic personality with a penchant for the narrative and the spectacular, lacking subtlety and avoiding empty spaces. The extras in the Lille Descent from the Cross can only be described as plump. We see a solid and capable hand that loves to paint shiny fabrics and that is not afraid of strong contrasts, vividly coloured half shadows and reflections; a painter who smoothly unites his thick paint, but who does not – unlike Rubens in these years – bother about transparent glazes.29 In my opinion, these elements point in one direction: Jordaens. Archival documents that give us information on Jacob Jordaens’s life and activities before 1620 are scarce.30 Only a handful of his earliest paintings are signed, dated or documented.31 On the whole, assuming that Jordaens was active as an independent artist from 1612 onwards, his artistic output in the second decade seems surprisingly modest. In all likelihood, our understanding of the artist’s production in those years is obscured by his share in the production of pictures that are labelled as Rubens. However, the list of these works is growing. The Flight of Lot and his Daughters from Sodom in Tokyo was added to this category by d’Hulst with good reason.32 Equally convincing is Balis’s reattribution to Jordaens of the portraits of Archduke Albert of Austria and The Infanta Isabella in

d’Hulst 1982, p. 67, fig. 36; d’Hulst, De Poorter and Vandenven 1993. In this context, a similar double use of study material in the Rubens orbit can be mentioned. It should be remarked that the man on top of the ladder in the upper right of the Descent has the same facial features as the male nude appearing in a series of model studies in Darmstadt and Düsseldorf. Difficult to attribute, these drawings reflect positions of figures in paintings by Jordaens, Vinckenborch and Rubens. See Vlieghe 1987a and my article in Brussels 2012, pp. 55–59: ‘Jordaens of geen Jordaens? Over het gebruik van modelstudies in de zeventiende eeuw.’ 27 

28 

44

Or, as d’Hulst characterized Jordaens’s style: ‘de figuren zijn korter en daardoor minder sierlijk, een sterke golving verleent de omtreklijnen een dynamischer karakter, terwijl bovendien het koele en felle coloriet waarin heliotroop, lila, scherp geel en giftig groen een belangrijke rol spelen, alsmede de kordate toets …’ (d’Hulst 1982, p. 44). 30  He was baptized on 20 May 1593 in Our Lady’s Church in Antwerp. In 1607–08 he is known to have been a pupil of Adam van Noort (1562–1641). In 1615–16 he became master in the Guild of St Luke where he was registered as waterschilder (painter of watercolours on canvas or paper). On 15 May 1616 he married Catharina, the eldest daughter of his master. In 1620–21 a certain Charles du Val is registered as Jordaens’s pupil. 31  Among these, we should mention an Adoration of the Shepherds (1616, New York, Metropolitan Museum); a Crucifixion for St Paul’s Church in Antwerp, paid 150 guilders by Magdalena Lewieter in 1616–17; The Daughters of Cecrops Finding Erichthonius (1617, KMSKA); and finally an Adoration of the Shepherds (1618, Stockholm, Nationalmuseum). 32  d’Hulst 1967; d’Hulst and Vandenven 1989, no. 5 copy 2; Jaffé 1989, no. 266: 1614; Vlieghe 1993, p. 161; Nakamura 1994; Liedtke 1993; Balis 1994, p. 112. 29 

45


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Antwerp (c. 1616).27 Nevertheless, the tronie also appears as St John the Evangelist on the left wing of Rubens’s Adoration of the Magi in Mechelen (c. 1616–19).28 In Rubens’s modello for the painting in Lille, the corpse of Christ visually merges with the white shroud, as it did in the Antwerp Descent. Through this masterly solution the viewer’s attention is focused on the centre of the drama. A deep fold in the shroud casts a sharp-edged shadow that links the stretched arm of the man on the upper left via Christ’s dead body to the leg of St John and the ladder on the lower right. In this way, a striking diagonal is created, resulting in a triangular composition. The modello already hints at the intended colour scheme of the draperies, in line with convention. The simplicity of composition and the focus on drama as expressed in the modello was abandoned in the altarpiece. These observations support the hypothesis that Jordaens actually made the first design and that Rubens adapted it in his modello, after which Jordaens put the old woman in again and got away with it. The fact that the artistic brainstorming session was resumed in a masterful Rubens modello and the existence of two model drawings by Rubens in preparation of the altarpiece do not exclude a participation by Jordaens in the process of invention. By omitting the shadowed fold in the shroud, Rubens’s powerful diagonal was interrupted. The eyes of the viewer are distracted from the tragedy by the boldly coloured draperies of the protagonists. Under his red cloak, St John is wearing an olive-green tunic. Wearing a simple yellow garment in the modello, Mary Magdalene seems rather overdressed in the altarpiece, where she is given a sumptuous attire in yellow silk and pink lining, covering a light purple-blue dress. This mother-of-pearl outfit is rather out of place and reduces the impact of the main subject of the altarpiece. The rich purple drapery and yellow turban of Nicodemus are

overly present. The reintroduction of the elderly woman on the left could be called quite unnecessary too. All these deviations from the original con­cept must have been decided by Jordaens, an artistic personality with a penchant for the narrative and the spectacular, lacking subtlety and avoiding empty spaces. The extras in the Lille Descent from the Cross can only be described as plump. We see a solid and capable hand that loves to paint shiny fabrics and that is not afraid of strong contrasts, vividly coloured half shadows and reflections; a painter who smoothly unites his thick paint, but who does not – unlike Rubens in these years – bother about transparent glazes.29 In my opinion, these elements point in one direction: Jordaens. Archival documents that give us information on Jacob Jordaens’s life and activities before 1620 are scarce.30 Only a handful of his earliest paintings are signed, dated or documented.31 On the whole, assuming that Jordaens was active as an independent artist from 1612 onwards, his artistic output in the second decade seems surprisingly modest. In all likelihood, our understanding of the artist’s production in those years is obscured by his share in the production of pictures that are labelled as Rubens. However, the list of these works is growing. The Flight of Lot and his Daughters from Sodom in Tokyo was added to this category by d’Hulst with good reason.32 Equally convincing is Balis’s reattribution to Jordaens of the portraits of Archduke Albert of Austria and The Infanta Isabella in

d’Hulst 1982, p. 67, fig. 36; d’Hulst, De Poorter and Vandenven 1993. In this context, a similar double use of study material in the Rubens orbit can be mentioned. It should be remarked that the man on top of the ladder in the upper right of the Descent has the same facial features as the male nude appearing in a series of model studies in Darmstadt and Düsseldorf. Difficult to attribute, these drawings reflect positions of figures in paintings by Jordaens, Vinckenborch and Rubens. See Vlieghe 1987a and my article in Brussels 2012, pp. 55–59: ‘Jordaens of geen Jordaens? Over het gebruik van modelstudies in de zeventiende eeuw.’ 27 

28 

44

Or, as d’Hulst characterized Jordaens’s style: ‘de figuren zijn korter en daardoor minder sierlijk, een sterke golving verleent de omtreklijnen een dynamischer karakter, terwijl bovendien het koele en felle coloriet waarin heliotroop, lila, scherp geel en giftig groen een belangrijke rol spelen, alsmede de kordate toets …’ (d’Hulst 1982, p. 44). 30  He was baptized on 20 May 1593 in Our Lady’s Church in Antwerp. In 1607–08 he is known to have been a pupil of Adam van Noort (1562–1641). In 1615–16 he became master in the Guild of St Luke where he was registered as waterschilder (painter of watercolours on canvas or paper). On 15 May 1616 he married Catharina, the eldest daughter of his master. In 1620–21 a certain Charles du Val is registered as Jordaens’s pupil. 31  Among these, we should mention an Adoration of the Shepherds (1616, New York, Metropolitan Museum); a Crucifixion for St Paul’s Church in Antwerp, paid 150 guilders by Magdalena Lewieter in 1616–17; The Daughters of Cecrops Finding Erichthonius (1617, KMSKA); and finally an Adoration of the Shepherds (1618, Stockholm, Nationalmuseum). 32  d’Hulst 1967; d’Hulst and Vandenven 1989, no. 5 copy 2; Jaffé 1989, no. 266: 1614; Vlieghe 1993, p. 161; Nakamura 1994; Liedtke 1993; Balis 1994, p. 112. 29 

45


BULLETIN

Vienna.33 In the case of these paintings, the role of each artist is well defined and can be resumed conveniently as ‘Rubens invenit, Jordaens pinxit’. In other paintings, Jordaens seems to have participated in even closer symbiosis. According to an old inventory description, the Latin Church Fathers, formerly at Stoneyhurst College in Blackburn, Lancashire, was ‘made by Rubens and Jordaens’, although nobody attempted to separate hands in this shared activity.34 Michael Jaffé considered Rubens’s Christ in the House of Simon in St Petersburg to have been painted in a joint effort by Jordaens and Van Dyck.35 That author detected Jordaens’s hand in number of other Rubens paintings as well.36As another candidate, Balis suggested Christ’s Charge to Peter in the Wallace Collection, London.37 On looking at the rubber-like flesh tones and poisonous colours in Christ Giving the Keys to St Peter in the Berlin Gemäldegalerie, one also thinks more of Jordaens than of Rubens.38 I am convinced that among the growing list of Rubens pictures painted by Jordaens, the Descent from the Cross in Lille should feature prominently as a great artistic achievement, even if it did not quite eclipse its illustrious predecessor. This will be confirmed by any visitor to the Palais des Beaux-Arts.

Glück 1921; Oldenbourg 1921, p. 27; K. Schütz, in Vienna 1977, nos. 13–14; Vlieghe 1987b, nos. 68–69, figs. 20–21; Jaffé 1989, nos. 245–246; Balis 1994, pp. 112–13. 34  The inventory of Herman de Neyt of 15–22 October 1642 lists ‘Een groot stuck op doeck in lyste inhoudende de Vier Doctoren van de Heylige Kercke gemaect door Rubbens ende Jordaens’ (Duverger, V, p. 24). See Vlieghe 1972, no. 60, fig. 104; Ottawa 1968–69, no. 69; R.-A. d’Hulst, in d’Hulst, De Poorter and Vandenven 1993, no. A40. 35  St Petersburg, Hermitage, inv. 306; M. Jaffé, in Ottawa 1968–69, p. 41. The attribution of the figures on the right of this picture is based upon the fact that two Apostles sitting next to Christ were prepared in study heads by Van Dyck, now in the Gemäldegalerie, Berlin (inv. 933), and in the Staatsgalerie, Neuburg an der Donau (Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, inv. 1248); Barnes, De Poorter, Millar and Vey 2004, p. 91, no. I.95; Gritsay and Babina 2008, pp. 245–48. 36  These include St Peter Finding the Stater (Dublin), Tomyris and Cyrus (Boston), The Council of the Gods from the Medici Cycle (Paris) and Salome with the Head of St John the Baptist in Castle Howard (Yorkshire) (see Jaffé 1989, nos. 506, 508, 510, 737, 882). 37  Inv. P 93; also known as the Damant epitaph; Freedberg 1984, no. 17. In my view, the attribution of this painting to Jordaens by Balis 1994 (pp. 103–04, nn. 71 and 72) must remain tentative, certainly when it is compared to the Four Evangelists by Pieter Soutman in Stockholm (Nationalmuseum, inv. NM 343). That Rubensian picture is dated 1615 and its style is remarkably close to Jordaens’s idiom, though its palette seems more bright than gaudy. 38  Freedberg 1984, no. 23, pp. 91–94. 33 

46

BULLETIN

Bibliography Balis 1994 A. Balis, ‘“Fatto da un mio discepolo”: Rubens’s Studio Practices Reviewed’, in Nakamura 1994, pp. 97–128. Barnes, De Poorter, Millar and Vey 2004 S. J. Barnes, N. De Poorter, O. Millar and H. Vey, Van Dyck. A Complete Catalogue of the Paintings, New Haven and London 2004. Brussels 2012 J. Vander Auwera and I. Schaudies, Jordaens and the Antique (exh. cat. Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, 2012–13), Brussels 2012. Burchard and d’Hulst 1956 L. Burchard and R.-A. d’Hulst, Rubens Drawings, Antwerp 1956. d’Hulst 1967 R.-A. d’Hulst, ‘Drie vroege schilderijen van Jacob Jordaens’, Gentse bijdragen tot de kunstgeschiedenis en oudheidkunde 20 (1967), pp. 71–74. d’Hulst 1974 R.-A. d’Hulst, Jordaens Drawings (Nationaal Centrum voor de Plastische Kunsten van de XVIde en XVIIde Eeuw, Monographieën, 5), 4 vols., London and New York 1974. d’Hulst 1982 R.-A. d’Hulst, Jacob Jordaens, Antwerp 1982. d’Hulst and Vandenven 1989 R.-A. d’Hulst and M. Vandenven, The Old Testament (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, III), London and New York 1989. d’Hulst, De Poorter and Vandenven 1993 R.-A. d’Hulst, N. De Poorter and M. Vandenven, Jacob Jordaens (1593–1678) (exh. cat. KMSKA), 2 vols., Brussels 1993. Duverger 1991 E. Duverger, Antwerpse kunstinventarissen uit de zeventiende eeuw (Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten van België), vol. I.5, Brussels 1991.

47


BULLETIN

Vienna.33 In the case of these paintings, the role of each artist is well defined and can be resumed conveniently as ‘Rubens invenit, Jordaens pinxit’. In other paintings, Jordaens seems to have participated in even closer symbiosis. According to an old inventory description, the Latin Church Fathers, formerly at Stoneyhurst College in Blackburn, Lancashire, was ‘made by Rubens and Jordaens’, although nobody attempted to separate hands in this shared activity.34 Michael Jaffé considered Rubens’s Christ in the House of Simon in St Petersburg to have been painted in a joint effort by Jordaens and Van Dyck.35 That author detected Jordaens’s hand in number of other Rubens paintings as well.36As another candidate, Balis suggested Christ’s Charge to Peter in the Wallace Collection, London.37 On looking at the rubber-like flesh tones and poisonous colours in Christ Giving the Keys to St Peter in the Berlin Gemäldegalerie, one also thinks more of Jordaens than of Rubens.38 I am convinced that among the growing list of Rubens pictures painted by Jordaens, the Descent from the Cross in Lille should feature prominently as a great artistic achievement, even if it did not quite eclipse its illustrious predecessor. This will be confirmed by any visitor to the Palais des Beaux-Arts.

Glück 1921; Oldenbourg 1921, p. 27; K. Schütz, in Vienna 1977, nos. 13–14; Vlieghe 1987b, nos. 68–69, figs. 20–21; Jaffé 1989, nos. 245–246; Balis 1994, pp. 112–13. 34  The inventory of Herman de Neyt of 15–22 October 1642 lists ‘Een groot stuck op doeck in lyste inhoudende de Vier Doctoren van de Heylige Kercke gemaect door Rubbens ende Jordaens’ (Duverger, V, p. 24). See Vlieghe 1972, no. 60, fig. 104; Ottawa 1968–69, no. 69; R.-A. d’Hulst, in d’Hulst, De Poorter and Vandenven 1993, no. A40. 35  St Petersburg, Hermitage, inv. 306; M. Jaffé, in Ottawa 1968–69, p. 41. The attribution of the figures on the right of this picture is based upon the fact that two Apostles sitting next to Christ were prepared in study heads by Van Dyck, now in the Gemäldegalerie, Berlin (inv. 933), and in the Staatsgalerie, Neuburg an der Donau (Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, inv. 1248); Barnes, De Poorter, Millar and Vey 2004, p. 91, no. I.95; Gritsay and Babina 2008, pp. 245–48. 36  These include St Peter Finding the Stater (Dublin), Tomyris and Cyrus (Boston), The Council of the Gods from the Medici Cycle (Paris) and Salome with the Head of St John the Baptist in Castle Howard (Yorkshire) (see Jaffé 1989, nos. 506, 508, 510, 737, 882). 37  Inv. P 93; also known as the Damant epitaph; Freedberg 1984, no. 17. In my view, the attribution of this painting to Jordaens by Balis 1994 (pp. 103–04, nn. 71 and 72) must remain tentative, certainly when it is compared to the Four Evangelists by Pieter Soutman in Stockholm (Nationalmuseum, inv. NM 343). That Rubensian picture is dated 1615 and its style is remarkably close to Jordaens’s idiom, though its palette seems more bright than gaudy. 38  Freedberg 1984, no. 23, pp. 91–94. 33 

46

BULLETIN

Bibliography Balis 1994 A. Balis, ‘“Fatto da un mio discepolo”: Rubens’s Studio Practices Reviewed’, in Nakamura 1994, pp. 97–128. Barnes, De Poorter, Millar and Vey 2004 S. J. Barnes, N. De Poorter, O. Millar and H. Vey, Van Dyck. A Complete Catalogue of the Paintings, New Haven and London 2004. Brussels 2012 J. Vander Auwera and I. Schaudies, Jordaens and the Antique (exh. cat. Musées Royaux des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, Brussels, 2012–13), Brussels 2012. Burchard and d’Hulst 1956 L. Burchard and R.-A. d’Hulst, Rubens Drawings, Antwerp 1956. d’Hulst 1967 R.-A. d’Hulst, ‘Drie vroege schilderijen van Jacob Jordaens’, Gentse bijdragen tot de kunstgeschiedenis en oudheidkunde 20 (1967), pp. 71–74. d’Hulst 1974 R.-A. d’Hulst, Jordaens Drawings (Nationaal Centrum voor de Plastische Kunsten van de XVIde en XVIIde Eeuw, Monographieën, 5), 4 vols., London and New York 1974. d’Hulst 1982 R.-A. d’Hulst, Jacob Jordaens, Antwerp 1982. d’Hulst and Vandenven 1989 R.-A. d’Hulst and M. Vandenven, The Old Testament (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, III), London and New York 1989. d’Hulst, De Poorter and Vandenven 1993 R.-A. d’Hulst, N. De Poorter and M. Vandenven, Jacob Jordaens (1593–1678) (exh. cat. KMSKA), 2 vols., Brussels 1993. Duverger 1991 E. Duverger, Antwerpse kunstinventarissen uit de zeventiende eeuw (Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten van België), vol. I.5, Brussels 1991.

47


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Freedberg 1984 D. Freedberg, The Life of Christ after the Passion (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VII), London, Oxford and New York 1984.

Ottawa 1968–69 M. Jaffé, Jacob Jordaens 1593–1678 (exh. cat. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1968–69), Ottawa 1968.

Glück 1921 G. Glück, ‘Rubens’ Bildnisse des Erzhertogs Albert und der Infantin Isabella’, Bildende Künste 4 (1921), pp. 49–54.

Van Hout 2011 N. Van Hout, ‘On the invention and execution of the Coup de Lance’, Rubensbulletin (2011), web publication, appendix II, pp. 32–35.

Gritsay and Babina 2008 N. Gritsay and N. Babina, State Hermitage Museum Catalogue. Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Flemish Painting, New Haven and London 2008.

Varshavskaya and Yegorova 1989 M. Varshavskaya and X. Yegorova, Peter Paul Rubens, Paintings from Soviet Museums, Leningrad 1989.

Held 1959 J. S. Held, Rubens: Selected Drawings, 2 vols., London 1959.

Vienna 1977 Peter Paul Rubens 1577–1640 (exh. cat. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna), 1977.

Held 1980 J. S. Held, The Oil Sketches of Peter Paul Rubens, A Critical Catalogue, Princeton 1980.

Vlieghe 1972 H. Vlieghe, Saints (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VIII, 1), Brussels, London and New York 1972.

Held 1986 J. S. Held, Rubens: Selected Drawings, 2nd edn., New York 1986. Jaffé 1989 M. Jaffé, Rubens. Catalogo Completo, Milan 1989. Judson 2000 J. R. Judson, Rubens: The Passion of Christ (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VI), Turnhout 2000. Liedtke 1993 W. Liedtke, ‘Tokyo, “Lots” of Rubens’, The Burlington Magazine 135 (1993), pp. 718–19. McGrath 1997 E. McGrath, Subjects from History (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XIII, 2), London 1997.

Vlieghe 1987a H. Vlieghe, ‘Rubens’ beginnende invloed: Arnout Vinckenborch en het probleem van Jordaens’ vroegste tekeningen’, Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 38 (1987), pp. 383–96. Vlieghe 1987b H. Vlieghe, Rubens: Portraits of Identified Sitters Painted in Antwerp (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XIX, 2), London and New York 1987. Vlieghe 1993 H. Vlieghe, ‘Rubens’s Atelier and History Painting in Flanders. A Review of the Evidence’, in P. C. Sutton (ed.), The Age of Rubens (exh. cat. Boston and Toledo 1993–94), Boston and Antwerp 1993, pp. 158–70.

Nakamura 1994 T. Nakamura, ‘The Flight of Lot and his Family from Sodom: Rubens and his Studio’, in T. Nakamura (ed.), Rubens and his Workshop. The Flight of Lot and his Family from Sodom (exh. cat. The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo), 1994. Oldenbourg 1921 R. Oldenbourg, P. P. Rubens. Des Meisters Gemälde (Klassiker der Kunst), Stuttgart 1921.

48

49


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Freedberg 1984 D. Freedberg, The Life of Christ after the Passion (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VII), London, Oxford and New York 1984.

Ottawa 1968–69 M. Jaffé, Jacob Jordaens 1593–1678 (exh. cat. National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, 1968–69), Ottawa 1968.

Glück 1921 G. Glück, ‘Rubens’ Bildnisse des Erzhertogs Albert und der Infantin Isabella’, Bildende Künste 4 (1921), pp. 49–54.

Van Hout 2011 N. Van Hout, ‘On the invention and execution of the Coup de Lance’, Rubensbulletin (2011), web publication, appendix II, pp. 32–35.

Gritsay and Babina 2008 N. Gritsay and N. Babina, State Hermitage Museum Catalogue. Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century Flemish Painting, New Haven and London 2008.

Varshavskaya and Yegorova 1989 M. Varshavskaya and X. Yegorova, Peter Paul Rubens, Paintings from Soviet Museums, Leningrad 1989.

Held 1959 J. S. Held, Rubens: Selected Drawings, 2 vols., London 1959.

Vienna 1977 Peter Paul Rubens 1577–1640 (exh. cat. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna), 1977.

Held 1980 J. S. Held, The Oil Sketches of Peter Paul Rubens, A Critical Catalogue, Princeton 1980.

Vlieghe 1972 H. Vlieghe, Saints (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VIII, 1), Brussels, London and New York 1972.

Held 1986 J. S. Held, Rubens: Selected Drawings, 2nd edn., New York 1986. Jaffé 1989 M. Jaffé, Rubens. Catalogo Completo, Milan 1989. Judson 2000 J. R. Judson, Rubens: The Passion of Christ (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VI), Turnhout 2000. Liedtke 1993 W. Liedtke, ‘Tokyo, “Lots” of Rubens’, The Burlington Magazine 135 (1993), pp. 718–19. McGrath 1997 E. McGrath, Subjects from History (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XIII, 2), London 1997.

Vlieghe 1987a H. Vlieghe, ‘Rubens’ beginnende invloed: Arnout Vinckenborch en het probleem van Jordaens’ vroegste tekeningen’, Nederlands Kunsthistorisch Jaarboek 38 (1987), pp. 383–96. Vlieghe 1987b H. Vlieghe, Rubens: Portraits of Identified Sitters Painted in Antwerp (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, XIX, 2), London and New York 1987. Vlieghe 1993 H. Vlieghe, ‘Rubens’s Atelier and History Painting in Flanders. A Review of the Evidence’, in P. C. Sutton (ed.), The Age of Rubens (exh. cat. Boston and Toledo 1993–94), Boston and Antwerp 1993, pp. 158–70.

Nakamura 1994 T. Nakamura, ‘The Flight of Lot and his Family from Sodom: Rubens and his Studio’, in T. Nakamura (ed.), Rubens and his Workshop. The Flight of Lot and his Family from Sodom (exh. cat. The National Museum of Western Art, Tokyo), 1994. Oldenbourg 1921 R. Oldenbourg, P. P. Rubens. Des Meisters Gemälde (Klassiker der Kunst), Stuttgart 1921.

48

49


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Christus en de ongelovige Thomas. Iconologische opmerkingen bij enige afbeeldingen van na de Reformatie Alexander Mossel Op drie plaatsen in de Bijbel (Lucas 24 : 33–43; Johannes 20 : 20 en 20 : 24– 29) staat dat Christus, toen hij na zijn kruisdood terugkeerde, zijn wonden toonde aan de leerlingen om hen te overtuigen van zijn opstanding. Sinds de vroege middeleeuwen werd het onderwerp talloze malen afgebeeld, waarbij bijna altijd de tekst uit Johannes 20 : 24–29 werd gebruikt, die be­trekking heeft op de apostel Thomas. Thomas, die er niet bij was toen de verrezen Christus aan de leerlingen verscheen, uit zijn twijfels en wil bewijzen. Op afbeeldingen is hij te herkennen als de leerling die met zijn hand de zijdewond van Christus aanraakt of op het punt staat dat te doen, terwijl de overige leerlingen toekijken. De kerkvaders hechtten zoveel waarde aan het voorbeeld van de twijfelaar die door Christus zelf tot het geloof werd gebracht dat deze tekst hun voorkeur genoot. Daarbij toonden ze begrip voor het aanvankelijke ongeloof van Thomas. Luther en Calvijn dachten daar anders over. Dat Thomas geen waarde had gehecht aan wat de leerlingen zeiden, was tot daar aan toe, maar dat hij voorbij was gegaan aan teksten uit de Schrift die de opstanding verkondigden, was in hun ogen onvergeeflijk. Hun opvattingen zijn van invloed geweest op de wijze waarop de verschijning van Christus aan de leerlingen in de zestiende en zeventiende eeuw werd verbeeld. De Bijbelteksten1 Lucas beschrijft de komst van Christus bij de verzamelde leerlingen als volgt: ‘Nadat de twee Emmaüsgangers terug waren gegaan naar Jeruzalem,

In dit artikel is gebruikgemaakt van de Nieuwe Bijbelvertaling van het Nederlands Bijbelgenootschap (Heerenveen 2004). 1 

Afb. 1 Peter Paul Rubens, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen (Rockoxtriptiek), 1613–15, KMSKA. Detail van het middenpaneel

51


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Christus en de ongelovige Thomas. Iconologische opmerkingen bij enige afbeeldingen van na de Reformatie Alexander Mossel Op drie plaatsen in de Bijbel (Lucas 24 : 33–43; Johannes 20 : 20 en 20 : 24– 29) staat dat Christus, toen hij na zijn kruisdood terugkeerde, zijn wonden toonde aan de leerlingen om hen te overtuigen van zijn opstanding. Sinds de vroege middeleeuwen werd het onderwerp talloze malen afgebeeld, waarbij bijna altijd de tekst uit Johannes 20 : 24–29 werd gebruikt, die be­trekking heeft op de apostel Thomas. Thomas, die er niet bij was toen de verrezen Christus aan de leerlingen verscheen, uit zijn twijfels en wil bewijzen. Op afbeeldingen is hij te herkennen als de leerling die met zijn hand de zijdewond van Christus aanraakt of op het punt staat dat te doen, terwijl de overige leerlingen toekijken. De kerkvaders hechtten zoveel waarde aan het voorbeeld van de twijfelaar die door Christus zelf tot het geloof werd gebracht dat deze tekst hun voorkeur genoot. Daarbij toonden ze begrip voor het aanvankelijke ongeloof van Thomas. Luther en Calvijn dachten daar anders over. Dat Thomas geen waarde had gehecht aan wat de leerlingen zeiden, was tot daar aan toe, maar dat hij voorbij was gegaan aan teksten uit de Schrift die de opstanding verkondigden, was in hun ogen onvergeeflijk. Hun opvattingen zijn van invloed geweest op de wijze waarop de verschijning van Christus aan de leerlingen in de zestiende en zeventiende eeuw werd verbeeld. De Bijbelteksten1 Lucas beschrijft de komst van Christus bij de verzamelde leerlingen als volgt: ‘Nadat de twee Emmaüsgangers terug waren gegaan naar Jeruzalem,

In dit artikel is gebruikgemaakt van de Nieuwe Bijbelvertaling van het Nederlands Bijbelgenootschap (Heerenveen 2004). 1 

Afb. 1 Peter Paul Rubens, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen (Rockoxtriptiek), 1613–15, KMSKA. Detail van het middenpaneel

51


BULLETIN

waar ze de elf en de anderen aantroffen, kwam Jezus zelf in hun midden staan en zei: “Vrede zij met jullie.” Verbijsterd en door angst overmand meen­den zij een geestverschijning te zien. Maar hij zei tegen hen: “Waarom zijn jullie zo ontzet en waarom zijn jullie ten prooi aan twijfel? Kijk naar mijn handen en voeten, ik ben het zelf! Raak me aan en kijk goed, want een geest heeft geen vlees en beenderen zoals jullie zien dat ik heb.” Daarna toonde hij hun zijn handen en zijn voeten. Omdat ze het van vreugde nog niet konden geloven en stomverbaasd waren, vroeg hij hun: “Hebben jullie hier iets te eten?” Ze gaven hem een stuk geroosterde vis. Hij nam het aan en at het voor hun ogen op’ (24 : 33–43). Volgens Johannes verscheen Jezus tweemaal aan de leerlingen toen ze in vergadering bijeenwaren. De eerste keer, nadat Jezus hun zijn handen en zijde getoond had, was er geen sprake van twijfel of ongeloof; integendeel, zij waren blij omdat ze de Heer zagen, waarna ze de Heilige Geest ontvingen (20 : 19–21). De tweede verschijning beschrijft Johannes als volgt: ‘Een van de twaalf, Thomas (dat betekent tweeling), was er niet bij toen Jezus kwam. Toen de andere leerlingen hem vertelden: “Wij heb­ ben de Heer gezien!” zei hij: “Alleen als ik de wonden van de spijkers in zijn handen zie en met mijn vingers kan voelen, en als ik mijn hand in zijn zij kan leggen, zal ik het geloven.” Een week later waren de leerlingen weer bij elkaar en Thomas was er nu ook bij. Terwijl de deuren gesloten waren, kwam Jezus in hun midden staan. “Ik wens jullie vrede!” zei hij, en daarna richtte hij zich tot Thomas: “Leg je vingers hier en kijk naar mijn handen, en leg je hand in mijn zij. Wees niet langer ongelovig maar geloof.” Thomas antwoordde: “Mijn Heer, mijn God!” Jezus zei tegen hem: “Omdat je me gezien hebt, geloof je. Gelukkig zijn zij die niet zien en toch geloven” (20 : 24–29). Lucas spreekt over het ongeloof van de leerlingen, Johannes over het ongeloof van Thomas. Volgens Johannes toont Christus tijdens de eerste verschijning wel zijn wonden, maar in tegenstelling tot wat in Lucas staat, roept hij de leerlingen niet op om hem aan te raken. Dat is ook niet nodig want ze geloven en twijfelen niet.2

BULLETIN

Opvattingen over Thomas In zijn proefschrift beschrijft Ulrich Pflugk uitvoerig de ontwikkeling van de kerkelijke uitleg van de tekst in Johannes 20 : 24–29.3 Daaruit blijkt dat de Kerk veel begrip heeft getoond voor het initiële ongeloof van Thomas, die immers beter had moeten weten. Niet alleen hadden de andere leerlingen de verrezen Christus gezien en hem daarover verteld maar ook was de opstanding zowel door Christus zelf als door de Schrift aangekondigd. Niettemin werd Thomas net als de andere apostelen heilig verklaard. Middeleeuwse afbeeldingen van de ongelovige Thomas zijn gebaseerd op de exegese van de kerkvaders, die, ofschoon dat niet letterlijk in de Bijbel vermeld wordt, ervan uitgingen dat Thomas de zijdewond van Christus had aangeraakt. Nadat hij de woorden ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God!’ had gesproken, was hij genezen van zijn ongeloof. De gedachte dat Christus terug was gekomen in het lichaam dat hij voor zijn dood had gehad, was daarbij cruciaal. Volgens Ambrosius (339–397) twijfelde Thomas niet aan de opstanding zelf maar aan de hoedanigheid ervan. Hij kon zich niet voorstellen dat zoiets sterfelijks als een lichaam onsterfelijk kon zijn en bovendien door een gesloten deur naar binnen was gekomen.4 Ambrosius wees op de symbolische betekenis van de deur: Christus zelf is de deur waar men moet aankloppen om tot het geloof te komen. Geloven in Christus betekent door die deur naar binnen gaan, en dat is precies wat Thomas doet door de zijdewond aan te raken. Ook Augustinus (354–430) meende dat het aanraken van het lichaam van Christus neerkwam op geloven in God en stelde dat Christus de deur is waardoor wij tot de Vader komen, zonder wie wij het koninkrijk der hemelen niet zullen betreden.5 Augustinus heeft de geschiedenis van Thomas ook in verband ge­ bracht met de Noli me tangere-scène in Johannes 20 : 11–17 en daarbij de paradox verklaard waarom Thomas Christus wél mocht aanraken en Maria Magdalena niet. Volgens Johannes zei de verrezen Christus tegen Maria Magdalena dat ze hem niet mocht aanraken. Augustinus stelt dat

Pflugk 1966. Ibid., pp. 99–100. 5  Stokstad 1988, p. 317. 3 

4  2 

52

Schunk-Heller 1995, p. 92.

53


BULLETIN

waar ze de elf en de anderen aantroffen, kwam Jezus zelf in hun midden staan en zei: “Vrede zij met jullie.” Verbijsterd en door angst overmand meen­den zij een geestverschijning te zien. Maar hij zei tegen hen: “Waarom zijn jullie zo ontzet en waarom zijn jullie ten prooi aan twijfel? Kijk naar mijn handen en voeten, ik ben het zelf! Raak me aan en kijk goed, want een geest heeft geen vlees en beenderen zoals jullie zien dat ik heb.” Daarna toonde hij hun zijn handen en zijn voeten. Omdat ze het van vreugde nog niet konden geloven en stomverbaasd waren, vroeg hij hun: “Hebben jullie hier iets te eten?” Ze gaven hem een stuk geroosterde vis. Hij nam het aan en at het voor hun ogen op’ (24 : 33–43). Volgens Johannes verscheen Jezus tweemaal aan de leerlingen toen ze in vergadering bijeenwaren. De eerste keer, nadat Jezus hun zijn handen en zijde getoond had, was er geen sprake van twijfel of ongeloof; integendeel, zij waren blij omdat ze de Heer zagen, waarna ze de Heilige Geest ontvingen (20 : 19–21). De tweede verschijning beschrijft Johannes als volgt: ‘Een van de twaalf, Thomas (dat betekent tweeling), was er niet bij toen Jezus kwam. Toen de andere leerlingen hem vertelden: “Wij heb­ ben de Heer gezien!” zei hij: “Alleen als ik de wonden van de spijkers in zijn handen zie en met mijn vingers kan voelen, en als ik mijn hand in zijn zij kan leggen, zal ik het geloven.” Een week later waren de leerlingen weer bij elkaar en Thomas was er nu ook bij. Terwijl de deuren gesloten waren, kwam Jezus in hun midden staan. “Ik wens jullie vrede!” zei hij, en daarna richtte hij zich tot Thomas: “Leg je vingers hier en kijk naar mijn handen, en leg je hand in mijn zij. Wees niet langer ongelovig maar geloof.” Thomas antwoordde: “Mijn Heer, mijn God!” Jezus zei tegen hem: “Omdat je me gezien hebt, geloof je. Gelukkig zijn zij die niet zien en toch geloven” (20 : 24–29). Lucas spreekt over het ongeloof van de leerlingen, Johannes over het ongeloof van Thomas. Volgens Johannes toont Christus tijdens de eerste verschijning wel zijn wonden, maar in tegenstelling tot wat in Lucas staat, roept hij de leerlingen niet op om hem aan te raken. Dat is ook niet nodig want ze geloven en twijfelen niet.2

BULLETIN

Opvattingen over Thomas In zijn proefschrift beschrijft Ulrich Pflugk uitvoerig de ontwikkeling van de kerkelijke uitleg van de tekst in Johannes 20 : 24–29.3 Daaruit blijkt dat de Kerk veel begrip heeft getoond voor het initiële ongeloof van Thomas, die immers beter had moeten weten. Niet alleen hadden de andere leerlingen de verrezen Christus gezien en hem daarover verteld maar ook was de opstanding zowel door Christus zelf als door de Schrift aangekondigd. Niettemin werd Thomas net als de andere apostelen heilig verklaard. Middeleeuwse afbeeldingen van de ongelovige Thomas zijn gebaseerd op de exegese van de kerkvaders, die, ofschoon dat niet letterlijk in de Bijbel vermeld wordt, ervan uitgingen dat Thomas de zijdewond van Christus had aangeraakt. Nadat hij de woorden ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God!’ had gesproken, was hij genezen van zijn ongeloof. De gedachte dat Christus terug was gekomen in het lichaam dat hij voor zijn dood had gehad, was daarbij cruciaal. Volgens Ambrosius (339–397) twijfelde Thomas niet aan de opstanding zelf maar aan de hoedanigheid ervan. Hij kon zich niet voorstellen dat zoiets sterfelijks als een lichaam onsterfelijk kon zijn en bovendien door een gesloten deur naar binnen was gekomen.4 Ambrosius wees op de symbolische betekenis van de deur: Christus zelf is de deur waar men moet aankloppen om tot het geloof te komen. Geloven in Christus betekent door die deur naar binnen gaan, en dat is precies wat Thomas doet door de zijdewond aan te raken. Ook Augustinus (354–430) meende dat het aanraken van het lichaam van Christus neerkwam op geloven in God en stelde dat Christus de deur is waardoor wij tot de Vader komen, zonder wie wij het koninkrijk der hemelen niet zullen betreden.5 Augustinus heeft de geschiedenis van Thomas ook in verband ge­ bracht met de Noli me tangere-scène in Johannes 20 : 11–17 en daarbij de paradox verklaard waarom Thomas Christus wél mocht aanraken en Maria Magdalena niet. Volgens Johannes zei de verrezen Christus tegen Maria Magdalena dat ze hem niet mocht aanraken. Augustinus stelt dat

Pflugk 1966. Ibid., pp. 99–100. 5  Stokstad 1988, p. 317. 3 

4  2 

52

Schunk-Heller 1995, p. 92.

53


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

zij dat als gelovige ook niet nodig had: haar in deum crede (geloof in God) betekent voor hem hetzelfde als ‘deum tange ’ (raak God aan), maar bij Thomas is het net omgekeerd: zijn ‘deum tange’ is een ‘in deum crede’.6 De dertiende-eeuwse Legenda Aurea bevestigt het beeld van Thomas als ongelovige apostel. Volgens Jacobus de Voragine legden de leerlingen Maria toen zij gestorven was in het graf om vervolgens getuige te zijn van haar tenhemelopneming. Ook ditmaal was Thomas afwezig en geloofde hij niets van het verhaal dat de anderen hem vertelden. Pas toen vanuit de hemel Maria’s gordel plotseling in zijn handen viel, realiseerde hij zich dat zij daar met lichaam en ziel was opgenomen.7 De theologen van de Reformatie verwierpen iedere exegese van het Thomasverhaal die niet gebaseerd was op de letterlijke tekst in het Johannesevangelie. Luther (1483–1546) noemde alles wat de Kerk verder over deze apostel zegt ‘erstunken und erlogen’. Hij stelde vast dat Christus na zijn verschijningen op de eerste dag, acht dagen wachtte alvorens terug te komen opdat zijn leerlingen het idee van zijn opstanding goed tot zich konden laten doordringen. Aan het eind van die acht dagen waren allen overtuigd, op Thomas na. Thomas wist van de aankondigingen van het lijden en opstaan van Christus, maar liet zich niet door de vrouwen of de apostelen overtuigen. Daarmee was hij net zo zondig en ongelovig als Petrus toen die Christus verloochende. Volgens Luther ging Christus met zijn oproep aan Thomas om hem aan te raken, zachtmoedig met hem om hoewel hij hem vanwege zijn ongeloof had kunnen verstoten. Christus’ lankmoedigheid kwam voort uit begrip voor het verdriet van Thomas. Dat verdriet was zo groot dat het zijn geloof in de opstanding in de weg stond. Maar, aldus Luther, ‘zalig zijn zij die het niet gezien hebben en alleen het Woord geloven’. Uit de geschiedenis van deze ongelovigheid, die volgens Luther de apostelen bepaald niet tot eer strekt, kunnen wij leren hoe barmhartig God is en hoe gering het onderscheid tussen de apostelen en de gewone stervelingen die troost kunnen putten uit hun voorbeeld’.8

Volgens Calvijn (1509–1564) diende het verhaal van de ongelovige Thomas om de vrome mens in zijn geloof te sterken: Thomas was niet alleen langzaam en moeilijk met geloven, maar hij was ook weerspannig. Die weerspannigheid is voor ons een waarschuwend voorbeeld omdat het een eigenschap is die bijna iedereen is aangeboren. De vriendelijke uitnodiging van Christus aan Thomas om hem aan te raken, laat zien dat Christus zeer bezorgd was voor Thomas. Ofschoon de houding van Thomas aanmatigend en zelfs beledigend was voor Christus, liet deze niets onbeproefd om hem weer tot het geloof te brengen. Thomas kwam echter pas op grond van eigen waarneming tot bezinning. Calvijn stelde zich daarbij de vraag of een overtuiging die op grond van zien en betasten tot stand gekomen was, wel als geloof kon worden aangemerkt. Op grond van Thomas’ uitspraak ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God!’ kwam hij echter tot de conclusie dat in het geval van Thomas inderdaad van geloof moest worden gesproken. Maar, zo voegde hij eraan toe: ‘het ware geloof komt alleen voort uit het woord Gods en niet uit waarneming’.9 Johannes Molanus verwoordde het standpunt van de katholieke kerk over Thomas na afloop van het Concilie van Trente. In zijn verhande­ ling uit 1570 over de afbeeldingen van heiligen schreef hij: ‘dat schilders met hun ondeugdelijk oordeel de heilige Thomas erbarmelijk laag inschatten onder voorwendsel dat hij getwijfeld heeft aan de opstanding van Christus. Het is om die reden dat sommigen, wanneer zij het ongeloof van iemand willen benadrukken, de gewoonte hebben hem op een te veroordelen en oneerbiedige manier te zeggen: “Jij behoort tot het Thomasgebroed.” Toch is de apostelen, die om zo te zeggen de vaders, de pijlers en de fundamenten van de wereld zijn, alle eer verschuldigd en wanneer wij lezen dat de belangrijkste apostelen falen, moeten wij bedenken dat de Heer dat heeft toegestaan ter lering van ons zelf. Zoals Gregorius al zei: “Het gebrek aan geloof van Thomas is nuttiger voor ons geloof geweest dan het geloof van de discipelen die geloofd hebben”.’10 Het feit dat Molanus het nodig vond de ongelovige apostel zo na­ drukkelijk in bescherming te nemen tegen de ‘schilders met hun ondeug­

Pflugk 1966, p. 115. De Voragine 1995, p. 317. 8  Pflugk 1966, pp. 182–192. 6  7 

54

9 

Ibid., pp. 205–206. Molanus 1996, p. 473.

10 

55


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

zij dat als gelovige ook niet nodig had: haar in deum crede (geloof in God) betekent voor hem hetzelfde als ‘deum tange ’ (raak God aan), maar bij Thomas is het net omgekeerd: zijn ‘deum tange’ is een ‘in deum crede’.6 De dertiende-eeuwse Legenda Aurea bevestigt het beeld van Thomas als ongelovige apostel. Volgens Jacobus de Voragine legden de leerlingen Maria toen zij gestorven was in het graf om vervolgens getuige te zijn van haar tenhemelopneming. Ook ditmaal was Thomas afwezig en geloofde hij niets van het verhaal dat de anderen hem vertelden. Pas toen vanuit de hemel Maria’s gordel plotseling in zijn handen viel, realiseerde hij zich dat zij daar met lichaam en ziel was opgenomen.7 De theologen van de Reformatie verwierpen iedere exegese van het Thomasverhaal die niet gebaseerd was op de letterlijke tekst in het Johannesevangelie. Luther (1483–1546) noemde alles wat de Kerk verder over deze apostel zegt ‘erstunken und erlogen’. Hij stelde vast dat Christus na zijn verschijningen op de eerste dag, acht dagen wachtte alvorens terug te komen opdat zijn leerlingen het idee van zijn opstanding goed tot zich konden laten doordringen. Aan het eind van die acht dagen waren allen overtuigd, op Thomas na. Thomas wist van de aankondigingen van het lijden en opstaan van Christus, maar liet zich niet door de vrouwen of de apostelen overtuigen. Daarmee was hij net zo zondig en ongelovig als Petrus toen die Christus verloochende. Volgens Luther ging Christus met zijn oproep aan Thomas om hem aan te raken, zachtmoedig met hem om hoewel hij hem vanwege zijn ongeloof had kunnen verstoten. Christus’ lankmoedigheid kwam voort uit begrip voor het verdriet van Thomas. Dat verdriet was zo groot dat het zijn geloof in de opstanding in de weg stond. Maar, aldus Luther, ‘zalig zijn zij die het niet gezien hebben en alleen het Woord geloven’. Uit de geschiedenis van deze ongelovigheid, die volgens Luther de apostelen bepaald niet tot eer strekt, kunnen wij leren hoe barmhartig God is en hoe gering het onderscheid tussen de apostelen en de gewone stervelingen die troost kunnen putten uit hun voorbeeld’.8

Volgens Calvijn (1509–1564) diende het verhaal van de ongelovige Thomas om de vrome mens in zijn geloof te sterken: Thomas was niet alleen langzaam en moeilijk met geloven, maar hij was ook weerspannig. Die weerspannigheid is voor ons een waarschuwend voorbeeld omdat het een eigenschap is die bijna iedereen is aangeboren. De vriendelijke uitnodiging van Christus aan Thomas om hem aan te raken, laat zien dat Christus zeer bezorgd was voor Thomas. Ofschoon de houding van Thomas aanmatigend en zelfs beledigend was voor Christus, liet deze niets onbeproefd om hem weer tot het geloof te brengen. Thomas kwam echter pas op grond van eigen waarneming tot bezinning. Calvijn stelde zich daarbij de vraag of een overtuiging die op grond van zien en betasten tot stand gekomen was, wel als geloof kon worden aangemerkt. Op grond van Thomas’ uitspraak ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God!’ kwam hij echter tot de conclusie dat in het geval van Thomas inderdaad van geloof moest worden gesproken. Maar, zo voegde hij eraan toe: ‘het ware geloof komt alleen voort uit het woord Gods en niet uit waarneming’.9 Johannes Molanus verwoordde het standpunt van de katholieke kerk over Thomas na afloop van het Concilie van Trente. In zijn verhande­ ling uit 1570 over de afbeeldingen van heiligen schreef hij: ‘dat schilders met hun ondeugdelijk oordeel de heilige Thomas erbarmelijk laag inschatten onder voorwendsel dat hij getwijfeld heeft aan de opstanding van Christus. Het is om die reden dat sommigen, wanneer zij het ongeloof van iemand willen benadrukken, de gewoonte hebben hem op een te veroordelen en oneerbiedige manier te zeggen: “Jij behoort tot het Thomasgebroed.” Toch is de apostelen, die om zo te zeggen de vaders, de pijlers en de fundamenten van de wereld zijn, alle eer verschuldigd en wanneer wij lezen dat de belangrijkste apostelen falen, moeten wij bedenken dat de Heer dat heeft toegestaan ter lering van ons zelf. Zoals Gregorius al zei: “Het gebrek aan geloof van Thomas is nuttiger voor ons geloof geweest dan het geloof van de discipelen die geloofd hebben”.’10 Het feit dat Molanus het nodig vond de ongelovige apostel zo na­ drukkelijk in bescherming te nemen tegen de ‘schilders met hun ondeug­

Pflugk 1966, p. 115. De Voragine 1995, p. 317. 8  Pflugk 1966, pp. 182–192. 6  7 

54

9 

Ibid., pp. 205–206. Molanus 1996, p. 473.

10 

55


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

delijk oordeel’ geeft aan dat Thomas in diskrediet was geraakt. Thomas twijfelde aan het Woord en wilde alleen door eigen waarneming overtuigd worden, een houding die door Luther en Calvijn sterk werd veroordeeld. Vanaf het midden van de zestiende eeuw werd die ratio­na­listische manier van denken gebruikt bij de bestudering van de na­tuur. De resultaten daarvan leidden in een aantal gevallen tot grote ver­ontwaardiging bij de kerkelijke autoriteiten. De heliocentrische opvattingen van Coper­nicus bijvoorbeeld, die het resultaat waren van eigen waarnemingen, wer­den door hen rechtstreeks in strijd met de Bijbel geacht. In de zeventiende eeuw gaven die opvattingen met zowel protestantse als katholieke theo­ logen aanleiding tot hoogoplopende conflicten, die niet tot de uni­versitaire wereld beperkt bleven. Het lijkt aannemelijk dat mede daardoor ook de rooms-katholieke kerk kritischer werd jegens Thomas. De Ant­werpse jezuïet Franciscus Coster had in elk geval geen goed woord voor hem over in zijn sermoen voor de kerkelijke feestdag van de heilige op 21 december. In de bundel Catholieke Sermoenen op alle de Heilichdaghen die in’t Gheheel jaer komen (Antwerpen 1616) staat over Thomas onder meer het volgende: ‘Niettemin toonde hij in zijn ongelovigheid grote ob­sti­naat­heid met geen mindere bottigheid …, zo is hij ook van grouwen verstande die te curieuselijk zelf wil onderzoeken en niemand gelooft.’ En, houdt Coster zijn gehoor voor, ‘vraagt niet in Gods werken hoe dit ofte dat ge­schie­den kan: gelijk Thomas bij zich zelve disputeerde van Christi ver­rijzenis, maar prijst dat God almachtig is, die meer kan doen dan wij begrijpen.’ Een tweede sermoen, afkomstig uit de Kerkelycke Basuyne vervattende vier en zestig Sermone ofte predicatien wt de Sentbrieven des H. Apostels Paulij ende twintig Sermonen door Iohannem Strachinum (Amsterdam 1617), is al evenmin vleiend voor Thomas. De auteur verwijt hem afwezig te zijn geweest toen Christus voor de eerste maal verscheen aan zijn leerlingen.11 In plaats van de leerlingen te geloven op hun woord komt Thomas met zijn eis tot lichamelijke aanraking van Christus: ‘Voor­waer een schadelijcke onghelovigheydt ende oock overgroote zonde de welcke in desen Thoma wort bevonden want hy gheensins voor gheloof­weerdich begeert aen te

neme tgene God de Vader so ooc de Sone Gods de Propheten en Engelen des Heeren hadden voorseyt.’ De preek eindigt met: ‘T is wel waar dat d’Apostelen door d’aanschouwen Christi ende door hem te hooren niet alleen grote troost ontvingen maar ook versterkt werden in het geloof ende ontsteken in zijne liefde: nochtans is onze meerdere verdienste die alleen uit hooren geloven want het gelove komt uit het gehoor (Rom : 10).’ Afbeeldingen Maarten de Vos Het Thomasdrieluik,12 een altaarstuk van Maarten de Vos (afb. 2) uit 1574, werd gemaakt in opdracht van het Antwerpse bontwerkersgilde. Thomas was de schutspatroon van de bontwerkers, die tijdens de Beeldenstorm (1566) hun altaar verloren hadden. Het middenpaneel laat Christus zien met Maria, Maria Magdalena en de overige leerlingen, terwijl Thomas voor hem neerknielt en met zijn vingers Zijn zijdewond aanraakt. Een zittende leerling, prominenter afgebeeld dan Thomas, wijst hem op een tekst uit de Lutherbijbel (De Vos was lutheraan in die tijd):13 ‘Nu sal ick opstaen seÿet die heere nu sal ick verheeve woerden nu sal ick opgevoert woerden (Jes. 33 : 10).’ Het onderwerp van het schilderij is niet Thomas die door Christus van zijn ongeloof wordt genezen maar het Woord dat de weg wijst naar het ware geloof. Rubens, Van Dyck, Vinckenborch Rubens schilderde het paneel dat bekendstaat als ‘Het ongeloof van Tho­ mas’ (afb. 1, 3) omstreeks 1613–15 in opdracht van zijn vriend Nicolaas Rockox, burgemeester van Antwerpen.14 Het is het middenpaneel van een

Paneel, 207 × 185 cm (middenpaneel), KMSKA, inv. 77–81. Na de val van Antwerpen in 1585 bekeerde De Vos zich tot het katholieke geloof maar in 1574 was hij nog lutheraan. Zweite 1980, pp. 26 en 285. 14  Paneel, 143 × 123 cm (middenpaneel), KMSKA, inv. 307–311. 12 

13 

  ‘Want by aldien dat den Apostel Thomas by de Gemeente hadde gebleven voorwaer hy en zoude tot zodanige ellendighe onghelovigheydt niet zijn vervallen geweest.’ 11

56

57


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

delijk oordeel’ geeft aan dat Thomas in diskrediet was geraakt. Thomas twijfelde aan het Woord en wilde alleen door eigen waarneming overtuigd worden, een houding die door Luther en Calvijn sterk werd veroordeeld. Vanaf het midden van de zestiende eeuw werd die ratio­na­listische manier van denken gebruikt bij de bestudering van de na­tuur. De resultaten daarvan leidden in een aantal gevallen tot grote ver­ontwaardiging bij de kerkelijke autoriteiten. De heliocentrische opvattingen van Coper­nicus bijvoorbeeld, die het resultaat waren van eigen waarnemingen, wer­den door hen rechtstreeks in strijd met de Bijbel geacht. In de zeventiende eeuw gaven die opvattingen met zowel protestantse als katholieke theo­ logen aanleiding tot hoogoplopende conflicten, die niet tot de uni­versitaire wereld beperkt bleven. Het lijkt aannemelijk dat mede daardoor ook de rooms-katholieke kerk kritischer werd jegens Thomas. De Ant­werpse jezuïet Franciscus Coster had in elk geval geen goed woord voor hem over in zijn sermoen voor de kerkelijke feestdag van de heilige op 21 december. In de bundel Catholieke Sermoenen op alle de Heilichdaghen die in’t Gheheel jaer komen (Antwerpen 1616) staat over Thomas onder meer het volgende: ‘Niettemin toonde hij in zijn ongelovigheid grote ob­sti­naat­heid met geen mindere bottigheid …, zo is hij ook van grouwen verstande die te curieuselijk zelf wil onderzoeken en niemand gelooft.’ En, houdt Coster zijn gehoor voor, ‘vraagt niet in Gods werken hoe dit ofte dat ge­schie­den kan: gelijk Thomas bij zich zelve disputeerde van Christi ver­rijzenis, maar prijst dat God almachtig is, die meer kan doen dan wij begrijpen.’ Een tweede sermoen, afkomstig uit de Kerkelycke Basuyne vervattende vier en zestig Sermone ofte predicatien wt de Sentbrieven des H. Apostels Paulij ende twintig Sermonen door Iohannem Strachinum (Amsterdam 1617), is al evenmin vleiend voor Thomas. De auteur verwijt hem afwezig te zijn geweest toen Christus voor de eerste maal verscheen aan zijn leerlingen.11 In plaats van de leerlingen te geloven op hun woord komt Thomas met zijn eis tot lichamelijke aanraking van Christus: ‘Voor­waer een schadelijcke onghelovigheydt ende oock overgroote zonde de welcke in desen Thoma wort bevonden want hy gheensins voor gheloof­weerdich begeert aen te

neme tgene God de Vader so ooc de Sone Gods de Propheten en Engelen des Heeren hadden voorseyt.’ De preek eindigt met: ‘T is wel waar dat d’Apostelen door d’aanschouwen Christi ende door hem te hooren niet alleen grote troost ontvingen maar ook versterkt werden in het geloof ende ontsteken in zijne liefde: nochtans is onze meerdere verdienste die alleen uit hooren geloven want het gelove komt uit het gehoor (Rom : 10).’ Afbeeldingen Maarten de Vos Het Thomasdrieluik,12 een altaarstuk van Maarten de Vos (afb. 2) uit 1574, werd gemaakt in opdracht van het Antwerpse bontwerkersgilde. Thomas was de schutspatroon van de bontwerkers, die tijdens de Beeldenstorm (1566) hun altaar verloren hadden. Het middenpaneel laat Christus zien met Maria, Maria Magdalena en de overige leerlingen, terwijl Thomas voor hem neerknielt en met zijn vingers Zijn zijdewond aanraakt. Een zittende leerling, prominenter afgebeeld dan Thomas, wijst hem op een tekst uit de Lutherbijbel (De Vos was lutheraan in die tijd):13 ‘Nu sal ick opstaen seÿet die heere nu sal ick verheeve woerden nu sal ick opgevoert woerden (Jes. 33 : 10).’ Het onderwerp van het schilderij is niet Thomas die door Christus van zijn ongeloof wordt genezen maar het Woord dat de weg wijst naar het ware geloof. Rubens, Van Dyck, Vinckenborch Rubens schilderde het paneel dat bekendstaat als ‘Het ongeloof van Tho­ mas’ (afb. 1, 3) omstreeks 1613–15 in opdracht van zijn vriend Nicolaas Rockox, burgemeester van Antwerpen.14 Het is het middenpaneel van een

Paneel, 207 × 185 cm (middenpaneel), KMSKA, inv. 77–81. Na de val van Antwerpen in 1585 bekeerde De Vos zich tot het katholieke geloof maar in 1574 was hij nog lutheraan. Zweite 1980, pp. 26 en 285. 14  Paneel, 143 × 123 cm (middenpaneel), KMSKA, inv. 307–311. 12 

13 

  ‘Want by aldien dat den Apostel Thomas by de Gemeente hadde gebleven voorwaer hy en zoude tot zodanige ellendighe onghelovigheydt niet zijn vervallen geweest.’ 11

56

57


BULLETIN

Afb. 2 Maarten de Vos, Christus en de ongelovige Thomas, 1574, middenpaneel van de Triptiek van de bontwerkers, KMSKA

BULLETIN

drieluik met op de luiken de afbeeldingen van Rockox zelf en zijn vrouw Adriana Perez, dat te zijner tijd als epitaaf moest dienen bij het graf van het echtpaar. Op het schilderij staat Christus afgebeeld met drie apostelen van wie er twee de wond van zijn linkerhand bekijken. Geen van hen steekt zijn hand in de zijdewond van Christus, die niet of nauwelijks zicht­baar is, of raakt hem aan. Het onderwerp van het Antwerpse paneel heeft aanleiding gegeven tot een uitvoerige discussie over de passage uit het evangelie waarop het schilderij betrekking heeft, waarom er geen zijdewond te zien is en wie de afgebeelde apostelen zijn. Zowel Ingrid Haug als Justus Müller Hofstede vinden dat het schilderij de verschijning van Christus voor de elf leerlingen voorstelt en ten onrechte als De ongelovige Thomas wordt aangeduid. Rubens zou niet aan de tekst uit Johannes 20 : 24–29 refereren maar aan Lucas 24 : 36–43: ‘Kijk naar mijn handen en voeten, ik ben het zelf.’15 Kramer en Schily zijn het daarmee eens.16 Adolf Monballieu is van mening dat het werk niet moet worden beschouwd als de weergave van een episode uit het evangelie, maar als een leerstellig stuk waarin het geloof in de opstanding aanschouwelijk wordt voorgesteld. Volgens hem zijn de door Rubens afgebeelde apostelen niet gekozen vanwege hun aanwezigheid bij een bepaalde verschijning, maar om hun getuigenis in verband met de verrezen Christus en zijn (van boven naar beneden) Paulus, Petrus en Thomas weergegeven. De zijdewond was volgens Monballieu vroeger wel aanwezig, oorspronkelijk op de rechterzijde. Mogelijk werd ze door Rubens zelf verplaatst naar de linkerzijde en vermoedelijk is ze bij een latere restauratie verdwenen of herleid tot het nu zichtbare, donkerbruine vlekje.17 Vladimir Gurewich, die aanvankelijk meende dat de zijdewond afwezig was,18 herzag zijn standpunt een paar jaar later en stelde dat de wond zich bijna onzichtbaar bevindt aan de linkerzijde van het lichaam van Christus.19 Thomas Glen betoogt dat het paneel beslist de ongelovige Thomas voorstelt en dat zowel de aanwezigheid van de twijfelende apostel als die van het echtpaar Rockox (afgebeeld op de luiken) essentieel zijn Haug 1967, p. 1335; Müller Hofstede 1971, p. 261 n. 161. Kramer en Schily 1999. 17  Monballieu 1970. 18  Gurewich 1957. 19  Gurewich 1963. 15 

16 

58

59


BULLETIN

Afb. 2 Maarten de Vos, Christus en de ongelovige Thomas, 1574, middenpaneel van de Triptiek van de bontwerkers, KMSKA

BULLETIN

drieluik met op de luiken de afbeeldingen van Rockox zelf en zijn vrouw Adriana Perez, dat te zijner tijd als epitaaf moest dienen bij het graf van het echtpaar. Op het schilderij staat Christus afgebeeld met drie apostelen van wie er twee de wond van zijn linkerhand bekijken. Geen van hen steekt zijn hand in de zijdewond van Christus, die niet of nauwelijks zicht­baar is, of raakt hem aan. Het onderwerp van het Antwerpse paneel heeft aanleiding gegeven tot een uitvoerige discussie over de passage uit het evangelie waarop het schilderij betrekking heeft, waarom er geen zijdewond te zien is en wie de afgebeelde apostelen zijn. Zowel Ingrid Haug als Justus Müller Hofstede vinden dat het schilderij de verschijning van Christus voor de elf leerlingen voorstelt en ten onrechte als De ongelovige Thomas wordt aangeduid. Rubens zou niet aan de tekst uit Johannes 20 : 24–29 refereren maar aan Lucas 24 : 36–43: ‘Kijk naar mijn handen en voeten, ik ben het zelf.’15 Kramer en Schily zijn het daarmee eens.16 Adolf Monballieu is van mening dat het werk niet moet worden beschouwd als de weergave van een episode uit het evangelie, maar als een leerstellig stuk waarin het geloof in de opstanding aanschouwelijk wordt voorgesteld. Volgens hem zijn de door Rubens afgebeelde apostelen niet gekozen vanwege hun aanwezigheid bij een bepaalde verschijning, maar om hun getuigenis in verband met de verrezen Christus en zijn (van boven naar beneden) Paulus, Petrus en Thomas weergegeven. De zijdewond was volgens Monballieu vroeger wel aanwezig, oorspronkelijk op de rechterzijde. Mogelijk werd ze door Rubens zelf verplaatst naar de linkerzijde en vermoedelijk is ze bij een latere restauratie verdwenen of herleid tot het nu zichtbare, donkerbruine vlekje.17 Vladimir Gurewich, die aanvankelijk meende dat de zijdewond afwezig was,18 herzag zijn standpunt een paar jaar later en stelde dat de wond zich bijna onzichtbaar bevindt aan de linkerzijde van het lichaam van Christus.19 Thomas Glen betoogt dat het paneel beslist de ongelovige Thomas voorstelt en dat zowel de aanwezigheid van de twijfelende apostel als die van het echtpaar Rockox (afgebeeld op de luiken) essentieel zijn Haug 1967, p. 1335; Müller Hofstede 1971, p. 261 n. 161. Kramer en Schily 1999. 17  Monballieu 1970. 18  Gurewich 1957. 19  Gurewich 1963. 15 

16 

58

59


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

voor een goed begrip van het epitaaf. Het onderwerp van het schilderij is volgens hem het geloof van het echtpaar, dat niet onderbouwd hoeft te worden door eigen waarneming, in tegenstelling tot dat van Thomas. Anders dan Monballieu is Glen ervan overtuigd dat Thomas de middelste apostel is.20 Volgens David Freedberg zijn de drie afgebeelde apostelen Paulus, Petrus en Thomas en kan de scène betrekking hebben op Johannes 20 : 27, waarin Christus zich tot Thomas richt met de woorden: ‘Kijk maar, hier zijn mijn handen; kom nu maar met je vinger.’21 Net als Glen veronderstelt Freedberg dat Rubens van mening moet zijn geweest dat voor het ware geloof in de opstanding geen bewijs vereist is in de zin zoals Thomas dat wil. Om die reden zou hij afgeweken zijn van de traditionele weergave van de ongelovige Thomas en de wond van ondergeschikt belang hebben gevonden. En daarom zou hij die niet of nauwelijks zichtbaar hebben afgebeeld. Monballieu, Glen en Freedberg gaan uit van de gedachte dat een van de afgebeelde apostelen Thomas moet zijn.22 Zij beroepen zich op een commentaar uit 1770–71 door Jacob van der Sande, die in de jongste apostel Thomas meent te herkennen en in de twee andere Paulus en Petrus: ‘… toerijkende de regte hand aen den apostel Thomas, afgebeld als een blonten jongman en wetensbegerig, nevens den grijsaert Petrus, boogende het hoofd met oodmoedigheid, waer by Paulus als tweeden Prins der Apostelen, met bruijnen en langen baert in de kragt der mannejaeren aenschouwd met verwonderende ingetogentheijd den Heere, en opper­ leeraer van het Geloof.’23 Deze tekst is echter zo’n anderhalve eeuw na de totstandkoming van het paneel geschreven en de bewering dat het hier zou gaan om een afbeelding van Christus en de ongelovige Thomas met Paulus en Petrus mist elke grond. Zoals blijkt uit de hierboven geciteerde sermoenen uit 1616 en 1617 lag Thomas ook bij rooms-katholieken uit die tijd onder vuur, en de vraag ligt voor de hand waarom Rockox het Thomasverhaal tot onderwerp van zijn epitaaf zou hebben gekozen. Aangenomen dat het moest verwijzen naar

het vaste geloof van het echtpaar (Rockox zelf heeft de Bijbel in de hand, Adriana een rozenkrans), lag het onderwerp van de verrijzenis voor de hand en is gezocht naar een passende Bijbeltekst. Alle vier de evangelisten beschrijven de terugkeer van Christus bij de leerlingen na diens kruisdood, maar alleen Lucas en Johannes vermelden dat hij hun ter overtuiging zijn wonden laat zien. Dat is wat Rubens afbeeldt op het epitaaf, en hij kon daarbij kiezen uit de al vermelde Bijbelplaatsen. Johannes 20 : 24–29 lijkt onwaarschijnlijk, want afgezien van de vraag of Rockox geassocieerd wilde worden met de twijfelaar Thomas, wordt in deze tekst met geen woord gerept over meerdere leerlingen die een kruiswond bestuderen, zoals op het schilderij het geval is. Haug, Müller Hofstede en Kramer en Schily hebben Lucas 24 : 39 voorgesteld, waarin Jezus alleen verwijst naar de wonden in zijn handen en voeten (wat de afwezigheid van de zijdewond zou kunnen verklaren) en waarin Thomas niet wordt genoemd maar wel aanwezig is. De volledige tekst bij Lucas getuigt echter van twijfel bij de leerlingen en bevat een oproep van Christus om hem aan te raken, wat niet blijkt uit het schilderij. Wat betreft de aanwezigheid van de zijdewond wijzen zowel Gurewich als Monballieu op de controversen die destijds over de ligging van de wond bestonden. De traditie om de zijdewond rechts af te beelden (rechts gaat boven links) had volgens Gurewich in de zeventiende eeuw veel van haar betekenis verloren, maar veel kunstenaars aarzelden om met die traditie te breken en de wond links af te beelden, dichter bij het hart van Christus. Rubens zou, mogelijk in overleg met zijn opdrachtgever, ervoor gekozen hebben de zijdewond zo discreet mogelijk weer te geven. In de katholieke theologie speelt de zijdewond echter een belangrijke rol omdat het de plaats was waaruit de twee voornaamste sacramenten stroomden – bloed en water, respectievelijk de eucharistie en het doop­sel – en de Kerk werd geboren. Het is onwaarschijnlijk dat Rubens, die volgens zijn tijdgenoten aandacht besteedde aan de kleinste iconografische details,24 de zijdewond met opzet wegliet om de verwijzing naar het Lucasevangelie duidelijk te maken. In dat geval had hij die ook met een arm of met het kleed van Christus aan het oog kunnen onttrekken. Naar mijn mening ligt Johannes 20 : 19–21 dan ook het meest voor de hand.

Glen 1977, p. 103. Freedberg 1984, pp. 82–84. 22  Monballieu 1970, p. 141; Glen 1977, p. 103; Freedberg 1984, p. 84. 23  Van der Sande geciteerd door Monballieu 1970, p. 153. 20  21 

60

24 

Gurewich 1963.

61


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

voor een goed begrip van het epitaaf. Het onderwerp van het schilderij is volgens hem het geloof van het echtpaar, dat niet onderbouwd hoeft te worden door eigen waarneming, in tegenstelling tot dat van Thomas. Anders dan Monballieu is Glen ervan overtuigd dat Thomas de middelste apostel is.20 Volgens David Freedberg zijn de drie afgebeelde apostelen Paulus, Petrus en Thomas en kan de scène betrekking hebben op Johannes 20 : 27, waarin Christus zich tot Thomas richt met de woorden: ‘Kijk maar, hier zijn mijn handen; kom nu maar met je vinger.’21 Net als Glen veronderstelt Freedberg dat Rubens van mening moet zijn geweest dat voor het ware geloof in de opstanding geen bewijs vereist is in de zin zoals Thomas dat wil. Om die reden zou hij afgeweken zijn van de traditionele weergave van de ongelovige Thomas en de wond van ondergeschikt belang hebben gevonden. En daarom zou hij die niet of nauwelijks zichtbaar hebben afgebeeld. Monballieu, Glen en Freedberg gaan uit van de gedachte dat een van de afgebeelde apostelen Thomas moet zijn.22 Zij beroepen zich op een commentaar uit 1770–71 door Jacob van der Sande, die in de jongste apostel Thomas meent te herkennen en in de twee andere Paulus en Petrus: ‘… toerijkende de regte hand aen den apostel Thomas, afgebeld als een blonten jongman en wetensbegerig, nevens den grijsaert Petrus, boogende het hoofd met oodmoedigheid, waer by Paulus als tweeden Prins der Apostelen, met bruijnen en langen baert in de kragt der mannejaeren aenschouwd met verwonderende ingetogentheijd den Heere, en opper­ leeraer van het Geloof.’23 Deze tekst is echter zo’n anderhalve eeuw na de totstandkoming van het paneel geschreven en de bewering dat het hier zou gaan om een afbeelding van Christus en de ongelovige Thomas met Paulus en Petrus mist elke grond. Zoals blijkt uit de hierboven geciteerde sermoenen uit 1616 en 1617 lag Thomas ook bij rooms-katholieken uit die tijd onder vuur, en de vraag ligt voor de hand waarom Rockox het Thomasverhaal tot onderwerp van zijn epitaaf zou hebben gekozen. Aangenomen dat het moest verwijzen naar

het vaste geloof van het echtpaar (Rockox zelf heeft de Bijbel in de hand, Adriana een rozenkrans), lag het onderwerp van de verrijzenis voor de hand en is gezocht naar een passende Bijbeltekst. Alle vier de evangelisten beschrijven de terugkeer van Christus bij de leerlingen na diens kruisdood, maar alleen Lucas en Johannes vermelden dat hij hun ter overtuiging zijn wonden laat zien. Dat is wat Rubens afbeeldt op het epitaaf, en hij kon daarbij kiezen uit de al vermelde Bijbelplaatsen. Johannes 20 : 24–29 lijkt onwaarschijnlijk, want afgezien van de vraag of Rockox geassocieerd wilde worden met de twijfelaar Thomas, wordt in deze tekst met geen woord gerept over meerdere leerlingen die een kruiswond bestuderen, zoals op het schilderij het geval is. Haug, Müller Hofstede en Kramer en Schily hebben Lucas 24 : 39 voorgesteld, waarin Jezus alleen verwijst naar de wonden in zijn handen en voeten (wat de afwezigheid van de zijdewond zou kunnen verklaren) en waarin Thomas niet wordt genoemd maar wel aanwezig is. De volledige tekst bij Lucas getuigt echter van twijfel bij de leerlingen en bevat een oproep van Christus om hem aan te raken, wat niet blijkt uit het schilderij. Wat betreft de aanwezigheid van de zijdewond wijzen zowel Gurewich als Monballieu op de controversen die destijds over de ligging van de wond bestonden. De traditie om de zijdewond rechts af te beelden (rechts gaat boven links) had volgens Gurewich in de zeventiende eeuw veel van haar betekenis verloren, maar veel kunstenaars aarzelden om met die traditie te breken en de wond links af te beelden, dichter bij het hart van Christus. Rubens zou, mogelijk in overleg met zijn opdrachtgever, ervoor gekozen hebben de zijdewond zo discreet mogelijk weer te geven. In de katholieke theologie speelt de zijdewond echter een belangrijke rol omdat het de plaats was waaruit de twee voornaamste sacramenten stroomden – bloed en water, respectievelijk de eucharistie en het doop­sel – en de Kerk werd geboren. Het is onwaarschijnlijk dat Rubens, die volgens zijn tijdgenoten aandacht besteedde aan de kleinste iconografische details,24 de zijdewond met opzet wegliet om de verwijzing naar het Lucasevangelie duidelijk te maken. In dat geval had hij die ook met een arm of met het kleed van Christus aan het oog kunnen onttrekken. Naar mijn mening ligt Johannes 20 : 19–21 dan ook het meest voor de hand.

Glen 1977, p. 103. Freedberg 1984, pp. 82–84. 22  Monballieu 1970, p. 141; Glen 1977, p. 103; Freedberg 1984, p. 84. 23  Van der Sande geciteerd door Monballieu 1970, p. 153. 20  21 

60

24 

Gurewich 1963.

61


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Afb. 5 Arnout Vinckenborch, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, vóór 1620, Oxford, Ashmolean Museum

Afb. 3 Peter Paul Rubens, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, middenpaneel van de Rockoxtriptiek, 1613–15, KMSKA

Afb. 4 Antoon van Dyck, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, 1625–26, Sint-Petersburg, Staatsmuseum de Hermitage

Volgens die tekst verschijnt Christus aan de leerlingen en is Thomas afwe­ zig, zoals letterlijk staat in vers 24. In dit Bijbelfragment is van twijfel aan de opstanding geen sprake en zijn de leerlingen blij omdat ze de Heer zien. Voor een epitaaf is dat een relevante tekst. Inderdaad verwacht men op het ontblote bovenlichaam van Christus de zijdewond aan te treffen maar die kan dus met opzet nauwelijks zichtbaar zijn weergegeven of bij een latere restauratie zijn verdwenen.25 De opvatting van Monballieu en Freedberg dat de twee oudste apos­­­telen Petrus en Paulus zijn – een anachronisme voor zover het Paulus betreft – is verdedigbaar. Kort na de verschijning aan de apostelen vaart Jezus ten hemel, waarbij de Kerk, traditioneel vertegenwoordigd door Petrus en Paulus, achterblijft. Op middeleeuwse afbeeldingen van Jezus’ hemelvaart wordt Paulus vaak aangetroffen onder de omhoog starende

apostelen. Als inderdaad is uitgegaan van Johannes 20 : 19–21, dan is het vrijwel zeker dat de jongste apostel Johannes is (een opvatting die door Haug wordt gedeeld),26 waarmee Rubens verwijst naar de auteur van de gebruikte tekst. Dat het paneel betrekking heeft op de eerste verschijning van Chris­tus aan de leerlingen wordt ondersteund door het werk van twee leerlingen van Rubens: Antoon van Dyck (afb. 4) en Arnout Vinckenborch (afb. 5). Zij maakten ieder een schilderij met als onderwerp Christus die aan de leerlingen verschijnt, waarop Christus hun zijn wonden laat zien. De verwantschap van de twee schilderijen met het paneel van Rubens is evident: op geen ervan is sprake van een apostel die zijn hand in de zij­ dewond steekt of Christus aanraakt. Wel is op beide schilderijen Christus mét zijdewond (aan zijn rechterzijde) afgebeeld. De versie van Van Dyck27 lijkt sprekend op die van Rubens, met als belangrijkste verschil dat slechts één leerling de wond in de hand van Christus bestudeert. Het paneel van Vinckenborch,28 waar tien apostelen zijn afgebeeld en verscheidene van hen zowel de zijdewond als een nagelwond bestuderen, verwijst over­ tuigend naar Johannes 20 : 19–21.

Haug 1967, p. 1335. Doek, 147 × 110 cm, Sint-Petersburg, Staatsmuseum de Hermitage. 28  Paneel, 137 × 190 cm, Oxford, Ashmolean Museum. 26  27 

25 

62

Monballieu 1970, pp. 148–149.

63


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Afb. 5 Arnout Vinckenborch, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, vóór 1620, Oxford, Ashmolean Museum

Afb. 3 Peter Paul Rubens, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, middenpaneel van de Rockoxtriptiek, 1613–15, KMSKA

Afb. 4 Antoon van Dyck, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, 1625–26, Sint-Petersburg, Staatsmuseum de Hermitage

Volgens die tekst verschijnt Christus aan de leerlingen en is Thomas afwe­ zig, zoals letterlijk staat in vers 24. In dit Bijbelfragment is van twijfel aan de opstanding geen sprake en zijn de leerlingen blij omdat ze de Heer zien. Voor een epitaaf is dat een relevante tekst. Inderdaad verwacht men op het ontblote bovenlichaam van Christus de zijdewond aan te treffen maar die kan dus met opzet nauwelijks zichtbaar zijn weergegeven of bij een latere restauratie zijn verdwenen.25 De opvatting van Monballieu en Freedberg dat de twee oudste apos­­­telen Petrus en Paulus zijn – een anachronisme voor zover het Paulus betreft – is verdedigbaar. Kort na de verschijning aan de apostelen vaart Jezus ten hemel, waarbij de Kerk, traditioneel vertegenwoordigd door Petrus en Paulus, achterblijft. Op middeleeuwse afbeeldingen van Jezus’ hemelvaart wordt Paulus vaak aangetroffen onder de omhoog starende

apostelen. Als inderdaad is uitgegaan van Johannes 20 : 19–21, dan is het vrijwel zeker dat de jongste apostel Johannes is (een opvatting die door Haug wordt gedeeld),26 waarmee Rubens verwijst naar de auteur van de gebruikte tekst. Dat het paneel betrekking heeft op de eerste verschijning van Chris­tus aan de leerlingen wordt ondersteund door het werk van twee leerlingen van Rubens: Antoon van Dyck (afb. 4) en Arnout Vinckenborch (afb. 5). Zij maakten ieder een schilderij met als onderwerp Christus die aan de leerlingen verschijnt, waarop Christus hun zijn wonden laat zien. De verwantschap van de twee schilderijen met het paneel van Rubens is evident: op geen ervan is sprake van een apostel die zijn hand in de zij­ dewond steekt of Christus aanraakt. Wel is op beide schilderijen Christus mét zijdewond (aan zijn rechterzijde) afgebeeld. De versie van Van Dyck27 lijkt sprekend op die van Rubens, met als belangrijkste verschil dat slechts één leerling de wond in de hand van Christus bestudeert. Het paneel van Vinckenborch,28 waar tien apostelen zijn afgebeeld en verscheidene van hen zowel de zijdewond als een nagelwond bestuderen, verwijst over­ tuigend naar Johannes 20 : 19–21.

Haug 1967, p. 1335. Doek, 147 × 110 cm, Sint-Petersburg, Staatsmuseum de Hermitage. 28  Paneel, 137 × 190 cm, Oxford, Ashmolean Museum. 26  27 

25 

62

Monballieu 1970, pp. 148–149.

63


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Rembrandt en Van Hoogstraten Op Rembrandts Ongelovige Thomas  29 uit 1634 zijn Christus en Tho­mas weergegeven, omringd door Maria, Maria Magdalena en tien leer­lingen. Christus, die de enige lichtbron op het schilderij is, heeft zijn kleed op­ gelicht zodat de zijdewond zichtbaar is. Thomas deinst terug en heft zijn handen in een gebaar van verbazing en herkenning. Het is het moment waarop hij de woorden ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God’ spreekt, waarop Christus hem antwoordt: ‘Omdat je me gezien hebt, geloof je. Gelukkig zijn zij die niet zien en toch geloven.’ Johannes, half liggend tegen een meubelstuk, heeft zich afgewend en de ogen gesloten. Achter hem buigt zich een leer­­­ling met neergeslagen ogen en gevouwen handen in zijn richting. In tegenstelling tot de overige leerlingen zijn zij degenen die geloven zonder te zien en niet willen kijken naar de zijdewond, het fysieke bewijs dat Christus is opgestaan. Rembrandt had zeer waarschijnlijk een doopsgezinde opdracht­ ge­ver voor het schilderij.30 Doopsgezinden leggen een verband tussen de (weder)doop en de opstanding. Aangezien doopsgezinden, wanneer ze de volwassenendoop ondergaan, een persoonlijke geloofsbelijdenis schrij­ ven en Thomas’ woorden ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God’ als de eerste christelijke belijdenis opvatten, heeft de afgebeelde scène voor doopsgezinden een bijzondere betekenis. Mennonieten benadrukken ook het goddelijke karak­ ter van Christus en zowel het licht dat Christus uitstraalt als de woorden van Thomas getuigen daarvan. Zo schrijft Pieter Jansz. Twisck, leraar van de Doopsgezinde Gemeente te Hoorn, in zijn Bijbelsch Naem- ­ende ChronyckBoeck uit 1632 onder het lemma Thomas onder meer: ‘Thomas gheloofde daer hij sach/ vraegt gij wat hij gheloofde? Eigentlthlijck niet anders dan hij bekende. Doen hij Mijn Heer ende mijn God sprach … Want hij mochte door zich selfs niet van de dooden in’t leven opstaen/ zonder de natuur Gods/ zulks geloofde hij en bekende daarmee dat Christus God was.’ Doopsgezinden zien Johannes als een bijzondere apostel en evangelist en als zodanig wordt hij door Rembrandt afgebeeld. Bij het lemma ‘Johannes’ schrijft Twisck: ‘Dat Johannes so veel van de Godheid Christi in zijn

Afb. 6 Rembrandt van Rijn, De ongelovige Thomas, ca. 1655, pentekening, Parijs, Musée du Louvre

Afb. 7 Rembrandt van Rijn, De ongelovige Thomas, 1656, ets, Londen, The British Museum

Evangelium en Epistelen schrijft geschiedt principaal.’ En: ‘Johannes en wordt bij den ouden niet onbilck bij den Arendt die hoog vliegt afgebeelt/ omdat hij in zijn Evangelium zo hoog bo­ven die andere Evangelisten in de Godtheyt opzweeft ende meerder dan alle an­de­ren van de Godtheyt Chris­ ti spreekt.’ Van hetzelfde onder­werp maakte Rembrandt rond 1655 een teke­ ning (afb. 6) en een ets (1656; afb. 7) die nauw met elkaar verwant zijn.31 Op de tekening knielt Tho­mas deemoedig neer bij het zien van de zijde­ wond, zich realiserend dat hij zich tegenover de ver­rezen Christus bevindt.

Pentekening, 15 × 24 cm, Parijs, Musée du Louvre; ets (op Japans papier) 16,2 × 21 cm, Londen, The British Museum. White 1999, p. 107. De ets staat bekend als zowel Christus verschijnt aan de apostelen als De ongelovige Thomas. Naar mijn mening heeft zij betrekking op laatstgenoemd onderwerp. 31 

Paneel, 53 × 51 cm, Moskou, Poesjkin Museum. 30  Voor de doopsgezinde context, zie Van de Wetering 2000, p. 55; Dudok van Heel 1980. 29 

64

65


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Rembrandt en Van Hoogstraten Op Rembrandts Ongelovige Thomas  29 uit 1634 zijn Christus en Tho­mas weergegeven, omringd door Maria, Maria Magdalena en tien leer­lingen. Christus, die de enige lichtbron op het schilderij is, heeft zijn kleed op­ gelicht zodat de zijdewond zichtbaar is. Thomas deinst terug en heft zijn handen in een gebaar van verbazing en herkenning. Het is het moment waarop hij de woorden ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God’ spreekt, waarop Christus hem antwoordt: ‘Omdat je me gezien hebt, geloof je. Gelukkig zijn zij die niet zien en toch geloven.’ Johannes, half liggend tegen een meubelstuk, heeft zich afgewend en de ogen gesloten. Achter hem buigt zich een leer­­­ling met neergeslagen ogen en gevouwen handen in zijn richting. In tegenstelling tot de overige leerlingen zijn zij degenen die geloven zonder te zien en niet willen kijken naar de zijdewond, het fysieke bewijs dat Christus is opgestaan. Rembrandt had zeer waarschijnlijk een doopsgezinde opdracht­ ge­ver voor het schilderij.30 Doopsgezinden leggen een verband tussen de (weder)doop en de opstanding. Aangezien doopsgezinden, wanneer ze de volwassenendoop ondergaan, een persoonlijke geloofsbelijdenis schrij­ ven en Thomas’ woorden ‘Mijn Heer, mijn God’ als de eerste christelijke belijdenis opvatten, heeft de afgebeelde scène voor doopsgezinden een bijzondere betekenis. Mennonieten benadrukken ook het goddelijke karak­ ter van Christus en zowel het licht dat Christus uitstraalt als de woorden van Thomas getuigen daarvan. Zo schrijft Pieter Jansz. Twisck, leraar van de Doopsgezinde Gemeente te Hoorn, in zijn Bijbelsch Naem- ­ende ChronyckBoeck uit 1632 onder het lemma Thomas onder meer: ‘Thomas gheloofde daer hij sach/ vraegt gij wat hij gheloofde? Eigentlthlijck niet anders dan hij bekende. Doen hij Mijn Heer ende mijn God sprach … Want hij mochte door zich selfs niet van de dooden in’t leven opstaen/ zonder de natuur Gods/ zulks geloofde hij en bekende daarmee dat Christus God was.’ Doopsgezinden zien Johannes als een bijzondere apostel en evangelist en als zodanig wordt hij door Rembrandt afgebeeld. Bij het lemma ‘Johannes’ schrijft Twisck: ‘Dat Johannes so veel van de Godheid Christi in zijn

Afb. 6 Rembrandt van Rijn, De ongelovige Thomas, ca. 1655, pentekening, Parijs, Musée du Louvre

Afb. 7 Rembrandt van Rijn, De ongelovige Thomas, 1656, ets, Londen, The British Museum

Evangelium en Epistelen schrijft geschiedt principaal.’ En: ‘Johannes en wordt bij den ouden niet onbilck bij den Arendt die hoog vliegt afgebeelt/ omdat hij in zijn Evangelium zo hoog bo­ven die andere Evangelisten in de Godtheyt opzweeft ende meerder dan alle an­de­ren van de Godtheyt Chris­ ti spreekt.’ Van hetzelfde onder­werp maakte Rembrandt rond 1655 een teke­ ning (afb. 6) en een ets (1656; afb. 7) die nauw met elkaar verwant zijn.31 Op de tekening knielt Tho­mas deemoedig neer bij het zien van de zijde­ wond, zich realiserend dat hij zich tegenover de ver­rezen Christus bevindt.

Pentekening, 15 × 24 cm, Parijs, Musée du Louvre; ets (op Japans papier) 16,2 × 21 cm, Londen, The British Museum. White 1999, p. 107. De ets staat bekend als zowel Christus verschijnt aan de apostelen als De ongelovige Thomas. Naar mijn mening heeft zij betrekking op laatstgenoemd onderwerp. 31 

Paneel, 53 × 51 cm, Moskou, Poesjkin Museum. 30  Voor de doopsgezinde context, zie Van de Wetering 2000, p. 55; Dudok van Heel 1980. 29 

64

65


BULLETIN

Het is een iconografisch overtui­gende weergave van de cal­vinistische op­ vatting van Johannes 20 : 24–29, waar­bij de zonde van Tho­mas die zich niet door het Woord had laten over­tui­gen, wordt benadrukt. Op het Mos­kouse schilderij is Johan­nes met gesloten ogen afgebeeld. Hij slaapt niet want later zal hij verslag doen van de gebeurtenis. Ook op zijn ets uit 1656 geeft Rembrandt het moment weer waarop Christus tegen Thomas zegt dat hij gelooft omdat hij gezien heeft en daaraan toevoegt: ‘Gelukkig zijn zij die niet zien en toch geloven.’ De leerlingen die zich tegenover Christus be­ vinden, sluiten de ogen om de zijdewond niet te hoeven zien, de overigen, onder wie Johannes, die de zijdewond niet kunnen zien, hebben de ogen geopend en fungeren als getuigen. Samuel van Hoogstraeten was een leerling van Rembrandt en werk­ te vanaf 1642 een aantal jaren in diens atelier. Als lid van de doopsgezinde gemeenschap onderging hij in 1648 de volwassenendoop. Zijn Christus ver­schijnt aan de leerlingen (afb. 8)32 vertoont grote overeenkomst met het paneel van Rembrandt. Veel elementen (Christus als lichtbron, de tafel met het opengeslagen boek, de stoel, de knielende apostel) zijn er rechtstreeks aan ontleend maar een opvallend verschil is dat Thomas ontbreekt. Door slechts tien apostelen af te beelden refereert Van Hoogstraeten aan de tekst uit Johannes 20 : 19–21, waar Christus zijn wonden toont aan de leerlingen bij afwezigheid van Thomas.

BULLETIN

Afb. 8 Samuel van Hoogstraeten, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, 1649, Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum

SUMMARY Three gospel texts mention the fact that Christ shows his wounds to the disciples in order to convince them of his Resurrection, yet it was the scriptural passage of John 20 : 24–29, which refers to Christ and the Doubting Thomas, that was depicted almost invariably from the early Middle Ages onwards. The Church had always justified Thomas’s initial disbelief until after the Reformation, when Thomas was criticized by both Protestants and Roman Catholics for ignoring the words of the Scriptures. From the second half of the sixteenth century, biblical events were chal­ 32 

66

lenged by scientists who, like Thomas and much to the dislike of the theo­ logians, adopted an empirical approach in their search for the truth. This must have contributed to the negative perception of Thomas, which is reflected, directly or indirectly, in pictures by Rubens and Rembrandt and their pupils.

Paneel, 47 × 60 cm, Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum.

67


BULLETIN

Het is een iconografisch overtui­gende weergave van de cal­vinistische op­ vatting van Johannes 20 : 24–29, waar­bij de zonde van Tho­mas die zich niet door het Woord had laten over­tui­gen, wordt benadrukt. Op het Mos­kouse schilderij is Johan­nes met gesloten ogen afgebeeld. Hij slaapt niet want later zal hij verslag doen van de gebeurtenis. Ook op zijn ets uit 1656 geeft Rembrandt het moment weer waarop Christus tegen Thomas zegt dat hij gelooft omdat hij gezien heeft en daaraan toevoegt: ‘Gelukkig zijn zij die niet zien en toch geloven.’ De leerlingen die zich tegenover Christus be­ vinden, sluiten de ogen om de zijdewond niet te hoeven zien, de overigen, onder wie Johannes, die de zijdewond niet kunnen zien, hebben de ogen geopend en fungeren als getuigen. Samuel van Hoogstraeten was een leerling van Rembrandt en werk­ te vanaf 1642 een aantal jaren in diens atelier. Als lid van de doopsgezinde gemeenschap onderging hij in 1648 de volwassenendoop. Zijn Christus ver­schijnt aan de leerlingen (afb. 8)32 vertoont grote overeenkomst met het paneel van Rembrandt. Veel elementen (Christus als lichtbron, de tafel met het opengeslagen boek, de stoel, de knielende apostel) zijn er rechtstreeks aan ontleend maar een opvallend verschil is dat Thomas ontbreekt. Door slechts tien apostelen af te beelden refereert Van Hoogstraeten aan de tekst uit Johannes 20 : 19–21, waar Christus zijn wonden toont aan de leerlingen bij afwezigheid van Thomas.

BULLETIN

Afb. 8 Samuel van Hoogstraeten, Christus verschijnt aan de leerlingen, 1649, Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum

SUMMARY Three gospel texts mention the fact that Christ shows his wounds to the disciples in order to convince them of his Resurrection, yet it was the scriptural passage of John 20 : 24–29, which refers to Christ and the Doubting Thomas, that was depicted almost invariably from the early Middle Ages onwards. The Church had always justified Thomas’s initial disbelief until after the Reformation, when Thomas was criticized by both Protestants and Roman Catholics for ignoring the words of the Scriptures. From the second half of the sixteenth century, biblical events were chal­ 32 

66

lenged by scientists who, like Thomas and much to the dislike of the theo­ logians, adopted an empirical approach in their search for the truth. This must have contributed to the negative perception of Thomas, which is reflected, directly or indirectly, in pictures by Rubens and Rembrandt and their pupils.

Paneel, 47 × 60 cm, Mainz, Mittelrheinisches Landesmuseum.

67


BULLETIN

Bibliografie De Voragine 1995 J. de Voragine, The Golden Legend. Readings on the Saints, I en II (tweede helft dertiende eeuw, vertaald uit het Latijn), Princeton 1995. Dudok van Heel 1980 S.A.C. Dudok van Heel, ‘Doopsgezinden en schilderkunst in de 17e eeuw. Opdrachtgevers en verzamelaars’, Doopsgezinde Bijdragen, Nieuwe Reeks 6 (1980), pp. 105–123. Freedberg 1984 D. Freedberg, Rubens. The Life of Christ after the Passion (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VII), New York 1984. Glen 1977 T.L. Glen, Rubens and the Counter Reformation, proefschrift New York 1977. Gurewich 1957 V. Gurewich, ‘Observations on the iconography of the wound in Christ’s side, with special reference to its position’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 20 (1957), 3–4, pp. 338–362. Gurewich 1963 V. Gurewich, ‘Rubens and the wound in Christ’s side. A Postscript’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 26 (1963), 3–4, p. 358.

BULLETIN

Müller Hofstede 1971 J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Abraham Janssens. Zur Problematik des flämischen Caravaggismus’, Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen XIII, 1971. Pflugk 1966 U. Pflugk, Die Geschichte vom ungläubigen Thomas in der Auslegung der Kirche von den Anfängen bis zur Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts, proefschrift Hamburg 1966. Schunk-Heller 1995 S. Schunk-Heller, Die Darstellung des ungläubigen Thomas in der italienischen Kunst bis um 1500 unter Berücksichtigung der lukanischen Ostentatio Vulnerum, München 1995. Stokstad 1988 M. Stokstad, Medieval Art, New York 1988. Van de Wetering 2000 E. van de Wetering, ‘Remarks on Rembrandt’s oil sketches for etchings’, in E. Hinterding, G. Luijten en M. Royalton-Kisch, Rembrandt the Printmaker, Londen en Amsterdam 2000. White 1999 C. White, Rembrandt as an Etcher. A Study of the Artist at Work, New Haven en Londen 1999. Zweite 1980 A. Zweite, Martin de Vos als Maler, Berlijn 1980.

Haug 1967 I. Haug, ‘Erscheinungen Christi’, in O. Schmitt (red.), Reallexikon zur Deutschen Kunstgeschichte, V, Stuttgart 1967. Kramer en Schily 1999 E. Kramer en K. Schily, ‘De Rockox-triptiek van Rubens. De ongelovige Thomas?’, Desipientia, Zin en waan 6 (1999), pp. 40–45. Molanus 1996 J. Molanus, De historia sanctarum imaginum et picturarum, 1570. Franse vertaling: Traité des saintes images. Introduction, traduction, notes et index par F. Boespflug, M. Christin en B. Tassel (Patrimoine Christianisme), Parijs 1996. Monballieu 1970 A. Monballieu, ‘Bij de iconografie van Rubens’ Rockox-epitafium’, Jaarboek Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten (1970), pp. 135–155.

68

69


BULLETIN

Bibliografie De Voragine 1995 J. de Voragine, The Golden Legend. Readings on the Saints, I en II (tweede helft dertiende eeuw, vertaald uit het Latijn), Princeton 1995. Dudok van Heel 1980 S.A.C. Dudok van Heel, ‘Doopsgezinden en schilderkunst in de 17e eeuw. Opdrachtgevers en verzamelaars’, Doopsgezinde Bijdragen, Nieuwe Reeks 6 (1980), pp. 105–123. Freedberg 1984 D. Freedberg, Rubens. The Life of Christ after the Passion (Corpus Rubenianum Ludwig Burchard, VII), New York 1984. Glen 1977 T.L. Glen, Rubens and the Counter Reformation, proefschrift New York 1977. Gurewich 1957 V. Gurewich, ‘Observations on the iconography of the wound in Christ’s side, with special reference to its position’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 20 (1957), 3–4, pp. 338–362. Gurewich 1963 V. Gurewich, ‘Rubens and the wound in Christ’s side. A Postscript’, Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 26 (1963), 3–4, p. 358.

BULLETIN

Müller Hofstede 1971 J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Abraham Janssens. Zur Problematik des flämischen Caravaggismus’, Jahrbuch der Berliner Museen XIII, 1971. Pflugk 1966 U. Pflugk, Die Geschichte vom ungläubigen Thomas in der Auslegung der Kirche von den Anfängen bis zur Mitte des 16. Jahrhunderts, proefschrift Hamburg 1966. Schunk-Heller 1995 S. Schunk-Heller, Die Darstellung des ungläubigen Thomas in der italienischen Kunst bis um 1500 unter Berücksichtigung der lukanischen Ostentatio Vulnerum, München 1995. Stokstad 1988 M. Stokstad, Medieval Art, New York 1988. Van de Wetering 2000 E. van de Wetering, ‘Remarks on Rembrandt’s oil sketches for etchings’, in E. Hinterding, G. Luijten en M. Royalton-Kisch, Rembrandt the Printmaker, Londen en Amsterdam 2000. White 1999 C. White, Rembrandt as an Etcher. A Study of the Artist at Work, New Haven en Londen 1999. Zweite 1980 A. Zweite, Martin de Vos als Maler, Berlijn 1980.

Haug 1967 I. Haug, ‘Erscheinungen Christi’, in O. Schmitt (red.), Reallexikon zur Deutschen Kunstgeschichte, V, Stuttgart 1967. Kramer en Schily 1999 E. Kramer en K. Schily, ‘De Rockox-triptiek van Rubens. De ongelovige Thomas?’, Desipientia, Zin en waan 6 (1999), pp. 40–45. Molanus 1996 J. Molanus, De historia sanctarum imaginum et picturarum, 1570. Franse vertaling: Traité des saintes images. Introduction, traduction, notes et index par F. Boespflug, M. Christin en B. Tassel (Patrimoine Christianisme), Parijs 1996. Monballieu 1970 A. Monballieu, ‘Bij de iconografie van Rubens’ Rockox-epitafium’, Jaarboek Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten (1970), pp. 135–155.

68

69


BULLETIN

Rubens en Brueghel, bondgenoten in de slag om de gordel van Ares Christine Van Mulders De Bildergalerie van Schloss Sanssouci in Potsdam herbergt een bijzonder schilderij van de Amazonen van Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude (afb. 2).1 Op de voorgrond van een heuvelend boslandschap wordt een strijd te paard uitgevochten. Krijgshaftige vrouwen hebben het ge­ munt op een mannelijke legertroep. Ze zijn gewapend met lansen, dolken en pijlen. In het midden van het voorplan proberen twee vrouwen een gebaarde krijger te overmeesteren. De identificatie van het tafereel met het gevecht van de Amazonen tegen Heracles (Hercules) en Theseus ligt voor de hand.2 Heracles zelf is

Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin-Brandenburg, inv. GK I 10021: paneel, 97 × 124 cm. Tentoonstellingen: Parijs 1807, nr. 602; Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978, nr. 32; Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93, nr. 44.1; Londen 2005–06, nr. 1; Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, nr. 1. Literatuur: Nicolai 1779, nr. 666; Puhlmann 1790, nr. 47; cat. tent. Parijs 1807, nr. 602; Waagen 1830, II, pp. 227, 746; Parthey 1863, I, p. 181, nr. 67; Eckardt 1975, p. 77, nr. 74; Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24; cat. tent. Potsdam 1978, nr. 32; Bartoschek 1978, p. 11, nr. 1; Eckardt 1980, p. 80, nr. 74; Held 1982, p. 22; Held 1983, pp. 21–25; Bodart 1985, pp. 10–12, 151 n. 6a; Held 1987, pp. 9–22; cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, p. 36, onder nr. 1; cat. tent. Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93, pp. 343–344, nr. 44.1; Bartoschek en Murza 1994, p. 48; Von Simson 1996, pp. 34–35; Paulussen 1997, pp. 85–86; cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, pp. 240, 242, 243, 246, onder nr. 68; cat. tent. [Essen], Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, pp. 217–220, onder nr. 70; Vlieghe 1998, p. 23; Van Mulders 2000, pp. 116–117; Poeschel 2001, pp. 97, 107; Renger en Denk 2002, p. 350; cat. tent. Rijsel 2004, p. 32; cat. tent. Wenen 2004, pp. 158–160, nr. 11; Van Mulders 2004, pp. 64, 65, 68; cat. tent. New York 2005, p. 88; cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, pp. 44–51, nr. 1, pp. 228–229; Van Mulders 2007, p. 110. 2  Voor diensten bewezen aan koning Eurystheus werd Heracles de Aresgordel van de Amazonen­ koningin Hippolyte (of Hippolyta) beloofd; Heracles moest de gordel zelf gaan opeisen (het negende van de twaalf werken van Heracles). Toen Hippolyte hem de gordel toezegde, verspreidde Hera (Juno), in de gestalte van een Amazone, het valse gerucht dat Heracles Hippolyte zou ontvoeren. De Amazonen keerden zich tegen Heracles. Deze voelde zich door Hippolyte bedrogen en doodde haar. In het bezit van de gordel vertrok hij naar Mykene. Moormann en Uitterhoeve 1987, pp. 31–33, 122. 1 

Afb. 1 Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie. Detail van afb. 2

71


BULLETIN

Rubens en Brueghel, bondgenoten in de slag om de gordel van Ares Christine Van Mulders De Bildergalerie van Schloss Sanssouci in Potsdam herbergt een bijzonder schilderij van de Amazonen van Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude (afb. 2).1 Op de voorgrond van een heuvelend boslandschap wordt een strijd te paard uitgevochten. Krijgshaftige vrouwen hebben het ge­ munt op een mannelijke legertroep. Ze zijn gewapend met lansen, dolken en pijlen. In het midden van het voorplan proberen twee vrouwen een gebaarde krijger te overmeesteren. De identificatie van het tafereel met het gevecht van de Amazonen tegen Heracles (Hercules) en Theseus ligt voor de hand.2 Heracles zelf is

Stiftung Preussische Schlösser und Gärten Berlin-Brandenburg, inv. GK I 10021: paneel, 97 × 124 cm. Tentoonstellingen: Parijs 1807, nr. 602; Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978, nr. 32; Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93, nr. 44.1; Londen 2005–06, nr. 1; Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, nr. 1. Literatuur: Nicolai 1779, nr. 666; Puhlmann 1790, nr. 47; cat. tent. Parijs 1807, nr. 602; Waagen 1830, II, pp. 227, 746; Parthey 1863, I, p. 181, nr. 67; Eckardt 1975, p. 77, nr. 74; Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24; cat. tent. Potsdam 1978, nr. 32; Bartoschek 1978, p. 11, nr. 1; Eckardt 1980, p. 80, nr. 74; Held 1982, p. 22; Held 1983, pp. 21–25; Bodart 1985, pp. 10–12, 151 n. 6a; Held 1987, pp. 9–22; cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, p. 36, onder nr. 1; cat. tent. Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93, pp. 343–344, nr. 44.1; Bartoschek en Murza 1994, p. 48; Von Simson 1996, pp. 34–35; Paulussen 1997, pp. 85–86; cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, pp. 240, 242, 243, 246, onder nr. 68; cat. tent. [Essen], Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, pp. 217–220, onder nr. 70; Vlieghe 1998, p. 23; Van Mulders 2000, pp. 116–117; Poeschel 2001, pp. 97, 107; Renger en Denk 2002, p. 350; cat. tent. Rijsel 2004, p. 32; cat. tent. Wenen 2004, pp. 158–160, nr. 11; Van Mulders 2004, pp. 64, 65, 68; cat. tent. New York 2005, p. 88; cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, pp. 44–51, nr. 1, pp. 228–229; Van Mulders 2007, p. 110. 2  Voor diensten bewezen aan koning Eurystheus werd Heracles de Aresgordel van de Amazonen­ koningin Hippolyte (of Hippolyta) beloofd; Heracles moest de gordel zelf gaan opeisen (het negende van de twaalf werken van Heracles). Toen Hippolyte hem de gordel toezegde, verspreidde Hera (Juno), in de gestalte van een Amazone, het valse gerucht dat Heracles Hippolyte zou ontvoeren. De Amazonen keerden zich tegen Heracles. Deze voelde zich door Hippolyte bedrogen en doodde haar. In het bezit van de gordel vertrok hij naar Mykene. Moormann en Uitterhoeve 1987, pp. 31–33, 122. 1 

Afb. 1 Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie. Detail van afb. 2

71


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Afb. 2 Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie

72

73


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Afb. 2 Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie

72

73


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

voorgesteld als de met twee Amazonen worstelende krijger op de voorgrond (afb. 1). Theseus is mogelijk links van hem in een voorovergebogen houding af­gebeeld, met eveneens een Amazone in zijn greep. De Amazonenkoningin Hippolyte, ge­tooid in een rood kleed met de Aresgordel, voert rechts van het midden een charge uit in de strijdende massa (afb. 3). De compositie valt uiteen in twee delen. Onderaan vindt het eigen­ lijke gevecht plaats. De bovenste helft van de compositie wordt ingenomen door een vergezicht op een berglandschap. Het woelige strijdtoneel van figuren en paarden is van de hand van Rubens. Het landschap is geschilderd door Jan Brueghel de Oude. Vermoedelijk is het schilderij in Pots­ dam identiek met het werk dat op 12 juli 1682 wordt vermeld in de inventaris van Diego (Jacobus) Duarte II.3 In dat geval hebben we te maken met de oudste bron waarin de toe­schrij­ ving aan Rubens en Brueghel wordt genoemd. Onder nr. 62 staat geschreven: Van Petro Paulo Rubbens … Een stuck op paneel den slagh van de Amasoonen vol werckx van syn vroege manier. Het lantschap ofte verschiet is geheel vanden Fluweelen Bruegel guld. 100. Via de erfenis van Constancia Duarte (echtgenote van Manuel Levy) kwam dat stuk in 1692 terecht bij Don Estevan de Andrea.4 Het feit dat het Potsdamse schilderij getiteld Eine Amazonische Bataille mit Hercule und Theseo in 1699 voor het eerst op­ duikt in de inventaris van Schloss Ora­nien­burg Afb. 3 Peter Paul Rubens en Brueghel de Oude, De slag en in 1710 in die van het Berliner Schloss maakt Jan van de Amazonen, Potsdam, de kans groot dat het hier om een en hetzelfde Schloss Sanssouci, Bilder­ werk gaat.5 In de Berliner Schloss­inventaris van galerie. Detail van afb. 2

1779 wordt het toe­geschreven aan Hans Rotten­ham­mer en Jan Brueghel.6 Tijdens de jaren 1806–15, toen het schilderij in het Musée Napoléon was onder­gebracht, was er voor het eerst kortstondig sprake van Otto van Veen en Brueghel.7 Daarna bleef het in de achter­een­volgende catalogi van de Berliner Mu­seen op naam van Rottenhammer en Brueghel staan.8 In 1964 werd het schilderij verworven door de Bildergalerie (Schloss Sanssouci) in Potsdam. In de aanloop daarnaartoe schoof Justus Müller Hofstede de Parijse toe­schrijving aan Van Veen en Brueghel op­nieuw naar voren.9 Dit werd tot in 1980 herhaald in de verschillende museum­catalogi van Pots­ dam.10 Julius Held hernieuwde als eerste de oorspronkelijke zeven­tiendeeeuwse toeschrijving aan Rubens en Brue­ghel.11 Deze vi­sie wordt thans algemeen aanvaard en tevens opgenomen in de museumcatalogi van Potsdam.12 Zoals de zeventiende-eeuwse inventaris van Duarte al vermeldt, lijkt de Potsdamse Slag van de Amazonen in overeenstemming te zijn met wat we weten over de vroege stijl van Rubens op basis van de schaarse werken uit die periode. Het schilderij dateert vermoedelijk uit de jaren 1598–­1600, de periode nadat Rubens zijn meesterschap had verworven en vóór hij in mei 1600 naar Italië vertrok. 1596, het jaar waarin Brueghel terugkeerde uit Italië, is in ieder geval een terminus post quem. Het schil­ derij is het vroegste nog bekende werk van Rubens in samenwerking met Brueghel. Afgaande op het grote overwicht van de figurenpartij in de compo­ sitie is het duidelijk dat de oorsprong van het concept bij de figuurschilder

Brussel, Koninklijke Bibliotheek van België, ms. II 94. Dogaer 1971, pp. 208–209. Document, d.d. 4 november 1692. 5  Inventaris 1699, nr. 321; Eckardt 1980, p. 80; Held 1983, p. 22. 3 

4 

74

Nicolai 1779, nr. 666; Puhlmann 1790, nr. 47; Eckardt 1980, p. 80. Cat. tent. Parijs 1807, nr. 602; Held 1983, p. 21. 8  Waagen 1830, II, pp. 227, 746; Parthey 1863, I, p. 181, nr. 67; Eckardt 1980, p. 80. Circa 1930–40 is het gedocumenteerd in het Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft. 9  Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24. Müller Hofstede verwijst daarbij naar het getuigenis van Filips Rubens over de gelijkenis tussen de werken van Rubens en die van zijn meester Van Veen. 10  Eckardt 1975, p. 77, nr. 74; cat. tent. Potsdam 1978, nr. 32; Eckardt 1980, p. 80, nr. 74. 11  Held 1983, pp. 21–25; Held 1987, pp. 16–22. Held onderstreept dat wat bekend is over de herkomst van het Potsdamse Amazonengevecht niet in strijd is met de veronderstelling dat het gaat om het schilderij uit de Duarteverzameling; bovendien is er slechts een kort hiaat van 1692 (verzameling Don Estevan de Andrea) tot 1699 (verzameling Schloss Oranienburg). 12  Bartoschek en Murza 1994, p. 48. 6  7 

75


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

voorgesteld als de met twee Amazonen worstelende krijger op de voorgrond (afb. 1). Theseus is mogelijk links van hem in een voorovergebogen houding af­gebeeld, met eveneens een Amazone in zijn greep. De Amazonenkoningin Hippolyte, ge­tooid in een rood kleed met de Aresgordel, voert rechts van het midden een charge uit in de strijdende massa (afb. 3). De compositie valt uiteen in twee delen. Onderaan vindt het eigen­ lijke gevecht plaats. De bovenste helft van de compositie wordt ingenomen door een vergezicht op een berglandschap. Het woelige strijdtoneel van figuren en paarden is van de hand van Rubens. Het landschap is geschilderd door Jan Brueghel de Oude. Vermoedelijk is het schilderij in Pots­ dam identiek met het werk dat op 12 juli 1682 wordt vermeld in de inventaris van Diego (Jacobus) Duarte II.3 In dat geval hebben we te maken met de oudste bron waarin de toe­schrij­ ving aan Rubens en Brueghel wordt genoemd. Onder nr. 62 staat geschreven: Van Petro Paulo Rubbens … Een stuck op paneel den slagh van de Amasoonen vol werckx van syn vroege manier. Het lantschap ofte verschiet is geheel vanden Fluweelen Bruegel guld. 100. Via de erfenis van Constancia Duarte (echtgenote van Manuel Levy) kwam dat stuk in 1692 terecht bij Don Estevan de Andrea.4 Het feit dat het Potsdamse schilderij getiteld Eine Amazonische Bataille mit Hercule und Theseo in 1699 voor het eerst op­ duikt in de inventaris van Schloss Ora­nien­burg Afb. 3 Peter Paul Rubens en Brueghel de Oude, De slag en in 1710 in die van het Berliner Schloss maakt Jan van de Amazonen, Potsdam, de kans groot dat het hier om een en hetzelfde Schloss Sanssouci, Bilder­ werk gaat.5 In de Berliner Schloss­inventaris van galerie. Detail van afb. 2

1779 wordt het toe­geschreven aan Hans Rotten­ham­mer en Jan Brueghel.6 Tijdens de jaren 1806–15, toen het schilderij in het Musée Napoléon was onder­gebracht, was er voor het eerst kortstondig sprake van Otto van Veen en Brueghel.7 Daarna bleef het in de achter­een­volgende catalogi van de Berliner Mu­seen op naam van Rottenhammer en Brueghel staan.8 In 1964 werd het schilderij verworven door de Bildergalerie (Schloss Sanssouci) in Potsdam. In de aanloop daarnaartoe schoof Justus Müller Hofstede de Parijse toe­schrijving aan Van Veen en Brueghel op­nieuw naar voren.9 Dit werd tot in 1980 herhaald in de verschillende museum­catalogi van Pots­ dam.10 Julius Held hernieuwde als eerste de oorspronkelijke zeven­tiendeeeuwse toeschrijving aan Rubens en Brue­ghel.11 Deze vi­sie wordt thans algemeen aanvaard en tevens opgenomen in de museumcatalogi van Potsdam.12 Zoals de zeventiende-eeuwse inventaris van Duarte al vermeldt, lijkt de Potsdamse Slag van de Amazonen in overeenstemming te zijn met wat we weten over de vroege stijl van Rubens op basis van de schaarse werken uit die periode. Het schilderij dateert vermoedelijk uit de jaren 1598–­1600, de periode nadat Rubens zijn meesterschap had verworven en vóór hij in mei 1600 naar Italië vertrok. 1596, het jaar waarin Brueghel terugkeerde uit Italië, is in ieder geval een terminus post quem. Het schil­ derij is het vroegste nog bekende werk van Rubens in samenwerking met Brueghel. Afgaande op het grote overwicht van de figurenpartij in de compo­ sitie is het duidelijk dat de oorsprong van het concept bij de figuurschilder

Brussel, Koninklijke Bibliotheek van België, ms. II 94. Dogaer 1971, pp. 208–209. Document, d.d. 4 november 1692. 5  Inventaris 1699, nr. 321; Eckardt 1980, p. 80; Held 1983, p. 22. 3 

4 

74

Nicolai 1779, nr. 666; Puhlmann 1790, nr. 47; Eckardt 1980, p. 80. Cat. tent. Parijs 1807, nr. 602; Held 1983, p. 21. 8  Waagen 1830, II, pp. 227, 746; Parthey 1863, I, p. 181, nr. 67; Eckardt 1980, p. 80. Circa 1930–40 is het gedocumenteerd in het Kaiser-Wilhelm-Gesellschaft. 9  Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24. Müller Hofstede verwijst daarbij naar het getuigenis van Filips Rubens over de gelijkenis tussen de werken van Rubens en die van zijn meester Van Veen. 10  Eckardt 1975, p. 77, nr. 74; cat. tent. Potsdam 1978, nr. 32; Eckardt 1980, p. 80, nr. 74. 11  Held 1983, pp. 21–25; Held 1987, pp. 16–22. Held onderstreept dat wat bekend is over de herkomst van het Potsdamse Amazonengevecht niet in strijd is met de veronderstelling dat het gaat om het schilderij uit de Duarteverzameling; bovendien is er slechts een kort hiaat van 1692 (verzameling Don Estevan de Andrea) tot 1699 (verzameling Schloss Oranienburg). 12  Bartoschek en Murza 1994, p. 48. 6  7 

75


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Rubens moet worden gezocht. Op het ogenblik dat Rubens als meester in het gilde werd opgenomen, had hij een leerperiode van ongeveer vier jaar bij Van Veen achter de rug. Hij verbleef er van 1594–95 tot september 1598. Rubens’ leertijd bij deze humanistische pictor doctus, zijn laatste leermeester na Tobias Verhaecht en Adam van Noort, was determinerend voor zijn verdere carrière.13 De Slag van de Amazonen behoort tot de kleine groep schilderijen die Rubens voor zijn vertrek naar Italië maakte en die een sterke invloed van Van Veen vertonen. Het vroege oeuvre van Rubens heeft zich trouwens geleidelijk uit het oeuvre van, onder meer, zijn leermeester Van Veen gekristalliseerd. Rubenskenners als Müller Hofstede, Held, Frans Baudouin, Michael Jaffé, David Freedberg en Hans Vlieghe hebben zich in dat verband meer dan verdienstelijk gemaakt, maar dat neemt niet weg dat tot op heden het vroege werk een onvoldoende bestudeerd en vaag terrein blijft en dat de jonge kunstenaar voor elk van ons een moeilijk kind blijft.14 Op enkele grondig bestudeerde, toegeschreven schilderijen in de sfeer van Van Veen na, bijvoorbeeld Adam en Eva (Antwerpen, Rubenshuis), werden vooral Rubens’ vroege tekeningen onder de loep genomen.15 Toch lijkt het zinvol te blijven zoeken naar creaties van de jonge Rubens van voor zijn vertrek naar Italië. Uit de vermelding van talrijke werken van Rubens in het 1606 gedateerde testament van zijn moeder Maria Pypelinckx blijkt een grotere activiteit dan we zouden durven veronderstellen op grond van het aantal schilderijen dat tegenwoordig met die vroege periode in verband wordt gebracht.16 Voorts kennen we het getuigenis van Filips Rubens in de Rubensbiografie van Roger de Piles (1681) over de ‘veeniaanse’ inslag van de vroegste schilderijen van Rubens.17 Held stelt bovendien dat Rubens

verscheidene aanbevelingen voor Italiaanse opdrachtgevers op zak moet hebben gehad toen hij naar Italië afreisde, wat volgens hem wijst op het bestaan van een creatieve activiteit als zelfstandig kunstenaar, lid van het gilde, vóór zijn vertrek.18 Hij weerlegt met klem de opvatting van Rowlands dat Rubens, gezien de vele kopieën onder zijn jeugdtekeningen en het klei­ne aantal door Van Veen geïnspireerde schilderijen uit zijn prilste carrière, een laatbloeier zou zijn geweest op het ogenblik dat hij in contact kwam met de artistieke en intellectuele atmosfeer van Italië.19 Het originele karakter van zijn vroegste Italiaanse schilderijen spreekt immers die veronderstelling tegen. We kunnen er bovendien van uitgaan dat Rubens, na zijn klassieke opleiding, beginnend bij Rumoldus Verdonck en eindigend bij Van Veen, over de nodige kennis van histories en hun iconografieën beschikte om persoonlijke en originele creaties te maken.20 Tenslotte was Rubens in 1598 vrijmeester geworden en nog voor zijn vertrek naar Italië hield hij er een leerling op na. Voor Held getuigt het feit dat Rubens ondanks zijn afkomst uit de hogere burgerij en zijn uitzonderlijke intellectuele precociteit toch koos voor een schilderscarrière, die meestal rond dertien à veertien jaar werd ingezet, eveneens van zijn prille kwa­liteiten als schilder.21 Het concept van de Slag van de Amazonen geeft blijk van Rubens’ persoonlijke creativiteit nog voor hij in contact kwam met de grote Itali­ aanse voorbeelden. Het schilderij onderscheidt zich dus in dat opzicht van zijn vroege tekeningen naar Duitse, Nederlandse en Italiaanse prenten22 en van de enkele door Van Veen of anderen geïn­spi­reerde, aan hem toe­ geschreven werken, zoals het Bacchanaal met Silenus (Pommersfelden, Graf von Schönborn’sche Kunstsammlungen; naar Mantegna), de Bewening

Over Van Veen en zijn relatie tot Rubens, zie Müller Hofstede 1957; Müller Hofstede 1959; Müller Hofstede 1962a; Müller Hofstede 1962b; Baudouin 1968; Müller Hofstede 1977; Held 1983; Vlieghe 1998, pp. 18–19, 22–23, 117–119. 14  Al in 1977 wees Freedberg, naar aanleiding van het Rubensjaar, op bepaalde Rubensthema’s die om verder onderzoek vroegen. Freedberg 1978. 15  Bijvoorbeeld Pilatus en zeven mannen, naar Hendrik Goltzius (Frankfurt, Städelsches Kunstinstitut). 16  Genard 1877, pp. 371–376, ‘Al de andere schilderijen zijn het eigendom van P.P. Rubens die ze geschilderd heeft’. 17  De Reiffenberg 1837, pp. 10–11; Ruelens 1883, p. 166; Norris 1940, p. 189. Filips’ gegevens waren op hun beurt gebaseerd op notities van de toen reeds overleden Albert Rubens. 13 

76

Held 1983, p. 14. Rowlands 1977, p. 22. 20  Von Sandrart 1675, p. 156. Joachim von Sandrart wijst op de uitzonderlijke intellectuele vroegrijpheid van de jeugdige Rubens, waardoor zijn meesters in hem een jurist zagen. 21  Held 1983, pp. 15–16. Held veegt daarmee ook de stelling van Christopher Norris en Jaffé van tafel, namelijk dat Rubens, naar aanleiding van het huwelijk van zijn zus Blandina, genoodzaakt was geweest het ouderlijk huis te verlaten en daardoor zijn intellectuele opleiding had moeten stopzetten om een beroep te leren. Norris 1940, pp. 184 vv.; Jaffé 1977, p. 8. 22  Bijvoorbeeld deze naar Hans Holbein de Jonge (Dodendans) en Tobias Stimmer. Lugt 1943; Van Regteren Altena 1972. 18 

19 

77


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Rubens moet worden gezocht. Op het ogenblik dat Rubens als meester in het gilde werd opgenomen, had hij een leerperiode van ongeveer vier jaar bij Van Veen achter de rug. Hij verbleef er van 1594–95 tot september 1598. Rubens’ leertijd bij deze humanistische pictor doctus, zijn laatste leermeester na Tobias Verhaecht en Adam van Noort, was determinerend voor zijn verdere carrière.13 De Slag van de Amazonen behoort tot de kleine groep schilderijen die Rubens voor zijn vertrek naar Italië maakte en die een sterke invloed van Van Veen vertonen. Het vroege oeuvre van Rubens heeft zich trouwens geleidelijk uit het oeuvre van, onder meer, zijn leermeester Van Veen gekristalliseerd. Rubenskenners als Müller Hofstede, Held, Frans Baudouin, Michael Jaffé, David Freedberg en Hans Vlieghe hebben zich in dat verband meer dan verdienstelijk gemaakt, maar dat neemt niet weg dat tot op heden het vroege werk een onvoldoende bestudeerd en vaag terrein blijft en dat de jonge kunstenaar voor elk van ons een moeilijk kind blijft.14 Op enkele grondig bestudeerde, toegeschreven schilderijen in de sfeer van Van Veen na, bijvoorbeeld Adam en Eva (Antwerpen, Rubenshuis), werden vooral Rubens’ vroege tekeningen onder de loep genomen.15 Toch lijkt het zinvol te blijven zoeken naar creaties van de jonge Rubens van voor zijn vertrek naar Italië. Uit de vermelding van talrijke werken van Rubens in het 1606 gedateerde testament van zijn moeder Maria Pypelinckx blijkt een grotere activiteit dan we zouden durven veronderstellen op grond van het aantal schilderijen dat tegenwoordig met die vroege periode in verband wordt gebracht.16 Voorts kennen we het getuigenis van Filips Rubens in de Rubensbiografie van Roger de Piles (1681) over de ‘veeniaanse’ inslag van de vroegste schilderijen van Rubens.17 Held stelt bovendien dat Rubens

verscheidene aanbevelingen voor Italiaanse opdrachtgevers op zak moet hebben gehad toen hij naar Italië afreisde, wat volgens hem wijst op het bestaan van een creatieve activiteit als zelfstandig kunstenaar, lid van het gilde, vóór zijn vertrek.18 Hij weerlegt met klem de opvatting van Rowlands dat Rubens, gezien de vele kopieën onder zijn jeugdtekeningen en het klei­ne aantal door Van Veen geïnspireerde schilderijen uit zijn prilste carrière, een laatbloeier zou zijn geweest op het ogenblik dat hij in contact kwam met de artistieke en intellectuele atmosfeer van Italië.19 Het originele karakter van zijn vroegste Italiaanse schilderijen spreekt immers die veronderstelling tegen. We kunnen er bovendien van uitgaan dat Rubens, na zijn klassieke opleiding, beginnend bij Rumoldus Verdonck en eindigend bij Van Veen, over de nodige kennis van histories en hun iconografieën beschikte om persoonlijke en originele creaties te maken.20 Tenslotte was Rubens in 1598 vrijmeester geworden en nog voor zijn vertrek naar Italië hield hij er een leerling op na. Voor Held getuigt het feit dat Rubens ondanks zijn afkomst uit de hogere burgerij en zijn uitzonderlijke intellectuele precociteit toch koos voor een schilderscarrière, die meestal rond dertien à veertien jaar werd ingezet, eveneens van zijn prille kwa­liteiten als schilder.21 Het concept van de Slag van de Amazonen geeft blijk van Rubens’ persoonlijke creativiteit nog voor hij in contact kwam met de grote Itali­ aanse voorbeelden. Het schilderij onderscheidt zich dus in dat opzicht van zijn vroege tekeningen naar Duitse, Nederlandse en Italiaanse prenten22 en van de enkele door Van Veen of anderen geïn­spi­reerde, aan hem toe­ geschreven werken, zoals het Bacchanaal met Silenus (Pommersfelden, Graf von Schönborn’sche Kunstsammlungen; naar Mantegna), de Bewening

Over Van Veen en zijn relatie tot Rubens, zie Müller Hofstede 1957; Müller Hofstede 1959; Müller Hofstede 1962a; Müller Hofstede 1962b; Baudouin 1968; Müller Hofstede 1977; Held 1983; Vlieghe 1998, pp. 18–19, 22–23, 117–119. 14  Al in 1977 wees Freedberg, naar aanleiding van het Rubensjaar, op bepaalde Rubensthema’s die om verder onderzoek vroegen. Freedberg 1978. 15  Bijvoorbeeld Pilatus en zeven mannen, naar Hendrik Goltzius (Frankfurt, Städelsches Kunstinstitut). 16  Genard 1877, pp. 371–376, ‘Al de andere schilderijen zijn het eigendom van P.P. Rubens die ze geschilderd heeft’. 17  De Reiffenberg 1837, pp. 10–11; Ruelens 1883, p. 166; Norris 1940, p. 189. Filips’ gegevens waren op hun beurt gebaseerd op notities van de toen reeds overleden Albert Rubens. 13 

76

Held 1983, p. 14. Rowlands 1977, p. 22. 20  Von Sandrart 1675, p. 156. Joachim von Sandrart wijst op de uitzonderlijke intellectuele vroegrijpheid van de jeugdige Rubens, waardoor zijn meesters in hem een jurist zagen. 21  Held 1983, pp. 15–16. Held veegt daarmee ook de stelling van Christopher Norris en Jaffé van tafel, namelijk dat Rubens, naar aanleiding van het huwelijk van zijn zus Blandina, genoodzaakt was geweest het ouderlijk huis te verlaten en daardoor zijn intellectuele opleiding had moeten stopzetten om een beroep te leren. Norris 1940, pp. 184 vv.; Jaffé 1977, p. 8. 22  Bijvoorbeeld deze naar Hans Holbein de Jonge (Dodendans) en Tobias Stimmer. Lugt 1943; Van Regteren Altena 1972. 18 

19 

77


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

van Christus (Parijs, Musée du Louvre; naar Enea Vico, naar Rafaël), Adam en Eva (Antwerpen, Rubenshuis; naar Marcantonio Raimondi, naar Rafaël), Leda (Dresden, Staat­ li­che Kunst­sammlungen Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister; mogelijk naar Cornelis Bos, naar Michelangelo) en het Oordeel van Paris (Londen, National Gallery; naar Raimondi). Er is geen schilderij van Van Veen aanwijsbaar dat Rubens kan hebben geïnspireerd bij de creatie van de Slag van de Amazonen. Van Veen was op dat ogenblik bezig met grotere projecten zoals de Kruisiging van de heilige Andreas voor de Antwerpse Sint-Andrieskerk Afb. 4 Otto van Veen, Kruisiging (afb. 4) en de Allegorie van de Jeugd (Stock­ van de heilige Andreas, Antwerpen, holm, Nationalmuseum), beide van een heel Sint-Andrieskerk andere aard dan de amazonomachie in Pots­ dam.23 Rubens’ vroegste Italiaanse schilderijen daar­en­te­gen – werken die hij maakte vóór zijn vertrek naar Spanje in 1603 – vertonen al een be­trek­ kelijk persoonlijk en au­then­tiek karakter. Hoewel ze rijk zijn aan ontleende motieven gebruikte hij zelden prenten als vertrekpunt. Schil­de­rijen als de Graflegging (Rome, Galleria Borghese), de werken voor de Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome (Grasse, Cathédrale Notre-Dame-du-Puy), de Bij­ een­komst van de Olympische goden (Praag, Burchtgalerie), de Vlucht van Aeneas uit Troje (Fontainebleau, Musée National du Château), de Bekering van Paulus (Kortrijk, privéverzameling), de Marteling van de heilige Ursula (Mantua, Museo del Palazzo Ducale) en Hero en Leander (New Haven, Yale Univer­sity Art Gallery) illustreren dat. De Slag van de Amazonen sluit qua ori­ginaliteit van concept en compositie veeleer aan bij het vroege Italiaanse oeuvre van Rubens. Dit werk plaatst de juvenilia van de meester dan ook in een ander daglicht.

Toen Rubens het atelier van Van Veen verliet, was hij vooral ge­ boeid door mythologie. Hij was daarin uitstekend opgeleid door zijn leermeester.24 In het Liber Amicorum voor Van Veen schreef Abraham Or­te­­lius hoe deze pictor doctus de vrije kunsten aan de schilderkunst paar­­de. Vooral hun gemeenschappelijke belangstelling voor de letteren en de oudheid moet het cement van de vriendschapsband tussen Van Veen en Rubens zijn geweest. Zoals gezegd is er voor de Amazonenslag geen enkele compositie van Van Veen bekend die Rubens als voorbeeld kan hebben genomen. De tapijtenreeks voor Albrecht van Oostenrijk of andere strijdtaferelen van Van Veen zijn van latere datum. En bovendien staaft Müller Hofstede zijn toeschrijving aan Van Veen niet met directe vergelijkingen met andere schilderijen van de meester.25 Rubens was van bij het begin van zijn carrière geïnteresseerd in het thema van de Slag van de Amazonen en was daarmee veeleer een uit­ zondering. Het legendarische gevecht van de Amazonen was een frequent onderwerp op antieke sarcofagen maar geen favoriet onderwerp van renaissancekunstenaars.26 De tekeningen met Tafereel uit een Amazonen­

Afb. 5 Peter Paul Rubens, Tafereel uit een Amazonen­ gevecht en studies voor Simson, ca. 1601–03, Edinburgh, National Galleries of Scotland

Afb. 6 Peter Paul Rubens, Slag van de Amazonen, ca. 1602–04, Londen, The British Museum

Baudouin 1968. Müller Hofstede 1957; Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24. 26  Rubens kan de prenten van Enea Vico (1543), mogelijk naar Giulio Romano, gekend hebben. Held 1983, p. 22. 24 

Een voorbereidende grisailleschets van Van Veen voor het Martelaarschap van de heilige Andreas bevindt zich in New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Müller Hofstede 1957, pp. 142 vv.; Held 1983, pp. 18, 23. 23 

78

25 

79


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

van Christus (Parijs, Musée du Louvre; naar Enea Vico, naar Rafaël), Adam en Eva (Antwerpen, Rubenshuis; naar Marcantonio Raimondi, naar Rafaël), Leda (Dresden, Staat­ li­che Kunst­sammlungen Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister; mogelijk naar Cornelis Bos, naar Michelangelo) en het Oordeel van Paris (Londen, National Gallery; naar Raimondi). Er is geen schilderij van Van Veen aanwijsbaar dat Rubens kan hebben geïnspireerd bij de creatie van de Slag van de Amazonen. Van Veen was op dat ogenblik bezig met grotere projecten zoals de Kruisiging van de heilige Andreas voor de Antwerpse Sint-Andrieskerk Afb. 4 Otto van Veen, Kruisiging (afb. 4) en de Allegorie van de Jeugd (Stock­ van de heilige Andreas, Antwerpen, holm, Nationalmuseum), beide van een heel Sint-Andrieskerk andere aard dan de amazonomachie in Pots­ dam.23 Rubens’ vroegste Italiaanse schilderijen daar­en­te­gen – werken die hij maakte vóór zijn vertrek naar Spanje in 1603 – vertonen al een be­trek­ kelijk persoonlijk en au­then­tiek karakter. Hoewel ze rijk zijn aan ontleende motieven gebruikte hij zelden prenten als vertrekpunt. Schil­de­rijen als de Graflegging (Rome, Galleria Borghese), de werken voor de Santa Croce in Gerusalemme in Rome (Grasse, Cathédrale Notre-Dame-du-Puy), de Bij­ een­komst van de Olympische goden (Praag, Burchtgalerie), de Vlucht van Aeneas uit Troje (Fontainebleau, Musée National du Château), de Bekering van Paulus (Kortrijk, privéverzameling), de Marteling van de heilige Ursula (Mantua, Museo del Palazzo Ducale) en Hero en Leander (New Haven, Yale Univer­sity Art Gallery) illustreren dat. De Slag van de Amazonen sluit qua ori­ginaliteit van concept en compositie veeleer aan bij het vroege Italiaanse oeuvre van Rubens. Dit werk plaatst de juvenilia van de meester dan ook in een ander daglicht.

Toen Rubens het atelier van Van Veen verliet, was hij vooral ge­ boeid door mythologie. Hij was daarin uitstekend opgeleid door zijn leermeester.24 In het Liber Amicorum voor Van Veen schreef Abraham Or­te­­lius hoe deze pictor doctus de vrije kunsten aan de schilderkunst paar­­de. Vooral hun gemeenschappelijke belangstelling voor de letteren en de oudheid moet het cement van de vriendschapsband tussen Van Veen en Rubens zijn geweest. Zoals gezegd is er voor de Amazonenslag geen enkele compositie van Van Veen bekend die Rubens als voorbeeld kan hebben genomen. De tapijtenreeks voor Albrecht van Oostenrijk of andere strijdtaferelen van Van Veen zijn van latere datum. En bovendien staaft Müller Hofstede zijn toeschrijving aan Van Veen niet met directe vergelijkingen met andere schilderijen van de meester.25 Rubens was van bij het begin van zijn carrière geïnteresseerd in het thema van de Slag van de Amazonen en was daarmee veeleer een uit­ zondering. Het legendarische gevecht van de Amazonen was een frequent onderwerp op antieke sarcofagen maar geen favoriet onderwerp van renaissancekunstenaars.26 De tekeningen met Tafereel uit een Amazonen­

Afb. 5 Peter Paul Rubens, Tafereel uit een Amazonen­ gevecht en studies voor Simson, ca. 1601–03, Edinburgh, National Galleries of Scotland

Afb. 6 Peter Paul Rubens, Slag van de Amazonen, ca. 1602–04, Londen, The British Museum

Baudouin 1968. Müller Hofstede 1957; Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24. 26  Rubens kan de prenten van Enea Vico (1543), mogelijk naar Giulio Romano, gekend hebben. Held 1983, p. 22. 24 

Een voorbereidende grisailleschets van Van Veen voor het Martelaarschap van de heilige Andreas bevindt zich in New York, The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Müller Hofstede 1957, pp. 142 vv.; Held 1983, pp. 18, 23. 23 

78

25 

79


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

gevecht en studies voor Simson (ca. 1601–03; afb. 5),27 de Slag van de Ama­ zonen (ca. 1602–04; afb. 6)28 en kopieën van soortgelijke Rubens­composities (Kopenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst)29 weerspiegelen zijn interesse in het onderwerp. Dat die bleef voortduren blijkt uit latere werken met hetzelfde thema, zoals de Slag van de Amazonen te München (ca. 1618; Alte Pinakothek).30 Ook zijn latere algemene voorliefde voor bewogen taferelen met paarden en ruiters komt in het schilderij uit Potsdam al tot uiting. Samenwerking was geen nieuw gegeven voor Rubens. Hij kreeg er al mee te maken in het atelier van Van Veen, die sowieso vertrouwd was met het verschijnsel doordat hij onder meer met Brueghel aan het hof van Albrecht en Isabella had samengewerkt. Eén schilderij van Van Veen en Rubens, in samenwerking met Brueghel, is gedocumenteerd. Het staat vermeld in de inventaris van de verzameling van Herman de Neyt, gedateerd 15–21 oktober 1642: Een stuck van Octavi ende Breugel ende van Rubens eerst geschilderd, met buytenlyst, wesende den berch Parnassus, get. No. 362.31 De langdurige twijfel die heeft bestaan omtrent de toeschrijving van de Potsdamse Slag van de Amazonen aan Van Veen of Rubens zou kunnen doen vermoeden dat ook dit werk was ontstaan in dezelfde omstandigheden als de vermelde ‘berch Parnassus’, namelijk in het atelier van Van Veen, met participatie van Rubens en in samenwerking met Brueghel. De analyse van ontwerp en stijl laat er echter geen twijfel over bestaan dat de figurenpartij volledig eigenhandig werk van Rubens is en dat het schilderij ontstond kort nadat hij het atelier van Van Veen had verlaten. Vermoedelijk heeft Rubens, die verantwoordelijk was voor het concept van het schilderij, ook het initiatief voor de samenwer­ king genomen en Brueghel aangezocht om de achtergrond te schilderen.

Het is mogelijk dat Brueghel en Rubens elkaar al voor hun con­ tacten in het atelier van Van Veen hadden leren kennen, bijvoorbeeld in 1589, toen Brueghel op doorreis naar Italië zijn zus te Keulen bezocht, of in Antwerpen na de terugkeer van de familie Rubens uit Keulen en vóór het vertrek van Brueghel naar Italië. Rubens’ ontwerp van de Slag van de Amazonen is als een puzzel van verschillende individuele confrontaties, uitgesponnen over de hele breedte van de compositie. Ieder afzonderlijk gevecht is geladen met een eigen dramatiek. Het lijkt alsof Rubens er niet in geslaagd is om de talrijke individuele handelingen in een groter geheel onder te brengen, iets wat hem later wel lukte in de Slag van de Amazonen te München. Misschien werd hij voor het Münchense schilderij geholpen door herinneringen uit zijn verblijf in Italië, onder meer Giulio Romano’s fresco met de Overwinning van Constantijn (Rome, Musei Vaticani). Hoewel er geen ontwerptekening voor het geheel bekend is, kun­ nen toch enkele bladen met het schilderij in verband worden gebracht. Uit een kopietekening naar Rubens in Kopenhagen met Twee taferelen van Hercules en twee Amazonen (afb. 7) is het vroe­gere bestaan van ontwerp­ tekeningen van Rubens voor de centrale en belangrijkste groep van de

Inv. D 4936/verso (recto: Studies voor Hero en Leander): pen en bruine inkt, bruin gewassen, 204 × 306 mm. Müller Hofstede 1977, pp. 198–201, onder nr. 30; Held 1983, p. 23; cat. tent. New York 2005, pp. 83–85, nr. 10; cat. tent. Londen 2005–06, pp. 50–51, nr. 5 (toegeschreven aan Rubens); cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, pp. 50–51. 28  Inv. 1895.9.15.1045: pen en bruine en rode inkt over schets in zwart krijt, 252 × 430 mm. Held 1959, nr. 2; Burchard en d’Hulst 1963, nr. 50; Müller Hofstede 1977, pp. 181–182, nr. 24; Held 1983, p. 22; cat. tent. New York 2005, pp. 88–90, nr. 12; cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, pp. 50–51. 29  Held 1983, p. 23. 30  Inv. 324: paneel, 124,3 × 165,3 cm. Held 1983, p. 24; cat. München 1986, pp. 464–466, nr. 324. 31  Van den Branden 1883, p. 409; Denucé 1932, p. 100. 27 

80

Afb. 7 Kopie naar Rubens, Twee taferelen van Hercules en twee Amazonen, Kopenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst

81


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

gevecht en studies voor Simson (ca. 1601–03; afb. 5),27 de Slag van de Ama­ zonen (ca. 1602–04; afb. 6)28 en kopieën van soortgelijke Rubens­composities (Kopenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst)29 weerspiegelen zijn interesse in het onderwerp. Dat die bleef voortduren blijkt uit latere werken met hetzelfde thema, zoals de Slag van de Amazonen te München (ca. 1618; Alte Pinakothek).30 Ook zijn latere algemene voorliefde voor bewogen taferelen met paarden en ruiters komt in het schilderij uit Potsdam al tot uiting. Samenwerking was geen nieuw gegeven voor Rubens. Hij kreeg er al mee te maken in het atelier van Van Veen, die sowieso vertrouwd was met het verschijnsel doordat hij onder meer met Brueghel aan het hof van Albrecht en Isabella had samengewerkt. Eén schilderij van Van Veen en Rubens, in samenwerking met Brueghel, is gedocumenteerd. Het staat vermeld in de inventaris van de verzameling van Herman de Neyt, gedateerd 15–21 oktober 1642: Een stuck van Octavi ende Breugel ende van Rubens eerst geschilderd, met buytenlyst, wesende den berch Parnassus, get. No. 362.31 De langdurige twijfel die heeft bestaan omtrent de toeschrijving van de Potsdamse Slag van de Amazonen aan Van Veen of Rubens zou kunnen doen vermoeden dat ook dit werk was ontstaan in dezelfde omstandigheden als de vermelde ‘berch Parnassus’, namelijk in het atelier van Van Veen, met participatie van Rubens en in samenwerking met Brueghel. De analyse van ontwerp en stijl laat er echter geen twijfel over bestaan dat de figurenpartij volledig eigenhandig werk van Rubens is en dat het schilderij ontstond kort nadat hij het atelier van Van Veen had verlaten. Vermoedelijk heeft Rubens, die verantwoordelijk was voor het concept van het schilderij, ook het initiatief voor de samenwer­ king genomen en Brueghel aangezocht om de achtergrond te schilderen.

Het is mogelijk dat Brueghel en Rubens elkaar al voor hun con­ tacten in het atelier van Van Veen hadden leren kennen, bijvoorbeeld in 1589, toen Brueghel op doorreis naar Italië zijn zus te Keulen bezocht, of in Antwerpen na de terugkeer van de familie Rubens uit Keulen en vóór het vertrek van Brueghel naar Italië. Rubens’ ontwerp van de Slag van de Amazonen is als een puzzel van verschillende individuele confrontaties, uitgesponnen over de hele breedte van de compositie. Ieder afzonderlijk gevecht is geladen met een eigen dramatiek. Het lijkt alsof Rubens er niet in geslaagd is om de talrijke individuele handelingen in een groter geheel onder te brengen, iets wat hem later wel lukte in de Slag van de Amazonen te München. Misschien werd hij voor het Münchense schilderij geholpen door herinneringen uit zijn verblijf in Italië, onder meer Giulio Romano’s fresco met de Overwinning van Constantijn (Rome, Musei Vaticani). Hoewel er geen ontwerptekening voor het geheel bekend is, kun­ nen toch enkele bladen met het schilderij in verband worden gebracht. Uit een kopietekening naar Rubens in Kopenhagen met Twee taferelen van Hercules en twee Amazonen (afb. 7) is het vroe­gere bestaan van ontwerp­ tekeningen van Rubens voor de centrale en belangrijkste groep van de

Inv. D 4936/verso (recto: Studies voor Hero en Leander): pen en bruine inkt, bruin gewassen, 204 × 306 mm. Müller Hofstede 1977, pp. 198–201, onder nr. 30; Held 1983, p. 23; cat. tent. New York 2005, pp. 83–85, nr. 10; cat. tent. Londen 2005–06, pp. 50–51, nr. 5 (toegeschreven aan Rubens); cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, pp. 50–51. 28  Inv. 1895.9.15.1045: pen en bruine en rode inkt over schets in zwart krijt, 252 × 430 mm. Held 1959, nr. 2; Burchard en d’Hulst 1963, nr. 50; Müller Hofstede 1977, pp. 181–182, nr. 24; Held 1983, p. 22; cat. tent. New York 2005, pp. 88–90, nr. 12; cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07, pp. 50–51. 29  Held 1983, p. 23. 30  Inv. 324: paneel, 124,3 × 165,3 cm. Held 1983, p. 24; cat. München 1986, pp. 464–466, nr. 324. 31  Van den Branden 1883, p. 409; Denucé 1932, p. 100. 27 

80

Afb. 7 Kopie naar Rubens, Twee taferelen van Hercules en twee Amazonen, Kopenhagen, Statens Museum for Kunst

81


BULLETIN

compositie af te leiden.32 Dit ondersteunt de hypothese dat Rubens het volledige ontwerp van de figurenpartij voor zijn rekening nam.33 Het is weinig waarschijnlijk dat de al genoemde tekening uit het British Museum (afb. 6) als een oefening of voorontwerp is ontstaan tijdens het creatieproces van het schilderij in Potsdam. Ofschoon het blad aansluit bij enkele vroege Rubenstekeningen moet het op basis van de verschillende, aan Italiaanse gravures ontleende motieven in Rubens’ vroege Italiaanse jaren worden gedateerd (ca. 1602–04). Een vergelijking van Rubens’ energieke paardenontwerpen met de relatief logge dieren van Van Veen is verhelderend. Het massieve paard met zijn grote borstkas, brede nek en conventionele houding met opgeheven been en licht gedraaid hoofd in Van Veens contemporaine Kruisiging van de heilige Andreas (afb. 4) bijvoorbeeld verschilt zeer van Rubens’ leven­ dige, nerveuze paarden met fel gedraaide koppen, lange nekken en sierlijk gekrulde manen.34 Een tekening van Willem Panneels naar Jost Amman, ‘via Rubens’, met Studies van paarden en ruiters in Hamburg (afb. 8),35 geeft een idee van de interesse en de oefeningen van de jeugdige Rubens in deze materie. Vergelijkbare heftige paarden komen ook voor in de hogergenoemde vroege tekeningen van en naar Rubens in Edinburgh, Londen en Kopenhagen (afb. 5, 6) en bereiken uiteraard een summum in latere schilderijen zoals de eveneens al vermelde Slag van de Amazonen te München en andere historietaferelen en jachten op wilde dieren. Rubens’ oefeningen in het weer­geven van vechtende figuren vinden we ook terug in zijn vroege tekeningen, waaronder het blad naar Amman Het opschrift dat verwijst naar de historie van Romeinen en Sabijnen is vermoedelijk een verkeerde interpretatie vanwege de kopiist; naakte vrouwenfiguren zijn ongewoon voor het tafereel van de Roof van de Sabijnse maagden. 33  De door Müller Hofstede geopperde mogelijkheden dat Rubens zou hebben gewerkt naar een ontwerp van Van Veen of dat Van Veen zijn leerling de centrale groep liet ontwerpen en hem liet helpen bij de uitvoering ervan, lijken vergezocht. Müller Hofstede 1977, pp. 35, 181. 34  Ook de paarden in de van ca. 1612 daterende panelen van Van Veen met Gevechten van Bataven tegen Romeinen (Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum) zijn niet te vergelijken met die van Rubens. Held 1983, p. 23. 35  Küster 1963, pp. 25–26. Het gaat om een blad met 12 paardenhoudingen uit gevechtstaferelen van Amman, uit een Duitse editie van Flavius Josephus’ Joodse oorlogen, die mogelijk deel uitmaakte van de bibliotheek van de familie Rubens bij hun terugkeer uit Keulen. Over een andere Rubenstekening met paarden (Parijs) zegt Lugt: ‘Voici le Rubens des batailles à ses premiers pas’. Lugt 1949, II, p. 35.

BULLETIN

Afb. 8 Willem Panneels naar Jost Amman, ‘via Rubens’, Studies van paarden en ruiters, Hamburg, Kunsthalle, Graphische Sammlungen

32 

82

Afb. 9 Peter Paul Rubens, Hercules in gevecht met de Nemeïsche leeuw, Antwerpen, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet

83


BULLETIN

compositie af te leiden.32 Dit ondersteunt de hypothese dat Rubens het volledige ontwerp van de figurenpartij voor zijn rekening nam.33 Het is weinig waarschijnlijk dat de al genoemde tekening uit het British Museum (afb. 6) als een oefening of voorontwerp is ontstaan tijdens het creatieproces van het schilderij in Potsdam. Ofschoon het blad aansluit bij enkele vroege Rubenstekeningen moet het op basis van de verschillende, aan Italiaanse gravures ontleende motieven in Rubens’ vroege Italiaanse jaren worden gedateerd (ca. 1602–04). Een vergelijking van Rubens’ energieke paardenontwerpen met de relatief logge dieren van Van Veen is verhelderend. Het massieve paard met zijn grote borstkas, brede nek en conventionele houding met opgeheven been en licht gedraaid hoofd in Van Veens contemporaine Kruisiging van de heilige Andreas (afb. 4) bijvoorbeeld verschilt zeer van Rubens’ leven­ dige, nerveuze paarden met fel gedraaide koppen, lange nekken en sierlijk gekrulde manen.34 Een tekening van Willem Panneels naar Jost Amman, ‘via Rubens’, met Studies van paarden en ruiters in Hamburg (afb. 8),35 geeft een idee van de interesse en de oefeningen van de jeugdige Rubens in deze materie. Vergelijkbare heftige paarden komen ook voor in de hogergenoemde vroege tekeningen van en naar Rubens in Edinburgh, Londen en Kopenhagen (afb. 5, 6) en bereiken uiteraard een summum in latere schilderijen zoals de eveneens al vermelde Slag van de Amazonen te München en andere historietaferelen en jachten op wilde dieren. Rubens’ oefeningen in het weer­geven van vechtende figuren vinden we ook terug in zijn vroege tekeningen, waaronder het blad naar Amman Het opschrift dat verwijst naar de historie van Romeinen en Sabijnen is vermoedelijk een verkeerde interpretatie vanwege de kopiist; naakte vrouwenfiguren zijn ongewoon voor het tafereel van de Roof van de Sabijnse maagden. 33  De door Müller Hofstede geopperde mogelijkheden dat Rubens zou hebben gewerkt naar een ontwerp van Van Veen of dat Van Veen zijn leerling de centrale groep liet ontwerpen en hem liet helpen bij de uitvoering ervan, lijken vergezocht. Müller Hofstede 1977, pp. 35, 181. 34  Ook de paarden in de van ca. 1612 daterende panelen van Van Veen met Gevechten van Bataven tegen Romeinen (Amsterdam, Rijksmuseum) zijn niet te vergelijken met die van Rubens. Held 1983, p. 23. 35  Küster 1963, pp. 25–26. Het gaat om een blad met 12 paardenhoudingen uit gevechtstaferelen van Amman, uit een Duitse editie van Flavius Josephus’ Joodse oorlogen, die mogelijk deel uitmaakte van de bibliotheek van de familie Rubens bij hun terugkeer uit Keulen. Over een andere Rubenstekening met paarden (Parijs) zegt Lugt: ‘Voici le Rubens des batailles à ses premiers pas’. Lugt 1949, II, p. 35.

BULLETIN

Afb. 8 Willem Panneels naar Jost Amman, ‘via Rubens’, Studies van paarden en ruiters, Hamburg, Kunsthalle, Graphische Sammlungen

32 

82

Afb. 9 Peter Paul Rubens, Hercules in gevecht met de Nemeïsche leeuw, Antwerpen, Museum Plantin-Moretus/Prentenkabinet

83


BULLETIN

met Twee Romeinse sol­da­ten en diverse ge­­vechts­taferelen (ca. 1598; Brussel, Pren­ ­­ten­­­kabinet) en de tekening naar Bar­­thel Beham met een Gevecht van naakte man­ nen (Washington, National Gal­ lery of Art). Het motief van het weg­gedragen hoofd van de over­ won­ nen vij­ and is geïnspireerd op de reeds aan­ gehaalde Overwin­ning van Constan­tijn van Giulio Romano, naar een antieke afbeelding op de Zuil van Trajanus. Rubens gebruikte het opnieuw in zijn Slag van de Amazonen te München. De man met zijn armen rond een Amazone gaat terug op een houtsnede van Giu­sep­pe Niccolò Vicen­ tino naar Rafaël waarop Hercules in gevecht met de Nemeïsche leeuw is voor­­gesteld. Meerdere teke­nin­gen van Rubens, weliswaar van latere datum (afb. 9 en Parijs, Mu­sée du Louvre), bren­ gen dit motief in beeld.36 Het gebruik van een analoge figurengroep in verschillende contexten is een terugkerend verschijnsel in de carrière van Rubens. In deze compositie gaat het om Hercules in gevecht met een Amazone. Een vroege Rubenstekening naar een prent van Hans Collaert naar Johannes Stradanus (ca. 1598; Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen) toont Twee hoornblazers. Trompetten en hoornblazers kwa­ men ook al voor op Giulio Romano’s Overwinning van Constantijn. Ofschoon er geen tekeningen van Rubens bekend zijn voor de gehele compositie van de Slag van de Amazonen in Potsdam, kunnen we met behulp van infraroodopnamen zijn scheppende hand toch volgen in de ondertekening (afb. 10, 11). De aanwezigheid van een ondertekening, die in Rubens’ afgewerkte schilderijen – dus los van de olieverfschetsen, waar 36 

84

Lugt 1949, II, p. 13; Held 1983, p. 25.

BULLETIN

Afb. 10–11 Infraroodopnamen van De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bilder­galerie

we van doen hebben met een ander stadium in het ontstaansproces – eerder ongewoon is, is intrigerend. Zij is overvloedig en over het gehele paneel uitgewerkt, wat twijfels doet rijzen over de toeschrijving ervan aan Rubens, en dat terwijl de uitvoering van het schilderij juist met grote zekerheid aan de jonge Rubens kan worden toegeschreven. De ondertekening moet verder worden bestudeerd in andere vroege, aan Rubens toegeschreven werken om zicht te krijgen op een werkwijze die misschien enkel voor zijn vroegste schilderijen kenmerkend is. Een vergelijking met de tekeningen van Rubens’ hand uit dezelfde periode gaat niet echt op. Naargelang het gaat om nauwkeurig uitgewerkte, zelf ont­worpen of gekopieerde tekeningen of voorontwerpen in de meest uit­eenlopende stadia van voltooiing, hebben we te maken met telkens ver­schillende tekentechnieken, graden van af­ 85


BULLETIN

met Twee Romeinse sol­da­ten en diverse ge­­vechts­taferelen (ca. 1598; Brussel, Pren­ ­­ten­­­kabinet) en de tekening naar Bar­­thel Beham met een Gevecht van naakte man­ nen (Washington, National Gal­ lery of Art). Het motief van het weg­gedragen hoofd van de over­ won­ nen vij­ and is geïnspireerd op de reeds aan­ gehaalde Overwin­ning van Constan­tijn van Giulio Romano, naar een antieke afbeelding op de Zuil van Trajanus. Rubens gebruikte het opnieuw in zijn Slag van de Amazonen te München. De man met zijn armen rond een Amazone gaat terug op een houtsnede van Giu­sep­pe Niccolò Vicen­ tino naar Rafaël waarop Hercules in gevecht met de Nemeïsche leeuw is voor­­gesteld. Meerdere teke­nin­gen van Rubens, weliswaar van latere datum (afb. 9 en Parijs, Mu­sée du Louvre), bren­ gen dit motief in beeld.36 Het gebruik van een analoge figurengroep in verschillende contexten is een terugkerend verschijnsel in de carrière van Rubens. In deze compositie gaat het om Hercules in gevecht met een Amazone. Een vroege Rubenstekening naar een prent van Hans Collaert naar Johannes Stradanus (ca. 1598; Rotterdam, Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen) toont Twee hoornblazers. Trompetten en hoornblazers kwa­ men ook al voor op Giulio Romano’s Overwinning van Constantijn. Ofschoon er geen tekeningen van Rubens bekend zijn voor de gehele compositie van de Slag van de Amazonen in Potsdam, kunnen we met behulp van infraroodopnamen zijn scheppende hand toch volgen in de ondertekening (afb. 10, 11). De aanwezigheid van een ondertekening, die in Rubens’ afgewerkte schilderijen – dus los van de olieverfschetsen, waar 36 

84

Lugt 1949, II, p. 13; Held 1983, p. 25.

BULLETIN

Afb. 10–11 Infraroodopnamen van De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bilder­galerie

we van doen hebben met een ander stadium in het ontstaansproces – eerder ongewoon is, is intrigerend. Zij is overvloedig en over het gehele paneel uitgewerkt, wat twijfels doet rijzen over de toeschrijving ervan aan Rubens, en dat terwijl de uitvoering van het schilderij juist met grote zekerheid aan de jonge Rubens kan worden toegeschreven. De ondertekening moet verder worden bestudeerd in andere vroege, aan Rubens toegeschreven werken om zicht te krijgen op een werkwijze die misschien enkel voor zijn vroegste schilderijen kenmerkend is. Een vergelijking met de tekeningen van Rubens’ hand uit dezelfde periode gaat niet echt op. Naargelang het gaat om nauwkeurig uitgewerkte, zelf ont­worpen of gekopieerde tekeningen of voorontwerpen in de meest uit­eenlopende stadia van voltooiing, hebben we te maken met telkens ver­schillende tekentechnieken, graden van af­ 85


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

werking, bestemmingen, drijfveren, zodat het lijkt alsof we verschillende handen van dezelfde schilder te zien krijgen. Het ontwerp van het landschap in het schilderij uit Potsdam is ongetwijfeld van Jan Brueghel de Oude. De hoge horizont, het van boven­ uit geziene middenplan en de geaccentueerde omlijsting aan de linkerzijde wijzen op een ontstaan vóór 1600. Brueghels Landschap met de jonge Tobias (1598, Vaduz, Sammlungen des Fürsten von Liechtenstein) vertoont een gelijksoortig ontwerp. Het landschap van de Amazonenslag met haastig weergegeven troepen en vele kleine figuurtjes doet voorts denken aan Brueghels Slag bij Issus (1602; Parijs, Musée du Louvre) en zijn Slag van de Israëlieten en Amalekieten (Dresden, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister). Deze strijdtaferelen, waarin de individuele confrontaties opgaan in het massa­ gevecht, contrasteren met de in detail uitgewerkte duels op het voorplan van de Slag van de Amazonen.37 De classicistische portrettering van de figuren in Rubens’ uitvoe­ ring gaat terug op Van Veen, maar getuigt, zoals Vlieghe opmerkt, van een dieper anatomisch inzicht.38 De figuren zijn deels maniëristisch, vol beweging en vaak verwrongen weergegeven en met een betrekkelijk breed penseel geborsteld. Dat is bijzonder opvallend door het contrast met de fijne penseelstreken in het landschap. De hand van Rubens is vooral herkenbaar in de centrale groep van Hercules met de twee Amazonen en is te vergelijken met zijn vroege schildertechniek zoals we die kennen uit de aan hem toegeschreven Adam en Eva van het Antwerpse Rubenshuis.39 De schaamdoeken zijn later bijgeschilderd. De zeer specifieke, haast fluores­ ce­rende kleur van de manen komt later terug in Rubens’ Mantuaanse Bijeenkomst van de Olympische goden (Praag, Burchtgalerie)40 en verwijst vermoedelijk naar een poëtische boodschap in de oude literatuur. De haarfijne penseelvoering en het kleurgebruik in de uitvoering van het landschap zijn typisch voor Brueghel. De verregaande opheffing

van het strakke driekleurenschema (bruin, groen, blauw) en het aanwenden van een groenbruine eenheidstoon, die ook voorkomt in het blauw van de verre achtergrond, zijn voor die tijd heel ‘modern’.

Held 1983, p. 24. Vlieghe 1998, pp. 18–19, 22–23, 117–119. 39  Ook Müller Hofstede erkende voor deze centrale groep de medewerking van Rubens in het schilderij dat, volgens hem, voorts van de hand van Van Veen was. Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24. 40  Neumann 1968–69, pp. 73–134; Held 1983, p. 25. 37 

38 

86

Van de Slag van de Amazonen in Potsdam zijn meerdere Antwerpse ko­­pie­ en uit de zeventiende eeuw bekend.41 Eén ervan ­bevindt zich in een Amerikaanse privécollectie (afb. 13).42 De toeschrijvings­pro­ble­ma­tiek van dit werk wordt bemoeilijkt door zijn betrekkelijk slechte bewarings­ toestand en de talrijke overschilderingen.43 Belangrijk voor de toeschrijving zijn de ‘kopiërende’ hand van de ondertekening (afb. 16–17; vgl. afb. 14–15) en de mindere kwa­liteit van de uitvoering. Beide aspecten bekrachtigen de hypothese van een kopie. Wat de uitvoering betreft moet worden be­ nadrukt dat de schaam­doeken, latere toevoegsels in het originele schil­de­ rij, ontbreken. Dat wijst erop dat de kopie vroeg te dateren is. Het andere werk, afkomstig uit een Engelse particuliere verza­me­ ling, is in langdurig bruikleen in het Rubenshuis in Antwerpen.44

Een Amazonenschilderij (paneel, 130 × 252 cm), dat in 1895 in Keulen werd geveild als ‘Van Veen, Rubens en Brueghel’, is enkel bekend uit de literatuur. Müller Hofstede 1959. 42  Paneel, 102 × 120 cm. Tentoonstellingen: Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, nr. 1; Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, nr. 68; [Essen], Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, nr. 70. Literatuur: Held 1983, p. 25; Bodart 1985, pp. 10–12, 151 n. 6; cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, p. 36, nr. 1; cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, pp. 238–242, nr. 68; cat. tent. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, pp. 217–220, nr. 70; Van Mulders 2000, p. 116. 43  Het schilderij werd in 1985 gerestaureerd. Bodart schreef deze versie als eerste aan Rubens toe. Bodart 1985, pp. 10–12, 151 n. 6. De toeschrijving aan Rubens, ditmaal in samenwerking met Brueghel, werd achtereenvolgens bekrachtigd door Müller Hofstede (advies d.d. 27 maart 1986), Bodart en Ertz: Bodart, in cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, p. 36; Ertz, in cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, pp. 238–242; Ertz, in cat. tent. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, pp. 217–220. 44  Doek, 108 × 145 cm. 41 

87


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

werking, bestemmingen, drijfveren, zodat het lijkt alsof we verschillende handen van dezelfde schilder te zien krijgen. Het ontwerp van het landschap in het schilderij uit Potsdam is ongetwijfeld van Jan Brueghel de Oude. De hoge horizont, het van boven­ uit geziene middenplan en de geaccentueerde omlijsting aan de linkerzijde wijzen op een ontstaan vóór 1600. Brueghels Landschap met de jonge Tobias (1598, Vaduz, Sammlungen des Fürsten von Liechtenstein) vertoont een gelijksoortig ontwerp. Het landschap van de Amazonenslag met haastig weergegeven troepen en vele kleine figuurtjes doet voorts denken aan Brueghels Slag bij Issus (1602; Parijs, Musée du Louvre) en zijn Slag van de Israëlieten en Amalekieten (Dresden, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister). Deze strijdtaferelen, waarin de individuele confrontaties opgaan in het massa­ gevecht, contrasteren met de in detail uitgewerkte duels op het voorplan van de Slag van de Amazonen.37 De classicistische portrettering van de figuren in Rubens’ uitvoe­ ring gaat terug op Van Veen, maar getuigt, zoals Vlieghe opmerkt, van een dieper anatomisch inzicht.38 De figuren zijn deels maniëristisch, vol beweging en vaak verwrongen weergegeven en met een betrekkelijk breed penseel geborsteld. Dat is bijzonder opvallend door het contrast met de fijne penseelstreken in het landschap. De hand van Rubens is vooral herkenbaar in de centrale groep van Hercules met de twee Amazonen en is te vergelijken met zijn vroege schildertechniek zoals we die kennen uit de aan hem toegeschreven Adam en Eva van het Antwerpse Rubenshuis.39 De schaamdoeken zijn later bijgeschilderd. De zeer specifieke, haast fluores­ ce­rende kleur van de manen komt later terug in Rubens’ Mantuaanse Bijeenkomst van de Olympische goden (Praag, Burchtgalerie)40 en verwijst vermoedelijk naar een poëtische boodschap in de oude literatuur. De haarfijne penseelvoering en het kleurgebruik in de uitvoering van het landschap zijn typisch voor Brueghel. De verregaande opheffing

van het strakke driekleurenschema (bruin, groen, blauw) en het aanwenden van een groenbruine eenheidstoon, die ook voorkomt in het blauw van de verre achtergrond, zijn voor die tijd heel ‘modern’.

Held 1983, p. 24. Vlieghe 1998, pp. 18–19, 22–23, 117–119. 39  Ook Müller Hofstede erkende voor deze centrale groep de medewerking van Rubens in het schilderij dat, volgens hem, voorts van de hand van Van Veen was. Müller Hofstede 1977, p. 181, onder nr. 24. 40  Neumann 1968–69, pp. 73–134; Held 1983, p. 25. 37 

38 

86

Van de Slag van de Amazonen in Potsdam zijn meerdere Antwerpse ko­­pie­ en uit de zeventiende eeuw bekend.41 Eén ervan ­bevindt zich in een Amerikaanse privécollectie (afb. 13).42 De toeschrijvings­pro­ble­ma­tiek van dit werk wordt bemoeilijkt door zijn betrekkelijk slechte bewarings­ toestand en de talrijke overschilderingen.43 Belangrijk voor de toeschrijving zijn de ‘kopiërende’ hand van de ondertekening (afb. 16–17; vgl. afb. 14–15) en de mindere kwa­liteit van de uitvoering. Beide aspecten bekrachtigen de hypothese van een kopie. Wat de uitvoering betreft moet worden be­ nadrukt dat de schaam­doeken, latere toevoegsels in het originele schil­de­ rij, ontbreken. Dat wijst erop dat de kopie vroeg te dateren is. Het andere werk, afkomstig uit een Engelse particuliere verza­me­ ling, is in langdurig bruikleen in het Rubenshuis in Antwerpen.44

Een Amazonenschilderij (paneel, 130 × 252 cm), dat in 1895 in Keulen werd geveild als ‘Van Veen, Rubens en Brueghel’, is enkel bekend uit de literatuur. Müller Hofstede 1959. 42  Paneel, 102 × 120 cm. Tentoonstellingen: Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, nr. 1; Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, nr. 68; [Essen], Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, nr. 70. Literatuur: Held 1983, p. 25; Bodart 1985, pp. 10–12, 151 n. 6; cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, p. 36, nr. 1; cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, pp. 238–242, nr. 68; cat. tent. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, pp. 217–220, nr. 70; Van Mulders 2000, p. 116. 43  Het schilderij werd in 1985 gerestaureerd. Bodart schreef deze versie als eerste aan Rubens toe. Bodart 1985, pp. 10–12, 151 n. 6. De toeschrijving aan Rubens, ditmaal in samenwerking met Brueghel, werd achtereenvolgens bekrachtigd door Müller Hofstede (advies d.d. 27 maart 1986), Bodart en Ertz: Bodart, in cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990, p. 36; Ertz, in cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98, pp. 238–242; Ertz, in cat. tent. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98, pp. 217–220. 44  Doek, 108 × 145 cm. 41 

87


88

Afb. 12 Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie

Afb. 14–15 Detail en infraroodopname van afb. 12

Afb. 13 Kopie naar Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, California, Roderick LaShelle Collection

Afb. 16–17 Detail en infraroodopname van afb. 13

89


88

Afb. 12 Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, Potsdam, Schloss Sanssouci, Bildergalerie

Afb. 14–15 Detail en infraroodopname van afb. 12

Afb. 13 Kopie naar Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel de Oude, De slag van de Amazonen, California, Roderick LaShelle Collection

Afb. 16–17 Detail en infraroodopname van afb. 13

89


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Tentoonstellingen

Literatuur

Parijs 1807 ‘Statues, bustes, bas-reliefs, bronzes, et autres antiquités, peintures, dessins, et objets curieux conquis par la Grande Armée, dans les années 1806 et 1807: dont l’exposition a eu lieu le 4 octobre 1807, premier anniversaire de la Bataille d’Jena’, Parijs 1807.

Von Sandrart 1675 Joachim von Sandrarts Academie der Bau-, Bild- und Mahlerey-Künste von 1675. Leben der berühmten Maler, Bildhauer und Baumeister, ed. R.A. Peltzer, München 1925.

Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978 ‘Gemälde aus dem Schloß Oranienburg’, Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990 ‘Pietro Paolo Rubens (1577–1640)’, Palazzo della Ragione, Padua; Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Società per le Belle Arti ed Esposizione Permanente, Milaan; 1990. Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93 ‘Von Bruegel bis Rubens. Das goldene Jahrhundert der flämischen Malerei’, WallrafRichartz-Museum, Keulen, 1992; [Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerpen, 1992–93]; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen, 1993. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98 ‘Pieter Breughel der Jüngere (1565–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568–1625). Flämische Malerei um 1600. Tradition und Fortschritt’, Villa Hügel, Essen, 1997; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen, 1997–98. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1998 ‘Pieter Breughel de Jonge (1564–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel de Oude (1568–1625). Een Vlaamse schildersfamilie rond 1600’, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerpen, 1998.

Nicolai 1779 F. Nicolai, Beschreibung der Königlichen Residenzstädte Berlin und Potsdam, aller daselbst befindlichen Merkwürdigkeiten und der umliegenden Gegend, Berlijn 1779. Puhlmann 1790 J.G. Puhlmann, Beschreibung der Gemählde welche sich in der Bildergallerie, den daranstossenden Zimmern, und dem weissen Saale im Königl. Schlosse zu Berlin befinden, Berlijn 1790. Cat. tent. Parijs 1807 Statues, bustes, bas-reliefs, bronzes, et autres antiquités, peintures, dessins, et objets curieux conquis par la Grande Armée, dans les années 1806 et 1807: dont l’exposition a eu lieu le 4 octobre 1807, premier anniversaire de la Bataille d’Jena (cat. tent.), Parijs 1807. Waagen 1830 G.F. Waagen, Verzeichniss der Gemälde-Sammlungen des königlichen Museums zu Berlin, Berlijn 1830. De Reiffenberg 1837 F. De Reiffenberg, ‘Vita Petrii Paulii Rubenii (1676)’, Nouveaux Mémoires de l’Académie Royale des Sciences et Belles-Lettres de Bruxelles 10 (1837), pp. 10–11.

Londen 2005–06 ‘Rubens. A Master in the Making’, The National Gallery, Londen, 2005–06.

Parthey 1863 G. Parthey, Deutscher Bildersaal. Verzeichnis der in Deutschland vorhandenen Oelbilder verstorbener Maler aller Schulen, I–II, Berlijn 1863.

Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07 ‘Rubens and Brueghel: A Working Friendship’, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 2006; ‘Rubens en Brueghel, een artistieke vriendschap’, Koninklijk Kabinet van Schilderijen Mauritshuis, Den Haag, 2006–07.

Genard 1877 P. Genard, P.P. Rubens. Aanteekeningen over den grooten Meester en zijne Bloedverwanten, Antwerpen 1877. Ruelens 1883 Ch. Ruelens, ‘La vie de Rubens par Roger de Piles’, Rubens-Bulletijn 2 (1883), pp. 157–175. Van den Branden 1883 F.J. Van den Branden, Geschiedenis der Antwerpsche Schilderschool, Antwerpen 1883.

90

91


BULLETIN

BULLETIN

Tentoonstellingen

Literatuur

Parijs 1807 ‘Statues, bustes, bas-reliefs, bronzes, et autres antiquités, peintures, dessins, et objets curieux conquis par la Grande Armée, dans les années 1806 et 1807: dont l’exposition a eu lieu le 4 octobre 1807, premier anniversaire de la Bataille d’Jena’, Parijs 1807.

Von Sandrart 1675 Joachim von Sandrarts Academie der Bau-, Bild- und Mahlerey-Künste von 1675. Leben der berühmten Maler, Bildhauer und Baumeister, ed. R.A. Peltzer, München 1925.

Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978 ‘Gemälde aus dem Schloß Oranienburg’, Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990 ‘Pietro Paolo Rubens (1577–1640)’, Palazzo della Ragione, Padua; Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Società per le Belle Arti ed Esposizione Permanente, Milaan; 1990. Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93 ‘Von Bruegel bis Rubens. Das goldene Jahrhundert der flämischen Malerei’, WallrafRichartz-Museum, Keulen, 1992; [Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerpen, 1992–93]; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen, 1993. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98 ‘Pieter Breughel der Jüngere (1565–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568–1625). Flämische Malerei um 1600. Tradition und Fortschritt’, Villa Hügel, Essen, 1997; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen, 1997–98. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1998 ‘Pieter Breughel de Jonge (1564–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel de Oude (1568–1625). Een Vlaamse schildersfamilie rond 1600’, Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerpen, 1998.

Nicolai 1779 F. Nicolai, Beschreibung der Königlichen Residenzstädte Berlin und Potsdam, aller daselbst befindlichen Merkwürdigkeiten und der umliegenden Gegend, Berlijn 1779. Puhlmann 1790 J.G. Puhlmann, Beschreibung der Gemählde welche sich in der Bildergallerie, den daranstossenden Zimmern, und dem weissen Saale im Königl. Schlosse zu Berlin befinden, Berlijn 1790. Cat. tent. Parijs 1807 Statues, bustes, bas-reliefs, bronzes, et autres antiquités, peintures, dessins, et objets curieux conquis par la Grande Armée, dans les années 1806 et 1807: dont l’exposition a eu lieu le 4 octobre 1807, premier anniversaire de la Bataille d’Jena (cat. tent.), Parijs 1807. Waagen 1830 G.F. Waagen, Verzeichniss der Gemälde-Sammlungen des königlichen Museums zu Berlin, Berlijn 1830. De Reiffenberg 1837 F. De Reiffenberg, ‘Vita Petrii Paulii Rubenii (1676)’, Nouveaux Mémoires de l’Académie Royale des Sciences et Belles-Lettres de Bruxelles 10 (1837), pp. 10–11.

Londen 2005–06 ‘Rubens. A Master in the Making’, The National Gallery, Londen, 2005–06.

Parthey 1863 G. Parthey, Deutscher Bildersaal. Verzeichnis der in Deutschland vorhandenen Oelbilder verstorbener Maler aller Schulen, I–II, Berlijn 1863.

Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07 ‘Rubens and Brueghel: A Working Friendship’, J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 2006; ‘Rubens en Brueghel, een artistieke vriendschap’, Koninklijk Kabinet van Schilderijen Mauritshuis, Den Haag, 2006–07.

Genard 1877 P. Genard, P.P. Rubens. Aanteekeningen over den grooten Meester en zijne Bloedverwanten, Antwerpen 1877. Ruelens 1883 Ch. Ruelens, ‘La vie de Rubens par Roger de Piles’, Rubens-Bulletijn 2 (1883), pp. 157–175. Van den Branden 1883 F.J. Van den Branden, Geschiedenis der Antwerpsche Schilderschool, Antwerpen 1883.

90

91


BULLETIN

Denucé 1932 J. Denucé, De Antwerpsche ‘Konstkamers’. Inventarissen van Kunstverzamelingen te Antwerpen in de 16e en 17e eeuw (Bronnen voor de Geschiedenis van de Vlaamsche Kunst, II), Antwerpen 1932.

Neumann 1968–69 J. Neumann, ‘Aus den Jugendjahren Peter Paul Rubens’. Eine Versammlung der olympischen Götter’, Jahrbuch des Kunsthistorischen Institutes der Universität Graz 3–4 (1968–69), pp. 73–134.

Norris 1940 Ch. Norris, ‘Rubens before Italy’, The Burlington Magazine 76 (1940), pp. 184–194.

Dogaer 1971 G. Dogaer, ‘De inventaris der schilderijen van Diego Duarte’, Jaarboek Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen, 1971, pp. 195–221.

Lugt 1943 F. Lugt, ‘Rubens and Stimmer’, Art Quarterly 6 (1943), pp. 99–114. Lugt 1949 F. Lugt, Musée du Louvre. Inventaire général des dessins des écoles du nord. École flamande, I–II, Parijs 1949. Müller Hofstede 1957 J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Zum Werke des Otto van Veen, 1590–1600’, Bulletin Koninklijke Musea voor Schone Kunsten van België 6 (1957), pp. 127–174. Held 1959 J.S. Held, Rubens. Selected Drawings, I–II, Londen en New York 1959. Müller Hofstede 1959 J. Müller Hofstede, Otto van Veen. Der Lehrer des P.P. Rubens (Ph.D.), [Freiburg im Breisgau 1959]. Müller Hofstede 1962a J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Zur Antwerpener Frühzeit von Peter Paul Rubens’, Münchner Jahrbuch der bildenden Kunst 13 (1962), pp. 179–216. Müller Hofstede 1962b J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Zur frühen Bildnismalerei von Peter Paul Rubens’, Pantheon 20 (1962), pp. 279–290. Burchard en d’Hulst 1963 L. Burchard en R.-A. d’Hulst, Rubens Drawings, I–II, Brussel 1963. Küster 1963 Ch.-L. Küster, ‘Eine Kopie nach einem verschollenen Skizzenbuchblatt des Rubens’, Jahrbuch der Hamburger Kunstsammlungen 8 (1963), pp. 25–26. Baudouin 1968 F. Baudouin, ‘Een Jeugdwerk van Rubens, “Adam en Eva”, en de Relatie Van Veen en Rubens’, Antwerpen ( juli 1968), pp. 3–19.

92

BULLETIN

Van Regteren Altena 1972 J.Q. van Regteren Altena, ‘Het vroegste werk van Rubens’, Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten 34/2 (1972), pp. 3–23. Eckardt 1975 G. Eckardt, Die Gemälde in der Bildergalerie von Sanssouci, Potsdam-Sanssouci 1975. Jaffé 1977 M. Jaffé, Rubens and Italy, Oxford 1977. Müller Hofstede 1977 J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Rubens in Italien’, in Peter Paul Rubens 1577–1640 (cat. tent. Kunsthalle, Keulen, 1977), I, Keulen 1977, pp. 13–354. Rowlands 1977 J. Rowlands, Rubens. Drawings and Sketches (cat. tent. The British Museum, Londen, 1977), Londen 1977. Bartoschek 1978 G. Bartoschek, Flämische Barockmalerei in der Bildergalerie von Sanssouci, PotsdamSanssouci 1978. Cat. tent. Potsdam 1978 Gemälde aus dem Schloß Oranienburg (cat. tent.), Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978. Freedberg 1978 D. Freedberg, ‘L’année Rubens, manifestations et publications en 1977’, Revue de l’Art 39 (1978), pp. 82–94. Cat. München 1986 Alte Pinakothek München. Erläuterungen zu den ausgestellten Gemälden, München 1986. Cat. tent. Londen 2005–06 D. Jaffé, E. McGrath et al., Rubens. A Master in the Making (cat. tent. National Gallery, Londen, 2005–06), Londen 2005.

93


BULLETIN

Denucé 1932 J. Denucé, De Antwerpsche ‘Konstkamers’. Inventarissen van Kunstverzamelingen te Antwerpen in de 16e en 17e eeuw (Bronnen voor de Geschiedenis van de Vlaamsche Kunst, II), Antwerpen 1932.

Neumann 1968–69 J. Neumann, ‘Aus den Jugendjahren Peter Paul Rubens’. Eine Versammlung der olympischen Götter’, Jahrbuch des Kunsthistorischen Institutes der Universität Graz 3–4 (1968–69), pp. 73–134.

Norris 1940 Ch. Norris, ‘Rubens before Italy’, The Burlington Magazine 76 (1940), pp. 184–194.

Dogaer 1971 G. Dogaer, ‘De inventaris der schilderijen van Diego Duarte’, Jaarboek Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten Antwerpen, 1971, pp. 195–221.

Lugt 1943 F. Lugt, ‘Rubens and Stimmer’, Art Quarterly 6 (1943), pp. 99–114. Lugt 1949 F. Lugt, Musée du Louvre. Inventaire général des dessins des écoles du nord. École flamande, I–II, Parijs 1949. Müller Hofstede 1957 J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Zum Werke des Otto van Veen, 1590–1600’, Bulletin Koninklijke Musea voor Schone Kunsten van België 6 (1957), pp. 127–174. Held 1959 J.S. Held, Rubens. Selected Drawings, I–II, Londen en New York 1959. Müller Hofstede 1959 J. Müller Hofstede, Otto van Veen. Der Lehrer des P.P. Rubens (Ph.D.), [Freiburg im Breisgau 1959]. Müller Hofstede 1962a J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Zur Antwerpener Frühzeit von Peter Paul Rubens’, Münchner Jahrbuch der bildenden Kunst 13 (1962), pp. 179–216. Müller Hofstede 1962b J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Zur frühen Bildnismalerei von Peter Paul Rubens’, Pantheon 20 (1962), pp. 279–290. Burchard en d’Hulst 1963 L. Burchard en R.-A. d’Hulst, Rubens Drawings, I–II, Brussel 1963. Küster 1963 Ch.-L. Küster, ‘Eine Kopie nach einem verschollenen Skizzenbuchblatt des Rubens’, Jahrbuch der Hamburger Kunstsammlungen 8 (1963), pp. 25–26. Baudouin 1968 F. Baudouin, ‘Een Jeugdwerk van Rubens, “Adam en Eva”, en de Relatie Van Veen en Rubens’, Antwerpen ( juli 1968), pp. 3–19.

92

BULLETIN

Van Regteren Altena 1972 J.Q. van Regteren Altena, ‘Het vroegste werk van Rubens’, Mededelingen van de Koninklijke Academie voor Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schone Kunsten 34/2 (1972), pp. 3–23. Eckardt 1975 G. Eckardt, Die Gemälde in der Bildergalerie von Sanssouci, Potsdam-Sanssouci 1975. Jaffé 1977 M. Jaffé, Rubens and Italy, Oxford 1977. Müller Hofstede 1977 J. Müller Hofstede, ‘Rubens in Italien’, in Peter Paul Rubens 1577–1640 (cat. tent. Kunsthalle, Keulen, 1977), I, Keulen 1977, pp. 13–354. Rowlands 1977 J. Rowlands, Rubens. Drawings and Sketches (cat. tent. The British Museum, Londen, 1977), Londen 1977. Bartoschek 1978 G. Bartoschek, Flämische Barockmalerei in der Bildergalerie von Sanssouci, PotsdamSanssouci 1978. Cat. tent. Potsdam 1978 Gemälde aus dem Schloß Oranienburg (cat. tent.), Potsdam-Sanssouci 1978. Freedberg 1978 D. Freedberg, ‘L’année Rubens, manifestations et publications en 1977’, Revue de l’Art 39 (1978), pp. 82–94. Cat. München 1986 Alte Pinakothek München. Erläuterungen zu den ausgestellten Gemälden, München 1986. Cat. tent. Londen 2005–06 D. Jaffé, E. McGrath et al., Rubens. A Master in the Making (cat. tent. National Gallery, Londen, 2005–06), Londen 2005.

93


BULLETIN

Eckardt 1980 G. Eckardt, Die Gemälde in der Bildergalerie von Sanssouci, Potsdam-Sanssouci 1980. Held 1982 J.S. Held, Rubens and His Circle, Princeton 1982. Held 1983 J.S. Held, ‘Thoughts on Rubens’ Beginnings’, Papers Presented at the International Rubens Symposium April 14–16, 1982. The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, State Art Museum of Florida, ed. W.H. Wilson, Sarasota 1983, pp. 14–35. Bodart 1985 D. Bodart, Rubens, Milaan 1985. Held 1987 J.S. Held, Rubens-Studien, Leipzig 1987. Moormann en Uitterhoeve 1987 E.M. Moormann en W. Uitterhoeve, Van Achilleus tot Zeus. Thema’s uit de klassieke mythologie in literatuur, muziek, beeldende kunst en theater, Nijmegen 1987. Cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990 Pietro Paolo Rubens (1577–1640) (cat. tent. Palazzo della Ragione, Padua; Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Società per le Belle Arti ed Esposizione Permanente, Milaan), Milaan 1990. Cat. tent. Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93 Von Bruegel bis Rubens. Das goldene Jahrhundert der flämischen Malerei (cat. tent. WallrafRichartz-Museum, Keulen; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen), ed. E. Mai en H. Vlieghe, Keulen 1992. Bartoschek en Murza 1994 G. Bartoschek en G. Murza, Die Königlichen Galerien in Sanssouci, Leipzig 1994. Von Simson 1996 O. von Simson, Peter Paul Rubens 1577–1640. Humanist, Maler, Diplomat, Mainz 1996. Paulussen 1997 M. Paulussen, ‘Jan Brueghel d.Ä. “Weltlandschaft” und enzyklopädisches Stilleben’, (Ph.D. Philosophische Fakultät der Rheinisch-Westfälischen Technischen Hochschule Aachen, 1997), Aken 1997.

94

BULLETIN

Cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98 Pieter Breughel der Jüngere (1565–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568–1625). Flämische Malerei um 1600. Tradition und Fortschritt (cat. tent. Villa Hügel, Essen, 1997; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen, 1997–98), ed. K. Ertz, Lingen 1997. Cat. tent. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98 Pieter Breughel de Jonge (1564–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel de Oude (1568–1625). Een Vlaamse schildersfamilie rond 1600 (cat. tent. Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerpen, 1998), Antwerpen 1998. Vlieghe 1998 H. Vlieghe, Flemish Art and Architecture 1585–1700, New Haven en Londen 1998. Van Mulders 2000 C. Van Mulders, ‘Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel I: de drijfveren van hun samenwerking’, in Concept, Design, and Execution in Flemish Painting (1550–1680), ed. H. Vlieghe, A. Balis en C. Van de Velde, Turnhout 2000, pp. 111–126. Poeschel 2001 S. Poeschel, ‘Rubens’ Battle of the Amazons as a War-Picture. The Modernisation of a Myth’, Artibus et Historiae 22 (2001) 43, pp. 91–108. Renger en Denk 2002 K. Renger en C. Denk, Flämische Malerei des Barock in der Alten Pinakothek, München en Keulen 2002. Cat. tent. Rijsel 2004 Rubens (cat. tent. Palais des Beaux-Arts, Rijsel, 2004), Rijsel 2004. Cat. tent. Wenen 2004 Rubens in Wien. Die Meisterwerke (cat. tent. Liechtenstein Museum; Kunsthistorisches Museum; Akademie der bildenden Künste, Gemäldegalerie; Wenen, 2004), Wenen 2004. Van Mulders 2004 C. Van Mulders, ‘Die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Peter Paul Rubens und Jan Brueghel d. Ä’, Pan & Syrinx: Ein Erotische Jagd. Peter Paul Rubens, Jan Brueghel und ihre Zeitgenossen (cat. tent. Staatliche Museen, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Kassel; Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt am Main; 2004), Kassel 2004, pp. 59–79. Cat. tent. New York 2005 A.M. Logan en M.C. Plomp, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640). The Drawings (cat. tent. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2005), New York 2005.

95


BULLETIN

Eckardt 1980 G. Eckardt, Die Gemälde in der Bildergalerie von Sanssouci, Potsdam-Sanssouci 1980. Held 1982 J.S. Held, Rubens and His Circle, Princeton 1982. Held 1983 J.S. Held, ‘Thoughts on Rubens’ Beginnings’, Papers Presented at the International Rubens Symposium April 14–16, 1982. The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, State Art Museum of Florida, ed. W.H. Wilson, Sarasota 1983, pp. 14–35. Bodart 1985 D. Bodart, Rubens, Milaan 1985. Held 1987 J.S. Held, Rubens-Studien, Leipzig 1987. Moormann en Uitterhoeve 1987 E.M. Moormann en W. Uitterhoeve, Van Achilleus tot Zeus. Thema’s uit de klassieke mythologie in literatuur, muziek, beeldende kunst en theater, Nijmegen 1987. Cat. tent. Padua, Rome en Milaan 1990 Pietro Paolo Rubens (1577–1640) (cat. tent. Palazzo della Ragione, Padua; Palazzo delle Esposizioni, Rome; Società per le Belle Arti ed Esposizione Permanente, Milaan), Milaan 1990. Cat. tent. Keulen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1992–93 Von Bruegel bis Rubens. Das goldene Jahrhundert der flämischen Malerei (cat. tent. WallrafRichartz-Museum, Keulen; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen), ed. E. Mai en H. Vlieghe, Keulen 1992. Bartoschek en Murza 1994 G. Bartoschek en G. Murza, Die Königlichen Galerien in Sanssouci, Leipzig 1994. Von Simson 1996 O. von Simson, Peter Paul Rubens 1577–1640. Humanist, Maler, Diplomat, Mainz 1996. Paulussen 1997 M. Paulussen, ‘Jan Brueghel d.Ä. “Weltlandschaft” und enzyklopädisches Stilleben’, (Ph.D. Philosophische Fakultät der Rheinisch-Westfälischen Technischen Hochschule Aachen, 1997), Aken 1997.

94

BULLETIN

Cat. tent. Essen, [Antwerpen] en Wenen 1997–98 Pieter Breughel der Jüngere (1565–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel der Ältere (1568–1625). Flämische Malerei um 1600. Tradition und Fortschritt (cat. tent. Villa Hügel, Essen, 1997; Kunsthistorisches Museum, Wenen, 1997–98), ed. K. Ertz, Lingen 1997. Cat. tent. [Essen,] Antwerpen [en Wenen] 1997–98 Pieter Breughel de Jonge (1564–1637/8) – Jan Brueghel de Oude (1568–1625). Een Vlaamse schildersfamilie rond 1600 (cat. tent. Koninklijk Museum voor Schone Kunsten, Antwerpen, 1998), Antwerpen 1998. Vlieghe 1998 H. Vlieghe, Flemish Art and Architecture 1585–1700, New Haven en Londen 1998. Van Mulders 2000 C. Van Mulders, ‘Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel I: de drijfveren van hun samenwerking’, in Concept, Design, and Execution in Flemish Painting (1550–1680), ed. H. Vlieghe, A. Balis en C. Van de Velde, Turnhout 2000, pp. 111–126. Poeschel 2001 S. Poeschel, ‘Rubens’ Battle of the Amazons as a War-Picture. The Modernisation of a Myth’, Artibus et Historiae 22 (2001) 43, pp. 91–108. Renger en Denk 2002 K. Renger en C. Denk, Flämische Malerei des Barock in der Alten Pinakothek, München en Keulen 2002. Cat. tent. Rijsel 2004 Rubens (cat. tent. Palais des Beaux-Arts, Rijsel, 2004), Rijsel 2004. Cat. tent. Wenen 2004 Rubens in Wien. Die Meisterwerke (cat. tent. Liechtenstein Museum; Kunsthistorisches Museum; Akademie der bildenden Künste, Gemäldegalerie; Wenen, 2004), Wenen 2004. Van Mulders 2004 C. Van Mulders, ‘Die Zusammenarbeit zwischen Peter Paul Rubens und Jan Brueghel d. Ä’, Pan & Syrinx: Ein Erotische Jagd. Peter Paul Rubens, Jan Brueghel und ihre Zeitgenossen (cat. tent. Staatliche Museen, Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Kassel; Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt am Main; 2004), Kassel 2004, pp. 59–79. Cat. tent. New York 2005 A.M. Logan en M.C. Plomp, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640). The Drawings (cat. tent. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 2005), New York 2005.

95


BULLETIN

Cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07 Rubens and Brueghel. A Working Friendship (cat. tent. J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 2006), Los Angeles 2006. – Rubens en Brueghel, een artistieke vriendschap (Koninklijk Kabinet van Schilderijen Mauritshuis, Den Haag, 2006–07), Zwolle 2006. Van Mulders 2007 C. Van Mulders, ‘De samenwerking tussen Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel I’, in Rubens. Een genie aan het werk (cat. tent. Koninklijke Musea voor Schone Kunsten van België, Brussel, 2007–08), Tielt 2007, pp. 107–124.

96

BULLETIN


BULLETIN

Cat. tent. Los Angeles en Den Haag 2006–07 Rubens and Brueghel. A Working Friendship (cat. tent. J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, 2006), Los Angeles 2006. – Rubens en Brueghel, een artistieke vriendschap (Koninklijk Kabinet van Schilderijen Mauritshuis, Den Haag, 2006–07), Zwolle 2006. Van Mulders 2007 C. Van Mulders, ‘De samenwerking tussen Peter Paul Rubens en Jan Brueghel I’, in Rubens. Een genie aan het werk (cat. tent. Koninklijke Musea voor Schone Kunsten van België, Brussel, 2007–08), Tielt 2007, pp. 107–124.

96

BULLETIN


Rubensbulletin 2012