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EM EDUCATIONmatters

SECONDARY2010

inagural edition


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EM EDUCATIONmatters

features

Safe supportive and inclusive schools

3

Saving the planet 8

The universality of diversity

10

Mental health key concern for kids

14

Rethinking teacher development

15

The value of camps and outdoor education

25

Educating art in Australia

33

School fare

48

How does your garden grow?

51

Exercising your ‘DUTY OF CARE’

54

The scientific method: Critical yet misunderstood

60

21st Century Learning

64

The Cybersafey Help Button

78

Cyber security education package

79

Achieving the best relationship between school principals and teachers

88

Sewing back in vogue

categories

100

advertiser directory: page 113

Art 33

IT/Interactive learning 68

Audio Visual 110

Internet Security 80

Awards & Events 19

Libraries 94

Campaigns 6

Music/Drama

24

Canteens 53

PE/Outdoor Ed/Excursions 27

Facilities Supplies 41

Outdoor Furniture/Equipment 29

General Maintenance/Outdoor equipment 42

Science 60

Grounds Maintenance

42

Stationery/Back to School

Health 49

104

Storage Solutions 90

Health Campaigns

18

Tech Studies

54

Home Economics

98

Uniforms/Back to school

30

Indoor/Office Furniture 37 Infrastructure 96

EM

Contents


Editor Kathryn Edwards

Publisher Garth Wright

Head Designer Michael Griffiths

CEO Gary Peach

Graphic Designers Kym Reichenbacher Bianca Fidge Kimberly Smith

General Manager Graham Miles

Publications Executive Kimberly Rainsford

Marketing Cheree Gordon Johnathon Dunstan Advertising RenĂŠe Lambert 08 8113 9223

APRS Level 6, 38 Currie Street, Adelaide, South Australia, 5000 GPO Box 1746, Adelaide SA 5001 Phone: 08 8113 9200 Fax: 08 8113 9201 Pre-Press: 08 8113 9206 Email: prepress@aprs.com.au Printer Newstyle Printing Co. Pty Ltd 41 Manchester Street Mile End, SA 5031 Phone: 08 8234 6155

educationmatters Disclaimer APRS is not committed to nor takes responsibility for the views expressed in articles or advertisements herein. The publishers could not possibly ensure that each advertisement published in this magazine complies with the Trade Practises Act and responsibility must therefore rest with the person, company or agency submitting the advertisement for publication.


Foreword S h e re eV Presid ertigan, ent o f ASP A

d ters, we applau Education Mat of itiative, in on is iti th ed r st fo e fir ce Service ur so Welcome to th Re ng hi is stralian Publ r educators. the team at Au lian ing resource fo ss pa m t of the Austra co en l a great al ct the Presiden pe ss. ex ne si ld bu ou y w m u t title but yo matters; it is ea n io gr , at rs uc te ed at by M at ents Education ion to think th to policy statem cipals Associat time we have and if we listen to ns e lia ra tim Secondary Prin st m Au fro l al ly te to r na te rtu at fo m un ld of those two matter, Education shou leaders it does nd the meaning ta ity rs un de m un m ly co al d tu politicians an that others ac of the evidence e to go in search pals (2009), th ration of Princi de fe simple words. on C al l vit na t io os ‘the m the Internat education as, ent ld convention of Long described atement! He w en st si l At the ninth wor H fu e er Le w e, po or a t ap ha ng W Si .’ r of re fo tu basis Prime Minister ake for their fu ly sustainable societies can m orld, it is the on in building w d nt ie se ed ba gr einvestment that in dg al is also a vit it today’s knowle d ‘in an d rapidly , at th th an y g ow in sa on to in a confus generating gr e r ar fo e y, w rit ho pe w os d the poor to cohesion of progress, for pr communities an d lue and social va ge ies ta of y an tit dv en sa id d help di veloping econom a sense of y.’ is crucial for de the way to lift an it da is d e It an . on ld n, us or tio at w ra st changing h developed the next gene ac in r re d tte an be s ie do om advance and to developing econ ople. beyond being mmodity is pe apore’s only co if they are to go ng tivity Si ea , cr try d un an co g derstandin source rich un re a e, ’s is dg le at th ow co lia sure the untry e skills, kn Unlike Austra people have th tries. People en un its co at r th he re ot su d It has to en Singapore an of value to both cent capacity to be ad up to the re l. matter. In the le ld ne financial surviva ou do sh be or ld rs ou te w , what and it mat ucation matters ust wait ed people industry m a e on is w ry n d ta io le al en at st m uc Ed en in h com rnment has be there was muc w the that a new gove federal election e wait to see ho ow w N ly . nt ne rta do po be Im t y. no lic ld po ou w to t in and wha translated commentary is profession. to see how this rates with the siness bo lla co d an ts ul ucation and bu ns co cipants from ed government iqué rti un pa m , m PA co AS e d in July by st century. Th te 21 uc e nd th co in m n t ru io at ifican At TH100, a fo we shape educ e and seek sign ould matter as to find our voic d school ed an y ne lit e bi w ta at un defined what sh th co telligent ac rum stressed in fo g e in th us g by in d . ol te ng genera spendi public scho of government government in and efficiency ss investment by ion ne ive ct fe ef of the Associat sure the ed by the work reporting to en rm ork fo w in s ol as ho w y sc lit at t accountabi to ensure th en k or llig te ew in m r en fo fra a - “It is developm t The definition and the fullest Leaders (ASCL) od ge go le d ol on C m d m an co the strengths an of School both the iently towards ll expression to ol fic fu ho ef s d sc ve gi al an rn ly at te th ive in effect h set of data It combines . ric ls a pi es pu of us of t l It en ia . nt velopm of their pupils lfilling the pote the state of de n the school in fu appropriate to g rin ferences that ca in ito al on weaknesses of tic m is al at rn st te lid ex va of e ls th r leve only fo processes with should be used n.au) l school. Data ua at www.aspa.as e vid bl di la in ai ch av is ea rt po re ion bridge’ ll fu it.” (The ‘fix the educat to is n, lia ra be drawn from st need to ensure every Au mmunities. We PA, indeed for co AS d r fo ge e ta ng an le dv al and disa e are to seek a The other ch uctive and if w een advantaged od tw pr be ly p tru ga e be th or close Australia is to ts the target if that funding hi not destiny. is y demograph guarantee that igan , Sheree Vert ASPA in 2010 years. of nt ne ni de r si fo re , P ia , Tasman position of rt e po th on up ev D ng in ki Prior to ta High School pal of Reece was the Princi

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foreword


Safe supportive and inclusive schools

•S  tates’ and Territories’ Anti bullying policies http://www. deewr.gov.au/Schooling/NationalSafeSchools/Pages/ antibullyingpolicies.aspx •G  overnment, Catholic and Independent education authorities’ websites http://www.bullyingnoway.com.au/who/contactsaustralian.shtm

Schools are among the safest places in the community for children and young people. Bullying, cyber bullying, harassment and violence place students’ safety in jeopardy. These abuses of power occur in the social relationships between individuals and groups in school communities, in workplaces and in the wider society. No matter what age or role, we can each be each part of the problem or part of the solution. Young people can be supported now and in their future roles as active citizens through: •A  positive and inclusive school culture that builds care and respect for difference and encourages the active participation of students, staff and parents in decision making. •A  greed whole school definitions, which may include ageappropriate versions developed in collaboration with students to ensure shared understanding.

• Bullying. No way! www.bullyingnoway.com.au Bullying. No way! Bullying. No way! (BNW) is a user-friendly website collaboratively developed and maintained by Australia’s government, Catholic and Independent education authorities. Its purpose is to support all school communities in creating safer, more supportive environments free from bullying, harassment, discrimination and violence. BNW recognises that bullying, harassment, discrimination and violence are abuses of power that occur in the social relationships between individuals and groups in our school communities and society. We can help our young people both now and in their future roles as active citizens by fostering the values of caring and respect for difference and encouraging communities to work together towards locally relevant and sustainable approaches.

•C  ollaboratively developed policy, roles for key groups and procedural steps for responding to incidents when they occur. The website’s 300-plus pages offer staff, parents and students a wealth of information and ideas which can be used to gain • An integrated approach that is evidence based and responsive to local needs and the changing nature of bullying. personal advice and empowerment, seek justice for oneself and others; stimulate shared school, classroom or home • Addressing the behaviours and underlying beliefs through all discussions and action; inform the school’s whole school plan; curriculum areas, teaching practices and relationships. and help with research assignments. •P  rofessional development for staff and parent awareness raising. •A  continuous cycle of consultation, review, celebration and improvement.

Features include: • The Issues – definitions plus an exploration of underlying discrimination on the basis of race, gender, sexuality, ability and socioeconomic class.

Resources to assist in developing an integrated, comprehensive approach for immediate issues through to long term positive change and maintenance include:

•A  n Ideas box of practical activities and school case studies of effective approaches for long term change for the classroom and beyond.

•The National Safe Schools Framework (NSSF)

•P  rofiles of researchers, practitioners and others who have made a difference.

http://www.deewr.gov.au/Schooling/NationalSafeSchools/ Pages/nationalsafeschoolsframework.aspx The National Safe Schools Framework represents a collaborative effort by all Australian education authorities and other key stakeholders. It consists of a set of nationally agreed principles for safe and supportive school environments and includes appropriate responses that schools can adopt to address the issues of bullying, harassment, violence, and child abuse and neglect. It emphasises the need to develop and implement policies and programs through processes engaging the whole school community, for teachers to have appropriate training in positive student management, and the need for schools to respond proactively to incidents of victimisation or abuse.

•S  potlights on key issues and Forums for teachers, parents and students. •A  Chill out space with activities for children and young people. •Q  uick access to a wide range of teaching materials and other resources developed or provided by all states and territories. Bullying. No way! also distributes to subscribers a BNW e-bulletin highlighting useful research, resources and additions to the Bullying. No way! website, as well as what’s happening around Australia’s Government, Catholic and Independent education sectors. Visit the home page to sign up and view previous editions.

Australian school communities share cybersolutions

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supportive schools

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®

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AN ONLINE MATHS TUTORING PROGRAM PROVIDED FREE TO AUSTRALIAN SECONDARY SCHOOLS Almost 1 million Australian high school students have already seen the benefits of Maths Online and are currently using the program to improve their grasp of maths. Maths Online is a high quality, independent online maths tutoring program based on Australian State curricula for Years 7-12. The program features hundreds of fully animated and narrated maths lessons with over 15,000 examstyle questions to test a student’s mastery of maths.

Maths Online is available free of charge to every high school student in Australia. This has been made possible by McDonald’s Australia and its hundreds of Franchisees who have covered the costs of supplying the program. Usually a subscription to this program would cost $40 a month for one student.

To register for Maths Online or for more information and a demonstration go to: www.mathsonline.com.au


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I used to really struggle with maths. But now that I understand what I’m doing, I kind of like it. And my marks have improved heaps. Jordan Escobar, Year 12 student

Maths Online is a series of interactive lessons and exercises on the internet, to help students learn maths at their own pace. At McDonald’s we offer Maths Online as one of our staff benefits and after great feedback, we’re now making it available free to every secondary school student in Australia. It’s just one of the many things that we’re doing to give back to the community. Sign up free today at www.mathsonline.com.au


rightsED Human rights education resources for teachers What about Doug’s rights?, Young people in the workplace and Tackling sexual harassment. The Australian Human Rights Com mission feels it is important for all Australians to kno w their rights and their responsibility to respect the rights of others. To assist teachers to teach these imp ortant issues we have produced a range of human rights education resources entitled - rightsED.

rightsED comprises more than 450 pages of worksheets, activities, videos and audio resources. Guided by a clear set of education principles and learning outcomes, the resources aim to help students develop a critical understanding of human rights and responsibilities, as well as the attitudes, behaviours and skills needed to apply them in every day life.

While the majority of resources and activities have been developed for secondary students, some are suitable for younger students. All resources can be downloaded free of charge from our education web-section at: www.humanrights.gov.au/education. We have also produced a DVD which contains all these resources which can be ordered free of charge by calling (02) 9284 9600 or emailing: publications@humanrights.gov.au The multimedia resources from rightsED have also been put onto our YouTube channel - see www.youtube.com/user/ AustralianHRC For further information on the Commission’s human rights education initiatives, join our mailing list or email: education@humanrights.gov.au

There are nine resources, each featuring a range of activities around different human rights issues and topics, and each searchable by the Key Learning Areas into which they fit. The resources include: Understanding human rights, Commemorate Human Rights Day, Child rights, Bringing them home, Face the Facts, Voices of Australia, Disability rights –

rightsED

Human rights education resources for teachers

Human rights education resources for teachers The Australian Human Rights Commission has produced a range of human rights education resources for teachers called – rightsED. Guided by a clear set of education principles and learning outcomes, the resources aim to help students develop a critical understanding of human rights and responsibilities, as well as the attitudes, behaviours and skills to apply them in everyday life. There are nine resources each featuring a range of activities around different human rights issues and topics, and each searchable by Key Learning Area that they fit into. All resources are available free online at:

www.humanrights.gov.au/education or call (02) 9284 9600 or email publications@humanrights.gov.au

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EM EDUCATIONmatters

campaigns


Building a sustainable future Increasingly, Australia n schools are actively encouraging students to give thoug ht to their impact on the world, with many teachers incorp orating sustainable livi ng into their educational programs . In leading by examp le, many schools are similarly discovering the value of using sustaina ble products.

Jennifer Williams, Corporate Social Responsibility Manager, Corporate Express, says there is an increasing demand for schools to supply students with environmentally preferable products. “Schools are really feeling the pressure from students, parents and employees to select products wisely,” she said. Corporate Express has helped thousands of schools and businesses across Australia on their journey towards building sustainable workplaces. As Williams points out, the product options are vast. “Nowadays, environmentally preferable products are not just limited to paper supplies. Mailing bags, pens and even school furniture can all be made from ethically and sustainably sourced materials – and its also important to note that sustainable does not necessarily mean more expensive.” 

Corporate Express’ EarthSaver classification, which applies to more than 2,000 products, has been developed in response to this demand for easily identifiable sustainable products. EarthSaver-classified products meet specific criteria in relation to recycled content, end of lifecycle management, low ecological footprint, sustainable sourcing or energy conservation/greenhouse benefit. Dennis Freeman, Head of Marketing and Communications, from Wesley College in Melbourne says: “Sustainability is a priority for our school and Corporate Express helps us make the right choices by offering a range of environmentally preferable products appropriate for our school needs.” The EarthSaver range includes products from all categories including stationery, janitorial, arts and crafts, furniture and canteen.

Let your sustainability story start with us. From recycled paper to biodegradable cleaners and everything in between, Corporate Express has all your environmentally preferable product needs covered. Better still, we provide them all from one convenient source saving you time and money. To make identifying these products as simple as possible, we offer a range of over 2,000 EarthSaver classified products that meet specific criteria in relation to recycled content, end of lifecycle management, low ecological footprint, sustainable sourcing or energy conservation/greenhouse benefits. For more information on our environmentally preferable products or how we can help you on your sustainability journey, speak to one of our skilled Account Managers on 13 26 44.

A better way to do business Corporate Express Australia Limited ABN 94 000 728 398 Phone: 13 26 44 A member of the Staples Group

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sustainability

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Saving the planet: Schools take up the challenge

An increasing number of Australian schools have started to take action against environmental issues plaguing the planet. Three schools share their inspirational stories with Margaret Ambrose. At Radford College, a secondary school in Australia’s capital, the students were worked up. The kids wanted to see changes in their school, but surprisingly, their demands didn’t include less homework and longer lunch breaks. What did they want? Environmental sustainability! When did they want it? Now! It started with a group of students who wanted to see their school ‘walking the talk’ in terms of respect for the natural world and responsibility for their eco-footprint, and resulted in the Board signing the Radford School Sustainability Charter, in which they agreed that every project outlined in the 2011 Strategic Plan include a sustainability measure.

By far the biggest investment made by the Meriden School is the installation of solar cells, an investment that Dr Greenhalgh says is already paying off financially. “All the heating of the pool comes through the solar cells.” Change in attitudes and financial assistance have been key ingredients to achieving environmental goals, says Anthony Hyland, Middle School Academic Co-ordinator at the Hutchins School in Tasmania, which is a founding participant in the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative (Tasmania). Schools participating in the Australian Sustainable Schools Initiative, like the Hutchins School, form a School Environmental Management Team and develop a School Environmental Management Plan in consultation with their whole school community. They are given assistance in building networks with people and organisations, and applying for sustainability grants, awards and funding.

“Last year’s Years 11 and 12 students took up the challenge,” “Knowing what grants are available is so important,” says explains Principal Phillip Heath. “They started by creating an Hyland. “When you start to think about becoming sustainable, environment and sustainability charter. After a series of drafts came to me, the students presented the charter to the Board.” you have to weigh up the investment – in time and money – with results.” If the young students thought presenting to the school Board was intimidating, Heath says they managed it well. “They were When the Hutchins School joined the Initiative, its waste management system consisted of a large skip and some very passionate,” he says. “They presented a very determined random recycling of paper. Now, the school has a fullyand insistent paper.” functioning recycling system and a greatly reduced waste It helped, says Heath, that like an increasing number of stream – which benefits more than just the environment. The Australian businesses and community groups, Radford College recycling plant processing the reusable waste from the school had already started to think about sustainability, although it is a sheltered workshop, employing otherwise disadvantaged was limited to the development of new architecture. The junior members of the community. school, which was built three years ago, for example, has a full grey water system, and water tanks had been installed at the senior school. “The students pushed already fertile minds,” Heath says. Now, it’s official. With the Charter in place, students, teachers and the Board are working together on their first initiative – lowering the school’s carbon footprint. The Meriden Anglican School for Girls in New South Wales has also taken up the sustainability challenge – with such gusto that it recently won the Strathfield Council Sustainability Award. Also led by the students, the school has replaced all existing light globes with environmentally-friendly alternatives; tinted windows and installed manual external shutters on all the west-facing windows; installed dual-flush toilets; purchased water tanks at the senior school and a water recycling centre at the junior school; and replaced gardens with native plants. The significant changes undertaken by the school, says Principal Dr Julie Greenhalgh, started off as a small idea in a geography class. “The students felt strongly that we ought to have a group to examine sustainability,” she says. “The teacher came to me with the idea and we agreed to form a Green Team. The students analysed data on things like water-usage, and put together some suggestions.”

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environmental sustainability


Images courtesy of Meriden Sch ool

Implementing the scheme, though, wasn’t without its challenges, says Hyland. Changing peoples’ attitudes and financial constraints can be significant barriers to adopting sustainable behaviours, he explains. However, logical, well founded arguments that address the triple bottom line have been met with support from school management. “The biggest advantage was that less waste meant less cost to the school,” Hyland laughs. “The next step for us is to reduce our energy usage, and the financial benefits of that are becoming increasingly obvious. The school has already carried out professional energy audits and measures are being put into place to reduce heating and general power costs. Solar power will partially provide energy needs to a new library learning centre being completed now.” However, Hyland believes that you can’t put a price on the life lessons that the journey towards sustainability provides the students. Over the last three years, his colleague Trish Knight has installed individual kitchen gardens, in which the students plant and tend seasonal vegetables. “It’s an informal seed-toplate program,” Hyland explains. “The students learn about nutrition and understand exactly where food comes from and its journey to becoming what they eat.”

real sense of responsibility and respect – but what he couldn’t imagine was the flow-on affect that implementing the Charter would have on the parents and staff. “Seeing the students so passionate about the environment made us feel guilty in a way!” he laughs. “And made us look at our own behaviour.” Phillip Heath believes the next challenge for Radford College is to transform the passion of the students for the sustainability of the school into their own personal change. “What concerns me is the danger that their efforts at the school could absolve their own conscience,” he explains. “Implementing the Charter doesn’t necessarily mean that the kids will turn off the lights when they leave a room or pick up litter on the grounds. “We need to make sure they make that cognitive change in their own lives, beyond the school. After all that’s what we do: prepare them to leave us.”

Dr Greenhalgh, from the Meriden School, describes its journey towards sustainability as an “experience in creativity”, with most of the ingenious suggestions coming from the children themselves. “All creativity and initiative comes through girls,” she says. “Things that we normally would throw out, we now consider recycling for crafts in the junior school,” she provides as an example. “We also looked at paper use, in particular the daily bulletins that were being printed. Now we’ve installed big screens around the school that carry the bulletins.” Using less paper, she says, has brought environmental as well as financial pay-offs. At Radford College, Principal Heath agrees that sustainability makes financial and business sense, and that there are real benefits to sending off into the world students who have a

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environmental sustainability

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The universality of diversity

Schools are a microcosm of the wider society and as such reflect the reality of what is happening in the world around them. Schools, therefore, have a responsibility to ensure that both students and staff have insight and understanding into cultural diversity and its impact on all aspects of school life. Applying this knowledge in practical ways means that cultural diversity must form part of the schools’ main agenda and not be relegated ancillary status as an add-on. Values and actions advocating cultural acceptance must permeate the entire school and must be actively sustained. Developing school cultures that respect and promote diversity is essential in minimising the risk of racism and for ensuring healthy relationships and environments that nurture the individual. Feelings of alienation and marginalisation surface when students feel that they cannot affirm their own cultural identities and are ostracised from the dominant culture. Every student has the incontrovertible right to reach his or her potential at school, free from racism and victimisation. Schools, therefore, must commit to continuously improving their cultural diversity skills and knowledge to ensure that these rights are safeguarded.

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Forty-five per cent of all Australians were born overseas or have at least one parent born overseas. More than 260 languages are spoken and we identify with more than 270 ancestries. Each day in schools across Australia, students and teachers engage in the reality of diversity. Their reactions to cultural diversity are shaped largely by their attitudes and perceptions. In the absence of objectivity and understanding, a limited and subjective worldview often ensues. Over the years, consecutive governments have acknowledged the importance of developing multicultural educational policies and practices addressing the need to inform and educate students, teachers, staff and the broader school community to the realities of Australia’s multicultural status. From an educational perspective, multiculturalism offers a unique platform from which schools can develop and evolve into socially cohesive and responsive communities.

achieving harmony


Multiculturalism acknowledges the diverse cultural, linguistic and religious nature of school communities. Given the cultural richness that is reflected in Australian classrooms and the wider community that surrounds them, there is a responsibility on educators to develop innovative approaches to curriculum design and teaching practices that meets the unique learning styles, languages, attitudes and perceptions of our multicultural society. Authentic, relevant, participatory, inclusive and responsive pedagogies are crucial to engaging all students in the learning process. Education must reflect current Australian society if it is to continue to promote equality and fairness. In turn, developing enhanced cultural and linguistic skills and knowledge delivers a competitive advantage on the international stage. By definition, multiculturalism promotes community and social harmony by countering racism and intolerance. The roots of racism are often based on fear and misunderstanding, generally learnt through cultural conditioning. Cultural tunnel vision implies that only one set of cultural assumptions exist. There is insensitivity to individual cultural differences and other viewpoints are evaluated as either false or inferior or are totally disregarded. Educating both teachers and students to investigate, explore and make informed opinions on issues of social justice and human rights broadens perspectives and challenges preconceived notions of ‘us’ versus ‘them’. The classroom provides the ideal setting to promote greater tolerances, understandings and the acceptance of diversity. The classroom offers an environment where students can move safely out of their own framework and begin to cross boundaries and make cross-cultural connections. There are both legal and moral imperatives to ensure that the learning environment is free of racist behaviour. The effects, both long and short-term, of racism in schools cannot be underestimated and the deleterious effects on society as a whole have far broader and more sinister implications. A recent Australian study (2009) examining the impact of racism upon the health and wellbeing of young Australians, found that racism seriously impacted on students’ health and wellbeing. Some of the mental and physical issues experienced by the participants included ongoing feelings of sadness, anger, depression and exclusion; headaches and increased heart rate, sweating, trembling and muscle tension; a constant fear of being attacked verbally and physically; not wanting to attend school; having little trust or no trust in anybody apart from family members; and flashbacks to traumatic events. Students can experience direct expressions of racism in the form of racial abuse, harassment and discrimination and more subtle or indirect forms of racism. The latter often manifests when there is lack of commitment throughout the school to pursue the values of multiculturalism. For example, when the curriculum is non-inclusive and teaching practices assume the perspective of the dominant group as the norm, subtle and insidious forms of racism can quickly take hold and permeate undetected. These situations have the potential to undermine

students’ confidence and their belief in the education system. Teachers need to be aware that they take into the classroom their personal values and attitudes. Sometimes their values and attitudes reveal subtle biases that manifest as favouritism of one group over another or the non-recognition of cultural diversity or in the form of derogatory or derisive language. In these situations, denial of discrimination and prejudice can very easily happen, however, this only entrenches negative patterns and undermines whatever support there is in place to address racism. Denial can also have the effect of attributing blame to the minority group, which leads to further stigmatising of different groups. A key role of education is to ensure that racism and prejudice do not develop to impede individuals’ participation and contribution to their education and school. Preventing racism and intolerance requires leadership and commitment to ensure that policies are applied consistently and effectively across the school community. Implementing specific policy measures in countering racism such as anti-racism and anti-discrimination policies and complaint mechanisms ensure that members of the school community are aware of their rights and responsibilities in relation to racism and discrimination. In addition, leadership is required to make sure that there is acceptance and support for a proactive approach to multicultural policy. Research has shown that anti-racism policies were most effective in schools when the principal and senior staff exercised strong leadership in endorsing and enforcing them . Principals and senior staff are at the forefront when it comes to demonstrating their commitment to combat racism. Their pledge to counter race-based generalisations, stereotypes, bias, prejudice and discrimination will filter through the whole school – teachers, staff, students and parents will feel supported and encouraged in their individual and concerted efforts to promote school harmony and cohesion. A further primary function of education is to ensure that all students gain knowledge and skills to enable them to achieve their full potential so that they may participate effectively and successfully in a culturally diverse world. The knowledge and skills will be drawn from education programs and policies that accurately and positively reflect cultural diversity and promote social inclusiveness to help all students develop. It is the responsibility of schools to identify and counter cultural bias and prejudice in their teaching practices, in the materials

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used for teaching and in the value systems and attitudes that constitute the schools’ underlying ethos. Research has shown that schools that are successful in managing cultural diversity integrate cultural and linguistic diversity into all aspects of the curriculum rather than developing new subjects that are not academically challenging or are superficial curriculum add-ons. We now recognise the very real consequences that racism has on health, behaviours and learning outcomes for young people. Much of the latest research in this area points to the need for education to have a holistic and integrated response to racism. Three priority areas for schools have been identified to combat racism: (1) clear and constant anti-racism policies and programs; (2) ongoing cultural diversity training for teachers and professional staff; and (3) review and further development of curriculum that promotes awareness and acceptance of cultural difference. A recurrent theme in many studies highlighted the need for teachers to receive diversity training as part of their ongoing professional development. To ensure that teachers assist students in developing an understanding and respect for cultural diversity they themselves must have the skills and knowledge to be able to effectively impart the information.

Persistence and consistency are key factors in efforts to overcome racism, remembering that this is a long-term task and one that requires a whole school approach. Dr B. (Hass) Dellal OAM Executive Director Australian Multicultural Foundation

The findings of the report entitled The Impact of Racism on the Health and Wellbeing of Young Australians suggest that there is an urgent need for well-targeted, professional development for teachers, school leaders and administrative staff around the impact of personal and institutional attitudes upon the health and wellbeing of the broader school community. The report developed the following recommendations: Leadership training for principals around social cohesion and the engagement of culturally and linguistically diverse communities; developing the capacity of principals and other school leaders to develop whole-school initiatives to combat racism and reduce its impact on the health and wellbeing of students with the support of a mentoring program; ongoing targeted professional development for teachers to enable them to identify and deal with incidents of racism within the school and within their own classroom; provision of targeted resources and teaching tools, including curriculum materials that help teachers to engage students with the sensitive issues of culture, and social inclusion; and training for administrative staff around cultural diversity and inclusive practice. We have seen the negative effects of racism when students do not feel that they belong to the school community and that their cultural heritage is not recognised as part of the Australian national identity. We recognise the importance for students to feel included, understood and accepted by both their fellow students and teachers. To this end, schools must take responsibility to accept, acknowledge and factor in cultural diversity in all aspects of education and school life. Developing awareness of self and others is crucial if cultural diversity is to be implemented and sustained in our schools. Greater emphasis also needs to be placed on prevention strategies that deal constructively and effectively with racism. Developing insight and skills in teachers and students and providing environments that are safe, welcoming and supportive will minimise the risk of racism developing.

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le luab ny va at have ith a m h eal w he e are tes t Ther n websi how to d rces on t ools a i u l n c o o s h s ra Aust sources tional re condary lture a e e r cu educ llent sity ng a y in s exce addition, l diversit s: Creati e Univer n e a r ridg ultur m. In lbou racis ent of c uilding B 09), Me ony 0 m B 2 e in . al ag Harm alian e h t man be found souri et hing Ltd t as us r ublis such ty Ltd, A and Our can sity (Man P s r e P 6, ad 9. ver re re shing Ltd, 200 ess, 200 of di ere a C Publi y r t h P t P , g ity ls yU lishin ivers choo ks b ary s ing boo lake Pub xford Un m i r For p derstand dation, B stralia, O ung u of Yo thi n u A Un g o n o d i F t n e a Fe s: ral eys Wellb by Prof. a ence d icultu y: Journ r t l n e a u f on M it th en Re mun Heal ndertak nd Ms M lty of e h t a u Com u t n c upon rojec orga n, Fa acism search p Dr. Les M balisatio R f o ct Glo ersity. A re nkins, and 09). v Impa The lians (20 ouise Je zenship akin Uni i L , M.; e t a i . r r t D each ure Aus souri, D tute of C cation, L ; . L s. cult Man the Insti and Edu enkin eating a J , ; s . k t F r A Cr ity ri, Taou ges: ivers nsou . Ma ing brid urne Un ) 9 0 2 (20 , L. Build y. Melbo g. in h it Wals of divers Publish

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ids k r fo n r e c n o c y e k Mental health s now account

ed issue al that mental health-relat ve re s tic tis sta e lin elp H Kids g sessions. for two-in-five counsellin

general practitioners or psychologists to have a safety plan in place. But who responds to that young person at night time, when most of the health clinics are closed? Kids Helpline does.” Protheroe stressed that the statistics aren’t all doom and gloom. “So hopefully what we are seeing is that this generation is willing to reach out for help and talk about their concerns,” she said. “Being there at the end of the phone, email or web-chat session really does mean that we can save young lives.” Kids Helpline opened as a service of BoysTown in 1991 to provide a free confidential support and counselling service to children and young people in Australia. Kids Helpline General Manager Wendy Protheroe said, according to the national counselling service’s Annual Overview into the concerns of young Australians, counselling sessions had increased by four per cent, rising to 53,111 sessions during 2009.

“Since opening, Kids Helpline has helped more than 5.5 million young people work through many different challenges,” Protheroe said. “We recognise that while many young people have great parents, teachers and other adults who offer help and support, there are times when this is not the case.

“Disturbingly, of those 145 counselling sessions each day, 57 are about mental health-related concerns, such as diagnosed “Kids Helpline assists young people to work on issues and mental illnesses, habitual or problematic drug use, continued disordered eating behaviours, self-injury and suicidal thoughts,” empowers them to work through these with the help of their parents, teachers, friends and other support services.” she said. “That means every 10 minutes our counsellors are speaking with children and young people who are in distress and require counselling and every 25 minutes these counselling sessions relate to mental health concerns. “Kids Helpline is now a significant provider of mental health services for children and young people across Australia and we are often the only option the young have for support, particularly after hours or in regional and remote communities.” Mental health-related issues are also the main concern for young people who contact Kids Helpline online. “More than 40 per cent of all online counselling sessions during 2009 had to do with mental health-related concerns, representing the top reasons for contacting counsellors online,” Protheroe said. “Increasingly, more young people want to speak about serious and complex concerns like mental health online rather than on the phone. “This form of counselling takes more than twice as long as phone counselling and our ability to respond is capped as we simply do not have the funding available to extend the hours. “Web counselling is not available 24 hours a day; we open the service for 50 hours each week.” Kids Helpline is increasingly involved with ongoing or case managed clients, usually regarding mental health issues. “We have become a vital part of youth mental health services in this country, frequently working with the young person’s

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While Kids Helpline started out as a service for children and young people aged 5–18, the service now extends to young people aged 5-25 years. Counselling is provided via the phone, web and email by tertiary qualified, paid professionals who undergo additional accredited training at Kids Helpline. Young people like Lucy*. Thirteen year-old Lucy* had been contacting Kids Helpline about ongoing family relationship conflict, friendship breakdowns, bullying and her difficulties in understanding and managing her emotions. Lucy had a very negative image of herself, experienced suicidal thoughts and was engaging in self-harming behaviour. Through counselling sessions that would often focus on Lucy talking about her feelings and emotions in detail and the impact these have on her and her view of self, and with her counsellors validating her experiences, Lucy has been able to decrease her self-harming behaviour. Recognising that she does want to live, together they have collaboratively developed a safety plan to utilise when she is having suicidal thoughts. With her counsellors’ ongoing support, Lucy is increasingly recognising her internal strengths and resources and developing plans for an exciting future. *Name changed for privacy

mental health


Rethinking teacher development

Ongoing professional development for teachers is an issue that generates much debate within the education industry over more complex matters like funding and exactly what type of development best meets the needs of teachers. Tania Aspland explores the issue of professional development. In Australia, as elsewhere in the western world, the failure of school students to perform against international standards of literacy and numeracy is of concern for all jurisdictions. Central to the discourse of alarm in Australia, in her former position as Deputy Prime Minister, Julia Gillard called for initiatives in education to “overcome a legacy of neglect” (Gillard 2009). She based her criticism on the former government’s lack of investment in education. In more recent times Gillard has continued to advocate for the enhancement of schooling, teaching and education through the positioning of “education reform at the centre of the economic reform agenda” (The Australian August 10, 2010, p1). For this, educationalists are grateful. Central to this reform is the continuing education of teachers in the workforce. Currently, professional teachers engage in intellectually rigorous professional preparation programs that receive Commonwealth funding. However continuing education for teachers over the sustained period of a professional lifetime is not well funded by employers, nor greatly supported by government funding. Despite this situation, federal and state teacher registration authorities have recently mandated that teachers are required to provide evidence of continuing professional development to maintain registration as a teacher. This legislation is creating unrest in a profession where demands on teachers are increasing while support for ongoing professional learning is in decline. As stated, post-graduation and most professional development for teachers is self funded and takes place in post-workplace hours. The question of funding to support teachers in professional development is one issue that provides plentiful debate across government, employers, unions and professional associations. The type of professional development that best meet teachers’ needs is another. This paper will explore both issues with a view to proposing an alternative model of professional development for teachers that is aligned to government policy and in keeping with the specific needs of professional teachers and registration authorities across Australia. If educational reform, as central to economic reform, is to become a reality in Australia, the funding of innovative and contemporary models of professional development for teachers must become a national priority. Further, if teacher regulatory authorities are to work with government in maintaining high standards of teaching across Australia, then the models of teacher development that are legislated must be responsive to current research and thinking in the field. The paper analyses two recent government initiatives that impact on teacher development. It will be shown that such initiatives are illconceived and will not impact on long term change in teachers practice. In the second section of the paper an alternative model of professional development will be advocated, and a set of principles of professional development will be proposed. The paper closes with the argument that if teachers are to be

recognised as the key factor in enhancing student learning outcomes, and, if government is keen to elevate and sustain the quality of teachers’ performance over the lifetime of a professional career, then continuing investments in ongoing, contextually based, teacher professional development must reflect the principles outlined in this paper. Recent initiatives Most recently, the Australian Government has implemented several initiatives in support of teacher development. For example, in 2010 the Digital Strategy for Teachers and School Leaders, was launched as part of the Australian Government’s $2.2 billion Digital Education Revolution, which was designed to assist teachers and school leaders in enhancing their technological skills and improving curriculum and teaching practices. Further the national partnership for improving teacher quality was funded by government to improve the quality of the Australian teaching workforce through the $550 million over five years Smarter Schools – Improving Teacher Quality National Partnership (TQNP) agreement. Under the TQNP, Australian governments are implementing a range of nationally significant and sustainable reforms targeting teacher ‘lifecycle’ to attract, train, place, develop and retain quality teachers and leaders in our schools and classrooms. The focus of such reform includes the following: • Attracting the best graduates to teaching through additional pathways. • Improving the quality and consistency of teacher training in partnership with universities. • Developing National Professional Standards for Teachers to promote excellence in the profession, including requirements for teachers to have knowledge and understanding of the learning needs of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students. • National consistency in the registration of teachers to support improved mobility in the teaching workforce. • Developing and enhancing the skills and knowledge of teachers and school leaders through improved performance management and professional learning. • Increasing retention through improved in-school support and rewarding quality teachers and school leaders in rural/remote and hard-to-staff schools. • Improving the quality and availability of teacher workforce. Clearly teacher development is a high priority for the current government. While educationalists affirm the provision of such a large pool of funding for teacher development, the centralised model of determining the nature and focus of professional learning for teachers has been found to be largely ineffective in terms of long term change (Day and Sachs, 2005, 2007). For some time now, it has been evident that new models of professional development that are responsive to teachers’ needs in specific socio-cultural, socio-political and educational contexts, are more effective in generating sustainable changes in professional practices. A further development in government regulation of the teaching profession is the release of the draft National Professional

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Standards for Teachers (2010), central to which is the provision of a framework for “teachers to identify and engage in professional activities throughout their career.” The development of the professional profile of a teacher over the lifetime of a career is a key concept underpinning the framework. However, the view that the teaching profession can be conceptualised from a developmental perspective is highly contestable. The draft model implies that teachers improve with experience and age; moving from a stage of proficiency with time and experience, to un-problematically, becoming lead teachers. It further assumes that with time, teachers will develop and improve, experience being a significant factor. This suggestion is based on myth not evidence. There is plentiful evidence to support the argument that many teachers do not improve in their capacity over time without direct intervention. The model also assumes that once a teacher achieves the status of lead teacher that he or she will maintain that status. This is what a development continuum presupposes and this is what a linear conceptualisation of teaching dictates. Such a model is embedded in the philosophical thinking of the early 1900s and no longer holds up to scrutiny. Given the varied backgrounds and career trajectories of teachers working in the diverse range of school contexts in Australia, it is argued that this linear model is no longer sustainable as a framework for the professional development of teachers. It is publically accepted that the nature of teaching has changed. A new type of knowledge worker is evident is schools of contemporary times. Teachers today no longer work within certainty or the homogeneity of the dominant hegemonic discourse of “the classroom teacher”. Rather, teachers work is characterised by uncertainty, crisis and the multiplicities of new identities for students, and for teachers as facilitators of learning engagement across a broad range of learning contexts. The Australia Teacher Educators’ Association (ATEA), in its response to the National Professional Standards for Teachers (2010), argued that the developmental continuum for teacher growth and development is no longer viable. This cohort of teacher educators in Australia suggests the a multiphase taxonomy of performance (Biggs and Collis, 1982; Biggs and Tang, 2007) is more instructive in generating a conceptualisation of standards and professional development for teachers – a model that is sustainable and in keeping with new generations of teachers, now and in the future. A multi structural model of this type, rather than a linear model offers flexibility and variability in performance that is context responsive, not age, experience or time responsive. The developmental model provided in the framework for teacher development is a somewhat tired and unimaginative conceptualisation of the dynamic and complex constructs central to the teaching profession.

two central initiatives are current examples of government policy that, in terms of teacher development, are largely ill-conceived, ill-informed and unlikely to lead to any long term change in the quality of professional practices of teachers. We do know however, that teacher development is best initiated at the local level in educationally-responsive and culturally inclusive ways. Further, it is well recognised that centralised funding of teacher development is ineffective and more closely aligned to political grandstanding than teacher improvement. There are a myriad of models of teacher professional development that are recorded in the empirical literature. These have been largely ignored by government at the levels of design and funding. What follows is a model and a set of principles that are instructive in rethinking professional development for teachers that will ensure sustaining long term change and the enhancement of teachers practices and student learning outcomes. Performance review and professional development Central to this model of teacher professional development is the process of performance planning and review. As a key component of professional career planning teachers are invited to engage in critical review of their practice in terms of professional outcomes, and in light of these outcomes, partake in ongoing reflection of their learning needs and professional development. This model is based on a formal process of performance review that can be identified across a range of industries and professions including education. Currently, large corporations and government departments base their strategic planning, budgets, staff recruitment and resources on the outcomes of similar processes of performance review which are central to industrial collective agreements across Australia. In these new times of accountability and regulation, professional standards commonly provide the framework for performance review in a range of educational sectors such as higher education and the training sector. It is timely that this model be introduced into the schooling sector as the basis of not only review, but also, the foundation of professional development

As a group of teacher educators, ATEA strongly rejects the conceptualisation of the standards for professional development as linear and staged, and suggests that the capacities of teachers outlined in the draft standards reduce teachers work to basic elements of performance. The extant, simplified statement of teacher knowledge, capability and dispositions invites a de-professionalisation of teaching that will have very negative outcomes for teachers and teacher development. So whilst the government is intent on revolutionising education by placing teacher development high on their agenda, these

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Tania ssor ; MEd; e f o r P (PhD d of the and Aspl A) is hea on at the d ati ;B BEd of Educ laide, an n l e a o d i l o A a h r f Sc ity o the Aust s r e tion Univ ent of duca id P re s a c h e r s E t i o n . Te cia Asso

plans for teachers. It is argued here that if teachers were required to engage in the critique of their practice, with school leaders, through the lens of a newly developed multi-structured taxonomy of professional standards for teachers, as the basis for performance review and professional development, the reinvigoration of the teaching professional would result. A stronger argument for this model is possible if the large pools of government funding were redirected away from centralised initiatives to local models of professional development that are coupled with a process of teacher performance review. If teachers are repositioned as central to student success and as such, are instrumental in developing Australia as a nation, then surely this idiosyncratic model of teacher performance review and development is necessary. Implicit in this model of teacher performance and review, are a number of principles that have the capacity to shape professional development for new times. The principles of professional learning presented here value the centrality of dialogical conversations with educators that are collaborative, critical, action oriented, honest, meaningful, sustained and transformative in orientation (Aspland, Macpherson, Proudford & Whitmore, 1996). While the model invites the review process to begin with individual teachers, it celebrates the place of collegiality and community capacity building through activist models of professional learning (Sachs, 2003) that have been proved successful for the past decade (Macpherson, Brooker, Aspland,& Elliott, 1998). The juxtaposition of the individual, community and context is captured in the following principles as the key to successful professional learning for teachers.

The principles include the following: • Professional development requires support AND challenge from others particular curriculum leaders. • Professional development needs to be responsive to the dynamic contextual positioning and repositioning of individuals within their careers AND refrain from equating age or experience with stage of development. •P  rofessional development generally requires guidance AND intervention by leaders. •T  he catalyst for professional development can be found in the state of perplexity that often characterises professional work. •T  he different types of perplexities can be recognised as dilemma or ironies or paradoxes all of which can be managed as a central component of professional review and development. •T  he central focus of professional development should be the teacher who as a person lives and works within an educational, social and political context in differing ways and engages in curriculum decision making in unique ways over time that must be respected and celebrated. •P  rofessional development must recognise the complex interplay of factors that are central to and impact upon the uniqueness of teachers work; and • Professional development must actively involve teachers, individually AND collectively, in the ongoing generation of professional knowledge through interrogation of a multiphase framework of professional standards for teachers.

This paper has shown that government commitment to centralised professional development is not new, and yet it has been proved for many years that such initiatives are inadequate in changing or improving teacher quality. Further, while professional standards are accepted as central to the regulation of the teaching profession, this paper argues that the newly proposed model of teacher development implicit in the draft National Professional Standard for Teachers (2010) is illconceived and will not impact on long term change in teachers practice. An alternative model of professional development has been put forward, and a set of principles of professional development proposed. The paper closes with the argument that if teachers are to be recognised as the key to enhancing student learning outcomes, and, if governments are keen to elevate and sustain the quality of teachers’ performance over the lifetime of a professional career, then a shift away from centralised funding of professional development is required. Further the reconstitution of the teaching profession as a complex, multifaceted discourse requires a framing of professional standards as something other than a developmental framework that implies that teachers improve with experience and age. What is required, it is argued, is a repositioning of funding for teacher growth and development from central to local authorities. What is demanded is that teachers determine the agenda for professional learning in consultation with their school leaders through professional performance reviews and learning support. What is anticipated is a set of professional standards that are responsive to and inclusive of the changing needs of teachers that will provide a platform for regulation and a framing for ongoing professional learning and development. In order to do so, government must create the conditions and regulations necessary for teacher development to reflect the principles outlined in this paper, not those that have been advocated in times past.

References Aspland,T., Macpherson I. Proudford,C & Whitmore, L (1996) Critical Collaborative Action Research as a means of curriculum inquiry and empowerment, Educational Action Research, Volume 4, Number 1 pp 93-104. Biggs J and Collis K (1982) Evaluating the Quality of Learning: the SOLO taxonomy New York: Academic Press Biggs J and Tang C (2007) Teaching for Quality Learning at University (3rd edn) Buckingham: SRHE and Open University Press Macpherson, I., Brooker, R., Aspland, T. & Elliott, R. (1998). Putting professional learning up front: a perspective of professional development within a context of collaborative research about curriculum leadership. Journal of In-service Education. 24(1) pp73-86. Day, C. & Sachs, J. (2006). International Handbook of Continuing Professional development for Teachers. Australia and New Zealand: McGraw Hill Sachs, J. (2003). The Activist Teaching Profession. Australia and New Zealand: McGraw Hill Accessed Minister’s Media Centre: http://www.deewr.gov.au/ministers/ gillard/media/releases/pages/article_100218_130817.aspx

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The Butterfly Foundation Educating and empowering young Australians to improve their self esteem & body image confidence The Butterfly Foundatio n is Australia’s largest charity working to sup port sufferers of eating disorders and negative body image and those who care for them. Th e Butterfly Foundation was founded in 2002 by Claire Vickery and as the Foundation continu es to grow its services to the community, it rem ains committed to its vision of being dedic ated to changing the culture and treatm ent practice of eating disorders in this coun try.

The Butterfly Foundation’s key areas of focus include: •

Direct Financial Support – to those suffering from Eating Disorders

Online and Telephone Counselling for sufferers, carers and those seeking support about Eating Disorders

Advocacy and lobbying through government

Awareness Campaigns, Community Fundraising and Events

Research

Education Services (Prevention and Early Intervention programs) to young people, professionals and parents

Eating disorders Eating Disorders are serious and complex physical and psychological illnesses, that affect both males and females of all ages and cultural backgrounds but typically we see onset during adolescence and early adulthood. Eating disorders develop due to numerous reasons that include biological, psychological, socio-cultural and environmental factors. Low self esteem and negative body image have been consistently identified through rigorous and on-going research as being significant, contributing factors to the development of Eating Disorders. Therefore The Butterfly Foundation is committed and passionate about enhancing and developing self esteem and body image in young people and it is these pillars that the Prevention Education Services are based on. Butterfly education services The Butterfly Foundation offers a suite of services that are available to schools, organisations and the community that aims to provide information, education and tools to young people, professionals and parents. Please note that sessions directly to young people are currently only available in NSW and VIC.

strategies and advice on how to be a positive body image role model to their children Early Intervention Workshops for School Counsellors and Health Professionals. These sessions address and explore Eating Disorders in-depth. The workshop covers topics such as identification, intervention, prevention and support. In 2011 The Butterfly Foundation will be launching an extensive and exciting new resource for professionals to utilise in the education environment (Primary, Secondary and Tertiary). Information about this resource will be available on our website. If you are interested in finding out more about The Butterfly Foundation’s Education Services, please visit our website, under the services section, to find more details about the sessions listed above. To find out more about The Butterfly Foundation Education Services or to become a Friend of Butterfly to receive information about future trainings and programs please visit our website www.thebutterflyfoundation.org.au If you require support in relation to a student, young person, yourself or a loved one or are seeking information about eating disorders or negative body image please contact: Butterfly Foundation Help Line Monday-Friday, 9am-5pm 1800 ED HOPE (1800-33-4673) support@thebutterflyfoundation.org.au To contact The Butterfly Foundation – Education Managers: Melbourne: Danni Watts – Education Manager - Prevention Ph: (03) 9822-5771 E: danni@thebutterflyfoundation.org.au Address: PO Box 453, Malvern VIC 3144 Sydney:

Paula Kotowicz – Education Manager - Early Intervention Ph: (02) 8090 8199 E: paula@thebutterflyfoundation.org.au Address: 103 Alexander Street, Crows Nest NSW 2065

Our Education Services for Prevention/Early Intervention include: Workshops and Presentations to young people focusing on self esteem and body Image, media literacy and healthy living Dove BodyThink Educator Trainings – Dove BodyThink is an evaluated general self esteem, body image and media literacy program designed to be delivered by Educators, School Counsellors and those who are involved in the mentoring and educating of youth Dove BodyThink for Parents and Parent Information Sessions – these sessions are designed to inform parents on the topic of self esteem and body image and provides tips,

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campaigns


Schools First Brought to life by NAB, ACER and FYA ught l awards program bro Schools First a nationa n alia str Au ership with to life by NAB in partn The Research (ACER) and al on ati uc Ed Council for Australians (FYA). Foundation for Young Thanks to research from ACER, we know that student results and experiences are enhanced when they are connected with their community. ‘It takes a village to raise a child’ and it is the responsibility of everyone to help raise young people who are resilient, enquiring, adaptable and well-adjusted. Schools First aims to reward and recognise schools that are working in partnership with their local community to improve the lives and education of young people. To date, Schools First has awarded $10 million to 195 Australian schools to support and sustain their effective school-community partnerships. Over three years, Schools First has committed $15 million in awards funding to primary and secondary schools across the country. The strong response to Schools First in 2009 and 2010 proves how prolific school-community partnerships are throughout Australia, and has also highlighted that schools seek – and deserve – additional funding and formal recognition for their outstanding initiatives.

Schools First is an inclusive awards program reaching metropolitan, regional, remote, public, private and independent schools of varying shapes and sizes. The diversity of the 2009 and 2010 winners are a fantastic example of the reach this program is having across Australian schools. School First provides support and resources to schools at all stages of community partnerships – including those that are looking to start a partnership, and those looking to improve their established partnership programs. Every year, Schools First hosts a series of Partnership Forums designed to share knowledge on how partnerships can deliver very real benefits for young people. The Partnership Forums are also designed to provide guidance on how to apply for the awards. The Schools First website is a hub of helpful information with numerous tools and resources to help new and establish school-community partnerships. Designed to provide all schools throughout Australia with access to ongoing resources, networks and support to ensure they achieve the best possible outcomes for our young people. When we all work together, it is our young people who benefit. To find out Partnership Forums dates, to review 2009 and 2010 winning case studies and to find out how your school can share in what Schools First has to offer, please visit www. schoolsfirst.edu.au.

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Want your students to be number one? The Institute of Chartered Accoun tants in Australia is the premier accounting body, representing more than 50,000 members in diverse roles across Australia and the world.

“The most enjoyable aspect for me is being able to see the ‘numbers’ and assumptions brought into reality. The exposure offered by my role through site visits, talking to various operations and working with people with skills and specialities, has been enriching for my career. Having a Chartered Accountant designation provides me with more confidence to pursue career options due to the financial security that it offers. Plus, being internationally recognised has allowed me to broaden my career plans globally.” Daniel Chung CA, Investment Review Manager, Woolworths Limited. Contact details Customer Service Centre 1300 137 322

National Office / New South Wales 33 Erskine Street Sydney NSW 2000 GPO Box 9985, Sydney NSW 2001 Phone 02 9290 1344 Fax 02 9262 1512 careers.nsw@charteredaccountants.com.au

Tailored resources Designed specifically for teachers to stay up-to-date with news, events and student career opportunities, the range of DVDs, brochures, fact sheets and reports will give you everything they need for your students. Australian Capital Territory Level 10, 60 Marcus Clarke Street Canberra ACT 2601 GPO Box 9985, Canberra ACT 2601 Phone 02 6122 6100 Fax 02 6122 6122 careers.act@charteredaccountants.com.au

Queensland Level 32, Central Plaza One 345 Queen Street Brisbane Qld 4001 GPO Box 9985, Brisbane Qld 4001 Phone 07 3233 6500 Fax 07 3233 6555 careers.qld@charteredaccountants.com.au

South Australia / Northern Ter Level 11, 1 King William Street Adelaide SA 5000 GPO Box 9985, Adelaide SA 500 Phone 08 8113 5500 Fax 08 823 careers.sa@charteredaccountant

Victoria / Tasmania Level 3, 600 Bourke Street Melbourne Vic 3000 GPO Box 9985, Melbourne Vic 3 Phone 03 9641 7400 Fax 03 967 careers.vic@charteredaccountan

Western Australia Ground Floor BGC Centre 28 The Esplanade Perth WA 6000 PO Box 9985, Perth WA 6001 Phone 08 9420 0400 Fax 08 932 careers.wa@charteredaccountan

> High School student brochure

Accounting in Action illustrates how the t

> Curriculum support videos – Accounting in Action of accounting is used in the business wor By using real business examples including a surf school, art gallery, un Developed specifically for high school students, the a property developer, your students will gain a deeper understanding o concepts. This DVD is designed to support senior secondary school stu topics were pinpointed by researching areas that students 2. Non-current assets and depreci had difficulty understanding. Aligned with1. Financial statements theMallon current James CA Puja Ladva CA and Sylvia Choi CA. and Kris Kathiravel. curriculum, the Accounting in Action DVD series includes Financial Statements, Non-current assets and depreciation, Cash controls, Ratio analysis and Balance day adjustments. This is a free resource available at charteredaccountants.com.au/educators Total running time: 11 minutes 29 seconds

DISCLAIMER: The opinions expressed in this DVD are those of the interviewees, and may not reflect the views of The Institute of Chartered Accountants members, and/or partners. The information in this DVD is a general guide only. It is not professional advice, and should not be used, relied upon or treate professional advice in relation to your own particular circumstances. The Institute cannot accept any responsibility for any inaccuracies in or omissions disclaims all liability for loss or damage incurred as a consequence, directly or indirectly, of decisions made or actions taken as a result of using this DVD, or from it. Copyright © The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia 2009. The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia owns the copyright in th or shown in or communicated to the public, in whole or in part, in any form or by any means, without the prior written consent of The Institute. The Institu Incorporated in Australia Members’ Liability Limited. ABN 50 084 642 571 1109-34.

As a teacher, it can be difficult to get your students to start thinking about life beyond school. The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia provides support to you with a range of free resources which can assist your students with their studies and career decisions. Accounting provides a solid foundation for any career they choose. If your students want to be number one, with a qualification that sets them apart from the rest, encourage them to consider a career as a Chartered Accountant. Speaking the language of business For teachers, accounting is about communicating the language of business - the discipline of measuring, interpreting and communicating financial activity. Chartered Accountants are valued for their commercial know-how, analytical thinking, and leadership abilities, rather than number crunching. Becoming a Chartered Accountant requires strategic thinking, problem solving, communication, teamwork and leadership skills.

“The topics in the Accounting in Action will fit in perfectly with the syllabus starting next term. Thanks for the teacher resources.” “The DVDs you sent are fantastic and on point. I’ve used them with both my Year 11 and 12 Accounting classes.  I will also use them with my Year 10s when we do our Careers Planning Module.  Thank you so much for the material.” > Accounting career information – A Day in the Life DVD This DVD gives an insight to what working as a Chartered Accountant is really like, by profiling eight real Chartered Accountants. With only their qualification in common, it shows the diverse opportunities the career offers. > Educators e-news Sign up to our Educators e-news to receive all the latest Institute news, resources and updates for you and your students. > We also have a number of case studies, fact sheets and Institute Annual Reports that can be used in class.

“I saw accounting as a profitable career path, and with my high aptitude in maths it seemed like a great choice for a career. To order resources and to find out more about the Institute While maths was important, I found that other traits were also please visit charteredaccountants.com.au/educators very important... at school I gained valuable skills as a prefect, or call the Customer Service Centre on 1300 137 322. I think this was the starting point to help hone further skills in negotiation and communication, these traits will always help me be successful in my career.” Tauseef Mannan, Candidate of the Chartered Accountants Program. The blend of subjects and extracurricular activities helps shape the journey from student to professional. Encouraging students to join teams, clubs and groups is a great start to helping build the foundations of their career. Negotiation and communication are an important part of a budding accountant’s daily work, students who join groups and areas of responsibility such as sports captains, and group organisers are already on their way.

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iation

Australian Capital Territory Level 10, 60 Marcus Clarke Street Canberra ACT 2601 GPO Box 9985, Canberra, ACT 2601 Phone 02 6122 6100 Fax 02 6122 6122 careers.act@charteredaccountants.com.au

Victoria / Tasmania Level 3, 600 Bourke Street Melbourne Vic 3000 GPO Box 9985, Melbourne, Vic 3001 Phone 03 9641 7400 Fax 03 9670 3143 careers.vic@charteredaccountants.com.au

Queensland Level 32, Central Plaza One 345 Queen Street Brisbane Qld 4001 GPO Box 9985, Brisbane, Qld 4001 Phone 07 3233 6500 Fax 07 3233 6555 careers.qld@charteredaccountants.com.au

Western Australia Ground Floor BGC Centre 28 The Esplanade Perth WA 6000 PO Box 9985, Perth, WA 6001 Phone 08 9420 0400 Fax 08 9321 5141 careers.wa@charteredaccountants.com.au

Printed on Monza – a 50 per cent recycled paper supporting responsible use of forest resources.

charteredaccountants.com.au/students

A Day in the Life

Ever wondered what a

Chartered Accountant does?

This DVD gives an insight to what working as a Chartered Accountant could be like, with eight profiles of real life Chartered Accountants. With only their qualification in common, it shows the diverse opportunities the profession offers. Each profile has a separate introductory video clip accompanied by a set of frequently asked questions. The eight Chartered Accountants profiled are: > Prue Brumley, Financial Accountant, AXA > Thomas King, Divisional Financial Controller – Asia Pacific, ANZ > Jacinda Hoskins, Finance Manager, eBay Australia > Rajiv Goyal, Assistant Manager, McGrathNicol > Scott Lintern, Commercial Manager – Sales & Marketing, Constellation Wines Australia > Lieu Le, Forensic Accountant, Ferrier Hodgson > Caroline Mara, Director, PricewaterhouseCoopers > Kevin Zajax, Financial Controller, Coca-Cola Amatil Ltd.

0709-15 CM_DVD_Brochure-Cover_FA.indd 2

16/2/10 9:10:06 AM

Curriculum support videos:

Accounting career information:

Accounting in Action illustrates how the theory of accounting is used in the business world. Follow Chartered Accountants as they guide your students through real life examples.

A Day in the Life DVD profiles eight Chartered Accountants with only their qualification in common. This will give you and your students an insight into what a career as a Chartered Accountant really is; including the challenges, benefits and rewards.

0308-20

in Australia, its management, ed as a substitute for specific from the DVD, and expressly r of any errors in, or omissions his DVD. It may not be copied ute of Chartered Accountants.

South Australia / Northern Territory Level 11, 1 King William Street Adelaide SA 5000 GPO Box 9985, Adelaide, SA 5001 Phone 08 8113 5500 Fax 08 8231 1982 careers.sa@charteredaccountants.com.au

charteredaccountants.com.au/students1

Stay up-to-date: Sign up to our Educators e-news to receive all the latest news, resources and updates for you and your students.

The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia has free curriculum-aligned accounting education resources for teachers to use in the classroom. Visit our website for technical resources, career and study information, and the latest event details. You can access the contact details of your local Institute representative, who can present to your students about becoming a Chartered Accountant. If your students want to be number one, with a qualification that sets them apart from the rest, encourage them to consider a career as a Chartered Accountant. 0810-23

niversity and of accounting udies.

The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia

theory rld.

Customer Service Centre 1300 137 322

National Office / New South Wales 33 Erskine Street Sydney NSW 2000 GPO Box 9985, Sydney, NSW 2001 Phone 02 9290 1344 Fax 02 9262 1512 careers.nsw@charteredaccountants.com.au

The Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia

21 5141 nts.com.au

Accounting in Action

Contact details

A Day in the Life

3001 70 3143 nts.com.au

Free accounting resources for teachers Accounting in Action

rritory

01 31 1982 ts.com.au

Want your students to be number one?

For all your free accounting resources, visit charteredaccountants.com.au/educators

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Mark your diaries! Expo is set to provide The School Resources st ls with Australia’s large education professiona d an cts du pro nt, equipme showcase of the latest . tor sec on ati uc ed services available in the

There will be over 200 exhibitors when the event is staged at Melbourne Showgrounds next March with a huge array of products specifically for this sector including: •

teaching aids

furniture

technology

health

playground equipment

building products

consumables

teacher services

much more!

Many professional bodies are supporting partners of the Event including: •

Australian Education Union

Victorian Independent Education Union

Child Care Centres Association of Victoria

Victorian Parent’s Council

Victorian Principals Association

Victorian State Secondary Principals Association

Victorian Parents Council

Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation

So please take the time to see what’s available for education, sit in on the free seminars and network with industry colleagues at the industry functions. The School Resources Expo is free to attend and is open to any Education Professional. Dates: 17-19 March, 2011 Venue: Exhibition Hall, Melbourne Showgrounds Ascot Vale. For more information and to register as a visitor go to: www.schoolresourcesexpo.com.au

There will be FREE professional development seminars with halfindustry’s page education 16/09/2010 AM some of the mostmatters.pdf knowledgeable advice 11:21:31 on current issues.

For companies wishing to receive more information on exhibiting call 02 9416 2855 or email info@exhibitionsgroup.com.au

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Australian Drug Foundation leads the way In delivering alcohol and drug information to teenagers For more than 20 years, seco ndary school Australia have s around been turning to the Austral Foundation fo ian Drug r reputable an d innovative re that are approp sources riate for teenag ers. As Austral leading body committed to ia’s preventing al other drug pr cohol and oblems in com munities arou country, the Fo nd the undation spec ialises in prov educational in iding formation and prevention pr ograms.

Armed with a team of drug information experts and researchers, we pride ourselves on delivering the most upto-date alcohol and other drug information from globally recognised research and evidence. You can stay up to date with the latest alcohol and drug education resources by becoming an Australian Drug Foundation subscriber at www.bookshop.adf.org.au This is a free service and as a subscriber, you’ll receive a copy of our quarterly resource catalogue. As a subscriber, you’ll also have access to materials about how to help a friend or family member with an alcohol or drug problem or expert advice for parents.

A brand new addition to the educational resource library is Your Shout. This innovative DVD features a range of young Australians and health experts discussing openly and honestly their experiences with alcohol and the effects it has on physical, mental and social wellbeing. Your Shout is the first of its kind, fostering a discussion between twelve Australian teenagers speaking honestly about the role alcohol plays in their lives. The discussion is complemented by expert insight from health professionals, while maintaining a focus on preventing alcohol related harms. For more information on Your Shout, and how to order a copy for your school, visit www.adf.org.au/yourshout

The Australian Drug Foundation has been working to prevent alcohol and other drug problems in the community for 50 years. Our shop is a comprehensive resource of school drug education materials, including booklets, DVD’s, games, posters and more. Sign up online to receive our quarterly catalogues, promotions and specials, or call to discuss your particular needs.

www.bookshop.adf.org.au 1300 85 85 84

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>>

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We offer a choice of low cost starter pianos from trusted leading brands, all the way up to Handcrafted Japanese Shigeru Kawai & fine European Instruments,

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HUGE selection’s in stock! Our extensive range meets the requirements of school & music teachers, students and musicians of all abilities, styles and tastes. We pride ourselves on being able to find just about anything! SUPER Fast Phone, Fax or Internet mail-order service >>

General Musical Instruments From Rock to Classical we’re in it for all. Extensive range of leading brand musical instruments and accessories selected for their exceptional value and durability.

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Carlingford Music Centre Australia’s Leading independent Premier Kawai, Petrof, Beale & Bernstein Piano Dealership!

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Head office and showroom: 320 Pennant Hills Road Carlingford 2118 Phone: 02 9873 2333 FAX: 02 9873 1266 Why not try our On-Line Shop we can arrange shipping for most of Australia for your convenience!

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music / drama


The value outdoor edof camps and ucation

The Australian Camps Association has been assisting the residential camping, outdoor recreation and education community by providing information, resources, services and training to users and operators since 1983, and new services are continually being developed to ensure quality experiences are available. The Australian Camps Association is recognised as the national peak body for residential camps and activity providers in Australia. We believe that through participating in the temporary community we call ‘camp’, youth and adult citizens of Australia will enhance their lives individually and collectively. Background There is a long and proud camp tradition all around the world. Much of the philosophy of camps is based on the personal development of the participants especially in relation to respect for self, others and the environment. Unlike Australia however, the vast majority of camps around the world occur during school holidays. In Australia the significant majority of camps are run with and for schools during term and the outcomes are very much related to educational aims, whether they are linked to supporting and enhancing core subjects in the curriculum or whether they are linked to values education and a focus on respect for self, others and the environment.

So while many of the outcomes that camps deliver are similar all around the world, in Australia we have developed a much more overt and clear link with schools and educational outcomes. Interestingly I was fortunate enough to attend an International Camping Congress in Quebec, Canada in late 2008, and as a part of that trip we visited 25 camps across Canada and the United States. There is over 150 years of summer camp history in North America focused on large numbers of young people attending the same camp for the majority of the summer break – up to seven weeks – year after year. These camps have traditionally closed for the remainder of the year but on our trip a significant number of them were starting to take up the Australian model of working with schools to run camps during school time in the weeks leading up to and following the summer break. Benefits The Australian Camps Association, along with a range of other peak outdoor organisations around Australia, commissioned a literature search of Australian research into the benefits of camps and outdoor activities. The report, Australian Outdoor Adventure Activity Benefits Catalogue, available on our website at www.auscamps.asn.au, found that: “Research into the benefits of outdoor adventure activities highlights the valuable contribution they make to personal health and wellbeing. As the empirical and anecdotal evidence in the outdoor adventure field begins to unfold, the proliferation of evidencedbased research grows exponentially. The unique opportunities within the natural and social environments offered by outdoor adventure activities provide varying contexts in which these positive connections are made. These connections are referred to in the outdoor adventure literature as being with the self, others and the environment. Outdoor adventure activities provide opportunities for the connection of individuals with nature (the natural environment), direct connection with other people (interpersonal), and importantly, with themselves (personal).” The Australian Camps Association continues to support and encourage research into the benefits of camps and outdoor activities, but to quote Dr Howard Frumpkin in his keynote address at the recent (April 2010) ‘Healthy Parks, Healthy People International Congress’ in Melbourne, “Yes we need more research, but we know enough to act.” He continued, saying that we have enough

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research data to demonstrate the clear benefits of being This means the buildings are involved in camps and outdoor activities in nature, and now we appropriate and that proper visit activity equipment is provided need more research into the nature of those of benefits, into ation m r o f n and used in a safe manner. who benefits the most, what types of programs best deliver o re i site u For m our web ps.asn.a It ensures there are clear those benefits and into how long the benefits last. m usca on procedures for supervising s ww.a In the modern world these outcomes are more important than at w or call u 187. campers and administering 4 3 ever. Richard Louv, in his book Last Child in the Woods, said, 7 bookings and proper planning 1300 “The great worth of outdoor education programs is their focus has been done to manage on the elements that have always united humankind: driving emergencies should they arise. rain, hard wind, warm sun, forests deep and dark – and the The variety of campsites and outdoor awe and amazement that our Earth inspires, especially during experiences ensures that different groups our formative years.” He went on to report that, “Some of the large or small, children or adult, school, most exciting findings of a link between contact with green special interest, community – can enjoy diverse experiences. space and developmental outcomes come from studies Accreditation recognises the diversity and ensures that examining the effects of outdoor challenge programs on regardless of the type of experience your safety has been children’s self-esteem and sense of self…” considered as paramount. Dan Gardner in his book Risk, The Science and Politics of By choosing an accredited camp you are choosing a camp Fear, pointed out that “We are the healthiest, wealthiest, and that has had independent verification of its procedures and longest-lived people in history. And we are increasingly afraid. facilities against accepted industry standards. In Victoria, the This is one of the great paradoxes of our time.” Department of Education and Early Childhood Development Michael Ungar an internationally renowned expert on resilience has made a policy decision that when government schools among at-risk youth and leader of the International Resilience are using a camp they must only use accredited camps. Project, in his book Too safe for their own good; How risk Our accreditation, ‘Camping with Confidence’ has been and responsibility help teens thrive, said “…we need to endorsed by them as meeting all of the standards they provide children with safe substitutes for their risk-taking and require for this purpose. responsibility-seeking behaviours that can provide just as Whatever your requirements for a camp, whether that be much excitement as they find when they put themselves in harm’s way. These substitutes must help kids feel like adults in opportunities for adventure or for quiet study and reflection time, there will be camps to help you achieve your objectives. ways that are meaningful to them.” We can also help you find the camp that is right for you so Camps and outdoor adventure activities are one way to don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions. achieve this. Many of the activities conducted on camps, such David Petherick as high ropes courses, abseiling and canoeing are very low risk CEO, Australian Camps Association but have a high perceived risk. So participants get the benefits from pushing themselves outside their comfort zone and from working as a team in an adventure activity where the actual level of risk is very low. Colin Mortlock, in his book The Spirit of Adventure, suggested that adventure experiences are fundamentally important for the development of our values. With an increasing emphasis being placed on values education, camps and outdoor education offer an important opportunity to deliver outcomes in this important curriculum area. Accreditation ‘Camping with Confidence’ Australian Campsite and Outdoor Activity Provider Accreditation Program ‘Camping with Confidence’ is a national accreditation program designed to ensure the camping or outdoor experience is able to be conducted in a manner where the safety of participants and staff is assured.

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YHA: Specialists in School Excursion Accommodation With continued developments taking place, Sydney Central YHA remains the premier group accommodation option in Sydney winning, for the second year in a row, Best Backpacker Accommodation honours at the Australian Tourism Awards in 2010. Opposite Central Train Station, the group accommodation is within walking distance of major attractions, including museums, art galleries, the Entertainment Centre, China Town and Darling Harbour.

If you haven’t already planned your next school excursion, then have a look at what YHA can offer your school. YHA is leading the way providing safe and secure budget group accommodation and winning awards in the process. The new Sydney Harbour YHA, which is minutes walk from the iconic Harbour and Opera House, won the 2010 Best Tourism Development at the Urban Taskforce Development Excellence Awards. The facilities boast an exclusive groups’ accommodation wing including lounge, dining and TV area, and all rooms have private bathrooms for students and teachers. Located onsite, The Big Dig Archaeology Education Centre links an exciting archaeological dig site with fun curriculum-specific education programs for students of all ages.

Brisbane City YHA won the award for Best New Tourism Development at the Queensland Tourism Awards. To win this award is an achievement indeed, especially in a State with so much tourism development. Conveniently located in the Brisbane CBD within walking distance of all the major attractions, the renovations include a specialist group facility with an exclusive TV room, dining area and kitchen, as well as conference and AV facilities. The team at the Blue Mountains YHA has continued its outstanding contribution to the budget accommodation industry, by taking out the Hostelbookers Oceania Award of Excellence for Cleanliness! The accommodation, located in the heart of the Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, has consistently maintained high standards when catering for school group bookings. Every year the YHA’s are extremely popular with school group bookings. The calendar always fills quickly, so don’t delay in taking advantage of the specialised school excursion accommodation. Make your booking or accommodation enquiry online at www.yhagroups.com.au.

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SPORT

Play Hard

Oz Ring P/L Trading as

ABN 79 066 094 559

Play Hard Sports Equipment 24 Ern Harley Drive Burleigh Heads QLD 4220 Phone (07) 5593 4494 Fax (07) 5593 4338 Email email@playhardsports.com.au Web www.playhardsports.com.au

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SPORTS EQUIPMENT

Play Hard Sports manufactures and sells sports equipment to Schools, Councils, Clubs, Sports Venues and Homes. Situated on the Gold Coast Play Hard Sports makes over 300 different products for

AFL: Athletics: Badminton: Basketball: Cricket: Futsal: Golf: Hockey: Netball: Rugby: Soccer: Tennis and Volleyball.

Oz Ring P/L commenced business in 1994 from

a home garage in western Sydney with one product. Today Oz Ring trades as Play Hard Sports Equipment, a name derived from the company motto ‘play hard’, and better reflects the range of products now made.

All products are manufactured at the Gold Coast factory and are delivered direct to customers all round Australia. When customers contact Play Hard Sports they deal direct with the designers, manufacturers and service staff and because we make the product we know how the product works. Major projects include: # Installing hammer throw cages at Sydney Olympic Park. # Designing cricket sight screens for Blacktown Olympic Park. # Out fitting RAAF Base Amberley with indoor and outdoor sports equipment. # Installing rugby and soccer goals for Titans and Gold Coast United at Robina Stadium. # Designing show court tennis umpire chairs for Queensland Tennis Centre.

AFL

VOLLEYBALL

TENNIS

BASKETBALL

ATHLETICS

SOCCER RUGBY

HOCKEY

CRICKET

PLAY HARD 28

www.playhardsports.com.au EDUCATIONmatters


Yard Games ‘traditional’ The digital age still can’t outdo the and vity acti l when it comes to fun, physica m sroo clas and nd grou interaction in the play ctor Dire g agin Man d, mon Rich e Dav according to of Yardgames.

“Giant versions of chess are still our most popular item for schools, however once we have been discovered for these, education providers are going on to avail themselves of other products in our range” explains Richmond. “It is no longer just volleyball, it is giant volleyball, Connect Four is MEGA4, there are parachutes from as small as 1.8m up to a massive 13.6m suitable for 32+ participants; lite-flite shapes for all ages and abilities; giant LEGO style blocks; 4-way tug-of-war and much more.” Comprehensive product information can be found at www. yardgames.com.au including product details, images, prices, stock status, game instructions, activity suggestions and more.

Yardgames has a lot to offer when it comes to GIANT, TEAM and EDUCATIONAL resources. Their philosophy is to co-operate, learn, build relationships and understanding whilst having fun. With the right direction and the appropriate resources you can achieve these outcomes. As an educator, parent, co-ordinator or guardian you can develop programs that will be interesting, provide learning opportunities and facilitate strong interpersonal relationships with Yardgames products. Yardgames, and its national hire operation Yardparty, have resources that include parachute and Connect-A-Chute activities, giant soccer ball games, team walker races and obstacle courses, group loop activities and tinikling cord activities. There is also a giant crossword game, giant word scramble, conversation balls, earth balls, ‘monopoly’ athletics and much more.

Yardgames offers: •A  15% discount for education providers on most of its range • Easy ordering using School Purchase Orders • 21 day payment terms for pre-authorised orders • Strong customer service •N  ext day shipping on in-stock items upon approval of your quote • Delivery around Australia • Game ideas and instructions for many products •P  roducts that are innovative, fun and different – building upon learning outcomes, boosting physical involvement and enhancing social interaction for all levels of ability

Yardgames has experienced growing demand from teachers and students who love the variety and variation in their educationally beneficial giant and team games.

P: 1300 76 75 21 • F: 02 9938 6712 E: sales@yardgames.com.au • W: yardgames.com.au

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SECONDARY SCHOOL EXERSITE

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FITNESS TRAILS® Secondary School EXERSITETM is durable, effective, economical, environmentally & user friendly, safe, self guided – and has NO moving parts Endorsed by leading top Physical Education, Sports, Coaching and Recreational experts worldwide

Visit:

www.fitnesstrails.com.au

Phone: 02 6290 2437 or 0412 632 951 Email: fitnesstrails@bigpond.com ASA COMPLIANT

SPECIAL EDUCATION MATTERS PRICING: MENTION CODE FTEM

A shirt service that’s custom made for schools.

We’ll custom-make sport shirts or uniforms in your choice of style, fabric, colours and sizes, give you a fixed base price, and enable you to re-order small quantities. We’ll also guarantee to provide the same fabric and colours for at least 3 years, so future orders will match your first. If you’re looking for quality shirts made from premium, colour-fast fabrics, visit our website, experiment with styles and colours and request an obligation free quote. If you need help just give us a call.

Visit www.sportshirtsaustralia.com.au or call us 1300 735 158

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Requ e quote st a and g online et samp free les!


The AKUBRA story so far … creates a strong, interlocking matrix of fur fibres – and that’s what makes Akubra hats so durable. Our manufacturing quality assurance standards exceed AS/NZS ISO 9003, which we primarily quote for the Department of Defence contracts for supply of Slouch hats, while our fur-felt hat range achieves an Ultraviolet Protection Factor of UPF 50+(Excellent).

For over a century, Akubra’s fine felt hats have adorned and protected generations of Australians. The business started out as a small family operation in Tasmania in the 1870s, and now employs over 100 trades people and staff in Kempsey, NSW – manufacturing thousands of hats each week for distribution around Australia – and around the world. Crafted by hand from start to finish, Akubra ensures control of the complete production process in-house using the best fur-felt available, to achieve the highest quality standards in the textile industry.

Presenting and maintaining a unified, stylish image of school students to the broader community can be a real challenge, until you see the benefits that Akubra hats can bring – such as functionality and style, production flexibility, custom hatbands featuring your school’s crest and colours, and affordable durability. Combined with additional strengthening features unique to our school hat styles, the superior fur-felt used by Akubra reinforces its commitment to producing not only an exceptional-looking hat but one of the most durable. Akubra Hats Pty Limited continues to grow as an Australianowned, 5th generation family business, manufacturing in Australia, for Australians and for all who value quality Australian-made product.

Every Akubra hat is individually made from pure fur-felt (using no inferior wool or wool-blend felt), and passes through at least 70 sets of hands and more than 100 individual processes over an eight-week production period. The “felting” process

Akubra Hats, Guaranteed to make the grade.

Akubra offers a truly diverse and extensive range of quality fur felt and straw hats, to complete the style and unified impression of your school. A wide variety of shapes, brim widths, colours and trimming options backed up with unique features and benefits, make Akubra a perfect fit.

Call Dugal McIntyre at Akubra: 02 9499 3199 email: dugal@akubra.com.au or visit: www.akubra.com.au/corporate.html

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The Uniform Company The Uniform Company is the School Uniform Division of Williamson International. A family owned and operated company that started in 1969 with the purpose of supplying schools with reasonably priced, good quality uniforms. This is still part of our focus today but with an added emphasis on providing the best possible service to our wide range of customers.

With a dedicated school sales team, all of our school customers across Australia have a dedicated sales and service consultant. We are intent on building strong working relationships with all of our schools to ensure the highest levels of customer service. Our design team, pattern maker and artwork department can create the ideal image for your school, whether it is a brand new concept, an update of the existing uniform or just improving the fit. A uniform the students feel comfortable in is a uniform that is worn well and looks fantastic.

where possible. We are constantly looking at ways to improve our products to ensure that we supply the highest quality despite the origin of manufacture. As the only knitwear manufacturer in Queensland, all of our school knitwear is made in our Brisbane factory using the best Wool/Nylon and Polyester/Cotton Yarns. Our standard knitwear styles are complimented with stripe options and in house embroidery, not to mention reinforced stitching and elastic edges to prevent stretching. At The Uniform Company we believe that school based uniform shops offer huge benefits to every school. Aside from the obvious fundraising capabilities, a uniform shop also provides the school with control over the Price, Quality and Quantity of the uniforms. As suppliers to hundreds of uniform shops we can advise on all aspects of running a uniform shop. The Uniform Company knows school uniforms, we can help with the design and supply of your school uniform, and follow up with the best service to ensure you have the best image for your school with the most satisfaction.

Our Brisbane Factory ensures that the majority of our uniforms are made in Australia, however we also manufacture Fiji, China and Thailand so that we can offer better prices and choices

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alia r t s u A n i t r a Educating

Despite the increasing demands within the classroom today, teachers provide many opportunities to develop the creative potential of their students. This can confront the teacher with many challenges as they face a multitude of new art materials and technological advancements but it is these advancements, that have provided the classroom teacher with endless means to encourage appreciation, open mindedness, exploration, and experimentation with ideas. Creative visual arts activities develop problem solving skills that are a combination of the mental and the physical actions which finally develop into something uniquely its own...an artwork.

reason and the results of the inferior quality will be evident in the final artwork...thus, it becomes a false economy when the colours look drab and it takes three layers instead of one to get adequate paint coverage on the canvas. Your students will be more motivated and inspired when they can more easily achieve the desired outcome.

An art experience can be incorporated within every area of a school’s curriculum, but there is a need to ensure that visual arts is not just a colourful tool for learning another subject’s content, but that it “should operate on the basis of its own principles, not those of the subject being studied”. (Wankelmann, Wigg)

Much of what is exciting for art students (of any age) is the discovery of new materials. To consider just drawing media gives us a lengthy list of options: charcoal; willow or compressed, pastels; hard or soft, pens; inks; acrylic, pigmented, pencils; graphite, coloured, watercolour and so on. Along with the drawing media there is the consideration of what do we draw on? Paper; lightweight, heavy, smooth, textured, coloured, etc and then of course the teacher can provide a criteria of size, shape or format. The possibilities are truly endless even with the art media that would be very familiar to you!

Getting out the coloured pencils and paper and asking the students to do an illustration of the Australian goldfields does not constitute a valuable visual arts experience operating on its own principles. A key to developing meaningful and valued visual arts lessons is to understand your materials and distinguish their differences. Teachers need to understand that for students to achieve real success in art making they need to value the inherent qualities of a variety of art media to allow experimentation with techniques and the development of sophisticated materials handling skills. Considering the materials in conjunction with the idea or concept of the artwork develops a much deeper understanding in the student of how artists make artworks. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that whatever art media you use, it should be best practice. Experimentation should revolve around what you want to achieve with the material, rather than the material deciding for itself. That said, with the vast amounts of products available today, it can seem all too confusing and overwhelming. It is often difficult to choose wisely and understand what will be the most cost effective option for your limited budget. “Always ask your art supplier about the features of a product and what benefits it will give,” David Solomon, Eckersley’s schools supplier said. Often a cheaper item is cheap for a

t wha h of or art c u M f age) citing is ex s (of any of ery ent stud e discov ls. ia h r t is mate new

Finally, trial a new product or technique each year. Your students will see that you also experiment and take risks with art making. In addition, don’t forget that there are some art products that can be used in a variety of unexpected ways, for example, Winsor & Newton Artisan which is a water-mixable oil and not only safe for use in the classroom for all traditional oil painting techniques, but it also doubles as an excellent printmaking paint for monotypes. The results are truly amazing and the colours are unsurpassed. Remember, if you are inspired to learn new ways to know and use your art materials it will provide exciting opportunities for your students. Natalie O’Connor Lecturer at the College of Fine Arts, University of New South Wales, and education coordinator and materials expert for Winsor & Newton. Reference: A handbook of Arts and Crafts Pages 2-3. Fifth edition c. 1982 Wankelman/Wigg Wm. C. Brown Company Publishers

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           

           

   

   

     

   

   


The Pug Mill Pottery and ceramic supplies specialist since 1973

have been Here at The Pug Mill we , tools and equipment supplying clays, glazes d institutions for over to schools, colleges an e d expertise is extensiv 35 years. Our advice an of ge ran ge lar the covering all aspects of e of clay is best used typ at wh m fro cts du pro ze s as well as which gla for certain application to ted sui st mo be would and firing temperature can o als We . ult res ble achieve the best possi ttery wheels and which offer advice on kilns, po t your requirements as style and size would sui nt such as slab rollers, well as other equipme . pugmills and extruders PRODUCTS Following is a range of brands that we stock and distribute; •

Glazes and underglazes - Chrysanthos Ceramic Colour

Clays - Walkers, Clayworks, Feeneys, Keanes, Blackwattle

Tools and Brushes – Kemper, Seven Skill, Claytools, Designer Tools

Equipment – Tetlow Kilns, Woodrow Kilns, Venco Pottery Wheels and slab rollers, Shimpo Pottery Wheels

SCHOOL PROJECTS The Pug Mill can also supply a range of blank ceramic bisqueware ranging from tiles in various sizes to coffee mugs and plates. These can be decorated with Chrysanthos underglazes and then clear glazed producing a great finished product using simple to use and reliable products ensuring success for you and your students. Ceramic tile projects for a blank wall at your school is a very popular project that the whole school community can all participate in providing a long lasting and durable piece of art work. We can offer instruction on the use of all our products as well as trouble shooting should you encounter problems. Our range of Chrysanthos glazes and underglazes that we distribute Australia wide are all water based and certified non toxic and lead free making them ideally suited for use in schools. These products are simple to use and premixed and water based so no mixing of powders is required. They are available in small 60ml jars up to bulk 5lt containers. Please contact us for a price list and cataloge. 17A Rose St Mile End SA 5031 Telephone: (08) 8443 4544 Facsimile: (08) 8354 0991 Email: pugmill@pugmill.com.au Web: www.pugmill.com.au

EM EDUCATIONmatters

Pottery & Ceramic supply specialist Pottery and ceramic supplies specialist since 1973.

Here at The Pug Mill we have been supplying clays, glazes, tools and equipment to schools, colleges and institutions for over 35 years. Our advice and expertise is extensive covering all aspects of the large range of products from what type of clay is best used for certain applications as well as which glaze and firing temperature would be most suited to achieve the best possible result. We also can offer advice on kilns, p wheels and which style and size would suit your require as well as other equipment such as slab rollers, pugmills and extru PRODUCTS Following is a range of brands that we stock and distribute;

• Glazes and underglazes - Chrysanthos Ceramic Colour • Clays - Walkers, Clayworks, Feeneys, Keanes, Blackwattle • Tools and Brushes – Kemper, Seven Skill, Claytools, Design Tools • Equipment – Tetlow Kilns, Woodrow Kilns, Venco Pottery Wheels and slab rollers, Shimpo Pottery Wheels

SCHOOL PROJECTS The Pug Mill can also supply a range of blank ceramic bisquew ranging from tiles in various sizes to coffee mugs and plates. T can be decorated with Chrysanthos underglazes and then c glazed producing a great finished product using simple to and reliable products ensuring success for you and your stud Ceramic tile projects for a blank wall at your school is a popular project that the whole school community can all partici in providing a long lasting and durable piece of art w

We can offer instruction on the use of all our products as well as tr shooting should you encounter problems. Our range of Chrysa glazes and underglazes that we distribute Australia wide a water based and certified non toxic and lead free making ideally suited for use in schools. These products are simple t and premixed and water based so no mixing of powders is req They are available in small 60ml jars up to bulk 5lt conta

The Pug Mill PTY LTD 17A Rose St , Mile End SA 5031 Telephone (08) 8443 4544, Facsimile (08) 8354 0991 Email: pugmill@pugmill.com.au, Web: www.pugmill.com.au 35 art


Australian Made





  

 

    



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

  

Living Eggs* A unique 12 day experience in your classroom ..... All you need to successfully hatch and raise chickens Embryo Eggs only 2-3 days from hatching Incubator Brooder Box to raise the chickens in Feed and Waterer Comprehensive Manual and CD Rom Free wall poster Access to Teachers Resources on website Helpline Phone Number Delivery and Pick-up Service ...and we take the chicks back if you wish For further information or to make a booking simply call us on Queensland 07 5477 0010 Victoria 03 5428 5397 South Australia 08 8351 4228 New South Wales 02 9481 9568 Western Australia 08 9312 7330

or email info@livingeggs.com.au 36

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Building a sustainable future Increasingly, Australia n schools are actively encouraging students to give thoug ht to their impact on the world, with many teachers incorp orating sustainable livi ng into their educational programs . In leading by examp le, many schools are similarly discovering the value of using sustaina ble products.

Jennifer Williams, Corporate Social Responsibility Manager, Corporate Express, says there is an increasing demand for schools to supply students with environmentally preferable products. “Schools are really feeling the pressure from students, parents and employees to select products wisely,” she said. Corporate Express has helped thousands of schools and businesses across Australia on their journey towards building sustainable workplaces. As Williams points out, the product options are vast. “Nowadays, environmentally preferable products are not just limited to paper supplies. Mailing bags, pens and even school furniture can all be made from ethically and sustainably sourced materials – and its also important to note that sustainable does not necessarily mean more expensive.” 

Corporate Express’ EarthSaver classification, which applies to more than 2,000 products, has been developed in response to this demand for easily identifiable sustainable products. EarthSaver-classified products meet specific criteria in relation to recycled content, end of lifecycle management, low ecological footprint, sustainable sourcing or energy conservation/greenhouse benefit. Dennis Freeman, Head of Marketing and Communications, from Wesley College in Melbourne says: “Sustainability is a priority for our school and Corporate Express helps us make the right choices by offering a range of environmentally preferable products appropriate for our school needs.” The EarthSaver range includes products from all categories including stationery, janitorial, arts and crafts, furniture and canteen.

Let your sustainability story start with us. From recycled paper to biodegradable cleaners and everything in between, Corporate Express has all your environmentally preferable product needs covered. Better still, we provide them all from one convenient source saving you time and money. To make identifying these products as simple as possible, we offer a range of over 2,000 EarthSaver classified products that meet specific criteria in relation to recycled content, end of lifecycle management, low ecological footprint, sustainable sourcing or energy conservation/greenhouse benefits. For more information on our environmentally preferable products or how we can help you on your sustainability journey, speak to one of our skilled Account Managers on 13 26 44.

A better way to do business Corporate Express Australia Limited ABN 94 000 728 398 Phone: 13 26 44 A member of the Staples Group

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Ikcon is already a preferred supplier to many private schools and government departments. Our top quality office furniture, filing and storage solutions at highly competitive prices have placed us firmly at the fore-front of the industry. Our innovative and exciting educational range will enrich any learning environment. Visit our website for some great new products! Call or email us today for fast, friendly service and professional advice:

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www.edusource.net.au

Best Seller


Keeping clean A constant challenge for schools

Providing a healthy environment for current (and prospective) students is essential and every school in Australia faces the constant challenge of keeping their classrooms, hallways, toilet blocks and canteen areas clean at all times.

The Gap State School, located in Queensland with 473 students and 53 staff, is no exception.

new product was exciting for the students and encouraged them to wash their hands,” says Trotter.

When the school recognised there was a large amount of hand soap wastage in the student toilets, Business Services Manager, Kathryn Trotter contacted Corporate Express in an effort to solve the problem. The wastage was costing valuable funds, the leaking soap holders looked messy and soap on the floors posed an occupational health and safety risk.

On visiting the Corporate Express warehouse, the first thing Trotter noticed was the company’s experience and understanding of the education industry.

Following a visit to a Corporate Express warehouse, the school purchased Hygenifoam, a soap alternative ideal for the school environment. Not only did it end wastage, the bathrooms stayed cleaner and less money was spent on janitorial products and services. The cartridges also lasted longer and didn’t need to be replaced as often. Perhaps best of all, “The

“They recognised we have different needs than ordinary office environments and their products reflect an understanding of students’ behaviour and school objectives. They also have a very broad range of products, so really can be your single source supplier.” Hygenifoam is one of many facilities supplies available for schools from Corporate Express, including toilet tissues, facial tissues, paper towel and dispensers.

Stay clean, no matter what they throw at it. From toilet tissue to cleaning products and everything in between, Corporate Express has all your facilities supplies covered. Better still, we provide it all from one convenient source saving you time and money. Included in our range is an extensive selection of Exclusive Brand products. With over 2,000 items covering office products, computer supplies, janitorial products and furniture, our EXP range is both comprehensive and exclusive with each product representing excellent quality and value. Put simply, they are quality without compromise. So if it’s great value facilities supplies you’re after, look no further than Corporate Express. Speak to one of our skilled Account Managers on 13 26 44.

A better way to do business Corporate Express Australia Limited ABN 94 000 728 398 Phone: 13 26 44 A member of the Staples Group

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Majestic Fire Protection is a ‘One Stop Shop’ Fire Protection Company fully licensed and insured according to Australia regulations and legislation. We offer service, sales, and installation on a wide variety of products. Majestic Fire Protection Pty Ltd supply, sell and service the following: ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾ ¾

Fire Hose Reels Fire Blankets Smoke Detectors Fire Hydrants Signs Fire Extinguishers Fire Panels Fire Doors Emergency Lighting Fire Alarms Fire Sprinkler & suppression system Annual Fire Safety Statements

At Majestic Fire Protection we care about the satisfaction of our customers. Our experienced technicians are certified and trained to provide the best possible service on every job. We have certified technicians to install repair and test all types of exit lights, emergency lights and smoke detectors as well as fire alarm systems, so all jobs will be performed with the highest standard and professionalism.

Enquiries: sales@majesticfire.com.au Phone: 1300 730 904

http://www.majesticfire.com.au/

Fire Majestic PROTECTION

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Removing the risk Is your school free of the dangers of asbest os? Are you aware of the risk associated with leavin g asbestos materials un touched within your sch ool environment?

As one of Australia’s largest, most knowledgeable and highly trained Asbestos Removal companies, McMahon Services can help you to safely remove the risk to your students and the school community. Materials with asbestos content (made before the 1980s) may be found around your school. These include water drainage and flue pipes, roofing shingles, guttering, vinyl tiles and the underlay to vinyl sheet floors. Asbestos fibres can cause asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma. Please note that whilst this does not automatically mean that your health is at risk if you find that your school contains materials made from asbestos, the situation does warrant further investigation. McMahon Services holds asbestos removal licenses for bonded and friable asbestos in all states and territories around Australia. We are familiar with all current legislative requirements regarding asbestos removal in schools and in some instances, the requirement for these works to be undertaken outside of school hours. Our asbestos removal

services extend to advisory and removal strategies, audits and asbestos registers to final asbestos clearances and certificates. Working with asbestos requires extensive knowledge, extreme caution and attention to detail. Our core personnel has been working with asbestos for over 20 years and lead a highly qualified team. This invaluable experience provides our clients with the assurance and guarantee of thorough workmanship and a commitment to quality and safety on each and every job that is second to none. McMahon Services is one of Australia’s largest privately owned construction services organisations. Starting off as a small family business in Adelaide in 1990, we now operate nationally, employing over 400 staff. With offices in South Australia, Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory, we are able to work anywhere in Australia, to your timeframe and requirements. Our experience, safety and environmental credentials, multi-skilled workforce and modern fleet of plant and equipment combine to deliver progressive and innovative solutions for our clients. Talk to McMahon Services about your asbestos removal requirements. Our Asbestos Manager, John Flavel is available on 08 8203 3100 to answer any queries you may have.

Australia’s Most Experienced Asbestos Removalists 

Asbestos Removal & Reinstatement

Asbestos Surveys & Analysis

Airconditioning Decontamination

Contaminated Soil Removal

Demolition

25 Years Experience

Highly Trained Personnel

State-of-the-art Technology

Industry Leaders In Safety, Quality & Environmental Management

Phone (08) 8203 3100 I Facsimile (08) 8260 5210 I johnf@mcmservices.com.au I www.mcmservices.com.au

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Total Asbestos Services es, as an Total Asbestos Servic ed nse holder and recognis lice os est asb unlimited uth ed contractor in So Government pre-qualifi ed in the removal and olv inv en Australia, has be ed os and asbestos-relat management of asbest t en nm ver Go er oth d an issues within schools facilities since 1998.

Being fully compliant with DECS policies during the handling of asbestos, along with industry-trained staff, make using Total Asbestos Services for any asbestos issues that schools may come across, a comfortable and stress-free experience. To help protect staff, children and the public, air monitoring and post removal clearance inspection is conducted on all jobs by an independent air monitoring company, no matter how big or small the job is, with results of this being made available to the schools within a couple of hours after completion of the job. This helps ally any fears that staff or parents may have, as well as complying with Safework SA and DECS regulations. We are in a position to deal with after hours emergency call outs, usually as a result of vandalism with a full understanding of DECS policies in place to protect the public from asbestos exposure during these unfortunate times. The Director and license holder of Total Asbestos Services, Wendy Tredinnick, is all for promoting public awareness and education in the safe management and handling of asbestos. As a result of this, she is currently speaking at public forums to whoever is willing to listen. This also includes her recent offer to talk to young people in schools to provide information and education about the risks involved when dealing with asbestos. Her purpose being to curb the number of young people still being exposed and contracting fatal diseases like mesothelioma and asbestosis, quite often as a result of Mum and Dad’s home renovations. The number of young people dying from asbestos related diseases in their 20s is on the increase, and will continue to do so until the public starts taking the dealing with asbestos issues more seriously. For further information, please don’t hesitate to call our office on 8234 1282 where you can speak to one of our experienced staff. P 08 8234 1282 F 08 8234 7211 M 0411 724 833 15 William Street Mile End SA 5031 admin@totalasbestos.com.au

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SAFE ASBESTOS REMOVAL ‘This service is only available in South East QLD’ We use A and B class licensed contractors for bonded and friable ASBESTOS removal jobs. You will not get a better job. Dumping and clearance certificates are always provided. We are highly experienced in working in school environments and understand the need for the absolute safety of your community and our workers. BST Australia, 6/50-52 Hume Street, Norman Park, Brisbane 4170 Phone 07 33950311 Fax 07 33950422

www.fastenersales.com.au

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School fare

followed by a can Sausage roll anyone? What about a hot dog ? of soft drink? Or a dim sim and an ice cream

This is standard fare in school canteens across our nation and school canteens are the most readily available take away food outlets in the country. This fast food culture has our children becoming the fattest in the world. Childhood obesity is running at a staggering 27 per cent and the incidence of Type 2 diabetes, AHDD and asthma in children is also escalating alarmingly. Whilst there is no doubt that the ultimate responsibility for a child’s health rests with the parents, schools can play a major role in either supporting or undermining it. With creative solutions and support from the community, schools have the opportunity to seriously improve the health of Australian children. A school should be a place where children are nurtured and nourished at every level - emotionally, spiritually, physically and academically. This means that the food offered to the children through the school food service needs to be nutritious, nourishing and sustaining. What we eat affects everything: our mood, our behaviour, our academic performance, our growth, our health and our wellbeing. Poor diet leads to lethargy, lack of concentration, drowsiness and can seriously impede academic progress. It can also lead to behavioural problems in the classroom. On the other hand, a well-nourished student can be bright, energetic, focussed and eager to learn.

the importance of good food at home, then the canteen can reinforce those messages. If the children come from a home where healthy food is not important then it is even more critical that they receive the right messages at school. Either way the school canteen can make an enormous difference. If we want to effect change and help school children become adults who make wise choices about their environment and the food they eat, they need to be given every chance for healthy and positive eating experiences. This can happen at school. School canteens can serve good food, they can eradicate processed food, they can market and promote food in such a way that the kids will come back for more. And they can make a profit! It is easily within the power of schools to change the lives of many Australian children by setting and maintaining high standards in the food they choose to serve. The kids will love it, the parents will love it and perhaps we may even see a decline in our childhood obesity rates. Jacqi Deighan Natural Kitchen Strategies

It has become increasingly evident that something needs to be done about the appalling food children all around Australia are consuming every day in school canteens. It is well known that generally the food on offer in Australian school canteens is nutritionally poor. The menu is usually made up of high fat, high sugar, high salt fast foods, soft drinks or highly sweetened juices, confectionery and energy dense snack foods. When Jamie Oliver launched his ‘Feed Me Better’ school dinners campaign in the UK in 2005, many Australians were shocked and outraged at the food British children were eating at school. Yet, many of our school canteens are offering much the same choices here. As the major focus of food in a school and an integral part of the school environment, it is not only ideal that the school canteen sets and maintain standards but fundamental to the whole food education experience in the school. The eating habits of students are greatly influenced by the food available in the school environment and food eaten at school contributes substantially to the students’ daily nutrient intake. Today, with the ever-increasing reliance on before and after school programs, children can spend anything up to eight or nine hours a day at school. This means that a huge percentage of their dietary intake occurs at school. With everything it serves the school canteen has the potential to teach vital food messages. If children are being taught about

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Good hygiene is in your hands

• Kills 99.999% of bacteria • Moisturising • Long lasting protection

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Instant Hand Sanitiser  Non-flammable & non-toxic  Won’t dry out your hands  Fragrance free  Won’t sting or cause irritation  Safe, natural, foaming formula  Lasts more than 2 times longer than alcohol based gels

www.handsfirst.com.au contact@handsfirst.com.au

Ph: 08 8326 8892

GOOD HYGIENE IS IN YOUR HANDS

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natural hand sanitising foam 3 Unique natural ingredients kill 99.999% of bacteria (incl. E.coli, Salmonella). 3 No Alcohol, Petrochemicals, Parabens, Acrylates, Triclosan, Benzalkonium Chloride or artificial colours. 3 Natural extracts include Olive leaf, willow bark, citrus pulp. 3 Natural emollients to condition and moisturise the skin. 3 Dermatologically tested and suitable for sensitive skin. 3 Non-flammable (safe on aircraft)

health

Ideal to use everyday! Apply regularly throughout the day to provide around the clock protection from harmful bacteria around your home, shops, airports, and health care facilities. Available in handy 50mL, 200mL, 500mL and 1 litre packs. Available at Selected Chemists, Supermarkets and Health food stores. Visit www.aftertouch. com.au to find your local stockist. t. 1300 246 682 e. enquiries@aftertouch.com.au www.aftertouch.com.au

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Jet Dryer For the price of one use of paper towel, the latest in hand drying – the Jet Dryer, can dry 20-plus pairs of hands..

The Jet Dryer has three speed settings perfect depending on age of students at the school.

The Jet Dryer also reduces labour costs – no more ordering and storing of paper rolls, refilling of dispensers, cleaning up and getting rid of the waste. Typically towels end up in waste bins that overflow onto the floor, water splashes over the dispenser and bins and floor which can lead to health and safety issues.

There are considerable ecological benefits as well. Your dependence on natural resources is greatly reduced and there is no waste product to dispose of.

Jet Dryer operates at a low noise level of 65dba, which can be more user friendly than othe r hand dryers.

If you are already running older style hand dryers, they can take 30-45+ seconds to attempt a dry finish using 2400 watts and at the end of the cycle the user’s hands could still be wet, leading to transfer of bacteria. Jet Dryer runs at less than 1300W and shuts off when hands are removed. This could give up to a 75% reduction in running costs. The Jet Dryer has some real hygiene benefits with touchless operation, use of anti bacterial filters for cleaner air supply, the surfaces of the unit are coated in an anti bacterial coating for reducing bacteria build up on external surfaces, plus excess water is collected in the reservoir tank for later disposal, rather than spreading onto floor and into the surrounding room. Some other air hand dryers have no water catchment facility, leading to messy floors and therefore could create health and safety issues…

Jet Dryer is offered in silver and white as standard (custom colours like red or blue can be ordered to match the décor or your corporate colours). A fragrance/aromatic option is also available which can further enhance the hand drying experience. With a five year parts warranty, the Jet Dryer is covered by a 1,000,000 use guarantee within this period, having been designed for maximum reliability. If you would like to know more visit www.jetdryer.com.au or to get a cost savings report please don’t hesitate to contact us by email info@jetdryer.com.au or call 1300 071 041.

JET DRYER SOLUTION FAST >

3 Sensors detect your hands and powerful airflow from jets in front and back of hands wipes the water off in rapid time

CLEAN > >

Air filtration with antibacterial coating assists in providing cleaner air and reducing the spread of disease and germs Zero mess or waste

SAVE > > >

Enviroment – Remove dependence on natural resources and addition to landfill Normal hand dryers use up to 2400 watts and take 30+ seconds to dry Jet Dryer takes approx 10 – 15 secs at 1300 watts, saving electricity running costs Paper towels cost approx $0.02 per average use Jet Dryer can dry 20+ pairs of hands for approximately the same cost, saving considerable money and natural resources

COLOURS Silver, white, red, blue and custom colours available

PH: 1300 071 041

EMAIL: info@jetdryer.com.au WEBSITE: www.jetdryer.com.au

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?

n g row e d r a g r u o y s e o d w Ho olved in Getting school children inv

the food revolution

How much time does your school spend trying to teach students the importance of healthy eating? Does it work? Do all the pyramids, pamphlets and lessons on food groups really make a difference to a child’s choices regarding what they eat? Despite well-intentioned government programs aiming to address the growing problem of overweight and unhealthy children, it remains that by 2025, 50 per cent of the Australian population will be obese. There is not much evidence that interventions to date have made any measurable difference to the food choices of the young. At the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation, however, we believe that the most effective way to change the food choices made by children is to engage them in a program that not only gives them skills and knowledge to do this, but which is also so enjoyable that they are fully engaged from the very first class. Each week in Kitchen Garden Schools, students in Years 3 to 7 enjoy a garden class of 45 minutes and a kitchen class of 90 minutes. They experience pleasurable food education, with the underlying aim that their food choices be positively influenced through the joy and wellbeing brought by growing, harvesting, preparing and sharing the bounties of their kitchen gardens. A national project is running in 139 schools across Australia, and is steadily growing. The Program is much more than a school garden project. Its success is due to the way it involves all aspects of the food cycle – it integrates with the curriculum as the children experience the Program every week for at least three years. It becomes an integral part of their school and home lives, and the wider community. The benefits to children are many. They enjoy the physical gardening activity. They become more environmentally aware. They engage all their senses in the kitchen and the garden, especially their appreciation of beauty. They learn about teamwork and cultural understanding. While students enjoy kitchen or garden activities, they may be unaware of the integral links between the Program and the academic curriculum. Teaching opportunities occur naturally when measuring and weighing ingredients, calculating the area of garden beds, or estimating water catchment. Learning

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areas including Science, English and History come into focus through exploring the structure of plants, the vocabulary of cooking and features of procedural texts such as recipes, and the way that what we eat reflects Australia’s history and cultural origins. The children also learn specific skills that will enhance their lifelong wellbeing: skills that are reflected in the new Australian Curriculum, such as teamwork, selfresponsibility, and an understanding of sustainable ways of living. These skills are practised and positively encouraged through saving seeds, planting and harvesting crops, and taking responsibility for their immediate environment. Children expand their palates and enjoy increased pride and self-esteem. They learn how to interact with adults other than their teachers and parents, especially with the community volunteers who are essential to the Program. We hope you will join us in this food revolution. You can become a Kitchen Garden School by successfully applying for an Australian Government grant (a fourth round of grants for the Program will be available in 2011), and you can also join us through the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Subscription Program. Kitchen Garden Subscribers enjoy: •

Access to specialised training at a discounted rate, developed to meet specific Subscriber needs.

Access to exclusive Kitchen Garden Foundation offers including free and discounted products and services for Subscribers.

Access to the members portal of the upcoming new SAKGF website, including invaluable resources designed to help you succeed with your Program, including interactive digital learning resources.

The new SAKGP Tools for Teachers resource, which helps teachers implement learnings from the Program into the school curriculum.

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Opportunities to network with other Kitchen Garden Subscribers and the support of an extensive Kitchen Garden Community that includes the Jamie Oliver team (also a Kitchen Garden Subscriber!)

Please see our website for more details on how the Kitchen Garden Program works, the full formal evaluation report, details on how to apply for funding, as well as how to become a Kitchen Garden Subscriber. www.kitchengardenfoundation.org.au

canteen


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Exercising your ‘DUTY OF CARE’ For any teacher working in the technology curriculum over the last 30 years, the changes to the workplace safety requirements have been noticeable and now have far reaching effects. This is easy to see when you consider that in the 1980s schools had no formal training for teachers in the area of OH&S, whereas in today’s educational climate workshop safety systems are mandated and legislated before the curriculum can proceed. The obligation is now placed on education system educators and technology teachers to provide adequate safety training within their technology classrooms. Teachers also need to be made aware of legal aspects such as their ‘Duty of Care’, ‘Due Diligence’, ‘Foreseeable Risk’, ‘Reasonably Practicable’ and ‘Negligence’. In order for a technology teacher to be held liable for an incident (reportable accident) in his/her school workshop, it must be proven that they failed to exercise a proper standard of care for a teacher in similar circumstances. You should assume that a prosecution will follow all but minor workplace accidents. Although a relevant state workplace safety authority’s inspector’s investigation generally occurs shortly after the accident, a formal prosecution may be commenced at any time up to two years later. An injured party (student) may seek financial compensation (i.e. sue in common law) and if due process has not been followed (i.e. a documented risk assessment procedure, appropriate training and recording processes), then these events will involve lengthy and extremely stressful court processes for all concerned.

must exercise reasonable skill. Common law principles and terms of employment impose a positive duty on teachers to do what is ‘reasonably practicable’ to protect their students from ‘foreseeable risks’. This can cause or prevent drastic legal consequences. ‘Reasonably practicable’ means that the requirements of the law vary with the degree of risk in a particular activity or environment which must be balanced against the time, trouble and cost of taking measures to control the risk. It allows the duty holder to choose the most efficient means for controlling a particular risk from the range of feasible possibilities preferably in accordance with the ‘hierarchy of control’. What is your ‘Duty of Care’ It is to be noted that a teacher’s ‘duty of care’ is a higher standard than that of a reasonable person. In the workplace,

For an injured person to be successful in their common law claim, they must prove that the employer is legally liable for their injuries. Usually they will argue that the employer has been negligent, or breached workplace health and safety requirements, or breached the agreement that the employer will keep the injured worker safe at work. The basic principle in negligence cases is that liability to pay damages will arise where three elements are established by the person seeking damages. These three elements are: •T  hat there is a duty of care in the situation under consideration; •T  hat there has been a breach of that duty, that is, a failure to take care regarded by the law as reasonable in the circumstances; and •T  hat damage or injury has been caused by or contributed to by that breach. These three basic principles of negligence must apply before a claim for damages can be sustained. It is long accepted that every teacher owes a duty of care towards every student under their supervision. Teachers are trained professionals holding themselves out as being capable of caring for a large number of young people in a wide variety of circumstances and for this reason, teachers

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‘due diligence’ means taking every precaution reasonable in the circumstances to protect the health, safety and welfare of all persons. Evidence of due diligence is one of the two defences available to a person, charged with an offence under an Occupational Health and Safety Act. Due diligence requires that you address identified risks in your workplace through a properly functioning and documented health and safety system. The more harmful or serious are the potential dangers, the more you must guard against them to prevent workplace injuries and illnesses.

Whether an individual acted diligently, depends on whether he/she took every precaution reasonable in the circumstance for that particular case. What might constitute duly diligent behaviour in one case may not hold true in another. This is because each situation and each workplace is unique and needs to be assessed on an individual basis. There are a number of general measures that all employers and workplace supervisors can and should implement in an attempt to comply with the OHS Act and to demonstrate due diligence. These include: •C  arrying out all duties under the Act and ensuring that your company complies with the Act and associated legislation; •S  etting up a well-documented system for identifying, reporting and responding to all actual and potential hazards in the workplace; •E  stablishing safe practices, procedures and controls that are specific to the hazards in your workplace and that either meet or exceed the requirements set out in the Act; •P  roviding instruction and training on an on-going basis to all employees, including supervisors and workers; (and visitors) •C  ommunicating regularly with employees about foreseeable health and safety hazards; •A  llocating adequate time and resources for the health and safety program to be established and followed by all parties in the workplace; including the occupational health and safety committee; • Monitoring and auditing of your program on a regular basis. Failure to comply with workplace safety training regiments, including mandatory record keeping and registration, may lead to legal implications such as the term ‘negligence’. If this unfortunately becomes the case, and as a teacher you are charged as ‘negligent’, the plaintiff action (your injured student) will surely follow though the common law courts. Both the school and its workshop teachers will have to rely on their safety training policy, its safety training program, enforcement of the safety training procedure, and the overall ability of the teachers to exercise a high standard of ‘duty of care’. OnGuard Safety Training has designed and produced several unique digital media training packages for the education market since starting business in 2000. Our training solutions are preventative by their very nature, afford a visible level of protective care and are proactive by deliberate design. We are able to provide you with a Learning Management System to train, track and record safety training for all curriculumn areas within the school. Our programs are designed specifically to meet the needs of the Australian Education Sector and provides resources to assist teachers with meeting their duty of care and maintaining ongoing records for safety training conducted in the school for individual students.

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                                               

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o h t e m c fi i t n e i The sc der stood

Critical yet misun

The following is an extract of an article published in the Science Education Review, in which author Peter Eastwell argues how a more explicit use of the scientific method would improve both science education research and learning in science classrooms. Learning science in a school is a very different context from practicing science research proper, and one difference is that student investigations in school subjects are often conceived rather artificially. Considering the possibilities, I cannot imagine a worse way to introduce students to a scientific investigation than to have them turn the page of their textbook to find an investigation title – and a rather non-informative one at that, such as “Let’s Make a Splash” – for a stand-alone activity (i.e. one that is not integrated into a learning sequence in the text) that is accompanied by a series of steps to be followed “blindly” by students, and was very surprised to find just this structure in a relatively recently-published textbook for lower high school students. The students are expected to follow the “cookbook” without even knowing what they are trying to cook, which hardly appears motivating.

achieve the goals of the learning experience), one of which might be that a thicker ozone layer prevents more cosmic rays from reaching the Earth’s surface. Students would devise a way to collect appropriate data and find that a decrease in the thickness of the ozone layer is indeed associated with an increase in the incidence of cosmic rays, concluding that their results support the hypothesis. The student lab reports, featuring hypothesis, prediction, test (outcome), and conclusion, would then reflect one complete hypotheticodeductive cycle or argument. Of course, the alternative hypothesis that an increase in cosmic ray incidence degrades the ozone layer and thereby allows more cosmic rays to reach the surface would also be supported by the evidence (illustrating how support for a hypothesis does not prove it

Improving on this, one might provide students with a title, aim, and procedure, which now provides students with some sense of purpose. Better still, though, the activity can be made more authentic by providing a question instead of an aim. Now, here comes a crucial moment. Questions can be causal or non-causal, and a non-causal question, such as “is there a relationship between the incidence of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth and the thickness of the ozone layer?” does not require a hypothesis to be generated, because there is nothing to explain. Noncausal questions like this one, “what types of structures does a flower have,” and “does eating spicy food cause your body temperature to rise” have a place in science education, but answering them does not require the scientific method1. To provide students with experience in using the scientific method, then, we need causal questions (either supplied to students or generated by the students themselves) for them to investigate, and these might arise naturally during a course or be “engineered” by the teacher. For example, following from everyday experience students might be asked: “Why does a basketball go flat when used outdoors in winter?” Indeed, a teacher can even engineer a situation so as to change a non-causal question into a causal one. For example, instead of asking “what local climate changes are associated with El Niño,” students might investigate the question “why does our local climate change?” by testing, possibly among others, the hypothesis that local climate changes are caused by El Niño. Or, instead of asking “is there a relationship between the incidence of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth and the thickness of the ozone layer?” students might be asked to investigate: “What causes the incidence of cosmic rays on the surface of the Earth to vary?” In this case, students would be invited to generate hypotheses (with even the teacher suggesting one or more if it helps to

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correct), and the need for further research to distinguish between these two explanations could also appear in the reports. Comparing the different ways in which a non-causal question and a causal question need to be investigated, it is now perhaps easy to understand why so many curriculum materials incorrectly label the prediction of, or guess about, the answer to a non-causal question a hypothesis. As David Rudel wrote: “There is a push today to get students to use the scientific method as much as possible. If a textbook says a hypothesis is merely a guess as to what will occur in a given experiment, the procedure can be applied [albeit incorrectly] to almost anything the student is asked to study,”

(personal communication, May 25, 2010). Perhaps only after establishing such confusion does a statement such as “the first thing scientists do to conduct an experiment is to form a hypothesis” (Kim, Bland, & Chandler, 2009) make sense! Finally, perhaps another mechanism for providing students with experience with the scientific method is to structure even lectures on it. 1The scientific method (also called the hypothetico-deductive [HD] approach) comprises making a puzzling observation, asking a causal question, advancing a hypothesis (i.e. a proposed explanation), generating a prediction from this hypothesis, designing and conducting a test to check on the prediction, comparing the results of the test with the prediction, and reaching a conclusion as to whether the results support or contradict the hypothesis.

Dr Peter H. Eastwell PhD (Science Education), BSc (Honours, Phys. Chem.), DipEd, MRACI, MACE, C. Chem is Editor of The Science Education Review (www.scienceeducationreview.com) and Presenter, Science Time Education (www.sciencetime.com). Peter’s experience as a science educator began in 1978. He taught full-time in Queensland state and independent schools for over 17 years, 12 as Head of Science. He enjoyed his work in the classroom immensely, and documented some of it by authoring the textbook Physics Spectrum: Constructing an Understanding of Physics (McGraw-Hill), which promotes a constructivist approach to the learning of senior physics. He also completed doctoral studies on the effects of enrichment and extracurricular science activities on secondary students. Dr Eastwell’s students have been very successful in both State and National science competitions, including being National winners in both the 1996 and 1997 Earthworm Environmental Awards for scientific research. He has received a Service to Science Education Award (Science Teachers Association of Queensland), a BHP Science Teacher Award, and was a finalist in the 1999 Allen Strom Eureka Prize for Environmental Education Programs. Since 1997, Peter has been self-employed as the Director of Science Time Education, conducting science programs for students and workshops/seminars for teachers. He is a registered Science and Technology Communicator, an accredited Primary Investigations and Crest Awards trainer, and has authored broadly in the area of science education. With a deep passion for science education which students find contagious, he enjoys nothing more than sharing his fascination for the scientific principles which govern our world. References: Kim, M., Bland, L. C., & Chandler, K. (2009). Reinventing the wheel. Science and Children, 47(3), 40-43.

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21st century le

arning

The digital world Consider the changes to our lives over the last decade since the internet has become ubiquitous. We can now book airline tickets and accommodation online as well as see the hotel room, read what others have said about the location and even see their photos and read their blogs. No need for recipe books, we can find almost any recipe we need online. Want to find a place almost anywhere in the world? Google Maps can help us do this. E-business has achieved widespread acceptance as a powerful business tool and internet dating has revolutionised people’s love lives. Want to email someone, make a video or take a photo, watch a movie, check the weather, navigate, listen to music or check the news? Chances are you can do it all on your phone.

Growth of the online world is dramatic and its rate of penetration is amazing. In 2004, there were 800 million internet users, now there are 1.97 billion. Australia is the eigth largest user of Facebook which has increased its user base from one million in 2004 to over 500 million worldwide. Wikipedia, launched in 2001, contains more than 16 million articles in over 250 languages and has over 12.99 million registered users. Within 65 days of Apple’s iPad launch this year five million books were downloaded. The quality of the online experience is improving rapidly as more and more free services are hosted in the internet, often referred to as the ‘cloud’. Technology has made irreversible changes to the ways those of us who remember life before the internet live, work and create and consume knowledge. What is significant in the 21st century is the exponential rate of technological change, the immediacy of the impact of these changes globally and the resultant constant challenge to the established ways of working, living and learning. Young people in our schools have only ever known this digital world. To them, technology is invisible and normal. They increasingly live and thrive in the digital environment, comfortable with virtual, screen-to-screen and face-toface relationships. They take for granted that they can use interactive text, audio and image technologies to observe and participate in world events in real time. Their approach to learning is influenced by their expectations of 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year multiple media communications. Highly connected to a wide range of resources and services, they simultaneously do their homework, talk on the phone and text, listen to music, surf the web and maintain conversations on line. They regularly engage and work with multilayered packages of non-linear information comprising images, sound, video, text and graphics at home in their personal communications and entertainment. Many students spend time equivalent to a full-time job involved in media such as chat, blogs, wikis, reality television and interactive games. These are intrinsic to their world. Current technologies shape their expectations and their abilities to access, manipulate, create and communicate information. They are actively shaping and creating their online world and there is often little distinction between learning and play. While their schools may not have fully joined this vibrant digital space, information and communication technology is deeply entwined in their lives.

ralia Ltd. ion Services Aust Copyright Educat

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Schools and technology It is no wonder that students demand and expect increasing use of technology and interactivity in their learning at school. It is clear that education and curriculum must be flexible and responsive to this new world. Education systems and schools are responding to these needs and aspirations. The productive engagement by teachers and schools with information and communication technologies is becoming part of the everyday practices of all schools, supported by curriculum frameworks grounded in studentcentred learning, the high levels of interest and technology skills among students and the increasing levels of connectivity, reliable hardware, software, quality content, services and technical support in schools. There are significant differences in the perceived impact of technology’s effect on student learning between frequent and infrequent users. The more that teachers use technology, the more they recognise and value its strong effects on student learning and engagement. Continuous learning with clear purpose and connection to the real-world through information and communication technologies is critical to developing the dispositions, literacies and skills of negotiation, risk-taking, problem solving, knowledge analysis and creation, and team work and collaboration so needed for participating in our technological society and dealing with the complexities of issues and change. Teachers who are proficient in using technology in their teaching are communicating information and concepts clearly with lessons and digital curriculum resources, providing adaptive solutions for individual learners with special needs, creating a learning environment where learners feel safe and secure, and they are working in partnership with parents, families and the community. Diagram1: Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)

Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK)

Technological Knowledge (TK)

Pedagogical Knowledge (PK)

Content Knowledge (CK)

Pedagogical Content Knowledge

Technological Content Knowledge (TCK)

Many are also effectively using technology for a range of administrative processes including planning teaching and learning, reusing, adapting and sharing resources, and storing and analysing student assessment data, thereby saving valuable time that can be devoted to supporting their students’ learning. Developing teacher proficiency A lot has been written about the potential of e-learning and there is a considerable investment in professional learning and the development of teaching standards to increase teachers’ proficiency to effectively use information and communication technologies to support improved student learning outcomes. Changes in teaching methods and the level of learning outcomes won’t just happen by making technologies available or even by our schools adopting them. It will only happen when schools and teachers adopt appropriate pedagogies and new structures and behaviours that respond to the digital economy and acknowledge that today’s students are no longer the same people our schools were originally designed to teach. The Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) approach is useful in thinking about the essential qualities of understanding required by teachers for technology integration in their teaching. Quality teaching using information and communication technologies requires a nuanced understanding of the complex relationships between technology, content, and pedagogy, and using this understanding to develop appropriate, contextspecific strategies. The TPACK approach goes beyond seeing these three aspects of knowledge in isolation. It emphasises the new kinds of knowledge that lie at their intersections. Considering Pedagogy and Content together produces Pedagogical Content Knowledge, knowledge of pedagogy that is applicable to the teaching of specific content. Similarly, considering Technology and Content together, produces Technological Content Knowledge, the knowledge of the relationship between Technology and Content. At the intersection of Technology and Pedagogy, is Technological Pedagogical Knowledge, which emphasises the existence, components and capabilities of various technologies as they are used in the settings of teaching and learning. Finally, at the intersection of all three elements is Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge1. A teacher capable of negotiating these relationships represents a form of expertise different from, and greater than, the knowledge of a disciplinary expert (say a mathematician or a historian), a technology expert (a computer scientist) and a pedagogical expert (an experienced educator). Effective technology integration for pedagogy around specific subject matter requires developing sensitivity to the dynamic relationship between all three components. The National Reform Agenda Over the last decade there has been a national strategic effort by Australian education ministers to equip schools and teachers to use information and communication technologies. This began with a joint national statement, Learning in an Online World – the school action plan for ICT in 2001. It was quickly followed by the establishment of the Ministerial ICT

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As a result of the investment in the Learning Federation, Australia now has a critical mass of digital curriculum resources on which to build a specifically targeted collection aligned directly to the Australian curriculum. It has become clear that educators cannot rely on Google, or similar, to find the required range of specific online services, tools, resources and applications they need to do their job. In all state and territory education jurisdictions and in the Catholic education sector, therefore, teachers and school leaders have been provided with trustworthy portals, or virtual learning environments, through which to access national and local digital curriculum resources free of charge. Portals such as TaLE in New South Wales, Learning Place in Queensland, OTLS in WA, FUSE in Victoria and eCentre in Tasmania and Scootle access the national digital curriculum resources collection and download the resources and records. Teachers then access the resources through their jurisdiction portal or through Scootle. The resources are also made available to higher education teacher education faculties for use by pre-service teachers. These digital resources are all tagged to enable easy searching online via learning area and year level. They are also currently being aligned to the specific learning outcomes of the emerging Australian curriculum to enable more detailed search and discovery for teachers.

Copyright Educat ion Services Aust ralia Ltd. in Schools Taskforce and the national Learning Federation initiative to develop Australian digital curriculum content for schools. In 2005 the three-yearly national sample assessment testing program in ICT commenced for students in Years 6 and 10. These national policy developments culminated in the Digital Education Revolution announced in 2008 which provided $2.4 billion over seven years to provide technology equipment for secondary schools, school broadband services, support for teacher training, online curriculum tools and resources, online access to support parent participation and assistance for schools in the deployment of new technology. Education Services Australia and the National Digital Curriculum Resources Collection Education Services Australia2, has worked closely with education jurisdictions since 2001 managing the Learning Federation Initiative on behalf of the education ministers. The initiative has produced the national collection of digital curriculum resources and the national delivery infrastructure to support their disctribution.

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There are over 12,000 of these resources in the learning areas of English, science, mathematics, languages and history from the first years of schooling to Year 12. They include interactive learning objects, still images, audio files, moving image, datasets, data visualisation and presentation tools, teacher ideas, units of work and websites. Research shows that the digital curriculum resources, especially the interactive learning and assessment objects, are particularly beneficial in supporting the learning of difficult-to teach-concepts and their use increases students’ levels of engagement and motivation for learning.3 Some resources focus specifically on formative assessment. The selection of contexts, concepts and processes for these resources has been informed by the analysis of data on student underperformance in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), as well as Australian national testing programs. These assessment resources focus on areas not easily covered by pen and paper assessment items. An integral component of each assessment resource is a guide for the teacher and a

digital resources


report on student performance against the learning outcomes addressed by the resource. The digital curriculum resources in the national collection are sourced locally, nationally and internationally. Partnerships have been developed by Education Services Australia over the last decade with a large range of public and private cultural and collection agencies, including art galleries, science organisations, museums, libraries, private collections and archives, to enable educationally-relevant components of their valuable collections to become accessible to students across Australia. Some recent outcomes of successful international collaboration include resources from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology enabling Australian teachers to search for and access images and writings on aspects of modern Japan and China from the Visualizing Cultures project. Senior mathematics and science resources have also been licensed from ExploreLearning in the United States, the world’s largest library of interactive online mathematics and science simulations.

to the national collection of digital resources, as well as to local resources developed and procured by education jurisdictions, to resources shared by teachers and eventually, to overseas digital resource repositories. The intention, over time, is to develop a comprehensive digital curriculum collection that covers all aspects of the Australian curriculum drawing from the best sources available. Education Services Australia is continuing to maintain and build the national digital resource collection so that it can support teachers and students by filling resource gaps in response to new requirements arising from the Australian curriculum, supporting education jurisdictions and teachers to share digital resources nationally; and developing a marketplace for jurisdictions to trade in digital learning resources. Catalogues of all digital curriculum resources in the national digital curriculum collection are available online to enable teachers to browse what is available and to plan their work. These catalogues can be downloaded and printed for easy access.

To further assist teachers to select the most appropriate resources, Education Services Australia is grouping digital curriculum content thematically into collections of relevant interactive learning and assessment objects, film clips, images and sound files in a range of learning areas and year levels. The collection on Women’s Suffrage in Australia, for example, includes photos, documents and interactive resources sourced from the National Archives, the National Library of Australia and the state libraries of Queensland and South Australia. Resources in the form of shared teachers’ ideas and proven teacher-developed learning sequences and classroom strategies are also available to support teachers to effectively use digital curriculum resources to inspire and challenge their students. These resources provide teachers with engaging stories from classrooms across Australia and include printable worksheets, sample student work and other online and offline resources used for the topic. The units of work are available as downloadable activities in PDF and Word formats so teachers can customise them to suit their own purposes. Supporting the Australian Curriculum is an area of major strategic focus for Education Services Australia. It is is working closely with ACARA to link the emerging Australian curriculum

Susan Mann, CEO Education Services Australia 1

http://tpack.org/

2

In March 2010, two companies owned by Australian education ministers, Curriculum Corporation and Education.au, merged to form Education Services Australia

3

 reebody, P, Muspratt, S, McRae, D 2007, Evaluating F The Le@rning Federation’s online curriculum content initiative, summary of findings from surveys, site visits and a field experiment (http://www. thelearningfederation.edu.au/verve/_resources/ freebody_final_report_2007.pdf)

Information on how to access the range of digital curriculum resources is available at: www.thelearningfederation.edu.au Susan Mann was appointed as the Chief Executive Officer of Education Services Australia, in March 2010, after the merger of two ministerial companies, Curriculum Corporation and Education.au limited. Prior to this appointment, Susan was the Chief Executive Officer of Curriculum Corporation since 2005, particularly focusing on the transformative potential of information and communication technologies for education, national curriculum consistency and national assessment. From 2001 to 2005, Susan played a key role in the conceptualisation and leadership of the Learning Federation, an Australian and New Zealand government initiative producing digital content, distribution architecture and content development standards for schools. Susan has over 30 years experience in education as a secondary teacher, education consultant, policy analyst and university lecturer.

EM EDUCATIONmatters

digital resources

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Lenovo® recommends Windows® 7 Professional.

Make space for more learning. The ThinkCentre A70z all-in-one PC has more thinking built-in and saves up to 70%1 less desk space. The sleek new Lenovo ThinkCentre® A70z does away with bulky CPUs and wire tangles2, and gives your students back their desk. Up to 70% desk space isn’t all you save. The ThinkCentre A70z also saves you trouble with Lenovo Service and Support and is more affordable. It’s just what you need to make 1:1 computing a reality in your campus. Our nationwide network of Authorised Lenovo Business Partners provide customised solutions tailored to the specific and individual needs of schools all across Australia.

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[1] Compared to ThinkCentre A58 Tower plus 19" wide LCD monitor. [2] With optional WiFi models, wireless keyboard and mouse. Lenovo makes every effort to ensure accuracy of all information but is not liable or responsible for any editorial, photographic or typographic errors. All images are for illustration purposes only. For full Lenovo product, service and warranty specifications visit www.lenovo.com.au Lenovo makes no representations or warranties regarding third-party products or services. Celeron, Celeron Inside, Centrino, Centrino Inside, Core Inside, Intel, Intel Logo, Intel Atom, Intel Atom Inside, Intel Core, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Intel vPro, Itanium, Itanium Inside, Pentium, Pentium Inside, vPro Inside, Xeon and Xeon Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. Trademarks: The following are registered trademarks of Lenovo: Lenovo, the Lenovo logo and ThinkCentre. Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. or other countries. Other company, product and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. ©2010 Lenovo. All rights reserved. Visit www.lenovo.com/safecomputing periodically for MMG_AUS_PPA_Q2-11_17018 the latest information on safe and effective computing.

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Combining the new FX-Trio StarBoard with one of the Short Throw or Ultra Short Throw projectors into one seamless package creates the ultimate in interactive teaching solutions.


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Computelec, your complete technology solutions provider We are the experts

in guiding schools with getting the most out of their technology.

our tailored It solutions for education mean that we can assist you with the management of your school’s entire technology program from infrastructure support through to curriculum integration in the classroom.

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our team of industry certified software specialists can provide you with the most cost effective licensing options, help you remain compliant and ease the burden of managing multiple software contracts. Benefit from trusted advice and our breadth of experience in software solutions for the school environment.

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our long standing partnerships with tier one vendors enable us to source hardware products and solutions tailored for your needs at the best possible price. Wireless solutions | microsoft Windows and exchange server upgrades | Virtual local area networks (Vlans) | network Infrastructure upgrades | network security | technology auditing and Planning | disaster recovery Planning | support contracts and staff outsourcing

managed serVIces our managed services provide a proactive solution for schools, delivering continuous protection and support for your network infrastructure. We keep your It systems up and running, giving you greater control and visibility into your It environment. Providing reliable, responsive support when you need it, we help take the guesswork out of on-going expenditure in managing and maintaining your It infrastructure.

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to find out how we can support your school contact our education technology specialists on 1300 36 1988 or info@computelec.com.au www.computelec.com.au


ReadMe Literacy Software

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Installing Video Projectors or Interactive WhiteBoards? You need JED controllers! JED Microprocessors, Melbourne, designs and builds low cost wired remote controllers for video projectors in classrooms, laboratories, meeting rooms, churches and lecture theatres. They can mount on a lectern or desk, or wall using standard Clipsal 2000 hardware. The JED T460 (right) is a simple projector control panel with just four clearly labelled buttons. Compare this with complex, hand-held remotes, which get dropped, lost or stolen. The ON and OFF buttons turn the projector on and off. (The ON button also scrolls between up to eight sources). The VOLUME UP and VOLUME DOWN do just that (or can become Mute and Freeze toggles). The simple-to-use controller is pre-programmed with the codes for over 1600 different projectors, and can be updated with new codes. It has a backlit LCD display showing status: Warmup, Cooldown, and up to eight sources (VCR, computer, camera etc), Audio Volume and Lamp Hours. The JED T440 (left) is a low-cost, simple controller, with just 4, 6 or 8 buttons labelled by function, and LEDs for status. It teams nicely with whiteboards, and is

EM EDUCATIONmatters

Production notes: Maybe put into a box with a blue background and white

simply setup with switches on the back (no programming!). The JED T430 is a very simple two-button controller for simple, one or two source, whiteboard installations. All units have built-in timers, which, if you value the run-time costs of projector bulbs, can pay for them (and save power) just by preventing the projector from being left on when a PIR detector finds everyone has gone home. The 439 (right) is a USB switcher for use in IWB class-rooms, where it switches between the desk computer USB and the teacher’s laptop’s USB to control the IWB. A T441 and T461 audio mixers can control the audio if the projector doesn’t. The T465 is a microphone pre-amp/mixer. A T464 Ethernet Box has a CAT5 connection for remote monitoring of A/V equipment rooms by the techs. For more details of these products, see:

http://www.jedmicro.com.au or contact: JED Microprocessors Pty Ltd Boronia, 3155 Telephone: (03) 9762 3588

IT/interactive learning

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It’s fun to do my job again! MimioStudio 7 Software flawlessly integrates all Mimio Tools to allow teachers to Simply Teach

next generation in a fun, in order to bestow their knowledge onto the Teachers will often choose their career path ing lessons, marking plann hours ding spen s selve often find them engaging manner, however unfortunately they tonous tasks as well as the ed teachers need to be freed from these mono assignments or tallying results. Mimio believ to Simply Teach. inherent distractions of new technology in order

After much observation, interviews and listening to teachers, DYMO/Mimio developed the simplest interactive whiteboard solution on the market. The new MimioClassroom suite of innovative and affordable interactive teaching products are purpose-designed and built, allowing educators to teach creatively, engage students and provide real benefits to the learning process while saving time and reducing hassles in their existing classroom. The benefits of the new suite are further enhanced with the innovative new MimioStudio 7 Software. The software delivers automatic integration that lets MimioClassroom Tools including MimioTeach, MimioVote, MimioCapture and MimioPad work flawlessly – either on their own or together. Intuitive features and simple interface make it easy to pull together images, multimedia and Internet links so teachers can build interactive lessons effortlessly. The company’s General Manager, Laurence Huntley, says the design philosophy, ‘Simply Teach’, covers all hardware, software and firmware design that can be fully integrated for ease of use. “Our products have been designed by our engineers who went into classrooms to identify the problems and the needs of teachers and students with the objective of making our new technology easy to use and relevant in the classroom,” he said When developing creative, engaging yet simple lesson plans, teachers are able to take advantage of the Mimio Gallery for ready-to-use lessons and content such as word games, quizzes, audio, video, Flash files and hundreds of images. Teachers are then able to record video lessons as well as record audio files which are captured through a computer microphone to reuse at any time.

students. Results can be accessed at any time, where they can be reviewed, modified or downloaded into spreadsheets. This can be easily incorporated with MimioVote, a student assessment system that provides the easiest and most accurate way for teachers to evaluate student comprehension. One teacher’s comment really captures the essence of Mimio and the reduction of time spent on mundane tasks: “Teachers start to think ‘it’s fun to do my job again!’” Interactive learning is also incredibly beneficial for students. It creates an environment where students of all ages are encouraged to share their ideas and learn in a collaborative setting. MimioClassroom products can be used to educate students of all capabilities, including children with behavioural issues and special needs – or exceptionally gifted children.

Educators also have access to MimioConnect and MimioTraining, where they can collaborate online with other teachers, share and download resources as well as take part in virtual training programs.

As Huntley points out, “If the teacher can engage students in interesting and exciting projects through interactive teaching technology, there’s less chance of boredom and disruptive behaviour.

The software offers full compatibility with virtually every popular software application, including Microsoft Office and Adobe Acrobat. Lessons are further enhanced through use of the convenient drag-and-drop feature for Flash, audio and video files. One Victorian teacher commented her favourite Mimio feature was the screen annotation tool – “I love being able to write all over a website and then save my notes to use in future lessons. It definitely makes my job easier,” she said

“Interactive teaching and learning enables all children, including gifted and special needs children, to have new ways to express themselves and accelerate the learning process.” For further information on DYMO/Mimio ITT, please visit www.mimio.dymo.com/new90; you can also follow DYMO/ Mimio on Twitter @mimiotechnology and via Facebook. Download lesson plans and connect with other educators at www.mimioconnect.com

Integrated MimioStudio Gradebook is a great example of how teachers can reduce time spent on administration so they can concentrate on simply teaching. The tool keeps a running tally of answers and scores for both the entire class and individual

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IT/interactive learning


What if

someone

developed entirely new teaching technology that was better, more intuitive, more affordable, and a lot easier for teachers? (Imagine that.)

In the world of interactive teaching, Mimio stands apart. NEW from DYMO/Mimio. We took award-winning teaching technologies. We gathered meticulous input from teachers and administrators. We then challenged some of the best engineering minds in the industry to create an entirely new standard. The MimioTeach™ interactive system transforms the whiteboards you already have into interactive whiteboards. The MimioCapture™ tracking system lets you use dry erase markers to write, edit, and erase directly to your computer. The MimioVote™ assessment system provides instant assessment with a tool that’s more intuitive and easier to use. The MimioView™ document camera displays high-resolution camera images, gets power from your PC, and launches the onscreen software simultaneously. And there’s much more to Mimio interactive teaching solutions, all designed to work together. Simply.

Contact us if you would like to experience Mimio first hand. Please call Peter Goldie on 03 8796 7470 or visit mimio.dymo.com/new90 ©2010 DYMO, a Newell Rubbermaid company


ENHANCE TEACHING. INSPIRE LEARNING.

LOGITECH FOR EDUCATION Transform your classrooms into active learning environments with Logitech solutions. With 100+ products in our range, we can help you create a learning environment that’s effective, exciting and engaging. From our ergonomically designed wireless mice that fit perfectly in your hand to our comfortable keyboards, speakers with big sound, laptop stands that raise the screen to eye level or our webcams and headsets - we have the tools you need to make using computers in the classroom or at home easier, comfortable and more enjoyable.

PARTNERING WITH US Speak to one of our education specialists about the advantages of partnering with Logitech and find out how, together, we can power up your classrooms - fund raising, product testing, classroom fit-outs, specialist computer lab needs and more. Email us at ausmarketing@logitech.com and the first ten people will win our top of the range Logitech M950 Performance mouse valued at $199.

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Lenovo® recommends Windows® 7 Professional.

Built tough for school. ThinkPad Edge 15" comes with a spill-resistant keyboard to protect school work. Smart, tough and intelligent, just like your students, the bold new Lenovo ThinkPad® Edge 15" is loaded with breakthrough thinking. Its legendary reliability is complemented by features that ensure even more protection for your students and their data, like Rescue and Recovery® and Active Protection System™. ThinkPad Edge 15" definitely gives your students an edge. Our nationwide network of Authorised Lenovo Business Partners provide customised solutions tailored to the specific and individual needs of schools all across Australia.

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Lenovo makes every effort to ensure accuracy of all information but is not liable or responsible for any editorial, photographic or typographic errors. All images are for illustration purposes only. For full Lenovo product, service and warranty specifications visit www.lenovo.com.au Lenovo makes no representations or warranties regarding third-party products or services. Celeron, Celeron Inside, Centrino, Centrino Inside, Core Inside, Intel, Intel Logo, Intel Atom, Intel Atom Inside, Intel Core, Intel Inside, Intel Inside Logo, Intel vPro, Itanium, Itanium Inside, Pentium, Pentium Inside, vPro Inside, Xeon and Xeon Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. Trademarks: The following are trademarks or registered trademarks of Lenovo: Lenovo, the Lenovo logo, Active Protection System, Rescue and Recovery and ThinkPad. Microsoft and Windows are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the U.S. or other countries. Other company, product and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. ©2010 Lenovo. All rights reserved. Visit www.lenovo.com/safecomputing periodically for the latest information on safe and effective computing.

BUILT FOR BUSINESS.

EM EDUCATIONmatters

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MMG_AUS_PPA_Q2-11_17018


y The Cybersafet Help Button

The Cybersafety Help Button is a new Australian Government initiative designed to keep children and families safe online. It is an online resource that gives children and young people easy access to cybersafety help and information. The internet offers huge opportunities for improvements in education, social interaction, innovation and convenience. Along with these benefits come risks that can make the internet unpleasant and potentially dangerous. Cyberbullying, scams and fraud, offensive content and unwanted contact are all common risks for children and teenagers. Research by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) found that 11 per cent of Australians aged 12 to 17 years had experienced cyberbullying through either a mobile phone or the internet. The Cybersafety Help Button is an online resource hub that gives children and teenagers instant access to help and information on cybersafety issues 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The button is a free application available from the website of the Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy. Once downloaded, it sits on the computer desktop or within the taskbar. When the button is clicked,

users are taken directly to a web page where they can talk, report or learn about cybersafety issues. The talk function gives a link to Kids Helpline. Users who are worried by cyberbullying or offensive online behaviour or content can phone or chat online to a professional counsellor. The report function offers direct links to pages on social networking sites such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter that have site-specific cybersafety information. There are also links for reporting scams, fraud, inappropriate websites and improper behaviour and for contacting the Australian Federal Police. The learn function provides a range of cybersafety educational resources through the ACMA’s Cybersmart website and the Department’s Stay Smart Online website. Visitors to these sites can learn about cyberbullying, social networking sites, scams and frauds, password protection, viruses and malware, unwanted contact and inappropriate behaviour. The Cybersafety Help Button was developed in consultation with the Government’s Youth Advisory Group and the Consultative Working Group on Cybersafety. The Youth Advisory Group—consisting of members aged eight to 17 years—expressed the need for a ‘one-stop shop’ for cybersafety help and information. The Consultative Working Group consists of industry representatives from Google, Facebook, Yahoo!7, Telstra and Microsoft and non government organisations including the Alannah and Madeline Foundation, Childwise and Bravehearts.

The Cybersafety Help Button is available free of charge at www.dbcde.gov.au/helpbutton. It is compatible with all major PC and Mac operating systems and is easily installed onto home, school and library computers. For more information on the Cybersafety Help Button email helpbutton@dbcde.gov.au Australian Communications and Media Authority 2009, Click and Connect: Young Australians’ use of online social media 1

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internet security


Cyber security education package

Australians rely on the internet in their everyday lives for banking, shopping, education and communication. Children in particular are highly engaged with the online world and spend a lot of time socialising on the internet and downloading information and music. But with opportunity comes responsibility, and while the internet brings many benefits, there are also risks. The Australian Government has a range of initiatives to help Australian internet users protect their personal and financial information online. One of these is the award-winning Budd:e Cyber Security Education Package for Australian school students. This package, with separate modules for students in primary and secondary schools, encourages secure online practices and behaviours. The modules are interactive, engaging and most of all fun. Cyber security topics covered in the modules include advice on malware, securing personal information online and social networking. Both modules contain glossaries with useful background information for teachers and parents. The modules are also flexible and can be tailored to fit into different classroom learning styles. Students can work through the modules individually or in small groups.

Schools using the modules have reported that students subsequently approach the internet with an improved understanding of safe online practices. They have reported students revising their thinking on what access they allow to their social networking profiles, where they purchase online goods, how they research material for schoolwork, what types of creative content they publish and how they publish that content. In a further endorsement, Budd:e won the Best Children’s award at the 2010 Annual Australian Interactive Media Industry Awards. The Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy developed the Budd:e package in consultation with a reference group of teachers and curriculum experts. The modules were tested for content and functionality in 22 selected public, private and independent schools across Australia. They are consistent with the Statements of Learning for Information and Communication Technologies from the Ministerial Council on Education, Employment, Training and Youth Affairs.

The primary school module is an interactive training system that rewards students when they successfully complete activities. It introduces cyber security basics including privacy, password creation, protecting personal details, virus scanning, secure websites, copyright and scams. The cyber security message is presented in a fun and engaging way for young students and is not a burden on teachers’ resources. The secondary school module covers advanced cyber security topics including creating content, file sharing, pop-ups, privacy, sharing personal information, scams, spam, spyware, malware, phishing, online transactions and computer viruses. These topics are explored through three discrete learning activities that present their educational content through a range of innovative media.

EM EDUCATIONmatters

Budd:e is available free to all Australian schools through the Stay Smart Online website at www.staysmartonline.gov.au or on a CD ROM ordered from that site. An instructional DVD for teachers is also available from the Department to assist in using and promoting Budd:e in their schools.

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Top tips for staying safe online AVG (AU/NZ) explains how not to stray over to the dark side of the web

Certainly there are schools, teachers and parents who feel vulnerable online and believe the best solution is to have the government step in and help everyone to stay safe from exposure to offensive and illegal content and behaviour. But can the help they desire arrive in time? “Whatever you do, don’t rely on anyone else to wave a magic wand and protect you, your family, school and students online,” Lloyd Borrett, Security Evangelist for AVG (AU/NZ) explains. “Yes, the dangers are very real. Yes, you do need protection. But you need it now.” “It’s not as if staying safe online is hard to do,” Borrett continued. “It’s just simple commonsense plus eternal vigilance. So take personal and professional responsibility and follow these simple guidelines.” •

Install good Internet Security software and keep it up-to-date. Anti-Virus solutions provide good basic protection against viruses, worms, Trojans, spyware and adware. However, to keep your school and students safe online today you really need the additional layers of protection provided by an Internet Security software suite, like AVG Internet Security.

Turn on automatic updates so that ALL of your software stays up-to-date with the latest fixes. This is especially true for computers that have been shut down or offline for a while. You can configure most software to automatically check for updates. Don’t just focus on updates for the operating system. Remember all those other programs and software add-ons on the computer that need to be updated as well, e.g. Microsoft Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Adobe Acrobat Reader, Adobe Flash, Apple QuickTime etc.

Teach you students about how to set strong passwords and get them to change them regularly. This is especially needed on social networking web sites like Facebook. Also make sure they know how to properly set the privacy information on social networking sites so that their personal information can only be seen by those they trust and give permission to see it. You don’t want cyber criminals using the information to steal their ID, or paedophiles and sexual predators using it to groom them and/or their friends.

Don’t use computers with Administrator privileges as a matter of course. Sadly, most people run a single user account on their computer which has “administrator” privileges and it isn’t password protected. 90% of all security vulnerabilities can be mitigated against simply by setting up regular user accounts with strong passwords for normal daily use, thus eliminating administrator rights. Just have a password protected administrator account for those rare instances when greater privileges are required. Make sure all school computers are set up this way. Also educate parents and students about this simple measure.

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Teach everyone to stop and think before they click on links or attachments. Do you trust the integrity and reputation of the page you want to view? What’s the likelihood that it may take you to the dark side of the web? Please make sure you have good web scanning software, like the free AVG LinkScanner® for Windows and Mac computers. It will do a real-time check for any malware payloads that may be lurking on the web page.

Teach students to stop and think before sharing any personal information, especially on social networks like Facebook and Twitter. Paedophiles and other nasty types prey on chat rooms and social networking sites. Stranger danger applies to people online, just as it does in ‘real life’. By default, most social networking sites share too much information with everyone. To properly control the information you share you need to check and set your privacy settings on Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, forums etc. Treat you personal information as you would treat your money – don’t leave it lying around for others to take.

Schools are particularly susceptible to internet threats as a result of their very limited budgets and manpower. Yet AVG software is already protecting over one million computers in US K-12 schools. That’s because AVG helps schools with discounts of up to 50% on its award winning protection software. Schools are then provided with unlimited, expert technical support from the AVG (AU/NZ) team based in Melbourne, free of charge.

and/or ool’s students, parents Want to help your sch eats thr line on about today’s teachers to learn more yd Llo ve ha en online? Th and how to stay safe ) come gelist for AVG (AU/NZ an Ev rity cu Se Borrett, ool. and speak at your sch details. /security-evangelist/ for See www.avg.com.au

security


Create an affordable, secure and collaborative online learning environment

Across the world, schools like yours are focused on increasing student achievement, enabling the professional development of educators, and fostering collaboration between teachers and parents through Web-enabled applications and streaming media. At the same time, you need to protect students from malware, online threats, inappropriate content and potentially illegal sites that enable academic fraud.

Loop Technology and Bluecoat help you: • Prevent students from accessing inappropriate Web content as well as sites that enable academic fraud • Accelerate rich media and collaborative applications • Reduce bandwidth consumption by up to 50% • Control Web access based on user profile • Block proxy avoidance sites that enable users to access restricted Web sites.

To achieve these goals, you need to provide secure and reliable access to the latest Web As experts in Information Security, speak to applications and learning tools that help your Loop Technolgy today regarding your security requirements. students stay competitive. With Loop Technology and Bluecoat you can optimise and secure the flow of information across your distributed network. We enable you to identify all the traffic on your network, manage bandwidth consumption and help students safely navigate appropriate Web sites. You can leverage these technologies individually or combine them into a single, scalable and comprehensive architecture.

Contact Us Melbourne 03 9643 3600 Sydney 02 9464 0100 Brisbane 07 3367 2666 info@looptech.com.au www.looptech.com.au


Managing the electronic classroom NetSupport School

Have you got control? The modern classroom of today has embraced technology in the form of portable computers, allowing an enhanced learning experience for students and access to a wealth of information via the internet – a true electronic classroom of the future, available today. But how are you managing them? As usual, all advances have their downside. How do you provide this freedom to learn without it getting out of control and detracting from the purpose for which it was provided? Web sites, chat programs, games and millions of other applications can be a constant distraction from the lesson at hand. NetSupport School is the leading solution that effectively allows teachers to manage these valuable learning tools. Going way beyond the basic functionality needed to manage the computers; monitoring student’s screens, locking keyboards and blanking screens to obtain full class attention, are just the start of the experience. Teachers can prepare a lesson that defines specific applications that can be used and the web sites that can be visited, homework can be automatically distributed and collected from student’s machines, real-time pop quizzes can be run to assess the students’ comprehension during the lesson and a comprehensive testing module provides examination grading levels and progress tracking with which to assess student performance.

A Virtual Whiteboard can be used to allow anyone in the class to annotate on their screen and have it seen by all other students, allowing easy screen capture on their systems for review. The collaborative workgroups feature allows the teacher to break the class into screen groups and appoint one student to manage the group activities. A unique Student Journal can be kept and all subject matter relating to the lesson can be included in a PDF file including lesson objectives and details, teacher and student notes, screenshots, survey results, URLs used during the lesson and individual test results. This can be used for post-lesson review or provided to absent students so they can retain their place in the curriculum. NetSupport School includes unique Language Lab audio monitoring facilities and provides a method for technical staff to resolve issues on students systems without having to visit the classroom. Call our team today to arrange a demonstration.

Pixel IT - 1800 674 935 www.netsupportschool.com.au


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Laptop security revolution In 2008, PC Locs developed the Revolution Range of physical laptop security products. The new range was designed to be the most cost effective and functional range on the market. The laptop trolleys also featured a patented adjustable laptop shelf designed to fit notebooks or netbooks, whilst the laptop wall cages came in netbook and notebook sizes. In 2010, the Revolution Range has undergone a facelift. It still offers the great features and functionality as the first version, but now also includes a remote controlled ECO Safe Charge™ power management system. The ECO Safe Charge™ system is designed to save you time, money and reduce carbon emissions released out into the atmosphere. ECO Safe Charge™ is programmed to automatically stage power distribution to each laptop bank, preventing the initial surge caused by turning on a large number of laptops at one time. It also comes with a timer setting that can help save energy consumption as it can be programmed to charge for a specific amount of time. All Revolution Range laptop trolleys and wall cages now come with 10 years manufacturer’s warranty. For more information, about the Revolution Range ECO or any physical laptop storage and security solution, please don’t hesitate to contact PC Locs on 1300 725 627, or visit the website at www.pclocs.com.au.

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Futura Group Teachers! Futura is proud to brin g you the engaging, motivating educationa l system that allows you to devote your limited time to being creative in the classroom, focusing on your practical demonstrations, role plays and fina l assessments.

The new eCoach lets students gain insight into the real, practical world of the Hospitality, Tourism and Events Industry – explore the virtual kitchen or calculate the costs facing a business, watch the videos of proper techniques, use realistic data and scenarios, practise industry recipes and much more.

Your students will enjoy the interactive learning system of the eCoach (not just text online!) with animations to reinforce content, automatically-marked checkpoints, click and drag activities – all monitored by a series of colour-coded tiles to show progress. They can work sequentially or focus on specific sections needing review and their results are automatically marked and recorded. You can view individual progress and test results as well as class reports for each module. The assessment tasks come complete with answers and marking guidelines. They can be used as is, or modified for your particular student group. The eCoach enables you to combine this hands-on studentfocused learning system with your own established delivery style in creative, exciting teaching and learning situations.

Futura has also developed iPad and iPhone applications that can be used in the classroom, at home or on the bus to school. Students can review hundreds of videos of culinary techniques, with all the material available at any time.

The eCoach:

Our complete Training Package and Learning Management System includes: •

content, lesson plans and generic timetabling for each module

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best e h t g n i v e i h c A ool h c s n e e w t e b relationship ers h c a e t d n a s l a princip

“The principal has to be a team builder, a good leader of people. The principal must have educational credibility and not just follow the latest fad,” Elizabeth Turley, art teacher at Greythorn Public School in Victoria, said. Given Turley’s nearly 30 years experience, it is not surprising that her comments reflect research findings into good relationships between principals and teachers.

to know principals care before they care what principals know,” Smyth advised. But what principals know also makes a difference. Those interviewed here said principals need to understand the characteristics of a professional learning community, which is largely about collaboration and enquiry. Principals should facilitate professional dialogue, “the very heart of quality teaching,” Anna McKenzie, Acting Principal of Campbell Primary School in the ACT, argued.

In schools, there will always be relationships – deep or shallow, helpful or harmful. We can build them, or we can let them “Principals need to facilitate courageous conversations about happen and hope for the best. Successful relationships are teaching and learning and classroom relationships. They must those appropriate to context. For schools, student learning is foster a willingness to ask big questions!” the prime contextual issue that must be considered. Here, the Another task is to nurture critically reflective practitioners, research is clear: a culture of positive relationships across the who challenge and change, where necessary, approaches to school contributes to student achievement. teaching and learning. Differences of opinion will occur, but, “Leadership teams impact on school culture. It needs to “The principal must stand for something educationally and emphasise teachers and students working together to achieve enable respectful disagreement. Even if I disagree with the their best. Effective schools have a culture that is trusting,” principal’s decision and direction, I am happy to go with them Chris Smyth, former principal and now Secondary Schools if the principal has educational credibility,” Turley said. National Partnerships Agreement Manager, said. Smyth believes the principal needs to be an educational It’s not the principal’s job to be everyone’s best friend, but they leader, “Who understands quality classroom pedagogy and is able to work collaboratively with teachers to improve that have a vital role in fostering respect and cooperation. pedagogy, to model, critique and coach where needed. “Affirmative relations build teacher confidence to motivate and Data and agreed performance appraisal systems are central. creatively challenge students to achieve their best,” he said. These send the message that teaching and learning are valued above administration.” The relational culture matters. More: that climate needs to be developed with staff. “Sometimes things need to be decided unilaterally. But wherever possible, the principal should engage staff in the decision-making, particularly around matters of school culture,” recommended a principal from a special school in western Sydney who preferred not to be named. “It takes courage and self-assurance to involve teachers and share the decisionmaking, but it is very important to do.”

As with all relationships, those between principals and teachers endure tension. Demands from departments, changing lists of ‘new’ priorities, and expectations from the community create pressure. “Schools seem always to be patching gaps of responsibilities that used to belong to parents and communities. These steal professional learning time from teachers. As the principal, I try to make space for these matters,” McKenzie said.

Hattie’s research shows that five to 10 per cent of the variance “We have to mediate demands from department and community with the stresses, strains and dynamics that of student achievement is influenced by schools – a difference impinge on staff. Many initiatives have to be redesigned, pared that depends a good deal on school leaders: “Principals who down and negotiated with existing workloads. Jumping at create a school with high student responsiveness…a climate each request is a way to disorient staff and distract them from of psychological safety to learn…a focus of discussion on their core work.” student learning, have the influence.” Effective principals understand the importance of focus, and Teachers account for about 30 per cent of the variance: “It is ensure that the school community is aware of and in alignment what teachers know, do and care about which is very powerful with the school’s efforts to improve student learning. in this learning equation.” “Don’t strand teachers. Provide direction, clarity and support,” Principals’ decisions can build teacher capacity, confidence Turley pleaded. and morale to make that difference count. Sometimes for professional reasons, sometimes for political “We often say a principal’s decision should be based on what’s impulse, changes are required. These impact on relationships. best for the students, but if the decisions have a negative Leaders need to be consummate relationship builders with impact on teacher morale, then they might not be best for diverse people. Fullan notes that effective leaders constantly student outcomes. Teachers in classrooms matter. They need foster purposeful interaction and problem solving, and are

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wary of easy consensus. Studies show that change efforts fail if principals do not understand and support them, if teachers do not view them as relevant to their own goals and needs, and if they are inadequately resourced. Principals need to be active gatekeepers of change. Teachers are not let off the hook. “The most undermining thing in a school is often not student behaviour or achievement, but the inability of some staff to accommodate change,” the principal in western Sydney observed. Teachers share the responsibility for establishing and maintaining healthy, professional relationships with peers and leadership teams. Indeed, says Turley, teachers need to treat the principal respectfully, fairly and professionally if they expect to be treated in these ways themselves. “Teachers have to develop their education philosophies and be honest about their professional needs. The principal has to create a climate where it is safe to express those needs. The principal must take teachers’ concerns seriously.” Research yields long lists of dos and don’ts about school relational matters. In addition to those above, the following also surface regularly. “Good relationships are built when teachers see the leadership team working with under-achieving teachers. Accountability is a real thing. Professional and challenging conversations are essential,” Smyth said. “Problems like this are noticed. They don’t just go away. The principal must provide support,” Turley added. Private and public acknowledgements for teacher effort and achievement are critical. “Recognition, constructive feedback and reflective conversations about improvement build confidence and initiative in teachers,” Smyth said. A principal’s approach to building relations needs to be appropriate to the context. “It is not always Smith s closeness that is needed. Sometimes, distance r Phil nowHand d a o h t u a A K h f o h works well in establishing rapport,” the tor mit inDirec ultancy. S ching, tra ntal e h t Sydney principal noted. “Sometimes, it is e a s is e n m t o n l C o n enviro scho better to stand back. Keep the emotion ation catio Educ rs in high tdoor and ental edu ding lu a u out of it.” onm s, o , inc n ye doze r program rs in envir agencies rs as a t e e ea n y in y e a Those lists continue: Foster positive hs n the-tr n. A doze t environm and three een mont . t n A perceptions of teachers and teaching. h io e ig EP at ntre m educ te govern the NSW e NSW. E ment Ce al Demonstrate commitment to student n c a r o t ion u ir ith with s e years w n at Reso Shire Env al and reg ational and teacher learning. Be inspirational. c io d in r n te n d lo lan cat Be actively present and available. r Edu he Suther oordinate nal and in nt of the e g a Man ctor of t he c had natio Preside Facilitate links between people, ideas, e e here, n and as Dir his time t s. He has urrently th Educatio r in events and understandings. Listen. n l g c a ig t en tracto Durin y campa ce. He is Be approachable. Build the sense ironm as a con luation, v it n n n ie E r u r e rks , eva that we’re all in this together. Marry comm ation exp ciation fo ith wo ment d educ lian Asso SSEC. Sm develop ltation an high expectations with high support. am su s r stra y of the t n g u s o o e A c r r Nurture teacher autonomy. inte tar tion, gic p Secre ion, strate n, facilita . His main can be t t io t n e a At the beginning as in the end, student educ mmunica involveme sophy. H ilo co learning is the goal. Committed and unity : nd ph comm writing a tacted at m.au dedicated teachers engaged in healthy n o in o c . c e r s a nd enquiry and systemic, positive collaboration owha n k @ phil make the road to student achievement. Principals have a huge influence on the professional lives and morale of their teachers: their actions can improve negative environments or destroy positive ones. A principal’s daily behaviours play a vital role in the environment and learning potential within the school.

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EDUCATIONmatters


R.E. Batger Pty Ltd teacher who uses it. Function is at the core of each design with comfort for the user being paramount. Having a classroom, lab or hall fitted out with R.E. Batger furniture means having the ability to transform a room from sectioned-off independent work areas to a team brainstorming space. A debate arena or acting studio is easily turned into an examination hall or everyday classroom. Pieces are designed to work together and look just as good stacked up against a wall as they do for fullyfledged working mode. The possibilities to rework and adapt a single room are endless. Being organised is vital to creating a harmonious and fun environment. R.E Batger is renowned for on-time deliveries and supreme service before and after furnishing each project. The builders and special fitters know that finishing a job on time is just as important to the client as it is to their reputation, and they ensure quick and timely work without compromising quality. This quest for building world-class furniture has lead to ongoing investment in the latest equipment and technology. Over the past five years the company has invested in powder paint line, welding robots, computer controlled saws and pointto-point multi borers. Along with a commitment to technology, this Australian company has a commitment to the environment. R.E. Batger has worked hard to achieve environmental and quality control certification (AS/NZS ISO 14001:2004 and AS/NZS ISO 9001:2008) from NCS International. These two certifications signify the company’s vision to seek out and constantly improve manufacturing to ensure environmental sustainability and harm minimisation. R.E. Batger is proud of its global reputation yet its roots are firmly planted in Australian soil. The company takes great pride in producing all furniture in metal and woodwork factories in Sydney’s Granville and Guildford. The value of Australian quality for Australian schools has been one that has been ingrained since the company’s inception and it’s a commitment that this family company intends on maintaining. For more than 56 years R.E. Batger has been producing educational furniture for functional classrooms that command quality and style. This reputation for excellence has come through tireless hours designing, redesigning and refining each and every piece to ensure the maximum lifespan in demanding environments. One of the company’s most satisfying achievements has been in public and private schools around the country where R.E. Batger furniture has stood the test of time. The recent Government stimulus package for the Education Revolution has meant R.E. Batger has been hand-picked to transform hundreds of schools around Australia. In fact, 350 schools in Sydney’s South West have been made over by the team and the company has been sought out to engage in private partnerships for the Victorian, ACT and New South Wales Governments. The challenge has been met with excitement by the design team who have created educational and recreation spaces within the schools that will withstand the ultimate test of quality and endurance – being used and abused by hundreds of thousands of students for years to come. For R.E. Batger, it’s not just about creating an attractive, hard-wearing space but getting the most out of the student or

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R.E. Batger furniture is ideal for any school, commercial or private space with the company offering quality furniture for any area that requires endurance, space-conscious design and style. The designers, builders and manufacturers at R.E. Batger believe that Australian-made quality and world-class standards should be affordable and competitive prices reflect a commitment to make furniture of this standard available to every modern institution. If you can’t find what you need in the vast range of standard items, the team has ample experience designing custom and non-standard pieces for individual tasks and spaces. After a rigorous Research and Development Programme, R.E. Batger is now in the process of offering an exciting new range of products, which will be introduced over the next few months. There’s absolutely no function they can’t fit. To see the new range of R.E. Batger furniture, as well as the classics, head to the showroom at 5 Ferndell Street, South Granville NSW or visit the website at www.rebatger.com.au. There is never an R.E Batger representative too far away for a personal consultation with Sales Managers in Victoria, NSW and Queensland. Email the team at rebatger@bigpond.com.au or speak with one of the knowledgeable sales staff members on (toll free) 1300 553 240. To send a fax dial 1300 553 247.

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Quality Educational Furniture For more than 56 years R.E. Batger has been producing educational furniture for functional classrooms that command quality and style. This reputation for excellence has come through designing and refining every piece to ensure the maximum lifespan in such demanding environments.

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For more information phone 1300 553 240 or visit www.rebatger.com.au

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R.E.BATGER PTY LTD Specialists in Education and Commercial Furniture


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One Stop Shop for Building Services McMahon Services is one of Aus tralia’s largest privately owned constructio n services organisations. Starting off as a sma ll family business in Adelaide in 1990, we now operate nationally, employing over 400 staf f.

With offices in South Australia, Queensland, Western Australia and the Northern Territory, we are able to work anywhere in Australia, to your timeframe and requirements. Our experience, safety and environmental credentials, multi-skilled workforce and modern fleet of plant and equipment combine to deliver progressive and innovative solutions for our clients. McMahon Services has extensive experience in providing a wide range of construction services to schools, from simple maintenance and landscaping through to complete construction of multi purpose buildings.

McMahon Services is highly experienced in working within a fully operational school environment during the execution of our building, maintenance, roofing, electrical, asbestos removal, civil and demolition works. Our skilled, quality in-house tradesmen are also qualified to undertake specialised trades and we have carpenters, plasterboard fixers and flushers, electricians, plumbers, concretors, painters, roofers, bricklayers and tilers ready to meet specific project needs. McMahon Services will provide a dedicated Project Manager for your school, equipping you with a sole point of contact, who will additionally oversee the formation of budgets and management of all aspects of the construction process. Talk to McMahon Services about your next building or building maintenance project. Our Building Services Manager, Mr Shaun Emery is available on 08 8203 3100 to answer any queries you may have.

Integral to our approach is our commitment to work directly with individual school representatives to formulate appropriate project scope, timelines, budget and a strategy to minimise disruption. On approval, our services offer you a onestop solution, from statutory approvals, final design and construction through to landscaping, fit-out and handover.

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Australian Shadola Pty Ltd •

Ltd is a 100% owned Australian Shadola Pty have been fabricating Australian Company. We es rmanent shade structur and installing quality pe a is ce 1993. Shadola throughout Australia sin business that only run n so d friendly, father an s who fabricators and installer employs experienced field. are at the top of their

Walkways are fabricated in steel with colorbond roofing.

All Colorbond and PVC tensioned membrane covers are 100% waterproof. Shadecloth covers block up to 95% of dangerous UV rays. All of our steelwork is galvanised. We also hot dip galvanise black steel after fabrication in accordance to AS/NZS 4680:2006. After this process, it can then have a powdercoated finish applied to match your existing colour scheme. Australian Shadola specialise in producing a high quality finished product that only comes with 32 years of building experience. If you are currently thinking of covering or adding an outdoor area, we would be happy to provide an obligation free quotation, then you too could join our list of satisfied customers.

With 18 years of experience in the shade industry and 15 years prior experience in the building industry, we have gained a reputation of producing quality structures and have installed shade areas to over 180 schools within Australia and Internationally. We specialise in high quality commercial outdoor area’s, for schools and playgrounds plus various sporting and community areas. Our clients love the modular design that allows them to add to their Shadola as their need for outdoor area grows, or as funds become available.

You can see our work at www.shadola.com.au Australian Shadola Pty Ltd 2/13 Tucks Road Seven Hills NSW 2147 Phone: (02) 9674 8248 Fax: (02) 9674 8243 ABN 74 062 463 610

Our structures are engineered, including structural design certificate and wind rated up to wind speeds of W41 (41 metres per second). Shade Structures come in many different shapes, sizes and colours. All of our structures are individually designed and fabricated to meet each schools requirement. All steel is fabricated at our factory premises in Seven Hills. We do many different styles of structures: •

COLA’s (Covered Outdoor Learning Area’s) are fabricated in steel with colorbond steel roofing.

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Shadola’s structures are of the highest quality and engineer certified. All steel frame work is galvanised AFTER steel fabrication. Shadola construct canopies from UV shade cloth , PVC tensioned membrane and Colorbond. Call Shadola for an obligation free Shadolaʼs structures are of the highest quality and quotation and join our list of satisfied customers. engineer certified. All steel frame work is galvanised Australian Shadola specialize in large span structures. Shadola’s unique design is pleasing to the AFTER steel Shadola canopies from Shadolaʼs structures are of the highest quality and eye and modular. If you wish you canfabrication. add to your “Shadola” asconstruct more funds become available. UVmodular Barrierdesign mesh, PVCto tensioned membrane Colorbond. engineer certified. All steel frame work isand galvanised The applies fabric and solid structures. Shadolaʼs structures are of the highest quality and

engineer certified. All steel frameour work is of galvanised UN SCREEN SY STE MS list tensioned satisfied customers. UV Barrier mesh, PVC membrane and Colorbond. w w w . s h a d o l a . c o m . County ajoinuPublic School w w w . s h a d o l a . c o m . au steel fabrication. Shadola construct canopies from BirdAFTER proof steel structures Call Shadola for an obligation free quotation and Werrington Call Shadola for an obligation quotation and join AFTER steel fabrication. Shadolafree construct canopies from

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UV Barrier mesh, PVC tensioned membrane our listand of Colorbond. satisfied customers. Shadolaʼs unique design is pleasing to the eye and modular. Contact P. 02 9674 8248 Call Shadola for anAustralian obligation free quotation and join If you wish you canspecialize add to your “Shadola” as more Shadola in large span structures. DAVID SCRIVENS ourShadolaʼs list of satisfied customers. in our Sydney office F. 02 8243 funds become available. unique design ison: pleasing to the9674 eye and modular. TheIfmodular applies fabric and solidas structures. you wishdesign you can add totoyour “Shadola” more

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Shadola specialize large span structures. hadolaʼs structuresAustralian are of the highest qualityinand funds become available. One Third Horizontal-Shadola.ind1 1 6/6/08 3:17:30 PM gineer certified.Shadolaʼs All steelunique frame work isispleasing galvanised design to the eyeapplies and modular. Contact The modular design to fabric and solid structures. Werrington County Public School infrastructure www.shadola.com.au R steel fabrication.IfShadola construct canopies SCRIVENS you wishDAVID you can add to your from “Shadola” as moreWerrington County Public School rrier mesh, PVC tensioned membrane and Colorbond. in our Sydney office on: Contact

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Trusted for Generations

Tradition 2250 instructional dVd included 10 Built-in Stitches 30 Stitch Functions 4-step Buttonhole Reverse Operation Auto Tension Front Load Bobbin Auto Bobbin Winding Snap on Presser Feet Variable stitch width and length

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Seven Hills NSW 2147 p. (02) 8811 1900 e. info@singerco.com.au www.singerco.com.au


Sewing back in vogue

From teenagers to truck drivers, the quaint and crafty pastime has quietly been experiencing a resurgence in popularity, driven by a proliferation of fashion and do-ityourself reality shows as well as a growing “back-to-basics” mentality of people looking to recapture authentic values. Some use their sewing machine almost every day, some use it about as often as a weekend travelling bag, while others use it every now and then. Men and women of all ages and backgrounds are finding a sense of accomplishment and an outlet for creative expression and artistic passion in the imaginative world of sewing. The doyenne of domesticity recently reached out to lend a guiding hand to show us all what a good (and easy) thing threading a bobbin can be as well. Earlier this year, Martha Stewart released her best-selling book, Martha Stewart’s Encyclopedia of Sewing and Fabric Crafts, to great fanfare – a sign the trend is truly taking hold. Beyond the fun and fashion there is also the technology that is making it so easy for everyone to find their niche in sewing. Sewing machines are much more than a lever, pedal and turning wheel these days. Most of them are more intelligent than your desktop computer with plenty of programs to help you create that something special. Below are some of the major benefits of the owning/using a computerised sewing machine: 1. Speed: When it comes to sewing or embroidery of difficult patterns this kind of sewing machine outperforms the electrical and electronic sewing machines. Nevertheless it requires more time to translate the designed image into digital format which means that its speed can be experienced when doing big jobs. As an option users can download designs from the web which in turn saves on the time that could have been spent on design. 2. User friendly: After digitising is complete most of the embroidery work is carried out automatically by the sewing machine and this needs very little human participation. This means that even a sewing/embroidery beginner can effortlessly use the machine even without advanced training or skills.

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3. Precision: When working on detailed designs that must be replicated accurately, then a computerised machine can always be relied upon to consistently replicate the desired patterns without fail. 4. Extra stitching and embroidery design capabilities: Before the advent of computerised sewing machines, exceptional or complicated sewing patterns could not be created by the common sewing machine. This has nevertheless changed and now the average user can effortlessly generate as many unique patterns as they might desire. Computer controlled sewing machines provide more flexibility and capabilities than their predecessors, the only major downside of these machine is their initial cost which is compensated for in the long run through the above mentioned benefits. To add to the ease of the computerised sewing machine the many accessories/notions available for any given machine make it even easier to create that one-of-a-kind piece. As you move up the price range in sewing machines they become much more than a machine to piece together clothing and curtains, with the added extension of an embroidery unit the computerised sewing machine takes you that much further. The embroidery unit enables a sewer to attach an array of hoops to expand the embroidery machine’s creative potential and achieve the most professional results. All designs will be perfect, no matter what the size. Along with the hooping of designs and the ability to use your computer to enhance your design there are also designs available online. One such site that has the capacity for users to download multiformat embroidery designs is myembroideries.com. MyEmbroideries allows you to select a design from a catalogue of over 17,000 embroidery designs from the best international designers, digitisers and sewing celebrities! Giving you the ability to personalise your work with the click of button. All in all though, when you need your sewing machine, it has to be reliable and suit your sewing needs.

home economics


The perfect pair

TM

Select 4.0 IDT – The original from Pfaff 40 Stitches Integrated needle threader Free motion position 7 feet including free-motion foot Easy buttonhole Hard cover Full metal base for stability when sewing

Hobby 1142 Drop in bobbin Integrated needle threader Over 30 stitch functions One-step button-hole Hard cover

Full range of accessories also available. Contact us for your FREE catalogue and price list. H E aD O F F I C E

West Gosford NSW 2250 p. (02) 4337 3737 e. australia.info@blessingtongroup.com.au www.pfaff.com/au


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home economics


Simple elegance

183

emerald 183

83 Stitches Built in needle threader Stop and fix functions 7mm stitch width 1 Alphabet 4 Memories Mirror image side to side Needle Up/Down Hard cover Drop feed teeth One step buttonhole Free motion capability Built in needle threader

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emerald 116

60 stitch functions 8 presser feet Sewing guide reference chart One step buttonhole Built in needle threader Adjustable presser foot pressure Manual Thread Cutter Built in Ruler Drop feed teeth Hard Cover Drop in bobbin Snap on presser feet

Full range of accessories also available. Contact us for your FREE catalogue and price list. H e A D OFFice

West Gosford NSW 2250 p. (02) 4337 3737 e. australia.info@blessingtongroup.com.au www.husqvarnaviking.com/au


Officeworks not stationery in supporting Australian kids and their educators ALNF is a charitable organisation dedicated to raising language, literacy and numeracy standards in Australia and raises funds to develop, implement and sustain innovative projects for individuals, families and communities. Building on the success of Share-A-Book, Officeworks and ALNF are partnering to raise much needed funds through the sale of a soon-to-be-released reusable shopping bag and a national fundraising and awareness campaign during the 2011 back-to-school period designed to collect contributions of cash and school supplies for the ALNF’s Literacy Pack program. Officeworks Public Relations Manager, Felicia Booth, said that Officeworks is committed to supporting the educational needs of Australia’s children, as well as their educators, teachers and parents.

Most people know Officeworks as Australia’s largest retailer of stationery and technology products and therefore as the perfect place for families during the busy back-to-school rush. But did you know that Officeworks is also a direct supplier to many schools around Australia of products beyond the traditional school supplies list you’d probably expect? The business has a surprising range of cleaning and janitorial supplies as well a catering category chock-full of the products every staffroom needs – and wants. Of course, their stationery supplies range and pricing is not to be sneezed at either and since their handy 30 Day Account cards can be used to shop in store as well as over the phone or online, those mid-term top-up shops are made almost too easy. The convenience of one-stop-shopping aside, the stationery stalwart does more for education than simply cross things off shopping lists; they’re also a dedicated supporter of multiple educational initiatives across Australia.

“We recognise every child’s right to receive an education and the critical importance to Australia’s future that they receive one. That’s why children’s education is number one on our list of community priorities,” Booth said. “Our Taking Care philosophy is not just about providing products and cash donations. It’s very important to us that we support initiatives that empower and encourage young people to reach their full potential.” ALNF’s Director of Communications, Gabrielle Kemeny, is grateful for Officeworks’ ongoing support. “The partnership between ALNF and Officeworks is a wonderful example of business and education working together for the benefit of the entire community,” Kemeny said. “Officeworks’ generous donation demonstrates its commitment to both the educational and economic success of all Australians.”

As part of their Taking Care philosophy, the name given to their corporate social responsibility policy, Officeworks is committed to supporting initiatives that sustain and improve the quality of children’s education around Australia. Over the past two and half years, Officeworks has been involved in a number of programs designed to make a difference in the education sector. For example, 2010 was the second year that Officeworks has proudly sponsored the Whitlam Institute’s What Matters? competition – a creative writing initiative for students in New South Wales and the ACT. What Matters? celebrates the power of the written word and gives young people an opportunity to write about the issues and experiences that are significant to them. All of Officeworks’ 128 stores around Australia have an annually allocated community involvement budget and Taking Care mandates the support of children’s education and their health and wellbeing as a priority which has seen hundreds of thousands of dollars donated locally every year. Throughout February and March Officeworks supported the Australian Literacy & Numeracy Foundation’s (ALNF) Share-ABook campaign by collecting donations of pre-loved children’s books which were then distributed to Indigenous, refugee and marginalised children to help them improve their literacy skills through the establishment of community libraries.

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The widest range of

Teacher Supplies Paper & Notebooks

Whiteboards & Markers

Educational Software

Laptops

Art & Craft Supplies

Staffroom & Cleaning Supplies

For all your school needs visit officeworks.com.au/education

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APRS subscriptions A subscription to Education Matters will ensure you are

covering education, lifestyle, health, government and

kept up to date with industry developments and topics

mining. Simply complete the form below and send it by

of interest.

either fax, post or email.

Education Matters is also a one-stop shop for all of your

All APRS titles are produced with the highest possible

purchasing needs throughout the school year, serving all

production-quality. Content is always aimed at the

primary and secondary schools across australia.

discerning reader who is interested in quality, style and

APRS is proud to publish a varied selection of specialist

informative editorial.

titles offering a variety of focused articles and features

Here are some of our publications:

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> Telehealth at the crossroads p.14 > The evolution of the intensive care unit p.34 > Where to for e-health in Australia? p.49

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mining and energy

tips for tackling the over fifties dating game

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the master gardener in full bloom

Post-GFC mineral exploration in Queensland…. pg 18 Environment and coal seam gas: a sustainable future?…. pg 24

ISSN 1834-8483 01

Monetising coal basin energy resources…. pg 52 qld mining and energy bulletin

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Inagural edition

You can subscribe to Education Matters or any of our other magazines online at www.aprs.com.au Address: Town/suburb: State: Fax: + 61 8 8113 9201

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Market your school The easy way

skills, money and Do you have the time, l d deliver a professiona resources to design an e the vid pro s ter let ws Ne ? ge communications packa me ho l, oo between the sch vital communication link of k tas the ver ity. Howe and the wider commun image t reflect your school’s tha nts me cu do creating can be arduous.

Australian Newsletter Services is a family owned business which recognised the need for schools to effectively communicate with their families and community over 30 years ago. Now with changing family structures, such as two income families and split families, this communication is even more important. These changes in society, combined with the rapid growth in technology, require a new approach to the way we communicate. This has brought about the introduction of our electronic newsletter service - eNews.

eNews allows your school to send graphically rich, fully interactive, colour email newsletters directly to your parent’s inboxes – without having to depend on students for delivery. Let us provide your school with a customised communications You can incorporate school news, photos, slideshows, and marketing package; including printed and electronic videos, podcasts and more to create a totally interactive newsletters, image rebranding with specialist graphic designers experience. Furthermore you have complete control over and a wide range of printing services. We take pride in offering subscriptions and a range of reports at your fingertips exceptional service to meet your school’s needs. through the ‘School Dashboard’. “At all stages of our dealings we have been impressed with the high level of customer service in terms of professional approach, flexibility, value for money, friendliness and in general, a willingness to go that bit further to give us the best possible outcome to suit our needs.” Paul Zernike, Principal, Milton State School Best of all of our newsletter services are FREE to schools as local businesses support the school through advertising, building strong community relationships.

“We love eNews and Australian Newsletter Services provides an excellent service – where no problem is too big or too small and delivery is always on time.” Jo Psaros, P&C Liaison Officer, Sunnybank Hills State School Like hundreds of other schools your school can receive a professionally designed communications package totally FREE of charge – just phone 1800 245 077 to talk to a representative from Australian Newsletter Services Pty Ltd and discover how we can give your school the edge.

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A shirt service that’s custom made for schools.

We’ll custom-make sport shirts or uniforms in your choice of style, fabric, colours and sizes, give you a fixed base price, and enable you to re-order small quantities. We’ll also guarantee to provide the same fabric and colours for at least 3 years, so future orders will match your first. If you’re looking for quality shirts made from premium, colour-fast fabrics, visit our website, experiment with styles and colours and request an obligation free quote. If you need help just give us a call.

Visit www.sportshirtsaustralia.com.au or call us 1300 735 158

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Requ e quote st a and g online et samp free les!


Combating back-to-school pressure Every year teache rs experience the pressure of back school, with the to practical deman ds of preparing a often taking atte class ntion away from what is really impo - the preparation rtant of the education al program.

As leaders in the education supply market, Corporate Express understands these demands. They also understand that every school and every teacher has different needs when preparing for a new class, and have designed a specialist back to school offering in response to this diversity. Senada Djinovic, who heads up the Corporate Express Back to School program, says the service ensures the right products are available for teachers and students at the commencement of the new school year. “The procurement of products is not a teacher’s core business. They want to focus on their key responsibility, which is educating our children,” says Djinovic. The Back to School program sees dedicated Account Managers providing support to staff and teachers, a Customer Support Hub offering after-sale service and an entire warehouse devoted exclusively to school product distribution. The Back to School order pad allows teachers to easily select

classroom essentials and enables them to bulk order, saving time and money. After receiving feedback that dividing up classroom stationery was a time consuming and frustrating process for teachers, Corporate Express has even developed individual student packs so all teachers need to do is hand them out at the beginning of the school year. The Back to School program also allows schools to select environmentally preferable products that help support their sustainability objectives. “It’s all part of us helping teachers get on with the job of developing Australia’s future,” says Djinovic. The Corporate Express Back to School program takes orders from mid-September onwards, for fulfilment by early in the new school year.

Start the new year with Corporate Express. From pens and highlighters to calculators and notepads, we’ve got all your Back to School needs covered. Better still, we provide it all from one convenient source saving you time and money. Included in the range is a wide and ever-expanding selection of Australian made products. It’s our way of helping support local and Australian industry. So if it’s great value Back to School products you’re after, or anything else education related for that matter, look no further than Corporate Express. Speak to one of our skilled Account Managers on 13 26 44.

A better way to do business Corporate Express Australia Limited ABN 94 000 728 398 Phone: 13 26 44 A member of the Staples Group

EM EDUCATIONmatters

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EDUCATE WITH THE EPSON ULTRA SHORT THROW PROJECTOR It’s one less thing for students to get their head around.

n

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A (1 r) 1 + N=M n n Or N = r (1 + r) (1 + r) 70%

15%

60 50 40 30 20 10

With Epson’s unique E-TORL lamp technology and a high precision short throw lens which reduces glare in the presenter’s eyes and minimises shadows, the Epson ultra short throw projector delivers big, bright images that bring lessons to life! Low power consumption and a long lamp life saves you money and reduces impact on the environment. With the Epson ultra short throw projector, Let nothing get in the way of your student's work.

Epson, Engineered for Education.

For information on our range of projectors call 1300 130 194 or visit epson.com.au


Schools - Universities - Lecture Halls - TAFE - Conference Centres - Commercial Presentations

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Ph: (02) 9624 5499

112

Fax: (02) 9624 5672

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www.bluegumjoinery.com.au audio / visual


advertiser directory section

advertiser

page #

Art

Tetlow 34 The Pug Mill Pty Ltd 35 Woodrow Kilns 36 Lincraft 102 Living Eggs Pty Ltd 36

Audio Visual

3 Monkeys Audio Visual Blue Gum Joinery EPSON Optim Audio Visual

112 112 111 110

Awards/Events

Chartered accountants National Australia Bank (Schools First) Exhibition group

20 19 22

Campaigns

Australian Human Rights Commission Australian Drug Foundation Chartered Accountants National Australia Bank (Schools First) The Butterfly Foundation University of Ballarat

6 23 20 19 18 24

Canteen

D’Licious Drinks Mission Foods Australia

53 53

Facilities Supplies

Corporate Express

41

Grounds Maintenance

CLS Grounds Maintenance Majestic Fire

47 42

Health

Jet Dryer Moonscape Waterless Sungate Distributors Australia Living Eggs Pty Ltd. McDonald’s Australia

50 49 49 36 4-5

Health Campaigns

The Butterfly Foundation Australian Drug Foundation Australian Human Rights Commission

18 23 6

Home Economics

Horne Furniture Australia Singer Pfaff Husqvarna Kitchenware Direct Lincraft

98 99 101 103 102 102

Indoor/Office Furniture

Corporate Express Davell Products Pty Ltd. EduSource Pty Ltd. Excel Lockers Exhibition group Ikcon Innova Group Nepean Office Furniture R.E. Batger’s Blue Gum Joinery

37 90 40 91 38 39 38 39 92 112

Infrastructure

McMahon Services Shadola

96 97

I.T./ Interactive Learning Computelec BenQ Australia Pty Ltd D-Link Hitachi Australia Pty Ltd JED Microprocessors Pty Ltd Lenovo Loop Technology Pty Ltd

EM EDUCATIONmatters

advertiser directory

72 70 84 69 73 ii-iii, 68, 77 82

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advertiser directory section

advertiser

page #

I.T./ Interactive Learning Logitech Pixel IT Network Solutions Mimio Read Me Futura Training University of Ballarat

76 83 74 73 86 84

Internet Security

AVG (Au/NZ) Pty Ltd PC Locs

80 85

Libraries

Access Office Industries Raeco Advancetag Sisters Dreaming

95 94 94 95

Maintenance/Outdoor Equipment

Singer Shadola BST Australia Cavalier Bremworth Australia McMahon Services Total Asbestos Services Innova Group CLS Grounds Maintenance Majestic Fire National Australia Bank (Schools First) Commercial Systems Australia

99 97 45 46 43 44 38 47 42 45 47

Music/Drama

Carlingford Music Centre Innova Group

24 38

PE/Outdoor Ed/Excursions

Play Hard Sports YHA Yard Games Fitness Trails Australia

28 27 29 30

Outdoor Furniture/Equipment

Commercial Systems Australia Innova Group Yard Games Fitness Trails Australia Exhibition Group Australia

47 38 29 30 38

Science

Fizzics Education Lab Direct Lab Systems Group Microscopes and More

63 62 62 63

Stationery/Back to School

Akubra Hats Officeworks Australian Newsletter Service Redland Graphics Corporate Express Sports Shirts Australia

31 104 107 108 109 108

Storage Solutions

Davell Products Pty Ltd. Excel Lockers

90 91

Tech Studies

Elite Saw Sharpening, Hare & Forbes On Guard Safety Training Multicam Systems Pty Ltd Tools For Schools Woodworking Warehouse Hare & Forbes

56 56 57 58 58 59

Uniforms

Akubra Hats Sports Shirts Australia Williamson International

31 30 32

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advertiser directory


What if

someone

developed entirely new teaching technology that was better, more intuitive, more affordable, and a lot easier for teachers? (Imagine that.)

In the world of interactive teaching, Mimio stands apart. NEW from DYMO/Mimio. We took award-winning teaching technologies. We gathered meticulous input from teachers and administrators. We then challenged some of the best engineering minds in the industry to create an entirely new standard. The MimioTeach™ interactive system transforms the whiteboards you already have into interactive whiteboards. The MimioCapture™ tracking system lets you use dry erase markers to write, edit, and erase directly to your computer. The MimioVote™ assessment system provides instant assessment with a tool that’s more intuitive and easier to use. The MimioView™ document camera displays high-resolution camera images, gets power from your PC, and launches the onscreen software simultaneously. And there’s much more to Mimio interactive teaching solutions, all designed to work together. Simply.

Contact us if you would like to experience Mimio first hand. Please call Peter Goldie on 03 8796 7470 or visit mimio.dymo.com/new90 ©2010 DYMO, a Newell Rubbermaid company


Widest range of school supplies

at the lowest prices everyday of an ts fi e n e b e th ll a y jo n e To ount c c a n o ti a c u d e s rk o w Office ation c u d e / u .a m o .c s rk o w e visit offic hool’s online, in Shop for your school fax. store, by phone or via

ices on Guaranteed lowest pr d school over 15,000 admin an supplies. credit Check your school’s print your d balance online an own invoice.

sc Check and settle your re with sto in or e account onlin rd or ca dit cash, cheque, cre debit card.

as delivery, Access services such sembly extended warranty, as and print and copy. to Exclusive opportunities oducts. pr se ea rel pre-order new

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OW3381_2

Education Matters Secondary Edition 2010  

APRS is proud to announce the release of the second edition of Education Matters. Education Matters is a one stop shop for all your purchasi...

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