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Critical Supplier Vice Adm. Mark D. Harnitchek Director Defense Logistics Agency

2013

Defense Logistics aGENCY


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Air ForceDefense Life sUSTAINMENT Logistics Agency CENTER

Critical Supplier

Q& A

Staying in Tune to Keep the Supply Chain Moving

Vice Admiral Mark D. Harnitchek Director Defense Logistics Agency

Vice Admiral Mark D. Harnitchek became director of the Defense Logistics Agency in November 2011. As such, he is responsible for providing the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and other federal agencies with a variety of logistics, acquisition and technical services in peace and war. These services include logistics information, materiel management, procurement, warehousing and distribution of spare parts, food, clothing, medical supplies and fuel, reutilization of surplus military materiel and document automation and production. This worldwide mission is performed by nearly 27,000 civilian and military personnel. He previously served as deputy commander, U.S. Transportation Command, Scott Air Force Base, Ill. Harnitchek, a native of Philadelphia, received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Penn State University in 1977 and was commissioned through the Navy ROTC program. In 1987, he received a master’s degree in management from the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, Calif. Harnitchek has served in a variety of sea tours including two submarines, USS Will Rogers (SSBN 659) and USS Buffalo (SSN715); two ships, USS Holland (AS-32) and USS Proteus (AS-19); and the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71). His shore tours include commander, Submarine Group 7, Yokosuka, Japan; the Navy Ships Parts Control Center, Naval Air Station Oceana, Va.; and the Chief of Naval Operations Staff. Flag assignments include commanding officer, Naval Inventory Control Point; vice director for logistics, the Joint Staff; Director, Strategy, Policy, Programs and Logistics, USTRANSCOM; and director, U.S. Central Command Deployment and Distribution Operations Center in operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom. Q: You recently returned from a visit to the CENTCOM AOR [area of responsibility]. What’s your impression of CENTCOM’s progress toward retrograde disposal operations in theater and such, and what are some of the biggest challenges the DLA faces? A: I was, as usual, very impressed by everybody I met, whether in the Caucasus, Central Asia or Afghanistan. I think that the CMRE www.MLF-kmi.com

[consolidated materiel response element], which is a brigadesized unit responsible for retrograde that we’re a part of, is ready to go. They have their sea legs in terms of figuring out what the problems are and designing processes that are as streamlined as possible. The CMRE has their principles set in terms of minimizing risk to warfighters, touching things as little as possible and spending a lot of time moving or handling items that will eventually become scrap. For DLA, if we’re going to scrap something, we’re going to scrap it in place, touch it as little as possible and minimize movement across the road only to scrap it somewhere else. Simply put, be smart and be good stewards. Other than the magnitude of the job, I don’t see any sort of enormous challenges with the retrograde and disposition mission. We know what we’re capable of doing just because we’ve been doing this a while. Everything got there in a timely fashion and on time so whatever the timeline is for coming out of Afghanistan, I’m confident that we—the big we, the logistics nation—are going to figure out a way to support it. Defense Logistics Agency | MLF 7.5 | 1


dEFENSE lOGISTICS aGENCY

A rough terrain container handler of the 146th Transportation Company loading 20-foot shipping containers onto an outbound convoy. The image illustrates the partnering of commercial transportation assets directly with deployed military units. [Photo courtesy of U.S. Army]

Q: For the retrograde, does the DLA have a place at the table in formulating the timetable or has that guidance already been issued? A: We absolutely have a place at the planning table and that planning starts with the president’s guidance in regard to the force cap and the mission and everything else cascades from there. DLA’s big role in the retrograde mission is the disposition of all the equipment and material that will not leave Afghanistan. That could be hundreds to thousands of vehicles, tens of thousands of containers and damaged or excess equipment. We have the capacity now to cut up about 450 vehicles a month in Afghanistan and the wherewithal to process 40 million pounds of scrap a month. However, I don’t think that’s quite enough, so we’re going to expand our capability in the coming months. Something important is that we’re doing it all forward with major disposition sites at Bagram, Camp Pratt in the north, Kandahar in the south and Camp Leatherneck in the southwest. We’re also setting up something called hub-base disposal where a large forward operating base supports a satellite of combat outposts and smaller FOBs. The smaller installations send their disposal to the hub base and it will be cut up there. We’re looking to expand to about eight or nine of those. Overall, we’ll have the large complexes that are 20-30 acres, and probably between eight and nine smaller disposition operations out there throughout the regional commands with the intent to move it once, destroy it, and sell it as scrap. Q: What else is important to know about DLA’s forward presence in Afghanistan? 2 | MLF 7.5 | Defense Logistics Agency

A: We are everywhere. You really don’t go anywhere our forces are where there’s not a DLA representative of some kind. We have in the neighborhood of 200 people in Afghanistan representing all nine of our supply chains. In terms of volume and expense, two of our big missions there are supplying food and fuel. We want to make sure we’re in tune with the theater commander so as he draws down, we draw down. Both food and fuel are big commodities that you don’t fly in and have long lead times. Fuel sometimes is transported from as far as Latvia, food sometimes as far as here in the United States. It means planning ahead and making those adjustments for how long it takes based on lead times. It’s not rocket science, but if you’re not doing the arithmetic, you can either get behind pretty quickly or have too much. But I think we’re in good shape. The folks here, in the theater, the services, the agencies, and the interagency are really thinking hard about this and I’m confident we’re going to get it right. Q: How much of your budget comes from your customers, and how much of it is dependent upon what they purchase? A: It’s pretty much all from our customers. Last year we were $44 billion in sales, this year we’ll probably be in the neighborhood of about $40 billion. And all, with the exception of $4-5 billion in operating cost—comes from the sale of our material—food, fuel, repair parts, construction material, etc. So as DoD’s budget goes up and down, the art and science for DLA is matching our obligations [what DLA buys] to what the services have to spend—what they buy from us. If we get that roughly right, we won’t buy more www.MLF-kmi.com


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DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

cOMMANDERS & dIRECTORS

Vice Adm. Mark D. Harnitchek, SC, USN Director

Rear Adm. David F. Baucom, USN Commander DLA Troop Support

Brig. Gen. Mark K. Johnson, USAF Commander, DLA Aviation

Col. Jan K. DeMartini, USA Director DLA Office of Inspector General

Amy Sajda Director DLA Small Business (DB)

cORPORATE sTAFF

David Rodriguez Director DLA Installation Support

Brad B. Bunn Director DLA Human Resources (J1)

Maj. Gen. Kenneth S. Dowd Director, DLA Logistics Operations (J3)

Col. Joe E. Arnold Jr., USA Commander DLA Pacific

Col. Joseph E. Ladner IV, USA Commander DLA Europe and Africa

Col. Mark A. McCormick, USA Commander, DLA Central

Rear Adm. Ron J. MacLaren, USN Director Joint Contingency Acquisition Support Office


DEFENSE LOGISTICS AGENCY

Command Sgt. Maj. Sultan A. Muhammad, USA Senior Enlisted Leader

Renee L. Roman Chief of Staff

Edward J. Case Vice Director

Rear Adm. (Sel) David R. Pimpo, SC, USN Commander, DLA Land and Maritime

Brig. Gen. Susan A. Davidson, USA Commander, DLA Distribution

Brig. Gen. Giovanni K. Tuck, USAF Commander, DLA Energy

Phyllisa Goldenberg Director, DLA Strategic Plans and Policy (J5)

Kathy Cutler Director DLA Information Operations (J6)

Deborah L. Greger Director DLA Logistics Information Service

Fred T. Pribble DLA General Counsel (DG)

Stephen T. Sherman Director DLA Document Services

Twila C. Gonzales Director DLA Disposition Services

J. Anthony Poleo DLA Finance (J8)

Nancy M. Heimbaugh Director DLA Acquisition (J7)

Ronnie Favors Administrator DLA Strategic Materials

Rear Adm. Patricia E. Wolfe, USN Director Joint Reserve Force (J9)


dEFENSE lOGISTICS aGENCY

To reduce both cost and risk to personnel, and taking a lesson learned page from Iraq, the Army has established a number of materiel redistribution yards at several locations around Afghanistan. As much equipment, stores and scrap is handled and moved as few times as possible. [Photo courtesy of U.S. Army]

with our working capital than what the services have to buy from us. Again, not rocket science, but we have to pay attention to get this right. As for the budget, right now there’s a lot of uncertainty and we’re just taking it one step at a time, but we’ll get through it. In the early ’90s we went through some tough financial times and in my view it that was actually a little bit worse, so I’m confident we’ll get through this as well. As the vice chief of naval operations said at the recent meeting when he coined a phrase from the British during the dark days of the ‘Blitz’ in 1940: ‘Keep Calm and Carry On.’

we were there to support. From barges, blankets, cots and trash removal, we did a little bit of everything. Q: Were the relationships with FEMA and NORTHCOM preexisting to Sandy? A: Yes, the efforts for both food and fuel were pre-scripted. FEMA told us exactly what they wanted as a starting point so we were not trying to figure it out during the disaster, while the rain was coming down. Our arrangements for food and fuel are all contingency contracts and the second it looks like it’s going to be bad, we go into motion with our shipmates at FEMA.

Q: The services—Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, Coast Guard— are obvious customers of yours. What is DLA’s role in servicing other governmental agencies in much the same way you do with the military?

Q: Over the past few years, an area of interest to DLA has been workforce development and diversification. What are the challenges in this area?

A: Our big role with other government agencies is during disasters. We were really very involved last fall during Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. We were linked at the hip with FEMA, NORTHCOM and the services basically for food, water, fuel and whatever else they needed. We provided approximately 12 million gallons of fuel, and not just diesel but we were putting gas in gas stations, we were putting gas in doctors’ cars, police cars, buses, taxicabs—we even fired up the Verizon diesel generators so they could keep the network running up there in the Northeast. We supplied power, water pumps, and working closely with the Army Corps of Engineers we provided generators to augment their capabilities. In all manner of logistics,

A: We’ve been very fortunate to enjoy fully funded budgets for the past 11 or 12 years. We’ve been very well-supported by the Congress with regard to supplementals so we’re not going to stop developing our workforce, but I want folks to be a little more judicious when they’re spending money. Certainly some of that will apply to professional development, but one of the things I’ve been very impressed with here at DLA is we’re very mindful of our investment in people. We have a host of schools we send people to, employees can get a master’s degree; however, I don’t want to say the sky’s the limit. But this is a great place to work if you’re looking for professional development, online training and off-campus training. That’s at every level, so

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dEFENSE lOGISTICS aGENCY

I think we have a very great model here that looks at where you are in the organization and what you need to know to do your job. I’ve been really impressed with the leadership and learning continuum. We’re not going to stop focusing on workforce development, but I think we’re going to have to lean ourselves out a little bit. Q: Is there a concern that there might be a brain-drain based on the age of your workforce and the development of upcoming in size and the limitations you make? A: I’ve been hearing about the aging workforce since I was an 06 in the late ’90s. I can recall commanders showing the ‘average age of our workforce is 48’ slide and projecting that the older workforce would eventually keel over from all the work. Well, today the average age is still about 48 and I’m not worried about it. I’ve come to find that that average 48-year-old is a highly experienced, seasoned veteran in logistics who not only knows what it is they’re supposed to do, they know how to do it, and they have the benefit of many years of experience and knowledge that they can pass on to our new generation of employees. I don’t know what the phenomenon is here that keeps our workforce right around 48 years old, but whatever it is I want to keep it going.

Q: What are the measures DLA implements to monitor against counterfeit parts entering the supply chain, and are those efforts more manpower-driven, are they technology-driven? A: The risk now is higher than it’s ever been and it’s only going to get worse. You have entire industries overseas whose mission is to sell us counterfeit parts or parts that don’t perform as well. The risk is highest on the electronic end because they’re so easy to counterfeit. But all of the parts in our supply chain, to one extent or another, are subject to some risk so we’re taking a measured but aggressive approach. We’re focusing on the supply chains that are most at risk, and that’s the microchips and components that go in electronic equipment. The parts themselves don’t cost a lot of money, but you have $100 microcircuits that go in a Minuteman missile, a Virginia Class submarine, an F-16, you name it. The problem, of course, is that when that part fails or doesn’t perform very well, ultimately people’s lives and the mission are at risk. It’s up to us as the folks who buy these microchips to ensure that the technicians doing the work have the right parts. There are four things we are doing. First is to only buy from vendors on our qualified producer or distributor list. Fundamentally, if you’re not on the list, we’re not buying from you.

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dEFENSE lOGISTICS aGENCY

With materiel handling equipment in the foreground, and stock awaiting disposition in the background, the Bagram Air Filed resort facility is one flow point for the movement of materiel out of Afghanistan. [Photo courtesy of DoD]

Second is a vigorous effort to test what we already have in stock. We have routines where we regularly pull items off the shelf and test to make sure it’s compliant—if it is, we put it back. If it’s not, we do something about it. Third is a software system that operates much like the routines that your credit card company uses. For example, if there’s a pattern on your credit card bill that doesn’t quite look like you, somebody will pick up the phone and call you, or freeze your credit card and say ‘Hey, did you spend money in Shangri-La?’ And of course the answer is no, which means someone is using your credit cards. Our software looks at people who want to do business with us that perhaps have never done it before, which is not necessarily bad, but it’s a red flag. Companies with post office boxes, but not real addresses, phone numbers that go nowhere, etc. All the record-keeping forensics that indicates that a person we’re about to do business with isn’t quite on the up-and-up, or that a person we have done business with is sort of suspect. Fourth, and this is a big one, we are now requiring all of our microcircuit suppliers to apply a DNA mark to all of their microcircuits. That is a process whereby the microcircuit is marked with DNA-impregnated ink. It’s nearly impossible to counterfeit and is a fail-safe way of determining whether or not you have an authentic microcircuit. You can check the microcircuit by doing nothing more than shining one of those little lights on it that the TSA uses to check you ID at the airport. Basically, give somebody a light and they’re a counterfeit part detector. If it doesn’t have that mark, it’s not one of ours. We’re paying our suppliers to apply that mark and it’s part of the contract for all of our microcircuit producers. 8 | MLF 7.5 | Defense Logistics Agency

Q: About how old is this process? A: It was being tested when I got here about 14 months ago, and our folks think that this is the only fail-safe way to assure that we’re getting good parts. We have four lines of operation to combat counterfeit parts with the DNA marking being just one of them. You shine a light on it and can tell that it is, in fact, marked so it’s a good part. If you have further questions, you can send it back to the manufacturer and they can actually look at the DNA, tell you exactly where it came from, who made it and where it was made. Each manufacturer has its own unique DNA marking. Q: DLA has used reverse auctions in the past. Are you still a fan of reverse auctions? A: I’m a big fan of reverse auctions. They don’t work for everything but where there’s a lot of competition, the acquisition value of the contract is big and it’s a multiyear contract, they work very well. Reverse auctions don’t work as well for items where there’s not a lot of competition and the dollar value of the acquisition is relatively low. But when the dollar value is big and there’s a lot of competition, folks get very focused on competing for that next contract. We just had a recent example at DLA Troop Support where a reverse auction enabled almost half a billion dollars in savings— that’s some real money. But the auctions don’t work for everything and we’re working closely with our suppliers to determine where to use the tool to get the best outcome. www.MLF-kmi.com


dEFENSE lOGISTICS aGENCY

Defense Logistics Agency Director Vice Adm. Mark Harnitchek, Maj. Gen. Kenneth Dowd, DLA Director, Logistics Operations, and others take a tour of the DLA mobile command trailer during a disaster support table top exercise. The mobile command trailer was being used as an emergency command center. [Photo courtesy of DoD]

Q: A program that’s been instituted here is Captains of Industry. Can you tell me about that program, why it exists, what the benefits are, and is it going to expand?

Q: Do the people that you invite, the captains of industry, include the leaders of the big companies, but also small businesses?

A: In the SECDEF’s Defense Planning Guidance, he said, “…talk to industry.” There’s a lot of trepidation out there in industry about what the Budget Control Act and sequestration holds for them. So rather than just let people guess, it’s best to go talk to them. The folks at AT&L [Acquisition, Technology and Logistics] will tell you the relationship between government and industry takes place at two levels. It takes place at my level and my counterpart’s level in industry, and it takes place at the contracting officer level. And for the relationship to work, that relationship needs to exist at both levels, not just the contracting officer. And frankly with all this budget pressure, we’re not going to take the cost out of the enterprise with talking to our shipmates in industry. So it’s imperative that we talk to industry about what it is we’re trying to achieve strategically. Our big program here at DLA is called our “10 in 5”—reducing costs in our material and operations by 10 percent in five years. Industry is going to be a big part of that, if not the biggest part, because that’s where all our money is. So this effort has been very well received. We met with all of our supply chains the first year and we’re starting our second round. We decided that our mission is to further delight the warfighter while taking cost out of the logistics equation. And we have a host of initiatives to do that and we’re going to hold ourselves accountable to do them all.

A: Yes we do. In fact, some our supply chains, like Clothing and Textile, are almost all small business—and last year DLA spent more than $2.6 billion in that supply chain. That is big money in a lot of small businesses. And for those who attend, I ask them to not just represent Boeing, DeRossi uniforms, or Sysco foods. Instead, I ask them to represent their industry and find out where—competition notwithstanding—there are issues and interests that apply to them all. So even though they are ferocious competitors in the market for DLA’s business, one of the things we must do collectively is forge a better relationship that drives costs out and better serves the warfighter.

www.MLF-kmi.com

Q: Any closing thoughts about the men, women and mission of DLA? A: I’ve been a customer of DLA for 35 years. I knew it was big, I knew it was powerful, but I never knew how big or how powerful until I got here. It is frankly a national treasure. And the real treasure is our dedicated workforce and their performance is eye-watering. They do it all over the country and around the world. DLA is a big, complex, wonderful machine and I am tickled pink to be in charge. I’m delighted every day watching what our people do and how they do it. It’s a great time to be serving our country as a logistician. O Defense Logistics Agency | MLF 7.5 | 9


dEFENSE lOGISTICS aGENCY

DLA Top Contracts FY12 SUPREME FOODSERVICE AG

$2,543,688,933.50

EQUILON ENTERPRISES LLC

$2,017,272,908.28

AMERISOURCEBERGEN DRUG CORP.

$1,378,124,617.85

VALERO MARKETING AND SUPPLY COMPANY

$1,231,988,085.35

REFINERY ASSOCIATES OF TEXAS INC.

$1,193,389,702.80

WORLD FUEL SERVICES EUROPE LTD

$964,668,470.88

ATLANTIC DIVING SUPPLY INC.

$817,714,465.12

BP PRODUCTS NORTH AMERICA INC.

$815,772,268.32

B P WEST COAST PRODUCTS LLC

$781,823,915.50

RED STAR ENTERPRISES LTD

WESTERN REFINING COMPANY, LP

$197,874,000.00

HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL INC.

$93,651,726.36

ALON USA, LP

$196,555,231.93

$91,488,529.99

LOCKHEED MARTIN CORP.

$190,031,915.19

BELL BOEING JOINT PROJECT OFFICE

CONOCOPHILLIPS COMPANY

$183,548,891.71

SEVEN SEAS SHIPCHANDLERS LLC

$88,766,780.76

OWENS & MINOR DISTRIBUTION INC.

$179,754,008.24

MCDONNELL DOUGLAS CORP.

$87,892,615.62

MCKESSON CORP.

$179,400,696.25

$87,785,979.60

RAYTHEON COMPANY

$177,984,363.62

HERMES CONSOLIDATED LLC

PETRO STAR INC.

$172,570,555.38

NORTHROP GRUMMAN SYSTEMS CORP.

$87,631,646.45

CANADIAN COMMERCIAL CORP.

$83,475,387.58

READYONE INDUSTRIES INC.

$80,339,779.83

BAE SYSTEMS AEROSPACE & DEFENSE GROUP INC.

$79,718,056.29

LOCKHEED MARTIN AERONAUTICS SERVICE-INTERNATIONAL

$79,160,973.37

BELL HELICOPTER TEXTRON INC.

$77,836,034.20

CARDINAL HEALTH INC.

$169,078,227.01

CFM INTERNATIONAL INC.

$168,137,293.09

QATAR FUEL (WOQOD)

$162,905,613.00

GS CALTEX CORP.

$162,380,646.55

$688,467,145.56

AMERIQUAL GROUP LLC

$156,139,271.68

CARDINAL HEALTH INC.

$560,841,975.48

HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL INC.

$153,917,401.12

KUWAIT PETROLEUM CORP.

$556,300,985.37

BP PRODUCTS NORTH AMERICA INC.

CROWLEY PETROLEUM DIST INC.

$151,173,003.02

$552,521,276.24

S-OIL CORP.

$511,387,221.24

BELL HELICOPTER TEXTRON INC.

$148,755,197.59

IPC (USA) INC.

$77,275,560.28

SOURCE ONE DISTRIBUTORS INC.

$145,235,929.69

TIMKEN AEROSPACE TRANSMISSIONS LLC

$73,275,937.00

OSHKOSH CORP.

$142,777,245.82

GOODRICH CORP.

$71,705,324.03 $71,456,798.46

ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY FOR DISTRIBUTION

$423,049,392.00

SCIENCE APPLICATIONS INTERNATIONAL CORP.

$418,570,808.74

ASIA COMMERCE NETWORK

$139,911,306.00

VEYANCE TECHNOLOGIES INC.

EXXON MOBIL CORP.

$409,361,367.27

CARDINAL HEALTH 200 INC. (5186)

$135,759,315.45

CARTER ENTERPRISES LLC

$71,046,123.65

BAE SYSTEMS INFORMATION AND ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS INTEGRATION

$134,030,446.72

PTT PUBLIC COMPANY LIMITED

$70,589,820.79

AMERICAN APPAREL INC.

$70,263,483.62

$126,454,818.68

IRVING OIL TERMINALS INC.

$69,238,810.90

$124,406,305.55

MOTOR OIL (HELLAS) CORINTH REFINERIES S.A.

$406,497,328.14

TOTAL RAFFINAGE MARKETING

$385,224,950.58

CHEVRON U.S.A. INC.

$357,138,331.97

COMPANIA ESPANOLA DE PETROLEOS SA

PHILLIPS 66 COMPANY

$354,409,335.76

DELEK REFINING LTD.

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY

$339,995,941.06

PLACID REFINING COMPANY LLC

$336,134,788.27

PETROMAX LLC TESORO HAWAII CORP.

HUNT REFINING COMPANY

$69,165,008.41

W.S. DARLEY & CO.

$68,607,362.30

THE BOEING COMPANY

$123,121,984.01

FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES INC.

$120,158,216.07

BAHRAIN MARITIME AND MERCANTILE INTERNATIONAL

$67,441,624.89

$314,652,971.60

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP.

$115,493,554.36

NATIONAL INDUSTRIES FOR THE BLIND

$66,990,293.97

$302,703,782.62

NORDIC CAMP SUPPLY APS

$109,717,252.50

SUPREME FOODSERVICE GMBH

$107,060,781.55

BAE SYSTEMS SPECIALITY DEFENSE SYSTEMS OF PENNSYLVANIA INC.

$63,855,358.39

$284,409,340.25

TESORO REFINING AND MARKETING COMPANY

ANHAM FZCO LLC

$235,069,572.97

BP SINGAPORE PTE. LIMITED

$105,443,964.50

NUSTAR MARKETING LLC

$62,847,521.60

ACCENTURE NATIONAL SECURITY SERVICES LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY

$62,257,439.54

THEODOR WILLE INTERTRADE AG

$60,952,345.95

SIKORSKY AIRCRAFT CORP.

$219,535,134.82

WORLD FUEL SERVICES (SINGAPORE) PTE LTD

$217,825,375.37

UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORP.

$216,737,383.44

CALUMET SALE COMPANY INC.

THE BOEING COMPANY

$104,393,600.96

U.S. FOODSERVICE INC.

$101,176,109.82

CARDINAL HEALTH 200 LLC

$100,174,935.06

U.S. OIL TRADING LLC

$97,964,746.00

$211,121,550.00

SK ENERGY CORP.

$95,537,486.66

COASTAL PACIFIC FOOD DISTRIBUTORS INC.

$55,985,847.83

ENI SPA

$210,384,000.00

THE WORNICK COMPANY

$94,676,293.13

SOPAKCO INC.

$55,682,810.76

GARY-WILLIAMS ENERGY CORP.

$202,216,686.65

HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND CORP.

$93,931,815.70

HAMILTON SUNDSTRAND CORP. (3584)

$55,063,555.07

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