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Journal of Higher Learning for Today’s Servicemember

Military Family Advocate Charles E. Milam Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy

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December 2012 Volume 7, Issue 10

Inside: 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Online Education Support O Nursing Programs Academics Beyond the Semester O Solving the Pilot Crisis

Study at the only New York City university ranked in the top 25 “veteran friendly” colleges and universities by Military Times magazine. For more information, visit www.fordham.edu/vets

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Fordham was one of the first universities in the country to commit to full participation in the Yellow Ribbon Program, which removes any financial obstacles between eligible post-9/11 service members and a Fordham education. And today, even in the face of a new national cap, we have reaffirmed our Yellow Ribbon commitment to cover all tuition and mandatory fees for eligible post-9/11 veterans and dependents. That guarantee applies to any of our three campuses and to any of the 10 schools to which you are admitted.

2013

Fordham is proud to be a Yellow Ribbon University. eeo/aa

Military Advanced Education

December 2012 Volume 7 • Issue 10

Features

Cover / Q&A Solving the Pilot Crisis

A looming U.S. airline pilot shortage is prompting novel proposals for expanding participation in flight-training programs. But how to structure and fund such initiatives remains up in the air. By Andy Pasztor

6 Academics Beyond the Semester

8

Professors can help students develop inventive projects— whether it’s during summer research sessions or service trips abroad. MAE takes a look at schools that encourage their students to enhance their academic experience outside of the classroom. By Laural Hobbes

47 A New Career … Stat!

The United States of America needs more nurses. And for job-hunting veterans with medical experience hoping to segue into a civilian career, this serious shortage could be viewed as a marvelous opportunity. By J.B. Bissell

Charles E. Milam Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy

Departments

12 2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities Factoring in areas of particular interest to servicemembers such as flexibility, academic support, financial assistance and understanding of military culture, this year’s Guide illustrates schools’ policies so you can evaluate them in your own personally relevant context.

17

2 Editor’s Perspective 4 Program Notes/People 16 Class Notes 57 CCME Grapevine 58 Money Talks 59 Resource Center

Supporting the Distance Learning Student

53

Thanks to relocation, tours of duty and other military demands, servicemembers frequently must work towards a degree from a variety of locations. But if you take classes online, you can log into your classroom from anywhere around the world. By Kelly Fodel

University Corner

60 Lucille Sansing, Ph.D. President and CEO Trident University

Military Advanced Education Volume 7, Issue 10 December 2012

Journal of Higher Learning for Today’s Servicemember Editorial Editor Laural Hobbes lauralh@kmimediagroup.com Managing Editor Harrison Donnelly harrisond@kmimediagroup.com Online Editorial Manager Laura Davis laurad@kmimediagroup.com Correspondents Celeste Altus • J.B. Bissell • Kelly Fodel Kenya McCullum • William Murray

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KMI Media Group Publisher Kirk Brown kirkb@kmimediagroup.com Chief Executive Officer Jack Kerrigan jack@kmimediagroup.com Chief Financial Officer Constance Kerrigan connik@kmimediagroup.com Executive Vice President David Leaf davidl@kmimediagroup.com Editor-In-Chief Jeff McKaughan jeffm@kmimediagroup.com Controller Gigi Castro gcastro@kmimediagroup.com Marketing & Communications Manager Holly Winzler hollyw@kmimediagroup.com Operations Assistant Casandra Jones casandraj@kmimediagroup.com Trade Show Coordinator Holly Foster hollyf@kmimediagroup.com Operations, Circulation & Production Circulation & Marketing Administrator Duane Ebanks duanee@kmimediagroup.com Data Specialists Tuesday Johnson tuesdayj@kmimediagroup.com Summer Walker summerw@kmimediagroup.com Raymer Villanueva raymerv@kmimediagroup.com

EDITOR’S PERSPECTIVE The evolution of online education has been a hot topic in higher education. In August, when MAE published a piece on the trend of students taking free online classes taught by professors at elite universities, students were unable to receive class credit for course completion. In late October, however, Antioch University and its Los Angeles campus announced that they received approval from Coursera, a popular massive open online course (MOOC)-hosting website, to offer college credit through its platform. Their students will now have the option of reduced tuition rates for completion of Bachelor of Arts degrees and their high school-to-college bridge program. Laural C. Hobbes Meanwhile, Emerson College, in Boston, has a partnership with the Berklee Editor School of Music that allows students to take online courses at a lower cost than typical classes. According to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York’s Quarterly Report on Household Debt and Credit from November 27, outstanding student loan debt currently stands at $956 billion. Giving students the option of paying discounted tuition rates for online courses—while ensuring that these programs maintain the academic standards of the hosting university—could help them avoid accruing additional loans. Schools that offer less expensive online classes could quickly become the norm. “I think we’ll see digital learning communities cohabit with residential learning communities,” said Lee Pelton, the president of Emerson College, at the College Savings Foundation’s 2012 summit. While MOOCs have not yet been monetized, Pelton predicted that the incredible amount of students taking MOOCs—often a single class will attract millions of students—will entice businesses to invest. Only time will tell how quickly other universities will adapt similar programs, or if other MOOC platform providers will announce for-credit partnerships. In this issue of MAE, we address how exclusively online programs are handling the challenge of providing support services. For more information, flip to “Supporting the Distance Learning Student” on page 53. Last but not least, I’d like to encourage you to consult this year’s Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities, which incorporates visually striking dashboards to help you easily compare military-friendly policies between the almost 300 colleges and universities that responded to our questionnaire. Please email me with any questions you may have, and good luck to you on the next stage of your academic journey.

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We’re here to help your servicemembers shine. Whether the plan is to continue in the military or transition to civilian life, Baker College® Online can help your military personnel receive a regionally accredited college degree. Our programs are available 100% online with 24/7 access from anywhere in the world. “With Baker Online, I was able to complete my degree while I was deployed in Kuwait.” Nicholas J. Waldo— Baker College, BBa, ‘11

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Baker College is a member of Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC), DaNTES, GoarmyEd, and CCaF’s aU-aBC program. The college is eligible to receive Federal military and Veteran education benefits.

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PROGRAM NOTES

Compiled by KMI Media Group staff

TAP Updated Some reservists will be required to complete the DoD Transition Assistance Program (TAP) under legislation designed to reduce unemployment among veterans. The updated TAP went into effect November 21. It now requires mandatory pre-separation counseling, an individualized transition plan, VA benefits briefing and the Department of Labor (DoL) employment workshop for all active-duty military members retiring or separating from the Air Force. “Members of the Air Reserve Component on orders for 180 consecutive days or more are also now required to receive pre-separation counseling (to include an individualized transition plan) and receive a VA benefits briefing,” said Eddy Saunders, Air Force Reserve Command TAP program manager. Reserve members are encouraged to participate in TAP services. However, the Office of the Secretary of Defense is reviewing an exemption that will allow reservists to opt out of the DoL employment workshop if they already have a job or an education plan. “If members cannot provide proof, it will be mandatory that they also complete the TAP employment workshop,” Saunders said. Two pieces of legislation are driving changes to the program. The Veterans Opportunity to Work Act and Hiring Heroes Act directed the Department of Veterans Affairs, the DoL and DoD to expand current programs to reduce unemployment among veterans. “The newly revised TAP will offer veterans the skills needed to explore education and employment opportunities, translate military skills and training and to receive individualized assistance to successfully register for the right VA benefits and services,” added Krystal Shiver, AFRC’s other TAP manager. Reservists who need to fulfill TAP requirements should contact the airman and family readiness office at their location. “Members on an active-duty base will accomplish TAP requirements through the activeduty airman and family readiness center,” Shiver said.

Financial Aid Shopping Sheet Adopted by Over 500 Schools Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced in mid-November that the Financial Aid Financial Aid Shopping Sheet, a model Shopping Sheet financial aid award letter, has been Tuition Costs adopted by over 500 colleges and univerGrants and Scholorships sities. The Shopping Sheet, a standardized award letter, helps prospective students Loans by allowing them to easily compare Graduation Rates financial aid packages among schools. Default Rates The Shopping Sheet was introduced by the Obama administration in July. “I applaud the institutions that have agreed to adopt the Shopping Sheet, and hope more colleges and universities follow their example in offering students and families an easy-to-read award letter that delivers the bottom line on college costs,” Duncan wrote on the official blog of the U.S. Department of Education. The Shopping Sheet provides students with key information such as:

• The cost of one year of school at this institution; • Financial aid options to pay this cost, with a clear differentiation between grants and scholarships, which do not have to be repaid, and loans, which do; • The net costs after grants and scholarships; • Information about student results, including comparative information about default rates, graduation rates and median debt levels for the school; • Potential monthly payments for the federal student loans the typical student would owes after graduation.

PEOPLE In Pensacola, Fla., the Distinguished Civilian Service Award was presented to Dr. Carla Jill Stein on behalf of Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, by Rear Admiral David F. Steindl, the commander of the Naval Service Training Command (NSTC). NSTC’s Officer Development Directorate is responsible for the selection and placement of qualified applicants into university

4 | MAE 7.10

Compiled by KMI Media Group staff

Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps units as midshipmen, officer candidates and nurse candidates. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., Ph.D., has been named president of Morehouse College. Wilson has over 25 years of leadership in higher education and has extensive expertise in advancing the interests of black colleges through his research

at George Washington University, his service on the Spelman College Board of Trustees and as executive director of the White House Initiative on Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Charlotta R. Taylor, the associate director for academic support and recruitment at the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University, has

accepted a position as the director of admissions for recruitment and student engagement at the Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine at Quinnipiac University.

Ian Berry, the chief curator and associate director of the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College, has been promoted to director.

Brian J. May, the provost and vice president for academic affairs at Angelo State University, has been approved as the new president of the same institution.

Wolfgang Gilliar has been promoted to dean of the college of osteopathic medicine at New York Institute of Technology. His previous title was chair of osteopathic medicine.

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A looming pilot shortage could mean opportunity for prospective pilots. By Andy Pasztor

expand traditional training options for student pilots. Still, some A looming U.S. airline pilot shortage is prompting novel proindustry veterans insist a joint government-industry approach posals for expanding participation in flight-training programs. But seems inevitable. Randy Babbitt, a former FAA administrator, how to structure and fund such initiatives remains up in the air. pilot-union chief and commercial pilot, said a confluence of facBoth government and industry officials recently have emphators is “really putting pressure on the industry.” He predicted that sized the need to find new, long-term ways to increase the flow of for the first time in the U.S., “you’re going to see some partnership would-be pilots. In early November, more than a dozen major airbetween agencies and the private sector” to train new co-pilots, lines and commuter carriers participated in a meeting to discuss possibly by providing tax credits to carriers. potential solutions—dubbed the “Pilot Supply Summit”—sponMark Rosenker, former head of the National sored by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Transportation Safety Board, agrees that innovation Daytona Beach, Fla. is essential to retain high-quality flight instructors Tim Brady, dean of the school’s Florida college and also eventually attract more students. “What of aviation, warned that expanding the pipeline of happens to boost the development of pilots in five pilots “is not a future problem; it is upon us now.” to 10 years, that’s the real issue.” Some proponents want to see low-interest loans Enrollment has been declining for years in prior various other federal subsidies go to fledgling vate flight schools, where students can spend up to aviators at flight schools or academic institutions. $150,000 to train to the point where they become Others advocate scholarships or loan guarantees eligible for commercial flying jobs. Under the curprovided by prospective employers. rent training system, young pilots typically pay for “We're going to have to do something unique” to Tim Brady most of their own training. find answers, John Allen, a senior Federal Aviation Yet they know that once they get their first airAdministration (FAA) official, told a training contim.brady@erau.edu line job, starting pay often is under $25,000 a year. ference in Washington over the summer. Without “The profession is not as attractive today as it once swift, coordinated action, he told another industry was,” Rob Burke, an FAA training official, told an gathering, “by the time big airlines feel [a shortage], international meeting this past summer. the need will be critical.” At the University of North Dakota, which has Allen has been trying to generate interest in one of the best-known academic aviation programs creating a new breed of aviation academies feeding in the U.S., officials say student interest in airline young pilots to commuter airlines: hybrid institucareers is at the lowest level in four decades. “Their tions supported by the government and industry confidence in the industry just isn’t there,” said that would offer five-year bachelor’s degrees along Kent Lovelace, chairman of the aviation departwith flight time in twin-engine planes. But he ment. He is among those who argue that revving stresses that this is his personal vision. Kent Lovelace up pilot production requires active airline particiThe FAA hasn’t officially blessed any proposals lovelace@aero.und.edu pation. and the White House hasn’t earmarked dollars to 6 | MAE 7.10

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The industry “needs to have direct involvement in student enrollment,” according to Lovelace. Unless the system changes, “there probably will be a shortage very shortly.” Some aviation experts believe U.S. carriers should follow the lead of European and Asian countries in promoting airline-sponsored selection and training of future pilots from the start. Germany’s Deutsche Lufthansa runs its own basic training program, turning candidates without any flying experience into newly minted co-pilots in less than two years. Compared with traditional training, there is greater emphasis on simulator sessions focused on skills needed to fly twin-engine jets rather than total hours aloft. The airline and the student pilots split the cost, with graduates guaranteed a job at Lufthansa. Since 2009, the latest version of the program has produced 350 first officers. From the beginning, “you are teaching young pilots exactly what they need to do when they are flying the big jets,” said Captain Matthias Kippenberg of Lufthansa. The training is much more tailored to the specific demands of flying big jets than the skills U.S. student pilots typically get: flying single-engine, propeller planes from small airports to build hours in their logbooks. In China, where aviation is booming and there is a limited pool of trained pilots, some airlines are taking the same approach. Many of the new Chinese aviators sitting behind the controls of big passenger jets have substantially less than the congressionally imposed 1,500 hours of minimum flight time confronting U.S. pilots.

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But such programs have failed to gain traction in this country, even though concerns about pilot shortages are prompting debate about embracing new strategies. U.S. airlines, which are only marginally profitable, spend heavily on training and retraining the aviators they already employ. Carriers, however, are reluctant to invest in training pilot candidates, given the crush of other financial obligations facing the industry. Moreover, many regulators are wary of making major extensive changes in light of record low accident rates in this country. According to acting FAA chief Michael Huerta, the agency already is working on “the most significant overhaul of crew training” since the early 1990s. U.S. regional airlines—likely to be hurt the most by pilot shortages—seem more willing to experiment. Scott Foose, senior vice president of the Regional Airline Association, told an international safety conference in Cleveland in June that in order to assure an adequate supply of pilots, “everything needs to be on the table.” O Susan Carey and Jack Nicas contributed to this article. Reprinted by permission of The Wall Street Journal, Copyright © (2012) Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All rights reserved worldwide. License number 3045481471936. For more information, contact MAE Editor Laural Hobbes at laural@kmimediagroup.com or search our online archives for related stories at www.mae-kmi.com.

MAE  7.10 | 7

Academics

Innovative research opportunities don’t have to be limited to the classroom.

Beyond the Semester

“The village has a limited supply of water College is heralded as a time for inteland electricity, and one primary school,” lectual expansion both inside and outside the explained Major Tim Moore, an engineerclassroom. At schools such as the Virginia ing professor at VMI and the leader of this Military Institute (VMI), Texas A&M and NorEWB chapter. “Sanitation is a major probwich University, professors encourage their lem, and there’s not much usable land for students to make the most of their four years growing crops or any water treatment or by pursuing a variety of research and service sewage collection.” Villagers would like reliactivities beyond the typical classroom schedable access to water in order to improve ule. Whether through collaborative research, their diet and market their crops—so for independent research, language immersion the first project, students trips, or service trips, students installed a catchment basin at these schools have a host to collect uncontaminated of possibilities for additional water and installed 2,000 linacademic enrichment. ear feet of pipe, which helps Engineers Without Borwith irrigation and provides ders (EWB), a humanitarian clean drinking water. In June engineering organization, 2012, students put the finishhas had a chapter at VMI ing touches on the irrigasince December of 2010. The tion system and installed two group’s purpose is to provide 3,000 liter water tanks and sustainable engineering soluMaj. Tim Moore one 5,000 liter water tank. tions to impoverished comStudents also conducted a munities all over the world. health survey in the town to assess the vilOn July 26, 2011, and June 10, 2012, EWB lagers’ medical needs—and a water and saniparticipants from VMI and neighboring tation assessment to determine the best way Washington and Lee University traveled to to address the improvement of water supply a small village in Bolivia called Pampoyo to and sewage collection. implement a water irrigation system. 8 | MAE 7.10

By Laural Hobbes MAE Editor

Next May, 17 students will head to Pampoyo to design and construct seven “ecolatrines” and multiple experimental solar showers. The team also plans to develop another project that will allow the northern side of the village to receive clean water. In the future, the VMI-EWB project team intends to educate villagers on operation and maintenance of the water irrigation system, eco-latrines and water supply system. “It’s hard to find opportunities in college where you are making a real-world impact. In the future, I’d like to work as a doctor in a developing country, so being a member of EWB is giving me great opportunities and training,” said Hannah Dickinson, a biology major at VMI who plans to go on her first trip in May. “A project like building water tanks in Pampoyo will completely change the villagers’ lives,” Dickinson continued. “Creating structures to bring clean water to the villagers [will eliminate] diseases they were getting from drinking contaminated water. After this trip, I think I’ll see how health care and engineering are interrelated, especially in developing countries. This is my first exposure to civil engineering, but [it will be] very www.MAE-kmi.com

interesting to see how engineering concepts can solve health problems.” Throughout the school year, Moore prepares EWB students for what they will encounter abroad. “We work on developing designs and implementing those designs,” he said. “We also run through mock construction drills and do a lot of hands on learning through meetings, seminars and classroom exercises. Students also learn about the history of the areas we visit and how to pack as well as how to culturally relate to the people of the areas in which we visit.” Already the irrigation system the students installed have impacted the villagers’ lives. “They are using the irrigation/drinking water system daily, so it is working very well. Not only have many of [the villagers] remained in Pampoyo, but their sons and daughters are starting to come back, improving the labor force within the community for farming,” Moore said. Meanwhile, Texas A&M has a chapter of another national organization—Project Go, which offers study abroad opportunities to ROTC students in critical languages

Students working with locals to build the catchment basin. [Photo courtesy of Maj. Tim Moore]

like Arabic, Chinese and Russian. “Language immersion in a foreign country is one of the best ways to bolster student language proficiency and cultural knowledge in ways that cannot be easily attained through a regular classroom environment,” said Salah Ayari, Ph.D., a professor of Arabic at Texas A&M.

“Students gain first-hand experience in the target language, gain global awareness and insights into the culture of its native speakers. Students also have an opportunity to challenge stereotypes about Americans during their homestay and daily interaction with native speakers. Last but not least, students

You helped protect our freedom. We’ll help you prepare for your future. Recognized as a Military Friendly School, Berkeley College proudly supports the GI Bill and participates in the Yellow Ribbon Program. Servicemembers may be eligible for Berkeley grants covering up to 100% of undergraduate tuition and fees remaining after federal and state grants are applied. These are just some of the benefits Berkeley offers to veterans and military students: • Fully staffed Office of Military and Veterans to support all military and veterans programs • CVET program for eligible combat veterans (cvet.com) • Veterans Resource Centers at three locations • Two active chapters of the Student Veterans Association of America • Participate in all DOD Military Tuition Assistance programs

Find out more. Contact the Office of Military and Veteran Affairs: Email VeteransAffairs@BerkeleyCollege.edu or call 800-446-5400, ext. MC1 Berkeley College has been recognized by GI Jobs and Military Advanced Education Magazine as a Military Friendly School.

BerkeleyCollege.edu/Military • Locations in New York and New Jersey. Also, Online. Berkeley College reserves the right to add, discontinue, or modify its programs and policies at any time. Modifications subsequent to the original publication of this information may not be reflected here. For the most up-to-date information, please visit BerkeleyCollege.edu.

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mothers. One day, I watched a mother of enjoy the social and cultural activities and one of the children cry over her child before the many attractions that the host country [she left]. After she left, the nurse moved the has to offer.” child from one side of the room—where they In 2012, participating students stayed kept the children with parents—to the other with host families for 10 weeks, which side where the abandoned children were, the helped them to practice and develop their ones we were allowed to handle. This was Arabic language skills and gain in-depth incredibly eye opening and helped me realize understanding of the local culture. “Prior to exactly what I was taking part in.” departure and throughout the duration of “Each of these internships allowed the program, I expect and remind students the students to gain work experience and to be flexible, open-minded and have a posidevelop their language skills. They gained tive attitude. With this mindset, students are a valuable work and culable to come up and produce tural experience that interesting research projects, and they can build upon to to cope effectively with daily life advance their careers,” and unexpected challenges,” Ayari Ayari reflected. “Building said. Students visited locations on the successful experiof significance, such as the town ence gained in the sumof Sidi Bouzid, the birthplace of mer of 2012, we plan to the Arab Spring. Students also lead another program in visited Tunisian parliament, and Tunisia in the summer interacted with elected members of 2013, which will focus charged with drafting a new conon language and culture stitution. Amy Tease learning, while allowing Formal classroom instruction students to conduct research projects about took place Monday through Friday for the the historical changes unfolding in Tunisia, duration of the program. Classes were cothe birthplace of the Arab Spring.” taught by the program leader, a faculty memAt Norwich University, additional options ber from Texas A&M University, and faculty for academic enrichment exist closer to from the Center of Languages at Sidi Boucampus. said. Students had five hours of instruction The school offers summer research per day and received one-on-one assistance opportunities in either six-week or 10-week to improve their language skills. Students increments to students from all disciplines listened to guest speakers and participated across the university. “Basically, students in workshops (music, cooking, calligraphy, who are interested in pursuing independent dance, among others) conducted by Tunisian research projects approach professors [who professors and artists. would be] good mentors,” said Amy Tease, an Student Frank Marquette of the class of English professor. “I’ve had students come to 2013 became intrigued by Arabic after Air me and just say, ‘I have the ambition to do Force ROTC informed him of the scholarthis kind of project, but I have no idea where ship opportunities open to students who to start.’” Tease then helps these students speak critical languages. “At the end of my narrow down their interests. freshman year, I changed majors so that I A student research committee composed could pick up an Arabic minor,” Marquette of six faculty members from different dissaid. “The trip to Tunisia opened my eyes to ciplines reviews the applications, due in a world I did not realize existed.” March. “[The committee] decides which Students who participated in the study projects seem most do-able [in terms of] abroad program worked on a wide variety of scope, feasibility and research method—how research projects that complemented their well has the student thought about the academic majors and personal interests. project, the resources they need, what their Among the 20 students who participated faculty mentor is willing to help them with,” in the study abroad program, four students Tease explained. Although the faculty memconducted their internship in Tunisia: two at ber and the proposed mentee decide together the Center of Language Learning and two at how their relationship will work, research is a local hospital. all student-driven. “That’s really important Rather than complete a written capstone to us, that the student articulates what they essay, Marquette opted for the internship. “[I want to study. Then, the mentor acts as the interned] at a Tunisian hospital with babies facilitator or sounding board,” said Tease. who had been abandoned at birth by their www.MAE-kmi.com

At the end of the research sessions, students share their projects at “brown bag” discussions. After the summer, students can submit their papers to academic journals that publish undergraduate work; some students present their research at conferences. For students that do lab work with faculty, co-publishing is an option. “There are opportunities for them to get [their research] out there in the world,” Tease said. As students across all disciplines apply for summer research funding, the final projects are equally diverse: History majors have done archival research in Washington, D.C.; there have been projects on computing, dystopian literature, the evolution of game playing, and biology lab work. An architecture student went to Puerto Rico and Cuba to look at the buildings there. “For the undergrads that haven’t done these things before, it’s important to me that they receive guidance in terms of where to look for research documents,” said Tease. “I point my students towards databases they should use, if there is archival work available—then they’re responsible for coming

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up with a list of resources and a plan. The biggest challenge of [writing] a proposal is making it accessible to a general audience. So that’s something that comes out in the students we select; they’re articulate about their research goals, and they can say it in language that [anyone] can understand.” Chris Bock, a junior at Norwich, opted for the six-week session. As a criminal justice major who wants to work with a federal agency at some point, he researched Mexican drug cartels and the question of whether or not they should be designated as foreign terrorist organizations. “I wanted to do something that could be applicable to the real world, so my professor and I discussed the drug cartels and the problems they’ve been causing,” Bock said. He and his professor settled on the newspapers he should use as sources, and used coding software called Atlas PI that sifts through online articles according to designated keywords. Bock used his professor’s dissertation as a research model. In March, he will present his findings at the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences in Dallas.

A biology student, Liz Chapdelaine, also participated in the summer research program. To begin her project—creating a GSTfusion protein—Chapdelaine approached a professor about the research she had done while on sabbatical. “All of my work was done in the lab working with cell cultures or performing binding studies. It was a definite learning curve because I knew little about the subject and had no practice with the majority of the lab procedures,” Chapdelaine admitted. “[My professor] taught me everything I needed to know in order to be successful with my research.” Chapdelaine was ultimately successful in creating a GSTfusion protein, her ultimate goal. By pursuing additional academic opportunities not necessarily confined to the classroom, students will bring unique insights to their next semesters—and their lives after graduation. O For more information, contact MAE Editor Laural Hobbes at lauralh@kmimediagroup.com or search our online archives for related stories at www.mae-kmi.com.

MAE  7.10 | 11

A New Career …

Becoming a nurse could fulfill a national need— and lead to a rewarding profession. By J.B. Bissell MAE Correspodent The United States of America needs more nurses. We’re just a few years away from what appears to be escalating into a medical world version of a perfect storm: An aging, retiring population of baby boomers who will need additional quality health care—at the hospital, at their doctors’ offices, at home—colliding with an aging population of nurses, many of whom also will be ready for retirement. If these two circumstances continue unchecked—and obviously nothing can be done about the former—it’s easy to predict the potential for problems down the road. In fact, the prediction has already been made. “The U.S. Department of Labor projects that by the year 2020, more than 1 million new and replacement nurses will be needed to meet the country’s health care demands,” said Jane Kirschling, DNS, RN, FAAN, and president of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. For job-hunting veterans with medical experience hoping to segue into a civilian career, this serious shortage could be viewed as a marvelous opportunity. “Given the great demand for registered nurses into the foreseeable future,” Kirschling continued, “nursing is a secure, dynamic profession that offers career seekers a wide variety of practice opportunities in all settings where health care is delivered.”

Program Capacity The ability to meet this great demand, however, will be easier said than done. According to Kirschling, in addition to the maturing population and aging workforce, one of the situation’s major hurdles is “a shortage of faculty, which is limiting the size of nursing programs.” In other words, right now there aren’t enough teachers to train the next generation of health care professionals. “Despite the critical need for nurses, nursing schools turn away qualified applicants due to a shortage of faculty members, budget constraints, insufficient clinical teaching sites, and insufficient classroom space,” explained Dr. Jean D’Meza Leuner, professor and founding dean of the University of Central Florida (UCF) College of Nursing. 12 | MAE 7.10

Stat!

This desperate state of affairs is being addressed, and leaders at some of the country’s most forward-thinking institutions are figuring out, and starting to employ, various innovative approaches to rectify the problem—and get as many enthusiastic students into the programs as possible. “We have doubled enrollment in the baccalaureate program over the past eight years by opening new programs and developing new community-based partnerships,” Leuner continued. One of the latest opportunities is UCF’s concurrent Associate of Science in nursing to Bachelor of Science in nursing curriculum, which makes it possible for qualified students to earn both degrees in a very timely fashion. They focus on associate-level coursework at one of three state colleges while simultaneously enrolling in an array of nursing classes at UCF. The huge advantage is that once students have earned their ASN degree, they’ve also already wrapped up most of their bachelor’s credits and usually just need one or two more semesters to finish their BSN. Not only are graduates then better prepared to join the workforce, but some will continue their education. As Leuner said, “Nurses with graduate degrees will be able to replenish the faculty workforce, advance nursing science, and provide the leadership to redesign health care systems and practice.”

Talent Pool Of course, sometimes addressing a specific need doesn’t take major redesigning, just a little refocusing. Most of the country’s new nurses started their career journey directly out of high school, which remains a hotbed of potential learners. “We are engaging more strategically with high school counselors to educate them about the nursing profession so that they can more effectively counsel high school students toward careers in nursing,” said Rita A. Frantz, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, Kelting Dean and professor at the University of Iowa College of Nursing. Similarly, more veterans with military medical experience are being counseled toward careers in nursing, and for good reason. “In order to pursue a baccalaureate degree, students must complete a series of prerequisite courses in the biological and social sciences,” Frantz explained. “If veterans have that type of coursework completed prior to or during their military service, they will have an easier time transitioning into a nursing program.” This detail hasn’t been lost on industry leaders, many of whom see experienced veterans as a still somewhat-untapped portion of the talent pool that can eventually help curb the country’s nursing www.MAE-kmi.com

shortage. “Serving as a medic in the military would prepare an individual well for entering a health-related profession,” said Leuner. “The skills and experience of a soldier medic or corpsman provide an excellent background for someone entering a nursing education program.” Until recently, though, a medic’s background was merely that: a background. The experience didn’t offer any tangible educational benefit for servicemen or women who hoped to become civilian nurses. Then, “last year, the Health Resources and Services Administration awarded a Jane Kirschling generous grant to the Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi College of Nursing and Health Sciences that will allow the nursing school to work with key military leadership and training staff at the Medical Education and Training Command in San Antonio to identify strategies to align enlisted health care training and nursing academic credit,” said Kirschling. If this particular program is sucDr. Jean Leuner cessful, it could serve as a model for jean.leuner@ucf.edu other institutions to set up some sort of system for awarding academic credit for enlisted training. In the meantime, Texas A&M UniversityCorpus Christi has unveiled their eLine Military Program (ELM). “That’s our major initiative for veterans,” said Dr. Bunny Forgione, the associate dean for the College of Nursing and Health Sciences. While the ELM program was designed with veterans in mind, and Rita Frantz there are a number of important rita-frantz@uiowa.edu elements to the entire package, two things stand out. First, it’s available completely online. Second, some college credit is awarded for military medical experience. As Forgione said, nobody disputes that a soldier’s experiences “can add depth and breadth to their formal education,” but the “downside is that personnel find it difficult to transfer them into college credits. So when they leave the military, they Dr. Bunny Forgione may have to start from the beginbunny.forgione@tamucc.edu ning. Although they have had these rich experiences, there is not always credentialing which could be transferred to the civilian world.” Figuring out how to make that transfer is one of the goals of ELM. For now, it’s “an individual process and depends on the type of experience and length of time of the experience for the military personnel,” www.MAE-kmi.com

Forgione said. “As an example, some corpsmen or medics may have shortened clinical hours associated with their clinical didactic courses. Fundamentals of nursing in our program requires 135 hours, but the medical military veteran may only need to do 24 hours as a verification of his or her skills.” Forgione and her colleagues certainly are leading the way when it comes to this much-needed educational system overhaul, but it should be noted that this is of national interest. “Military medics and hospital corpsmen receive extensive health care training and valuable experience while on active duty,” said a written team response for the Department of Veterans Affairs that included contributions from Karen M. Ott, Jennifer Lee, Mary Dougherty and Johnnie Guttery. “However, when they transition to civilian life, the training, skills and experience they acquired in the military do not readily convert into comparable certifications or licenses required for similar jobs in the private health care sector. “Finding ways to bridge the gaps between military training and civilian employment is a priority of the current administration,” the VA continued. “At the president’s direction, the Department of Defense established the Military Credentialing and Licensing Task Force. The Task Force, which includes representatives from the Departments of Veterans Affairs, Labor, Education, Transportation, and Health and Human Services, has focused its initial efforts on industries, such as health care, that have a need for more skilled workers and stand to benefit from military expertise and training. The Task Force members are currently working with states and

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credentialing and licensing associations to provide skilled servicemembers with more employment opportunities when they return.”

Mind Your Prerequisites

WITHeveryYOU step of the way DeVry University thanks you for your service. We are dedicated to encouraging, mentoring and championing our veteran and military students from enrollment through graduation and beyond. • YEAR-ROUND CLASSES WHEN AND WHERE YOU WANT IT Earn an associate, bachelor’s or master’s degree, or complete a graduate certificate—online, on campus, at one of our 95+ locations—days, evenings and weekends.

• SPECIAL MILITARY PRICING Special savings on tuition for U.S. military personnel serving in any of the five branches of the U.S. Armed Forces (including National Guard and Reserves) and their spouses. Grants are available for veterans.

• CAREER SERVICES Our Career Services Team offers lifetime career assistance including a team of career experts, online tools, career planning, job interviewing and resume preparation.

lp.keller.devry.edu/mae1b | 877.894.6388

Photo courtesy of U.S. Army. www.army.mil. 5/12 In New York State, DeVry University and its Keller Graduate School of Management operate as DeVry College of New York. DeVry University is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, www.ncahlc.org. Keller Graduate School of Management is included in this accreditation. DeVry University operates as DeVry Institute of Technology in Calgary, Alberta. DeVry is certified to operate by the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia. DeVry University is authorized for operation by the THEC. www.state.tn.us/thec. Nashville Campus – 3343 Perimeter Hill Dr., Nashville, TN 37211. Licensed by the Mississippi Commission on Proprietary School and College Registration, Certification No. C-498. AC0060. Program availability varies by location. ©2012 DeVry Educational Development Corp. All rights reserved.

14 | MAE 7.10

Perhaps, though, some of the most important steps to ultimate success need to be taken before the soldier returns. Iowa’s Frantz mentioned prerequisites, and they are crucial. “A bachelor’s degree in nursing typically takes four years to complete,” she said. “The first two years are devoted to prerequisite courses in the biological and social sciences, as well as liberal arts courses, and the last two years focus on the didactic and clinical courses in nursing.” Unfortunately, even veterans who take college classes during their service time might not concentrate their efforts on a particular educational track—or the correct track. The end result can be a hodgepodge of coursework that doesn’t get them very far toward an actual degree. “Strategic counseling while still in the military can help direct future students to purposeful credits,” Forgione said. That type of counseling can make a decisive difference because at schools such as Central Florida, all prerequisites and general education courses must be completed before one can be admitted into the nursing program, which is already an admittedly competitive field. In fact, Leuner sees two to three times the number of applicants than can be accepted each term. Still, well-prepared veterans and military personnel will discover that they have certain advantages. “Our College of Nursing reserves five seats per semester for military students pursuing officer candidacy through the Medical Enlisted Commissioning Program [MECP],” Leuner said. “This means current enlisted students and ROTC students at UCF will only compete against each other for those five seats, and not against the entire pool of applicants [which can be around 500 to 600 people for the largest admission cycle]. If these military students are naturally competitive in the top 115 seats, they will earn the seat on their own and do not compete for one of the five reserved seats, allowing more than five military applicants to be accepted. All MECP applicants must meet the minimum standards for admission, including a slightly higher overall GPA [3.2 instead of 3.0], but in turn are not required to compete against all applicants.” Whether nursing hopefuls are accepted at UCF, Texas A&M, Iowa, or another institution, once the more medically focused part of the program begins, students should be prepared for a rather heavy academic workload. They’ll typically “take courses that prepare them for both acute care (hospital-based) and community-based care (clinics, schools, public health),” Frantz said. “Course content covers nursing care of patients with medical and surgical problems, maternity nursing, pediatrics, mental health nursing and community nursing.” And that’s just half of the commitment. Most likely, students will “be in the classroom about two and a half days per week,” Leuner said, “and then in a clinical setting caring for clients the other two days.” The schedule may be challenging, but that difficulty is an essential element of the overall education, since a bachelor’s degree prepares graduates to function in a full professional capacity—not just as a technician—and to assume some beginning leadership positions in a career field that is primed for, and quite frankly needs, an influx of new leaders. O For more information, contact MAE Editor Laural Hobbes at laural@kmimediagroup.com or search our online archives for related stories at www.mae-kmi.com.

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CLASS NOTES

Compiled by KMI Media Group staff

New Center for Military and Veterans Education Opens Tidewater Community College (TCC) opened a new Center for Military and Veterans Education (CMVE) with a special ceremony and Veterans Day observance on November 12. The center is located on the Virginia Beach Campus of TCC in the Kempsville Building. The center will provide a centralized and comprehensive clearinghouse for academic and student support services for the 14,000plus military-related students at TCC, which accounts for more than 30 percent of the student body. The grand opening included remarks and a formal opening of the facility, along with a special flag-folding ceremony to recognize the significance of the day for veterans. “We are proud to observe Veterans Day and honor our military and their families,” said TCC President Edna Baehre-Kolovani. “And we are pleased to provide active duty military servicemembers, veterans and their families a dedicated resource to serve all of their education needs.” The CMVE will include expanded, dedicated staff and advisers specializing in the unique needs of military-related students on TCC’s campuses

and around the globe. Staff members are trained to help students with admissions needs and financial concerns, and develop a roadmap for academic success and workforce development. The center also provides counselors skilled in non-academic issues of concern to veterans and even a special lounge for military-related students. “Using research into what works in a college environment, TCC has made a significant investment into the success of military-related students,”

said Bruce Brunson, executive director of the Center for Military and Veterans Education. “Our goals are to significantly increase student retention, success, employability and future economic security for servicemembers, including active duty, reserve and National Guard members, as well as veterans and their families. The CMVE will be an outstanding model for student success among colleges and universities across the nation.” Coordinated through the new center and located on all four campuses are Veterans Administration services and VetSuccess programs. Additional Center offerings include continuing education programs, military and government contract training, Navy College Program Distance Learning Partnership and the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges program, which helps transferring students coordinate continuation of studies with schools around the country. The CMVE will also provide special faculty and staff training to help all departments better serve TCC’s military-related students.

Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation Raises $1.5 Million; Honors Wounded Marines at Scholarship Dinner In late October, the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation hosted the Chicago Dinner for the Gravely Wounded, honoring Marine and Navy Corpsmen who have been severely wounded in combat by awarding college scholarships to their children. Nearly 13,000 Marines were wounded in action while serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom; 400 have experienced major limb amputations. The Scholarship Foundation will announce over $1,500,000 in new gifts for children of the wounded at the Chicago Dinner. This year, the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation celebrated 50 years of honoring Marines by educating their children, with consistent dedication to those who are wounded in combat. Since 1962, the Scholarship Foundation has awarded nearly 30,000 scholarships valued at over $70,000,000. Nearly 2,000 students received more than $6,000,000 in vocational and postsecondary scholarships for the 2012-2013 academic year. These scholarships have a major impact on Marine families, particularly those in which a parent has been killed or wounded in combat, and make a difference at a time when the ever-increasing cost of higher education significantly outpaces the average Marine family income. Thirty severely wounded Marine families from all over the country traveled to Chicago, thanks to American Airlines’ Miles for Kids in Need program, to attend the dinner and receive scholarship awards. “The Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation is keenly aware of the struggles military families face, made all the more challenging if a parent

16 | MAE 7.10

is severely wounded in combat. By helping send the children of Marines who have debilitating physical or emotional conditions to college, the Scholarship Foundation empowers the next generation of leaders, honors their sacrifices, and strengthens America’s workforce,” said Margaret B. Davis, president and CEO of the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation. Lieutenant General John Kelly, USMC, senior military assistant to the Secretary of Defense, and future commander, U.S. Southern Command, and his wife Karen Kelly attended the Chicago dinner as guests of honor. Their son, Lieutenant Robert Kelly, was killed in 2011 during his Marine Corps service in Afghanistan. At the time, General Kelly was the most senior military leader to speak openly about losing a child in Iraq or Afghanistan. His son’s legacy of service is honored through the Scholarship Foundation’s Lt. Robert Kelly Memorial Scholarship. “We expect Marines, regardless of rank, to stand their ground and do their duty, becoming wounded or dying in the process, if that is what the mission takes,” said Kelly. “Given all they sacrifice for us, it is our duty to stand behind them and their families and provide financial and emotional support where we can. Not only does the Marine Corps Scholarship Foundation make college a reality for military children, but it connects families to a support system that can help them cope with such adversity.” Scholarship recipients prove the effectiveness of the program through their academic and professional achievements. Eighty percent of recipients graduate from four-year institutions.

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2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities Welcome to Military Advanced Education’s 2013 Guide to MilitaryFriendly Colleges & Universities. You will notice that our Guide looks quite a bit different than in years past: This year, the MAE editorial team endeavored to provide more than a list of schools and present you with a way to easily compare the nearly 300 colleges and universities that responded to our questionnaire—while taking into consideration the military-friendly characteristics most relevant to you, the prospective student. Through consultation with a panel of education service officers (ESOs) and transition officers, we created a survey through which we could measure the military-friendly policies enacted at each school. Color-coded dashboards throughout the Guide display the results of our survey. They consist of four gauges representing key categories of consideration to servicemembers, veterans, their spouses, and dependents: Support Services, Flexibility, Financial Assistance and Military Culture. It is important to note that we could only evaluate the information that was provided; each institution was responsible for disclosure. Responses to the survey questions were assigned weights to reflect their relative importance within each of the four categories, and were then totaled to determine their score for that gauge. Each dashboard gauge has a shaded background that shows the maximum potential points for that category. Against that background is a darker bar, which shows how many points that school achieved. Support Services carried the most weight in our questionnaire, followed by Flexibility, Financial Assistance and Military Culture.

Military Culture Financial ASSISTANCE FLEXIBILITY SUPPORT SERVICES

two-year colleges separately, because we believe that regardless of size or degrees granted, there are efforts that any school can make to better serve those who have served our nation. Another change for this year’s Guide is the inclusion of the results for all the schools that responded to our questionnaire. We believe that having as much data as possible will help prospective students make a well-informed decision about which school best suits their needs. In light of this, we removed the word “Top” from the Guide’s name to reflect that it is ultimately up to the student to decide which school is the best fit for them. A school with low scores may still be a good fit for a particular student based on other traits, as long as the student understands what military-friendly policies to expect there. Although we are not ranking schools in the Guide, we have recognized the schools that exhibited strong military-friendly policies with an MAE 2013 top military-friendly logo to use in their promotional materials. In meetings with your ESO, you should develop a clear picture of what qualities you want in a college or university. Another important early step is a thorough self-assessment of your capabilities, resources, needs and objectives in order to determine the characteristics you should seek in a school. This Guide is a useful tool to help with one part of a larger research process. While this year’s Guide evaluates schools based on the four categories mentioned above, other lists, such as U.S. News and World Report and The Princeton Review, also take academics and world rankings into account. Please refer to the MAE website for links to additional resources and to view our searchable database of this year’s results. Good luck to you in the next stage of your academic journey.

As in previous years, all institutions were judged based on the same criteria; we did not judge private, public, for-profit, not-for-profit, four-year, or

Military Culture • • • • • •

Is the school a signatory to the DoD MOU? Is the school a Servicemembers Opportunity College (SOC)? Does the school offer ROTC? Is there an admission advisor exclusively for military personnel? Does the school have website pages for military students? Is the school MyCAA approved?

Financial ASSISTANCE • • • • • • • • • • • •

Are active duty students offered in-state tuition? Does in-state tuition also apply to Reserve and National Guard? Are tutors offered at no cost? Is the school part of the Yellow Ribbon program? Is tuition lower than the Yellow Ribbon minimum? Are there scholarships specifically for military students? Are credit hours within the DoD approved TA limit? Does the school reduce or waive fees for military students? Does the school offer book scholarships for military students? Is there a veterans work-study program? Are there tuition discounts for military students? Are there scholarships specifically for military dependents?

Flexibility • Is there an online distance learning program? • Does the school have an office on-base to assist veterans with counseling, registration and recruiting? • Is there an online-only program?

18 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Editor, MAE lauralh@kmimediagroup.com

• • • • • • • •

Are classes held on-base? Does the school accept transfer credits from other schools? How many transfer credits does the school accept? How many credits by examination does the school accept? What is the maximum number of ACE credits accepted? What is the maximum number of DSST credits accepted? Is there an activation penalty? Is there a lenient residency requirement for military students?

Support Services • Is the faculty trained in veteran reintegration? • Is there a dedicated office for military/veterans affairs that is part of the administration? • Is there an on-campus veterans organizaton? • Is the student veteran organization a chapter of Student Veterans of America (SVA)? • Is the veterans organization officially recognized by the school? • In there an on-campus veterans center? • Is there a full-time coordinator at the veterans center? • What is the size of the veterans center staff? • In there on-campus child care? • Does the veterans center offer the following services/counseling: • Vet-to-vet mentoring? • Registration? • Financial aid? • Disability? • Career Advising?

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2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Adelphi University

Garden City, N.Y. www.adelphi.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,021 Graduate Enrollment: 2,901 Military Enrollment: 96 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

American InterContinental University

Schaumburg, Ill. www.aiuniv.edu/about-aiu/military Undergrad Enrollment: 17,400 Graduate Enrollment: 2,116 Military Enrollment: 3,850 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Albertus Magnus College New Haven, Conn. http://albertus.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,200 Graduate Enrollment: 300 Military Enrollment: 25 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

American International College

Springfield, Mass. www.aic.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,669 Graduate Enrollment: 2,533 Military Enrollment: 54 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Arcadia University

Ashworth College

Argosy University

Asnuntuck Community College

Glenside, Pa. www.arcadia.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,211 Graduate Enrollment: 1,721 Military Enrollment: 50 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Orange, Calif. www.argosy.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,242 Graduate Enrollment: 11,648 Military Enrollment: 1,935 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Norcross, Ga. http://ashworthcollege.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,563 Graduate Enrollment: 165 Military Enrollment: 1,887 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Enfield, Conn. www.acc.commnet.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,687 Military Enrollment: 114 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Aspen University Allied American University

Laguna Hills, Calif. www.allied.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,289 Military Enrollment: 2,118 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

Arkansas State University American Sentinel University

Aurora, Colo. www.americansentinel.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,563 Graduate Enrollment: 844 Military Enrollment: 503 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

American Graduate University

State University, Ark. www.astate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,818 Graduate Enrollment: 6,013 Military Enrollment: 450 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Austin Peay State University Ashford University Clinton, Iowa www.military.ashford.edu

Covina, Calif. www.agu.edu

Anne Arundel Community College Contact: Marie Sirney Admissions Advisor info@agu.edu Graduate Enrollment: 1,045 Military Enrollment: 324 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: master’s, certificates

Arnold, Md. www.aacc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,626 Military Enrollment: 988 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Denver, Colo. www.aspen.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 185 Graduate Enrollment: 1,093 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Contact: Gregory Hollister Division Vice President Strategic Partnering, DoD and VA gregory.hollister@ashford.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 153,446 Graduate Enrollment: 16,397 Military Enrollment: 28,248 Average Class Size: 20-30 Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Clarksville, Tenn. www.apsu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,020 Graduate Enrollment: 853 Military Enrollment: 553 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 20 SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 5 www.MAE-kmi.com

2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 19

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Averett University

Danville, Va. www.averett.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,907 Graduate Enrollment: 661 Military Enrollment: 331 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Baker College Online Flint, Mich. www.bakercollegeonline.com

Contact: military@baker.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 45,000 Graduate Enrollment: 1,000 Military Enrollment: 2,500 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

The Baptist College of Florida

Graceville, Fla. www.baptistcollege.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 606 Graduate Enrollment: 18 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Barry University

Miami Shores, Fla. www.barry.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,619 Graduate Enrollment: 4,451 Military Enrollment: 276 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

Barton Community College

Fort Riley, Kan.; Fort Leavenworth, Kan.; Great Bend, Kan. www.bartonccc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 31,689 Military Enrollment: 5,064 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Berkeley College New York, N.Y. www.berkeleycollege.edu

Contact: Office of Veterans Affairs veteransaffairs@berkeleycollege.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,500 Military Enrollment: 505 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Bellevue University

Bellevue, Neb. http://bellevue.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,460 Graduate Enrollment: 3,844 Military Enrollment: 1,292 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 9

Bismarck State College

Bismarck, N.D. www.bismarckstate.edu/military Undergrad Enrollment: 4,422 Military Enrollment: 450 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 3

20 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

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Blue Ridge Community College

Weyers Cave, Va. www.brcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,833 Military Enrollment: 220 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Brandman University

Irvine, Calif. www.brandman.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,569 Graduate Enrollment: 5,436 Military Enrollment: 1,718 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Boise State University

Boise, Idaho http://boisestate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,368 Graduate Enrollment: 2,296 Military Enrollment: 2,200 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Brighton College

Scottsdale, Ariz. www.brightoncollege.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 800 Military Enrollment: 50 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Bristol Community College

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Broadview University

Fall River, Mass. www.bristolcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,804 Military Enrollment: 241 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Woodbury, Minn. www.broadviewuniversity.edu

Contact: Mike Hughes mhughes@broadviewuniversity.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,902 Graduate Enrollment: 18 Military Enrollment: 162 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

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Our schools offer a range of bachelor’s and associate’s degree programs, industry-grade technology, and an atmosphere of creative collaboration, support, and guidance from experienced faculty—helping you transform your creative energy into a fulfilling career. With a focused education from an Art Institutes school, you can get the skills you need to become a creative professional. And your military benefits can help make it possible.

veterans.artinstitutes.edu

1.800.894.5793 Since The Art Institutes is comprised of several institutions, see aiprograms.info for program duration, tuition, fees, other costs, median debt, federal salary data, alumni success, and other important info. The Art Institutes is a system of over 50 schools throughout North America. Programs, credential levels, technology, and scheduling options vary by school, and employment opportunities are not guaranteed. Financial aid is available to those who qualify. Several institutions included in The Art Institutes system are campuses of South University or Argosy University. OH Registration # 04-01-1698B; AC0165, AC0080; Licensed by the Florida Commission for Independent Education, License No. 1287, 3427, 3110, 2581. Certified by SCHEV to operate in Virginia. Administrative office: 210 Sixth Avenue, 33rd Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15222. ©2012 The Art Institutes International LLC. 112912 12/12

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2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 21

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Brown Mackie College

Cincinnati, Ohio www.brownmackie.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,850 Military Enrollment: 805 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

Bryant & Stratton College, Hampton Campus Hampton, Va. www.bryantstratton.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 400 Military Enrollment: 98 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Caldwell College

Caldwell, N.J. www.caldwell.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,647 Graduate Enrollment: 606 Military Enrollment: 52 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

California Southern University

Irvine, Calif. www.calsouthern.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 200 Graduate Enrollment: 1,450 Military Enrollment: 130 Average Class Size: under 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

California State University, Stanislaus

Turlock, Calif. http://csustan.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,246 Graduate Enrollment: 1,385 Military Enrollment: 124 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Cameron University

Lawton, Okla. www.cameron.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,941 Graduate Enrollment: 522 Military Enrollment: 1,585 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Bryant & Stratton College, Richmond Campus Richmond, Va. www.bryantstratton.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,006 Military Enrollment: 61 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Bryant & Stratton College, VIRGINIA BEACH CAMPUS Virginia Beach, Va. www.bryantstratton.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 858 Military Enrollment: 132 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Burlington County College

Pemberton, N.J. www.bcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,071 Military Enrollment: 1,040 Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

California State University, San Bernardino

San Bernardino, Calif. www.csusb.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,732 Graduate Enrollment: 2,518 Military Enrollment: 304 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: master’s, doctoral, certificates

Canisius College

Buffalo, N.Y. www.canisius.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,369 Graduate Enrollment: 1,172 Military Enrollment: 92 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

Capitol College California State University, Chico

Chico, Calif. www.csuchico.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,500 Graduate Enrollment: 1,500 Military Enrollment: 335 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Laurel, Md. www.capitol-college.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 487 Graduate Enrollment: 652 Military Enrollment: 247 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Carroll College

Helena, Mont. www.carroll.edu/veteran Undergrad Enrollment: 1,467 Military Enrollment: 50 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

Carson-Newman College

Jefferson City, Tenn. www.cn.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,686 Graduate Enrollment: 284 Military Enrollment: 40 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

The Catholic University of America

Washington, D.C. www.cua.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,633 Graduate Enrollment: 3,261 Military Enrollment: 109 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Central Michigan University Global Campus Mt. Pleasant, Mich. www.cmich.edu/military

Contact: New Student Services, Enrollment Specialist cmuglobal@cmich.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,945 Graduate Enrollment: 7,126 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 24

22 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

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Central Ohio Technical College Newark, Ohio www.cotc.edu/pages/index.aspx Undergrad Enrollment: 6,923 Military Enrollment: 306 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Central Texas College Killeen, Texas www.military.ctcd.edu

Contact: ctc.info@ctcd.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 57,124 Military Enrollment: 38,279 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Chaminade University of Honolulu

Honolulu, Hawaii www.chaminade.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,300 full-time day undergraduate; 7,500 evening and online students Graduate Enrollment: 2,400 Military Enrollment: 3,700 evening and online Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Charter Oak State College

New Britain, Conn. http://charteroak.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,050 Military Enrollment: 165 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

The Citadel

Charleston, S.C. www.citadel.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,477 Graduate Enrollment: 913 Military Enrollment: 176 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

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2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 23

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

The City University of New York (CUNY)

New York, N.Y. www.cuny.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 263,000 Graduate Enrollment: 7,300 Military Enrollment: 3,000 Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

CUNY Baccalaureate for Unique and Interdisciplinary Studies New York, N.Y. www.cunyba.cuny.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 400 Military Enrollment: 15 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

City University of Seattle

Bellevue, Wash. www.cityu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,848 Graduate Enrollment: 3,008 Military Enrollment: 337 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

Clemson University

Clemson, S.C. www.clemson.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 15,836 Graduate Enrollment: 4,078 Military Enrollment: 162 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Coastal Bend College Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Clarion, Pa. www.clarion.edu/virtualcampus Undergrad Enrollment: 5,876 Graduate Enrollment: 1,115 Military Enrollment: 170 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Beeville, Texas www.coastalbend.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,412 Military Enrollment: 125 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Over 150 Flag Officers have earned a bachelor’s or master’s degree from Central Michigan University’s Global Campus; shouldn’t you? • On-site at more than 20 military locations • Online worldwide • Repeatedly designated a military friendly university by Military Advanced Education magazine

Jacksonville, N.C. www.coastalcarolina.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,551 Military Enrollment: 2,029 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Coastal Carolina University Conway, S.C. www.coastal.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,517 Graduate Enrollment: 567 Military Enrollment: 397 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

College of Lake County Military Tuition Discounted Rate Visit cmich.edu/military for details.

Get it all at CMU’s Global Campus. Call 877-268-4636 today! cmich.edu/military • CMUglobal@cmich.edu

Duluth, Minn. http://go.css.edu/veterans

Contact: Clarence Sharp, Director Transfer Admissions csharpe@css.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,877 Graduate Enrollment: 1,137 Military Enrollment: 136 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

College of William & Mary Coastal Carolina Community College

Military Friendly Military Proud

The College of St. Scholastica

Grayslake, Ill. www.clcillinois.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 18,454 Military Enrollment: 918 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Williamsburg, Va. www.wm.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,071 Graduate Enrollment: 2,129 Military Enrollment: Fall, 84; Spring, 89 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Collin College

McKinney, Texas www.collin.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 40,420 Military Enrollment: 1,443 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Colorado State UniversityGlobal Campus

Greenwood Village, Colo. www.csuglobal.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,268 Graduate Enrollment: 1,269 Military Enrollment: 900 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Central Michigan University is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. CMU is an AA/EO institution (see cmich.edu/aaeo). 34125 10/12

24 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

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Colorado STate University-Pueblo

Pueblo, Colo. www.colostate-pueblo.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 500 Graduate Enrollment: 300 Military Enrollment: 400 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Colorado Technical University

Columbia College of Missouri

Contact: James Hendrickson Vice President of Military Education militaryeducation@ctuonline.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 22,000 Graduate Enrollment: 2,000 Military Enrollment: 8,000 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Contact: Ramona McAfee Assistant Dean for Military & Federal Programs rmcafee@ccis.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 30,133 Graduate Enrollment: 1,463 Military Enrollment: 7,749 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Colorado Springs, Colo. www.coloradotech.edu/military

Columbia, Mo. www.ccis.edu

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Columbia Southern University

Orange Beach, Ala. www.columbiasouthern.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,053 Graduate Enrollment: 2,067 Military Enrollment: 5,694 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Columbus State University Columbus, Ga. www.columbusstate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,037 Graduate Enrollment: 1,270 Military Enrollment: 830 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 25

You receive it on graduation day. But it’s never handed to you. Because when it’s a degree from Columbia College, it’s a degree that demands effort and rewards hard work. That’s a notion our students at 18 campuses on military bases truly understand.

Offering Associate, Bachelor’s and Master’s Degrees. Online. On campus. Or both. (877) 999-9876 • GoForGreater.org Columbia College, a regionally accredited institution founded in 1851, is a charter member of the Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges (SOC) Consortium and a member of the SOC Degree Network System.

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• Columbia College - Ad 3Joey • 7.375” x 5.25” • gew • Colleges V1-12/6/11 2013 Guide•to4C Military-Friendly & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 25

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Community Business College

Modesto, Calif. www.communitybusinesscollege.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 112 Military Enrollment: 35 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: certificates

The Community College of Baltimore County

Baltimore, Md. http://ccbcmd.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 27,000 Military Enrollment: 1,500 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Daemen College

Amherst, N.Y. http://go.css.edu/veterans

Contact: Walter Gordon Director, Center for Veterans & Veteran Family Services wgordon@daemen.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,177 Graduate Enrollment: 851 Military Enrollment: 62 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Wesson, Miss. www.colin.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,057 Military Enrollment: 170 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Albany, Ga. www.darton.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,900 Military Enrollment: 230 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Buffalo, N.Y. www.dyc.edu/veteran

Downers Grove, Ill. http://lp.keller.devry.edu

Undergrad Enrollment: 70,158 Graduate Enrollment: 23,956 Military Enrollment: 12,817 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Quincy, Mass. www.enc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 862 Graduate Enrollment: 174 Military Enrollment: 21 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Eastern Shore Community College SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 14 Philadelphia, Pa. www.drexel.com/military Undergrad Enrollment: 15,876 Graduate Enrollment: 9,624 Military Enrollment: over 500 students Average Class Size: online only Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Melfa, Va. www.es.vccs.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 988 Military Enrollment: 44 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Eastern Washington University

Cheney, Wash. http://access.ewu.edu/veteransservices.xml

Elkins, W.Va. www.dewv.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 784 Military Enrollment: 24 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Phoenix, Ariz. www.dunlap-stone.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 500 Military Enrollment: 50 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Duquesne University Contact: Ben Randle Director, Veterans Affairs Office randleb@dyc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,012 Graduate Enrollment: 1,135 Military Enrollment: 383 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Eastern Nazarene College

Dunlap-Stone University Davis & Elkins College

D’Youville College

DeVry University

DREXEL UNIVERSITY ONLINE

Darton State College Copiah-Lincoln Community College

Support SERVICES

Pittsburgh, Pa. www.duq.edu/military

Contact: David Millet Director, Veterans Resource Center dmillet@ewu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,100 Graduate Enrollment: 1,227 Military Enrollment: 500 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Del Mar College

Corpus Christi, Texas http://delmar.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,000 Military Enrollment: 1,100 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

26 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Contact: Don Accamando Military Programs Director accamandod@duq.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 280 Graduate Enrollment: 470 Military Enrollment: 230 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

East-West University

Chicago, Ill. www.eastwest.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 791 Military Enrollment: 24 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

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2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Ecotech Institute

Aurora, Colo. http://ecotechinstitute.com Undergrad Enrollment: 391 Military Enrollment: 71 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Elmira College

Elmira, N.Y. www.elmira.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,192 Graduate Enrollment: 150 Military Enrollment: 26 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

ECPI University

Virginia Beach, Va. http://ecpi.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,700 Graduate Enrollment: 20 Military Enrollment: 2,675 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

40

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University www.erau.edu

Contact: Faith DesLauriers Director Military & Veterans Enrollment and Transitions Services (MyVETS) myvets@erau.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 24,835 Graduate Enrollment: 8,573 Military Enrollment: 16,364 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Erie Community College

Buffalo, N.Y. www.ecc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 13,583 Military Enrollment: 475 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Everest University Online

Tampa, Fla. http://everestonline.edu/admissions/ military Undergrad Enrollment: 29,703 Graduate Enrollment: 539 Military Enrollment: 1,374 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

LOI Institution Fully Accredited Troops to Teachers Ranked a National Best Buy Accepts DSST/DANTES and CLEP Exams

AWARDED 5 Consecutive

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Member Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges Easy Transfer of Credits Partnered with GoArmyEd, AU–ABC, and NCPDLP

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CCME BOOTH #210 www.fhsu.edu/virtualcollege/military 800.628.FHSU

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Undergraduate: $178.30 Graduate: $241.35 MBA: $400.00 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE��� 7.10 | 27

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Excelsior College Albany, N.Y. www.excelsior.edu

Contact: Susan Dewan Executive Director, Center for Military Education sdewan@excelsior.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 31,337 Graduate Enrollment: 1,829 Military Enrollment: 12,320 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 50

Fayetteville Technical Community College Fayetteville, N.C. www.faytechcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 15,559 Military Enrollment: 4,818 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Ferris State University

Big Rapids, Mich. http://ferris.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 13,350 Graduate Enrollment: 1,210 Military Enrollment: 469 wAccreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Fordham University New York, N.Y. www.fordham.edu/vets

Contact: Anne Treantafeles University Veterans Entry Advisor atreantafele@fordham.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,427 Graduate Enrollment: 6,762 Military Enrollment: 264 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON THE INSIDE COVER

Fort Hays State University

Hays, Kan. www.fhsu.edu/virtualcollege

Contact: Jeremy Carlton Military Success Specialist jlcarlton2@fhsu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 13,240 Graduate Enrollment: 2,465 Military Enrollment: 823 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Support SERVICES

Georgia Southern University

Statesboro, Ga. www.georgiasouthern.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,525 Graduate Enrollment: 2,687 Military Enrollment: 416 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Globe University Woodbury, Minn. www.globeuniversity.edu

Contact: Mike Hughes mhughes@globeuniversity.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,408 Graduate Enrollment: 241 Military Enrollment: 656 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Melbourne, Fla. http://fit.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,384 Graduate Enrollment: 3,596 Military Enrollment: 685 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

28 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Washington, D.C. www.graduateschool.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,100 Military Enrollment: 85 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Grand Canyon University Phoenix, Ariz. www.gcu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 43,659 Graduate Enrollment: 30,462 Military Enrollment: 9,744 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 59

Golf Academy of America San Diego, Calif. http://golfacademy.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,045 Military Enrollment: 222 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate

Franklin University

Columbus, Ohio www.franklin.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,797 Graduate Enrollment: 1,352 Military Enrollment: 1,006 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Lamoni, Iowa www.graceland.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,515 Graduate Enrollment: 903 Military Enrollment: 15 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Graduate School USA

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 27

Florida Institute of Technology

Graceland University

Grand Valley State University

Allendale, Mich. www.gvsu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 21,236 Graduate Enrollment: 3,426 Military Enrollment: 452 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Governors State University

University Park, Ill. www.govst.edu Military Enrollment: 300 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

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2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Granite State College

Concord, N.H. www.granite.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,675 Graduate Enrollment: 326 Military Enrollment: 233 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Grantham University Kansas City, Mo. www.grantham.edu

Contact: Les Hyde President of Admissions and Education Outreach admissions@grantham.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,361 Graduate Enrollment: 1,980 Military Enrollment: 12,952 Average Class Size: 10 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Hamline University

St Paul, Minn. www.hamline.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,866 Graduate Enrollment: 3,134 Military Enrollment: 115 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Hardin-Simmons University

Abilene, Texas www.hsutx.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,891 Graduate Enrollment: 467 Military Enrollment: 70 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Hawai'i Pacific University Honolulu, Hawaii www.hpu.edu/military

Contact: Celina Barrios Director of Marketing and Recruiting, Military Campus Programs cbarrios@hpu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,740 Graduate Enrollment: 1,331 Military Enrollment: 3,800 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Henley-Putnam University

Santa Clara, Calif. www.henley-putnam.edu Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Heritage Unversity

Toppenish, Wash. http://heritage.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 884 Graduate Enrollment: 329 Military Enrollment: 15 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 29

Heidelberg University

Tiffin, Ohio www.heidelberg.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,113 Graduate Enrollment: 204 Military Enrollment: 18 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

Herzing University

Birmingham, Ala. www.herzing.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,500 Graduate Enrollment: 400 Military Enrollment: 250 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

More Than Just ‘Military Friendly’ Our commitment to servicemen and women and their families runs deep at Hawai‘i Pacific University. It’s why we’re known as one of America’s leading “military-friendly” universities, recognized as such by the Council of College and Military Educators, Military Advanced Education magazine and GI Jobs, among others. But it’s more than that. It’s part of our DNA; it’s who we are. It’s why thousands of military students – many of them from the six HPU campuses on Oahu military bases – each year pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees, in the unparalleled natural environment of Hawai‘i. It’s why many thousands more alumni have put their degrees to use in the military and fields ranging from marine science to diplomacy to business administration. See for yourself why when it comes to higher education, HPU is unlike anyplace else.

Hawai‘i Pacific University (808) 687-7072 • www.hpu.edu/military www.MAE-kmi.com

2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 29

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Hofstra University

Hempstead, N.Y. www.hofstra.edu Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Illinois State University

Normal, Ill. http://illinoisstate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 18,535 Graduate Enrollment: 2,545 Military Enrollment: 431 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

Indiana Wesleyan University

Marion, Ind. www.indwes.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,161 Graduate Enrollment: 4,711 Military Enrollment: 565 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Jefferson Community and Technical College

Louisville, Ky. http://jefferson.kconn.cs.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,793 Military Enrollment: 400 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Howard Community College Columbia, Md. www.howardcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,518 Military Enrollment: 407 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Indiana State University

Terre Haute, Ind. www.indstate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,200 Graduate Enrollment: 2,200 Military Enrollment: 300 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Inver Hills Community College

Inver Grove Heights, Minn. www.inverhills.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,852 Military Enrollment: 445 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Humboldt State University Arcata, Calif. www.humboldt.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,046 Graduate Enrollment: 660 Military Enrollment: 327 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Indiana Tech

Fort Wayne, Ind. http://military.indianatech.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,436 Graduate Enrollment: 629 Military Enrollment: 391 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

ITT Technical Institutes

www.itt-tech.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 66,000 Graduate Enrollment: n/a Military Enrollment: 10,000 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Huntington College of Health Sciences

Knoxville, Tenn. www.hchs.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 202 Graduate Enrollment: 35 Military Enrollment: 10 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Huntington University

J.F. Drake State Technical College Indiana UniversityPurdue University Indianapolis

Indianapolis, Ind. www.veterans.iupui.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 20,665 Graduate Enrollment: 8,116 Military Enrollment: 1,097 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Huntington, Ind. www.huntington.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,163 Graduate Enrollment: 90 Military Enrollment: 16 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

30 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Huntsville, Ala. www.drakestate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,250 Military Enrollment: 56 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Jones International University

Centennial, Colo. www.jiumilitary.com Undergrad Enrollment: 5,281 Graduate Enrollment: 3,096 Military Enrollment: 1,300 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Kansas State University Manhattan, Kan. www.dce.k-state.edu/military

Contact: Kirk Dimond Fort Riley Coordinator goarmyed@k-state.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 19,800 Graduate Enrollment: 4,500 Military Enrollment: 2,600 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 31

Jefferson College

Hillsboro, Mo. www.jeffco.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,089 Military Enrollment: 200 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

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KaPLAN UNIVERSITY Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. www.military.kaplan.edu

Contact: militaryinfo@kaplan.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 36,080 Graduate Enrollment: 7,920 Military Enrollment: 8,032 Average Class Size: 13-22 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Keystone College

La Plume, Pa. www.keystone.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,700 Military Enrollment: 50 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Lackawanna College

Scranton, Pa. www.lackawanna.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,535 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Lamar University Kilgore College

Kilgore, Texas www.kilgore.edu/veterans.asp Undergrad Enrollment: 6,200 Military Enrollment: 250 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Beaumont, Texas www.lamar.edu Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 49

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Liberty University Lynchburg, Va. www.luonline.com/mae

Contact: luoconsulting@liberty.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 57,518 Graduate Enrollment: 38,490 Military Enrollment: 24,097 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 46

Keiser University

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. www.keiseruniversity.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 12,663 Graduate Enrollment: 422 Military Enrollment: 1,874 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Kutztown University of Pennsylvania

Kutztown, Pa. www.kutztown.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,487 Graduate Enrollment: 796 Military Enrollment: 243 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

EXPLORE YOUR OPTIONS AT K-STATE No matter where you live today or tomorrow, you can continue your education online.

Online Credit Programs • Bachelor’s Degree Completion programs • Master’s degrees • Certificate programs • Ph.D. program • Professional minors

Professional development courses in legal studies offered online Hundreds of online courses offered each term

VISIT www.military.k-state.edu or Call 1-800-622-2578 6769

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2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 31

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Limestone College

Gaffney, S.C. http://extendedcampus.limestone.edu

Contact: Donna Hudson Internet Academic Advisor eciservices@limestone.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,200 Graduate Enrollment: 700 Military Enrollment: 500 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Lindsey Wilson College

Columbia, Ky. www.lindsey.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,222 Graduate Enrollment: 411 Military Enrollment: 55 Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Madonna University

Livonia, Mich. www.madonna.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,000 Graduate Enrollment: 500 Military Enrollment: 60 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Manhattan Area Technical College

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Marshall UnivERSITY

Huntington, W.Va. www.marshall.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,056 Graduate Enrollment: 3,621 Military Enrollment: 700 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Maryland Institute College of Art

Baltimore, Md. www.mica.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,830 Graduate Enrollment: 251 Military Enrollment: 15 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Massachusetts Bay Community College

Wellesley Hills, Mass. http://massbay.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,361 Military Enrollment: 243 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Support SERVICES

McMurry University

Abilene, Texas www.mcm.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,472 Graduate Enrollment: graduate programs began in fall 2012 Military Enrollment: 206 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

Medaille College

Buffalo, N.Y. http://medaille.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,798 Graduate Enrollment: 882 Military Enrollment: 115 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Mercer County Community College

Trenton, N.J. http://mccc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,600 Military Enrollment: 450 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate

Mercy College Mayville State University Mayville, N.D. www.mayvillestate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 970 Military Enrollment: 25 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Manhattan, Kan. www.manhattantech.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,183 Military Enrollment: 119 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

32 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Dobbs Ferry, N.Y. www.mercy.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,968 Graduate Enrollment: 3,571 Military Enrollment: 268 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Methodist University

Fayetteville, N.C. www.methodist.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,280 Graduate Enrollment: 196 Military Enrollment: 486 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Metropolitan State University

St. Paul, Minn. www.metrostate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,000 Graduate Enrollment: 450 Military Enrollment: 964 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Metropolitan State University of Denver Denver, Colo. www.msudenver.edu

Contact: askmetro@msudever.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 23,578 Graduate Enrollment: 250 Military Enrollment: 14,140 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Mid-South Community College

West Memphis, Ark. www.midsouthcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,175 Military Enrollment: 50 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

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Milwaukee School of Engineering

Milwaukee, Wis. www.msoe.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,310 Graduate Enrollment: 176 Military Enrollment: 71 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Rolla, Mo. http://mst.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,672 Graduate Enrollment: 1,850 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Mitchell Technical Institute Minnesota School of Business

Mitchell, S.D. www.mitchelltech.edu

Woodbury, Minn. www.msbcollege.edu

Contact: Mike Hughes mhughes@msbcollege.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,748 Graduate Enrollment: 144 Military Enrollment: 593 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Montgomery County Community College

Blue Bell, Pa. www.mc3.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,000 Military Enrollment: 376 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

The National Graduate School of Quality Management

Falmouth, Mass. www.ngs.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 120 Graduate Enrollment: 385 Military Enrollment: 200 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Nash Community College

Rocky Mount, N.C. www.nashcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,600 Military Enrollment: 87 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Contact: questions@mitchelltech.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,103 Military Enrollment: 55 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

Monmouth University

Mississippi State University

Mississippi State, Miss. www.veterans.msstate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 16,312 Graduate Enrollment: 4,112 Military Enrollment: 2,143 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

West Long Branch, N.J. www.monmouth.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,700 Graduate Enrollment: 1,868 Military Enrollment: 71 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Call us today at (800) 755-7275. Or visit us online at www.park.edu/mae

Monroe Community College

Missouri State University Springfield, Mo. www.missouristate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,589 Graduate Enrollment: 3,256 Military Enrollment: 614 Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Webster, N.Y. www.monroecc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,699 Military Enrollment: 792 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

PARK UNIVERSITY’S close relationship with the U.S. military dates back nearly a century. The University prides itself in its long-standing partnership with the military and is recognized as one of the largest providers of online undergraduate education to the armed forces. Each year, more than half of Park’s students are either military service, veterans or family members. Park University truly recognizes the enormous contribution military personnel make to society and the sacrifices of military families.

PA R K ’ S P RO M I S E :

Serving Those Who Serve Their Community and Country with Personalized, Globally-Relevant Education for Life. Park Universityʼs degree programs are accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, a member of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools.

www.MAE-kmi.com

Since 1875.

2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 33

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Nazareth College of Rochester

New England College

Neumann University

New Jersey City University

Rochester, N.Y. www.naz.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,195 Graduate Enrollment: 980 Military Enrollment: 60 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Aston, Pa. www.neumann.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,087 Graduate Enrollment: 470 Military Enrollment: 44 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Henniker, N.H. www.nec.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,088 Graduate Enrollment: 1,400 Military Enrollment: 30 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Jersey City, N.J. www.njcu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,639 Graduate Enrollment: 1,689 Military Enrollment: 200 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

New York Chiropractic College

Seneca Falls, N.Y. www.nycc.edu Graduate Enrollment: 862 Military Enrollment: 12 Average Class Size: over 40 Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: master’s, doctoral

New York Film Academy

Los Angeles, Calif. www.nyfa.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,086 Graduate Enrollment: 235 Military Enrollment: 200 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Niagara County Community College

What you need for where you’re going

Undergraduate and Graduate Degree Programs Classroom and Online Approved for VA Benefits/GI Bill Regionally Accredited

CELEBR ATING 40 YEARS OF EDUCATING THOSE WHO SERVE OUR NATION

(888) 875-8265

saintleo.edu

Sanborn, N.Y. www.niagaracc.suny.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,177 Military Enrollment: 231 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Norfolk State University Norfolk, Va. www.nsu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,264 Graduate Enrollment: 827 Military Enrollment: 430 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Northeastern University Boston, Mass. www.northeastern.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 16,385 Graduate Enrollment: 4,202 Military Enrollment: 483 Average class size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

North Georgia College & State University

Dahlonega, Ga. www.northgeorgia.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,541 Graduate Enrollment: 526 Military Enrollment: 1,011 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Northern Virginia Community College Annandale, Va. www.nvcc.edu

Contact: Michael Johnson Director of Military Services cjohnson@nvcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 75,000 Military Enrollment: 6,800 Average Class Size: over 40 Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 52

Norwich University

Northfield, Vt. www.norwich.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,311 Graduate Enrollment: 1,104 Military Enrollment: 398 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Classes Now Forming – Call Today! Certified by SCHEV Saint Leo University admits students of any race, color, religion, and national or ethnic origin. Saint Leo University operates as a private, not-for-profit institution.

34 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

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The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio www.osu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 42,916 Graduate Enrollment: 13,776 Military Enrollment: 1,800 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Ohio Valley University

Parkersburg, W.Va. www.ovu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 488 Graduate Enrollment: 39 Military Enrollment: 8 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Old Dominion University

Norfolk, Va. http://odu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 18,965 Graduate Enrollment: 5,501 Military Enrollment: 6,250 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Oregon Institute of Technology

Klamath Falls, Ore. www.oit.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,881 Graduate Enrollment: 30 Military Enrollment: 265 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Penn State World Campus University Park, Pa. www.worldcampus.psu.edu

Contact: wdmilitary@outreach.psu.edu/military Undergrad Enrollment: 24,552 Graduate Enrollment: 13,745 Military Enrollment: 6,806 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 55 Contact: Stephen Terry Director, Military and Veteran Services stephen.terry@park.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 25,000 Graduate Enrollment: 1,200 Military Enrollment: 15,000 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

North Little Rock, Ark. www.pulaskitech.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 16,391 Military Enrollment: 996 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Locations: Falls Church, Woodbridge, Newport News, Richmond & Baltimore Stratford degree programs are designed to meet the educational needs of the Military • Accelerated programs – 15 months A.A.S. degree, additional 15 months B.S. degree, and another 15 months M.S. degree • Flexible class schedules – Day, evening, and weekend classes • Online degrees available in several programs • Five entry points per year: Jan., Mar., May, Aug., & Oct. • Career placement assistance • Free tutoring available • Veteran on staff for your assistance • Transfer credits – Transfer credits up to 75% for undergraduate and up to 50% for graduate degrees. Transfer credits are accepted from: AARTS, SMART, CCAF, ACE, DANTES, CLEP, other colleges and universities.

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Paul Smiths, N.Y. www.paulsmiths.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 955 Military Enrollment: 35 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Waterbury, Conn. www.post.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,005 Graduate Enrollment: 1,399 Military Enrollment: 3,226 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Rib

Paul Smith’s College

Post University

ow

Champaign, Ill. http://parkland.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,000 Military Enrollment: 350 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Support SERVICES

Pulaski Technical College

Parkville, Mo. www.park.edu/military

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 33

Flexibility

ll Ye

Bremerton, Wash. www.olympic.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 15,306 Military Enrollment: 1,659 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Park University

Parkland College

Olympic College

Military Culture

Stratford University is affiliated with • Service Members Opportunity College (SOC) • Concurrent Admissions Program (ConAP)

ENROLL TODAY! 855-216-5190 www.Stratford.edu *Contact Admissions for degree availability at each campus. **Disclosure statements available at www.stratford.edu/disclosures

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2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 35

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Regent University

Virginia Beach, Va. www.regent.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,374 Graduate Enrollment: 3,491 Military Enrollment: 1,108 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

RegIS UNIVERSITY

Denver, Colo. www.cps.regis.edu/military

Contact: info@regis.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,165 Graduate Enrollment: 7,476 Military Enrollment: 962 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Roger Williams University

Bristol, R.I. http://rwu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,700 Graduate Enrollment: 400 Military Enrollment: 765 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey New Brunswick, Newark and Camden, N.J. www.rutgers.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 43,386 Graduate Enrollment: 14,795 Military Enrollment: 1,877 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Saint Leo University Saint Leo, Fla. www.saintleo.edu

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 51

Rio Salado College

Tempe, Ariz. www.riosalado.edu/military/html/ default.aspx Undergrad Enrollment: 60,000 Military Enrollment: 5,000 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Rochester Institute of Technology

Rochester, N.Y. www.rit.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,750 Graduate Enrollment: 2,900 Military Enrollment: 300 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Contact: grad.admissions@saintleo.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 21,831 Graduate Enrollment: 4,856 Military Enrollment: 9,329 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 34

Saint Louis University

St. Louis, Mo. www.slu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,670 Graduate Enrollment: 5,403 Military Enrollment: 249 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

36 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Support SERVICES

Saint Martin’s University Lacey, Wash. www.stmartin.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,426 Graduate Enrollment: 374 Military Enrollment: 310 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Salve Regina University

Newport, R.I. www.salve.edu/academics/ graduatestudies Undergrad Enrollment: 2,000 Graduate Enrollment: 600 Military Enrollment: 52 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

San Diego City College

San Diego, Calif. www.sdcity.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,685 Military Enrollment: 825 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Siena Heights University

Adrian, Mich. www.sienaheights.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,262 Graduate Enrollment: 368 Military Enrollment: 83 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Southern California Institute of Technology

Anaheim, Calif. www.sciteche.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 969 Military Enrollment: 18 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: hybrid, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

Southern Illinois University

Carbondale, Ill. http://siu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 19,817 Graduate Enrollment: 4,085 Military Enrollment: 1,763 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Santa Clara University

Santa Clara, Calif. www.scu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,200 Graduate Enrollment: 3,000 Military Enrollment: 45 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Southern Illinois University Edwardsville

Edwardsville, Ill. www.siue.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,428 Graduate Enrollment: 2,807 Military Enrollment: 674 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

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online.nebraska.edu/mission Choose from 100+ academic programs from four, military-friendly campuses. Proud participant in the Yellow Ribbon Program.

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Southwestern College

Winfield, Kan. www.southwesterncollege.org Undergrad Enrollment: 2,647 Graduate Enrollment: 797 Military Enrollment: 1,631 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

St. Cloud State University

St. Cloud, Minn. www.stcloudstate.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,231 Graduate Enrollment: 1,695 Military Enrollment: 540 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

State Fair Community College

Sedalia, Mo. www.sfccmo.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,000 Military Enrollment: 1,500 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Support SERVICES

SUNY Empire State College

Saratoga, N.Y. www.esc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 18,894 Graduate Enrollment: 1,244 Military Enrollment: 1,579 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

State University of New York at Canton

Canton, N.Y. www.canton.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,825 Military Enrollment: 100 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

SUNY Maritime College

Throggs Neck, The Bronx, N.Y. www.sunymaritime.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,750 Graduate Enrollment: 150 Military Enrollment: 350 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

State University of New York at Potsdam St. Gregory’s University College for Working Adults

Tulsa, Okla. www.stgregorys.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 276 Graduate Enrollment: 45 Military Enrollment: 40 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Potsdam, N.Y. www.potsdam.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,988 Graduate Enrollment: 435 Military Enrollment: 120 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

SUNY Oswego

Oswego, N.Y. www.oswego.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,379 Graduate Enrollment: 837 Military Enrollment: 120 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Stratford University Falls Church, Va. www.stratford.edu

St. Joseph’s College

Patchogue, N.Y. www.sjcny.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,037 Graduate Enrollment: 800 Military Enrollment: 160 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Contact: military@stratford.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,200 Graduate Enrollment: 400 Military Enrollment: 355 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Syracuse University

Syracuse, N.Y. http://syr.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,671 Graduate Enrollment: 6,158 Military Enrollment: 201 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Tennessee Technological University Cookeville, Tenn. www.tntech.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,119 Graduate Enrollment: 589 Military Enrollment: 613 Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Texas A&M International University Laredo, Texas www.tamiu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,754 Graduate Enrollment: 1,812 Military Enrollment: 298 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Texas A&M University

College Station, Texas www.tamu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 39,867 Graduate Enrollment: 9,994 Military Enrollment: 566 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Texas State Technical College, West Texas

Sweetwater, Texas www.westtexas.tstc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,036 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

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38 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

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Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas http://mba.ba.ttu.edu

Contact: Elizabeth Stuart, Director Graduate Services Center mba@ttu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 26,063 Graduate Enrollment: 6,264 Military Enrollment: 1,098 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Texas Wesleyan University

Fort Worth, Texas www.txwes.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,483 Graduate Enrollment: 1,457 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional, Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral,

Thiel College

Greenville, Pa. www.thiel.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,109 Military Enrollment: 20 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Thomas Edison State College

Trident University International

United States Sports Academy

Contact: militaryeducation@tesc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 19,441 Graduate Enrollment: 1,201 Military Enrollment: 7,175 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Troy University

United States University

Trenton, N.J. www.tesc.edu/militaryinfo

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Tidewater Community College

Cypress, Calif. www.trident.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,955 Graduate Enrollment: 9,017 Military Enrollment: 15,231 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Troy, Ala. www.troy.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 20,556 Graduate Enrollment: 6,014 Military Enrollment: 4,338 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Daphne, Ala. www.ussa.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 244 Graduate Enrollment: 805 Military Enrollment: 37 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Chula Vista, Calif. http://usuniversity.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 200 Graduate Enrollment: 100 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

Norfolk, Va. www.tcc.edu/military

Contact: Center for Military and Veterans Education cmvesupport@tcc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 47,757 Military Enrollment: 7,513 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Towson University

Towson, Md. www.towson.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,517 Graduate Enrollment: 3,947 Military Enrollment: 300 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

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2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 39

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

The University of Alabama in Huntsville

Huntsville, Ala. www.uah.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,935 Graduate Enrollment: 1,694 Military Enrollment: 295 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

The University of Findlay Findlay, Ohio www.findlay.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,700 Graduate Enrollment: 1,000 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Florida University of Arkansas at Monticello

Monticello, Ark. www.uamont.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 3,800 Graduate Enrollment: 120 Military Enrollment: 107 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Gainesville, Fla. http://ufl.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 32,008 Graduate Enrollment: 12,031 Military Enrollment: 850 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

University of the Incarnate Word San Antonio, Texas www.military.uiw.edu

Contact: Luis Gonzalez Admissions Counselor eapadmission@uiwtx.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,863 Graduate Enrollment: 1,049 Military Enrollment: 1,059 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 39

The University of Iowa

University of Arkansas Fort Smith

Fort Smith, Ark. www.uafs.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,300 Military Enrollment: 360 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, certificates

University of Florida Online Master’s of Science in Pharmaceutical Outcomes & Policy Program Gainesville, Fla. http://online.cop.ufl.edu/ mspharmacyregulation Graduate Enrollment: 100 Military Enrollment: 8 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: master’s

Iowa City, Iowa www.uiowa.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 21,565 Graduate Enrollment: 9,328 Military Enrollment: 487 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Kansas

University of Management and Technology

Arlington, Va. www.umtweb.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,183 Graduate Enrollment: 745 Military Enrollment: 1,619 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Mary

Bismarck, N.D. www.umary.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,042 Graduate Enrollment: 1,126 Military Enrollment: 166 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Mary Hardin-Baylor

Belton, Texas www.umhb.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,926 Graduate Enrollment: 278 Military Enrollment: 397 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Lawrence, Kan. www.gmp.ku.edu

University of Fairfax

Vienna, Va. www.ufairfax.edu Graduate Enrollment: 60 Military Enrollment: 20 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: master’s, doctoral, certificate

University of Great Falls Great Falls, Mont. www.ugf.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,004 Graduate Enrollment: 70 Military Enrollment: 126 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

40 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Contact: Randy Masten, Assistant Director Graduate Military Programs randymasten@ku.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 19,673 Graduate Enrollment: 9,045 Military Enrollment: 396 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Massachusetts, Amherst

Amherst, Mass. www.umass.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 26,975 Graduate Enrollment: 6,088 Military Enrollment: 450 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

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2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

University of Memphis

Memphis, Tenn. www.memphis.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,966 Graduate Enrollment: 4,340 Military Enrollment: 1,034 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Ann Arbor, Mich. www.umich.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 27,407 Graduate Enrollment: 15,309 Military Enrollment: 269 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Nebraska at Omaha Omaha, Neb. www.unomaha.edu

Contact: Online Student Services online@nebraska.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,731 Graduate Enrollment: 2,698 Military Enrollment: 1,084 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 37

University of Nebraska Medical Center University of Montevallo Montevallo, Ala. www.montevallo.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,542 Graduate Enrollment: 525 Military Enrollment: 137 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

Omaha, Neb. www.unmc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,013 Graduate Enrollment: 3,177 Military Enrollment: 640 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

University of New Haven West Haven, Conn. www.newhaven.edu

Contact: Veteran Outreach veteranoutreach@newhaven.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 4,607 Graduate Enrollment: 1,778 Military Enrollment: 180 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of New Mexico Albuquerque, N.M. www.unm.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 47,774 Graduate Enrollment: 17,388 Military Enrollment: 2,301 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

University of North Alabama

Florence, Ala. http://una.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,054 Graduate Enrollment: 697 Military Enrollment: 300 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

University of North Carolina at Pembroke

Pembroke, N.C. www.uncp.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,131 Graduate Enrollment: 731 Military Enrollment: 220 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 37

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2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 41

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

University of North Carolina, Wilmington

Wilmington, N.C. www.csb.uncw.edu/gradprograms

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

University of Northern Iowa Cedar Falls, Iowa www.uni.edu

Contact: Karen Barnhill Graduate Programs Administrator barnhillk@uncw.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,099 Graduate Enrollment: 1,201 Military Enrollment: 800 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Contact: Jennifer Suchan Assistant Registrar jennifer.suchan@uni.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 11,408 Graduate Enrollment: 1,760 Military Enrollment: 236 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

University of North Dakota

The University of Oklahoma

Grand Forks, N.D. http://und.edu/military Undergrad Enrollment: 11,522 Graduate Enrollment: 3,175 Military Enrollment: 525 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of North Florida

Jacksonville, Fla. www.unf.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 14,631 Graduate Enrollment: 1,737 Military Enrollment: 767 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Norman, Okla. www.outreach.ou.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 26,000 Graduate Enrollment: 4,000 Military Enrollment: 8,350 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Phoenix www.phoenix.edu/mil

Contact: military.services@phoenix.edu Student Body Enrollment: 328,400 Military Enrollment: 50,000 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of North Texas Denton, Texas www.unt.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 28,283 Graduate Enrollment: 7,784 Military Enrollment: 1,014 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Support SERVICES

University of San Diego

San Diego, Calif. www.sandiego.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,493 Graduate Enrollment: 2,824 Military Enrollment: 465 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Southern Maine

Portland, Maine www.usm.maine.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,311 Graduate Enrollment: 1,990 Military Enrollment: 375 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

The University of Texas at BrownSvillE and Texas Southmost College Brownsville, Texas www.utb.edu

Contact: Ruth Torres Interim Program Director Veterans Resource Center veteranscenter@utb.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 22,697 Graduate Enrollment: 2,064 Military Enrollment: 529 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

The University of Texas at Dallas Richardson, Texas http://glemba.utdallas.edu

The University of Tampa

Tampa, Fla. www.ut.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,050 Graduate Enrollment: 687 Military Enrollment: 298 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Contact: glemba@utdallas.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,1760 Graduate Enrollment: 7,104 Military Enrollment: 925 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of West Florida

Pensacola, Fla. http://uwf.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,441 Graduate Enrollment: 1,779 Military Enrollment: 1,250 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 15

42 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

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2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

University of Wisconsin, Eau Claire

Eau Claire, Wis. www.uwec.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,578 Graduate Enrollment: 655 Military Enrollment: 350 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh

Oshkosh, Wis. www.uwosh.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,335 Graduate Enrollment: 164 Military Enrollment: 649 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, hybrid, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

University of WisconsinPlatteville, Online Platteville, Wis. www.gouwp.com/mae

Contact: disted@uwplatt.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 823 Graduate Enrollment: 1,113 Military Enrollment: 216 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

SEE OUR AD ON PAGE 10

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University of Wisconsin, Whitewater

Whitewater, Wis. http://uww.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 10,115 Graduate Enrollment: 1,410 Military Enrollment: 273 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Upper Iowa University

Military Culture

Financial ASSISTANCE

Vanderbilt University

Nashville, Tenn. www.vanderbilt.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,817 Graduate Enrollment: 6,019 Military Enrollment: 108 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology

Flexibility

Support SERVICES

Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Blacksburg, Va. www.vt.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 23,647 Graduate Enrollment: 5,003 Military Enrollment: 200 Average Class Size: over 40 Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Flushing, N.Y. www.vaughn.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,664 Graduate Enrollment: 14 Military Enrollment: 138 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Warner Pacific College

Logan, Utah www.usu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 25,516 Graduate Enrollment: 3,478 Military Enrollment: 475 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Vincennes University

Washington & Jefferson College

Utica College

Virginia College

Fayette, Iowa www.uiu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,252 Graduate Enrollment: 534 Military Enrollment: 1,549 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Utah State University

Utica, N.Y. www.utica.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,600 Graduate Enrollment: 750 Military Enrollment: 100 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Vincennes, Ind. www.vinu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 13,200 Military Enrollment: 1,400 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s

Birmingham, Ala. www.vcmilitary.com Undergrad Enrollment: 17,955 Graduate Enrollment: 94 Military Enrollment: 2,920 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Portland, Ore. www.warnerpacificcollege.com Undergrad Enrollment: 1,550 Graduate Enrollment: 129 Military Enrollment: 41 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Washington, Pa. www.washjeff.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 1,470 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s

Washington State University

Pullman, Wash. http://wsu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 22,763 Graduate Enrollment: 4,564 Military Enrollment: 1,026 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities | MAE  7.10 | 43

2013 GUIDE TO Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities rating categories:

Military Culture

Wayland Baptist University

Plainview, Texas www.wbu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 17,893 Graduate Enrollment: 6,824 Military Enrollment: 9,880 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

Weatherford College

Weatherford, Texas www.wc.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,433 Military Enrollment: 308 Average Class Size: 30-40 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Financial ASSISTANCE

Flexibility

West Texas A&M University

Canyon, Texas www.wtamu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 6,619 Graduate Enrollment: 1,283 Military Enrollment: 480 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Western Carolina University

Cullowhee, N.C. www.wcu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,944 Graduate Enrollment: 1,736 Military Enrollment: 337 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Support SERVICES

Western Illinois University

Macomb, Ill. www.wiu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 9,366 Graduate Enrollment: 1,057 Military Enrollment: 540 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Western Michigan University

Kalamazoo, Mich. www.wmich.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 48,476 Graduate Enrollment:14,930 Military Enrollment: 1,100 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Webster University St. Louis, Mo. http://webster.edu

West Chester University West Chester, Pa. www.wcumba.org Undergrad Enrollment: 13,000 Graduate Enrollment: 2,200 Military Enrollment: 94 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Winona, Minn. http://winona.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 8,845 Graduate Enrollment: 455 Military Enrollment: 175 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

Wiregrass Georgia Technical College

Valdosta, Ga. www.wiregrass.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 7,501 Military Enrollment: 314 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, certificates

Wright State University Western Governors University, ONLINE www.wgu.edu

Contact: Brig. Gen. Mike Callan, USAF (Ret.) Associate Vice President for Military & Governmental Programs mikecallan@webster.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,947 Graduate Enrollment: 22,144 Military Enrollment: 5,643 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral

Winona State University

Contact: Gail Iverson Veterans Affairs Lead gail.iverson@wgu.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 27,200 Graduate Enrollment: 7,800 Military Enrollment: 1,907 Average Class Size: over 45 students Accreditation: regional, specialized/ programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s

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44 | MAE 7.10 | 2013 Guide to Military-Friendly Colleges & Universities

Westfield State University

Westfield, Mass. www.westfield.ma.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 5,370 Graduate Enrollment: 700 Military Enrollment: 251 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: bachelor’s, master’s, certificates

Dayton, Ohio www.wright.edu

Contact: Amanda Watkins Assistant Director of Veteran Affairs veteransaffairs@wright.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 15,657 Graduate Enrollment: 3,943 Military Enrollment: 682 Average Class Size: 20-30 students Accreditation: national, regional, specialized/programmatic Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral, certificates

William Penn University

Oskaloosa, Iowa www.wmpenn.edu Undergrad Enrollment: 2,096 Graduate Enrollment: 270 Military Enrollment: 85 Average Class Size: less than 20 students Accreditation: regional Degrees Offered: associate, bachelor’s, master’s

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CLASS NOTES

Compiled by KMI Media Group staff

WWII Navajo Code Talker Honored with Diploma As part of university-wide Veterans Day activities, the University of Kansas College of Liberal Arts and Sciences honored the last surviving original World War II Navajo Code Talker for his service by presenting him with a diploma 60 years after he last took classes. In the spring of 1952, Marine Corps veteran Chester Nez had to abandon his studies at the University of Kansas because he had exhausted his GI Bill funding. Unable to secure enough money to complete his fine arts studies, Nez, a Navajo who grew up in New Mexico before attending boarding school in Arizona, relocated to Albuquerque, N.M., to find work and start a family. All that time, Nez was keeping a secret— one he and others would keep for more than

20 years. He was among the original 29 members of the all-Navajo 382nd Marine Platoon, now known more commonly as Code Talkers. During World War II, a total of 420 Code Talkers used a code based on the Navajo

language that was devised by the original 29 recruits. Now 91 years old and the last remaining survivor of the original 29 Code Talkers, Nez at long last received his diploma, which was presented by Dean Danny Anderson. “Chester Nez’s contributions as a Navajo Code Talker and his pursuit of a BFA degree after World War II are exceptional,” Anderson said. “The awarding of this diploma symbolizes our aspirations for our graduates to have an impact on the world and exemplifies how the talents and knowledge embodied in diverse ethnic and cultural identities, like Mr. Nez’s fluency in Navajo, are necessary for our collective prosperity. It is an honor to recognize him.”

Military Spouse Hiring Program Gains 30-plus Companies More than 30 companies and organizations joined the Military Spouse Employment Partnership on November 14 as part of the White Housesponsored Joining Forces effort to help unemployed spouses find jobs. The newly inducted businesses, which join 129 other companies, were brought into the program at the partnership’s third such ceremony. Inductees at the Washington Navy Yard event represented businesses including fitness centers, banks, a hotel chain and a major soft-drink company. The partnership’s members include small and large, local, national and international businesses, officials said. “We appreciate your patriotism and your understanding that investing in military spouses makes military families, servicemembers and national defense strong,” Charles E. Milam, acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for military community and family policy, told the new partnership members. “Statistics will show that you’ll be reaching into a rich talent pool,” Milam said. “Military spouses are well-educated; many have degrees in fields such as science, math and information technology, which create innovation in today’s global economy.” Milam added that the members’ commitment is a key component to military families’ improved quality of life. The partnership seeks to mitigate the challenges of military life by helping spouses find and maintain rewarding careers despite frequent relocations, said Frederick E. Vollrath, who is performing the duties of the assistant secretary of defense for readiness and force management. The partnership and its business members are vital to the military community because of spouses’ high unemployment rates and historically low wages, he said. Despite their hard-to-find skills and high levels of education and training, Vollrath said, military spouses “face a 26 percent unemployment rate and a 25 percent wage gap compared to their civilian counterparts.”

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And while 77 percent of military spouses—including men, and not just women, he pointed out—want or need to work, frequent relocation is often a barrier to establishing or continuing a career, Vollrath said. That inability to find and retain jobs because of relocation issues “compromises the quality of life of military families and the readiness of the military force,” he said. The military spouse is tech-savvy, adaptable and resilient, a strong leader, skilled multitasker and a team player who is mature and effective under pressure, Vollrath said. And only recently, the partnership’s business members have become a large part of a national solution to the challenges of military spouse employment, he added. Vollrath listed examples such as the Presidential Study Directive-9 report, “Strengthening Our Military Families: Meeting America’s Commitment,” which was published in January 2011 and highlighted the need for the federal government to help develop spouse career and education opportunities. “But the government can’t do this in a vacuum,” Vollrath said. So, a goal was set to increase those opportunities through public-sector jobs. “The Department of Defense looked at programs that were working well, and leveraged the successful partnerships created under the Army Spouse Employment Partnership,” he said. In June 2011, the program was expanded to add Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force spouses. In less than a year and a half, the partnership’s hiring figures have been “phenomenal,” said Vollrath, noting that more than 54,000 jobs were posted in October alone, and nearly 816,000 vacancies have been posted since June 29, 2011. Partner members have hired more than 32,000 military spouses during that time, he added. By Terri Moon Cronk American Forces Press Service

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Military Family Advocate

Q& A

Empowering Servicemembers and Their Families Through Innovative Programs Charles E. Milam Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Military Community and Family Policy Charles E. “Chuck” Milam assumed the duties of principal director for Military Community and Family Policy in March 2011. A member of the Senior Executive Service, he is responsible for policy, advocacy and oversight of all community support to service members and families including quality of life issues; family and casualty assistance; morale, welfare and recreation programs; Military OneSource and Military HOMEFRONT websites; the Department of Defense Education Activity; and the DoD’s commissary and exchange services. Milam holds a Bachelor of Science degree in business and management from the University of Maryland, a Master of Science degree in international relations from Troy State University, Ala., and a Juris Doctor degree from British-American University, Colo. He is a graduate of the Air War College, the Federal Executive Institute, and the Defense Leadership and Management Program. Milam began his career with civil service in 1980; since that time he has held several Air Staff level, major command and base-level positions in Morale, Welfare and Recreation, Services and Installation and Logistics organizations. His assignments have included Pirmasens and Zweibrucken Army posts, Lindsey Air Station and Ramstein Air Base, all located in Germany; Langley Air Force Base, Va.; Vance Air Force Base, Okla.; Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.; Bolling Air Force Base, Washington, D.C.; the Pentagon; and the U.S. Air Force Academy and Headquarters Air Force Space Command. Milam also served as the Air Force’s representative on the U.S. Olympic Committee Board of Directors from July 1998 through November 2003 and was most recently the Air Force’s adviser to the U.S. Olympic Committee. Prior to his current assignment in Military Community and Family Policy, Milam was director, Air Force Services, Headquarters Air Force. Milam is a two-time recipient of the Air Force Services Senior Civilian Manager of the Year award. Other awards and honors include the Exemplary Civilian Service Award, Meritorious Civilian Service Award (seven awards) and the Armed Forces Recreation Society Executive Fellow Award. Q: Can you please describe your primary responsibilities as the acting deputy assistant secretary of defense for military community and family policy? A: The office is responsible for policies and programs that support and empower military members and their families to remain strong and resilient. This very broad portfolio includes quality of life programs; family centers and children and youth support; casualty and mortuary affairs; Morale, Welfare and Recreation [MWR]; non-medical counseling; the Military OneSource website and call center; the Defense www.MAE-kmi.com

Department’s commissary and exchange services; and, of course, voluntary education. Q: In your opinion, what are the most pressing issues facing the military community today? A: Of the many issues that we are addressing today, I would have to say that support to and for deployed servicemembers and their families remains a very high priority. Our servicemembers and their families are strong and resilient. We need to build on those strengths to empower and sustain them throughout deployment and to facilitate successful transition back, either to civilian life at the end of their service agreement or retirement, or to their next duty station. It may seem to be a bit cliché, but it is true that when a servicemember deploys, the whole family deploys. And in many hometowns across the country, the entire community deploys. Our obligation is multiphased and multi-faceted—throughout the entire deployment cycle. One special area of concern that has arisen is the overall health and wellness of our military community. Today, Americans have access to higher calorie foods, and a more sedentary lifestyle has contributed to a nationwide obesity epidemic. This epidemic has national security implications because today, more than 25 percent of potential new recruits can’t meet weight standards. And experts expect that number to grow. Moreover, despite the very physical nature of military service where ‘fit to fight’ is a mantra, over time, more than half our servicemembers MAE  7.10 | 47

become overweight. Additionally, smoking rates are the highest among servicemembers compared to the U.S. population. In fact, these national health trends drew the attention and concern of the White House, and in 2010, the president rolled out his National Prevention Strategy to begin to address them to help make us a more fit nation. Clearly, we in DoD need to make some of our own changes in alignment with the strategy if we are to preserve and promote a fit and healthy force. I believe that Military Community and Family Policy is a good fit for this type of endeavor. We have partnerships that improve the access to fitness centers for military and their families, whether they live on an installation or far from one. The Military OneSource website and call center, www.miltaryonesource.mil [800-342-9647], offers health coaching for adults and teens to help with weight management and to meet their overall health goals. And my office is responsible for resale policy in the military exchanges and the commissary system. Currently, we are collaborating with the military services, other DoD directorates, government partners and subject-matter experts to develop prevention strategies. This ‘healthy base initiative’ is a work in progress. Our intent is to focus on improving nutrition, increase physical activity and decrease tobacco use. While there is still a lot of work to be done and much that has to be mapped out, we are very excited about this initiative and the positive potential it has for servicemembers, their families and the nation. Q: How has your background and experience helped inform the decisions you make in your current position?

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A: Over the past 30 years, I’ve had the opportunity to see support programs grow and change to meet the needs of a changing demographic. When I began my career, most servicemembers were single and those with families lived on the military installation—in fact, about 70 percent of the active force lived on base back then. For that reason, support programs were provided closest to the customer—within the confines of that installation. And it worked fairly well, but there were challenges. Today, the numbers are reversed—70 percent of the active force lives off the installation in local communities (on average about 20-30 miles away), so our model for program delivery has to evolve and change to meet our military and their families where they are living. Additionally, 30 years ago, many programs that are now embedded in the quality of life portfolio were run by volunteers and varied greatly from one installation to another. Child care services, for example, were often staffed by volunteers in facilities designed for use by adults. Today—and for the past 10-plus years—our military child development centers have served as a model for the nation. Quality, affordable, accessible child care contributes to the quality of life for servicemembers and their families. For many, access to child care is the linchpin to our military spouse career and employment strides. I’ve also had many opportunities to support programs at large and small installations here in the U.S. and overseas. I saw our many MWR programs enrich the lives of servicemembers and families. Learning how to ski in the Alps—priceless. Volksmarching—a great stress release. A hike and campfire with the Boy Scouts—memories in the making. Arts and crafts—honing a new skill. Voluntary education— personal and professional growth. A weekend on an outdoor recreation adventure, once again, priceless! Supporting these programs was an invaluable experience when I worked at the military service level and now at OSD [Office of the Secretary of Defense]. I understand how a top-level decision can impact customers and those responsible for delivering services at sites across the globe. I take that information and experience into consideration every day when making policy decisions. And I’ve also been a military spouse who experienced the sometime-single parent role that comes with a deployment. I know firsthand just how important it is to stay connected despite miles and months of family separation. The Internet cafes at our MWR sites around the world, support for stay-behind families, school staff that are tuned into the fact that Mom—or Dad—are deployed, all help children and families weather, grow through, and grow from the challenges of military deployments. Q: What support programs have you been most encouraged by in recent years? A: I would have to say that what I find to be most encouraging is the changing relationship between DoD and subject-matter experts in the government and the private sector. It wasn’t that long ago that the DoD and the military services looked only within themselves for solutions to challenges. While there is a wealth of resources internal to DoD, there is an incredible and diverse wealth of talent and resources in the communities and sectors across America—where the majority of our servicemembers and their families live. We can’t do it alone, and we shouldn’t. For example, Sesame Workshop’s “Talk, Listen, Connect” DVD series helps military families and communities adjust to the changes and challenges of military life. The Armed Forces YMCA provides programs that bring families closer together while at home and especially during deployment. The National Military Family Association’s Operation Purple provides unique summer camping opportunities for children www.MAE-kmi.com

with deployed parents. Blue Star Families’ Blue Star Museums and Blue Star Theaters programs offer free admission to museums and free or reduced admission to community theaters for all military personnel and their families to allow for fun family time and much needed respite. We’ve also benefitted from unprecedented support at the federal level. In 2011, the presidential study directive-9, Strengthening Our Military Families: Meeting America’s Commitment, highlighted the need for a whole-of-government approach to helping the military community. It directed inter-agency collaboration and cooperation. Another effort, Joining Forces, is a comprehensive national initiative championed by First Lady Michelle Obama and Dr. Jill Biden. The goal of Joining Forces is to mobilize all sectors of society to give servicemembers and their families the opportunities and support they have earned. The initiative has created greater connections between the American public and the military. In this ongoing effort, they’re highlighting issues that are of special importance to the military families they have met with across the country, including the areas of employment, education, and wellness. Q: Could you speak more about career advancement programs, such the Spouse Education and Career Opportunities [SECO] program and the Military Spouse Employment Partnership [MSEP], and how they contribute to enhanced quality of life for military families? A: The SECO program delivers a comprehensive and career solution for military spouses who are pursuing education, training, licenses,

credentials, jobs and sustainable, portable careers. There are four components to the program. The first, Career Exploration, includes career assessments, interest and skills inventories, portable career statistics and earning potential metrics. In the second component, Education and Training, spouses work with SECO consultants to create a plan of action that considers financial aid options, education and training resources, credentialing and licensing information, and for eligible spouses the Military Spouse Career Advancement Accounts program known as MyCAA. In the third component, Employment Readiness, spouses work with SECO counselors to perfect their resumes and hone interviewing skills. The consultants also cover job search techniques, relocation planning and flex-work options. In the fourth component, Career Connections, the SECO consultants help spouses find the right fit through existing resources like USAJobs, CareerOneStop and MSEP. MSEP is yet one more example of important collaboration with experts in the private sector. The partnership is a targeted recruitment and employment solution that connects employers and military spouses—a large and often overlooked body of workers who are diverse, well-educated, talented, exceptionally capable, dedicated and motivated. Through ongoing outreach to corporations, small businesses and other organizations, the DoD is able to expand the network of potential employers of military spouses. The program growth has been amazing. Only 18 months have passed since the first partner induction ceremony in June 2011. Since then, 161 partner companies have posted more than 815,000 job openings resulting in more than 32,000 hires.

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The support from business and industry is important to military families. More than two-thirds of military spouses report that they want or need to work. They tend to be better educated than their civilian counterparts: 84 percent have some college, 25 percent have baccalaureate degrees and 10 percent have advanced degrees. Yet, military spouses face a 26 percent unemployment rate and have a 25 percent wage gap when compared to that same civilian counterpart group. The inability of military spouses to obtain and retain fulfilling employment and careers as they relocate with the military compromises the quality of life of military families and the readiness of the military force. Just this past November, 32 additional partners were inducted into the partnership. The partner membership now includes companies ranging from local, small businesses to national and international corporations, some professional associations, and others that are networks of independent contractors providing services such as child and elder care, personal assistance, pet care and temporary work. These diverse organizations provide a full array of talent and resources that serve our military families. Here at DoD, we know how amazing our military spouses are and the positive attributes they bring to any workplace. They are tech-savvy, adaptable and resilient. They are dedicated, possess a can-do attitude and persevere when the going gets tough. Consequently, it’s exciting and inspiring to see military spouses find and maintain rewarding careers despite frequent relocation. We also believe that military spouses deserve an equal opportunity to pursue their career goals and should not be sidelined by the financial

or administrative burdens of applying for a new license every time they move across state lines. We are addressing this issue with state governments to ensure military spouses can pursue their careers regardless of the number of times they have to relocate. Currently 27 states have passed legislation that will improve the portability of getting a professional license. As a result, 82 percent of our military spouses benefit from this licensure legislation. Our Defense State Liaison Office will continue to pursue this with the remaining states. Q: How have you assisted in the health, wellness and fitness initiatives the services are implementing? How would you like to see these programs develop? A: The DoD takes the health and wellness of the military community very seriously, and the military services have been quite proactive in launching initiatives in support of this. The Military Community and Family Policy Office of Strategy and Innovation is working with MWR counterparts in the services to learn more about their programs and identify those best practices that can be applied across all the military services. For example, the Air Force Food Transformation initiative has proven that offering healthy alternatives in dining facilities and other on-base establishments can be very popular with troops and family members and cost-effective as well. The Army’s Soldier Fueling Initiative developed nutrition standards at Army basic training bases, which is designed to reduce injuries, lost training days, and attrition due to physical problems stemming from inadequate calcium, iron

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and other nutrients. The Navy Operational Fitness and Fueling Series is designed to provide a world-class performance training resource for sailors and uses the latest sports science resulting in safer training while yielding positive human performance outcomes. The Marine Corps Semper Fit concept offers Marines an excellent opportunity for self-improvement through fitness facilities, a health promotions program, and many others. Again, there is great, innovative work already going on out there—our office is looking to identify the best of the best in order to reduce costs and improve the health and wellness of the entire military community. Q: What have been some of the most significant lessons you’ve learned since assuming your position? A: At the policy level, especially at OSD, one has to stay plugged in to what’s going on outside the Pentagon to ensure the policies and programs designed to support and empower our customers—our troops and families—are doing just that. This requires close collaboration with the military service secretaries and taking advantage of opportunities to get out into the field to meet with troops and families and hear what they have to say. And especially in today’s fiscal environment, the DoD needs to make sure that any family support program has metrics and measures of effectiveness built-in at the start in order for that program to survive. Finally, DoD cannot support and empower troops and families alone; closer collaboration and cooperation with multiple sectors—other dederal agencies, non-profits,

and state and local groups to name a few—will be critical as we push further into the 21st century. Q: What do you think more servicemembers should know about policies benefitting military families and education? A: I would want servicemembers and their families to know that DoD is absolutely committed to ensuring its policies involving family support and quality of life are as effective and applicable as possible to ensure that their needs are met and that they have the tools necessary to not just survive, but thrive. I strongly encourage all troops and families to take advantage of military family support programs—they exist for their benefit, and reaching out for help is actually a sign of strength. I would also like them to know that we recognize their incredible commitment and contributions to this nation, and we are thankful that they are helping keep our military strong. Q: Any closing thoughts? A: There is another saying in the family support business that Military Community and Family Policy also subscribes to: “Families Also Serve.” Our military families have served admirably throughout over 10 years of war, and DoD is committed to keeping faith with them as we move forward to face new challenges in our global environment that will require our men and women in uniform to go into harm’s way. O

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Supporting the Distance Learning Student

By Kelly Fodel MAE Correspondent

Online institutions enlist innovative methods to give their students the support they need. As servicemembers work to earn their degrees, one of the biggest challenges is choosing a school—and location figures predominantly into this choice. Thanks to relocation, tours of duty and other demands, the servicemember is often challenged with trying to complete his or her degree from a variety of locations. That’s why online or distance learning is so appealing to the military student: If you have access to the internet and a computer, you can log in to your classroom from any spot around the world. “Distance education can be advantageous over the traditional on-campus learning route, as it is a means to provide accessible teaching or learning, anytime and anywhere,” said Diane Johnson, Ed.D., assistant director, faculty services at Saint Leo University’s Center for Online Learning. “This is especially advantageous for military students who do not need to interrupt their education due to deployment or relocation. It is also advantageous for adult learners, who require relevant learning www.MAE-kmi.com

offered by traditional universities, allowing where they can use their experience within students to take and earn collective credit a community of learners.” for classes across varied disciplines,” said “Online learning students come from George Vukovich, associate vice president all walks of life because distance educaof Strategic Relations-Veterans, American tion is a flexible, convenient option,” said Military University (AMU). “Because of the Cheryl Hayek, Ph.D., deputy provost and low overhead, online universities like AMU vice president of faculty and student expetypically offer more classes in niche areas rience at Grantham University. “Students than would be practical at a balancing work and famtraditional university.” ily may not have time to While location and cost sit in the classroom and are appealing to the military listen to a lecture. But student, there can be chalwith online learning, they lenges in tackling the discan study and attend class tance learning classroom. when it is convenient for It is imperative that schools their schedule, whether in offer proper support to stuthe morning, on a lunch dents to ensure the best break or after their chillearning environment and dren’s bedtime.” Diane Johnson the ultimate success of the In addition to more student. Of course, reaching accessible learning, cost diane.johnson@saintleo.edu out and asking for assistance, is often another benefit to or taking advantage of support services, is the distance learning classroom. “Online up to the student and is a matter of perdegree programs tend to be more affordable sonal responsibility. and flexible than comparable programs MAE  7.10 | 53

“We provide a wide range of resources to support our students worldwide,” said John D. Mills, M.S., advising program coordinator, Penn State World Campus. “These include online tutoring, career counseling, library services and online study modules to improve or refresh study skills. In addition, we host webinars, online chats and live webstreams on a variety of topics, including orientation, financial aid, career issues and understanding the requirements of specific majors. Our technical support team also has considerable experience in handling the challenges and tech issues encountered by online learners.” At Central Michigan University’s (CMU’s) Global Campus, academic support is available to students taking classes online in a variety of ways. Instructors are available via live chat, email and phone to answer questions. Math assistance tutoring is provided via phone, email and a live chatroom complete with camera to see math problems being solved. Writing support is provided via email: Papers are electronically submitted, then critiqued and returned to the student

face and have a veteran’s office or veteran’s electronically for polishing. CMU’s nationally resource center to assist with admissions recognized Global Campus Library Services issues. “Our dedicated team of advisers [at are available online, via email, phone and Penn State World Campus] works with our live chat to provide books, journal articles, military and veteran students to ensure and help with research. In addition, the CMU that they get connected Help Desk provides technical to the right resources for support to students seven days the help they need,” said a week via phone, email, and Mills. “These advisers have live remote sessions to help extensive experience in students with troubleshooting working with military stusoftware issues and within the dents all over the world and eLearning environment. help them with things like At AMU, the student advistuition assistance, earning ing department is available credit through alternative to help students with their means, such as CLEP and studying and time manageDSST exams, and transferment habits and academic Cheryl Hayek ring credits. All of our proscheduling. Students may chayek@grantham.edu grams are Yellow Ribbon contact their adviser by email and GI Bill-approved by the or visit the student advising Department of Veterans Affairs.” and resource center for help. They also According to AMU’s Vukovich, “Given have access to tutoring from strategically our focus on serving military and veteran located education coordinators positioned communities, we focus on their unique in numerous locations across the country. needs through relevant curriculum, recogMany schools are particularly attuned nition of appropriate military schools for to the challenges that military students

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assessment test, practice their interviewacademic credit, and assisting them with ing skills, participate in career webinars their career search and advancement, to and access Penn State’s extensive career include assistance in translating military research resources. experience into skills and accomplishments “From day one at Saint Leo University, with applicability to civilian employers and our military students have 24/7 access to a job opportunities. Through our Student full range of career services including: online Veterans of America chapter, we respond modules covering career diligently to and post useful exploration, interviewing, information for our student networking and resume veterans who have signed on writing. Students also have to our Facebook account. We access to career assessment also provide timely responses tools, resources for internto veteran student inquiries ship opportunities, detailed from our admissions team, job search information, instudent advisers, and Student depth graduate and profes& Career Services. … We also sional school profiles as well operate within the boundaras free resume builder softies of Executive Order 13607 George Vukovich ware,” said Johnson. [President Obama’s order Supporting the military that establishes principles of student doesn’t end with excellence for academic instigraduation. Many schools tutions that service serviceoffer alumni services, which members, veterans and their include career assistance, families] and provide approhelp with resume building, priate refunds or extensions mock interviews and career as required by students who fairs. Grantham University’s have valid reasons to warrant career services department them.” provides one-on-one career Schools that provide dissearch assistance. “Services tance learning work to proJohn Mills include targeted employvide new ways to support ment research, assistance students and improve interacjdm363@psu.edu with professional branding, tion with the instructors and help with creating custom other students. “All students resumes, cover letters and in online courses are encourportfolios, and interview aged to interact and connect preparation,” said Hayek. with their classmates,” said “Through Grantham PathMarnie Roestel, the manager ways, the university’s virof CMU Online, CMU Global tual career portal, students Campus. “A typical CMU and alumni can learn about online class begins with a the over 280 employers getting-to-know-you exercise participating in the portal to initiate interaction. DisMarnie Roestel and search and apply for cussion boards are heavily open positions. Because utilized to share ideas and [we] serve a large population of serviceprovide thought-provoking dialogue. Stumembers and veterans, the career services dents are informed that they should expect department has made it a mission to help to have their beliefs challenged so they may employers with their own veteran and entertain new ideas. While not necessarily servicemember hiring initiatives through a part of all online classes, group assignwebinar workshops like Veterans Thursday. ments are used to allow students to col[These] webinars are held bi-weekly and laborate and engage in projects.” focus on creating, developing and mainAs for career services, Penn State World taining veteran recruitment and retention Campus offers a wide range, including a strategies.” dedicated career counselor. World CamDistance learning schools also offer pus undergraduate and graduate students a variety of online study resources. AMU can schedule an appointment to talk to supports its onlinelearningtips.com and the counselor and develop a personalized onlinecareertips.com websites, and students career plan. Students also can take a career www.MAE-kmi.com

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• Top national ranking among military colleges for undergraduate and graduate studies • Flexible solutions designed for military personnel and their spouses • Easy credit transfer; credits awarded for military training To learn more call 1.877.319.2791 visit www.tesc.edu/militaryinfo or e-mail militaryeducation@tesc.edu Accredited by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools.

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can also consult online librarians and access the online library from any online classroom. Students can identify other students in their area to plan a study group, and can meet other students on Facebook, Twitter and the Online Learning Forum. The academic library in Charles Town, W.Va., is open to all students. At CMU, the Global Campus Library Services (GCLS) collections contain more than 1,000,000 books and other print items, 50,000 electronic books, 15,000 multimedia items, 125 electronic periodical article databases, and electronic access to the full-text content of more than 30,000 journals. Penn State World Campus students have access to iStudy tutorials at http:// istudy.psu.edu, which are designed to advance students’ knowledge and skills in areas that can promote overall academic achievement, such as studying, communicating and career planning. Students can use iStudy tutorials to prepare for academic achievement, improve communication skills and advance skills in career planning. Students also can use the “discussion forum” in the course site Angel to find other students who can answer questions for them or set up a study group with classmates using the Angel chat feature or Skype. Saint Leo students have the opportunity to connect with other students outside the e-classroom through avenues such as iRoar, a social network which complements the classroom experience by providing additional opportunities for students to connect. For their tutoring needs, Saint Leo students can use Smarthinking, a tutorial service available at all times, for improvement of their writing and math skills. AMU offers all students access to a student adviser, mentor and tutor.com, an award-winning online homework service that connects students to a certified tutor for one-on-one help. CMU makes tutoring available to students via email, phone and a live chat room with a webcam so they can watch the tutor work through problems. Students who submit drafts of papers through email receive suggestions and critiques from staff. At Grantham University, the Student Advising and Learning Center offers extra support in the form of one-on-one tutoring sessions, which are enhanced by web tools that allow virtual face-to-face tutoring sessions. Tutoring sessions for Penn State World Campus students take place in Elluminate, a web collaboration tool with a built-in

chat feature and headset-microphone communication capabilities. Students make an appointment through their online appointment scheduler, “show up” at the appointed time to the session, and use chat to correspond with the tutor. Students are also encouraged to evaluate the tutoring process, using online surveys to submit feedback. Sometimes a military student faces issues that are unique to their jobs. Many schools that have experience working with servicemembers are happy to accommodate. At AMU, “there is a ‘program hold’ option for students meeting certain deployment or AD/ TDY criteria,” said Vukovich. “This program will allow up to a 12-month extension of the course with no penalty. The readmission policy allows students who withdraw for military reasons to re-enroll in prior program or courses with no penalty. The school maintains a disability services accommodations office under the purview of the registrar, and also has a university chaplain for PTSD-impacted and other students seeking counseling or spiritual guidance.” “CMU has served military students for over 40 years through a wide variety of contingencies, deployments, and the war on terror,” said Jim Broestl, assistant director of marketing, CMU Global Campus. “In that time, over 155 admirals and generals have earned their degrees from CMU. We make every effort to work with our military students on a case-by-case basis to ensure that they have every opportunity to complete courses and continue their education when called to active duty or deployed. If feasible, students may continue their education through online courses worldwide. If this is not possible and they must withdraw from classes, they receive a full refund. For deployed students who are unable to complete their degree within the seven-year limit, military deployment may be considered as an extenuating circumstance.” While choosing the distance learning option might seem like a lonely way to pursue a degree, schools today prove that the experience doesn’t need to feel like that. By picking the right school and taking advantage of its support services, you can share in the experiences and viewpoints of classmates across the country and around the world. O For more information, contact MAE Editor Laural Hobbes at lauralh@kmimediagroup.com or search our online archives for related stories at www.mae-kmi.com.

www.MAE-kmi.com

CCME GRAPEVINE

Who, What, Where, Why and How? CCME and the 2013 Annual Professional Development Symposium By Joycelyn Groot Who? The Council of College and Military Educators (CCME) had its beginning in California. A group of education services officers (ESOs) gathered in the early 1970s to exchange ideas on how to best serve the needs of military personnel who desired a college education. From this early beginning, it was decided that they would meet annually in February. They further decided that educational institutions providing education for the military, both on and off base, should be invited to send a representative to the symposiums. It was in 1973 when the first annual symposium of the California Community Colleges and Military Educators Association was held. The organization was renamed CCME to more accurately reflect the membership and its role in military education. CCME’s scope has become worldwide. CCME’s all-voluntary board is comprised of leaders in higher education with liaison representation from the Department of Defense, the armed services, Servicemembers Opportunity Colleges, the National Association of Institutions for Military Education Services, and the Associations of College and Military Educators. CCME is an organization that includes strong membership from higher education institutions that have experience serving the military and those wishing to continually improve their programs and services for the military. Membership is made up of dynamic and diverse institutions from the public, private and for-profit sectors providing education and training leading to careers, degrees, certificates, licenses and other professional and academic growth opportunities. Some are nationally accredited, regionally accredited, or professionally licensed. Courses and programs are delivered on campuses, military installations and through many forms of distance learning modalities. CCME’s membership is also represented by organizations and businesses that provide tools, resources, supplies and services in support of the unique needs of the military community. www.MAE-kmi.com

What? CCME’s mission is to promote educational programs and services to support the unique needs of servicemembers, veterans and their families, and to facilitate communication between the membership and the DoD educational support network. Where? CCME holds an annual symposium at various locations nationwide to facilitate the exchange of information and delivery of professional development training that is both relevant and extremely valuable to advisors, ESOs, transition counselors, faculty, administrators and community leaders who have a role in supporting the educational, career and other professional goals of our servicemembers, veterans and their families. On February 25-28, 2013, CCME will celebrate its 40th annual symposium at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront. Why? The annual symposium is a premier professional development opportunity for the military education and training community. CCME is the only organization whose sole purpose is to engage the various constituencies that seek to create, enhance and deliver education and support services that meet the needs of the military community. It’s an opportunity to partake in relevant training, share best practices, learn about new or changing government regulations, participate in presentations, and engage in discussions. It’s an environment intended to bridge knowledge and skills gaps to enhance our ability to serve our nation's heroes. How? Engage in this collaborative training and “Build Bridges for Success in Education for the Military Community.” Be an advocate of CCME and understand the value this training opportunity will provide your service branch, institution, organization, employees, and most importantly, our military and veterans.

Please visit www.ccmeonline.org for membership, registration, hotel reservations and to peruse the agenda. Every session and presentation has specific learning outcomes relevant to careers and performance responsibilities in the areas of education and transition. Attendees will participate in presentations from DoD, Veterans Affairs, education service chiefs, Consumer Affairs, leaders in higher education; undergo training in areas such as counseling, human resources, disability services in higher education, and veterans services; and engage in discussions with colleagues. Wednesday will be open to servicemembers, veterans and their families. Not only does this provide a great opportunity for career and educational exploration, but also access to general session presentations about veteran entrepreneurship and the Veterans Opportunity to Work Act, and breakout sessions covering a wide array of topics related to this year's theme. Also on Wednesday, the National Board of Certified Counselors will host a professional development institute specifically designed for military and academic counselors. Budgets are tight and funding for travel may be limited. Attending CCME’s 2013 Professional Development Symposium is a wise investment. Not only will the training and networking provide value, but the venue in San Diego provides an opportunity to engage in a community that is home to a very large military and veteran population. O

Joycelyn Groot

Joycelyn Groot is the president of CCME. MAE  7.10 | 57

MONEY TALKS

Compiled by KMI Media Group staff

The American Freedom Foundation and Kaplan University Team Up for 2013 Military Scholarship Program The American Freedom Foundation and Kaplan University, a leader in higher education innovation, have once again teamed up to form the Kaplan University/American Freedom Foundation scholarship program for the spouses and dependents of active-duty, National Guard, and Reserve servicemembers. The scholarship program offers a full scholarship and up to 50 partial scholarships that will cover 55 percent of tuition costs, for

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military spouses and dependents who pursue an online associates or bachelor’s degree at Kaplan University. Applicants must have a grade point average of at least 3.75 to be eligible for the full scholarship, and minimum of a 3.0 grade point average to qualify for a partial scholarship. The application window is open until February 1, 2013. Interested applicants can visit www.americanfreedomfoundation.org

U.S. Army Women’s Foundation Legacy Scholarships

The U.S. Army Women’s Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization headquartered in Fort Lee, Va. The mission of the foundation is to recognize and honor the service of women in the Army and to support the Army Women’s Museum at Fort Lee. The Foundation Legacy Scholarship program recognizes the importance of education and helping recipients to achieve their educational goals. The Legacy Scholarship program offers financial support toward community college coursework and undergraduate degrees to Army women and their lineal descendants. Scholarships are based on merit, academic potential, community service and need. The Legacy Scholarships are available for tuition assistance at the community college level or four year academic institutions. At this time, scholarships for graduate work and/or an additional undergraduate degree are not part of the program. Community College/Certificate Program Legacy Scholarships will be awarded up to $1,000. College/University Legacy Scholarships will be awarded up to $2,500. Eligibility

1. Applicant must be a woman who has served or is serving honorably in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve, Army National Guard or the child of a woman who served honorably in the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve or Army National Guard. 2. Community College/Certificate Program Legacy Scholarships: Applicant must be a high school graduate or GED equivalency with a GPA of at least 2.5 and enrolled in an accredited community college or institution no later than fall of session 2013. Or

1. College/University Legacy Scholarships: Applicant must be currently enrolled at an accredited college or university, have academic credits by summer session of 2013 for junior or senior standing and have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better. Awards

Selection of the Legacy Scholarship recipient(s) will be made by a Scholarship Committee appointed by the Board of Directors of the U.S. Army Women’s Foundation. Each level of scholarship award will be evaluated 58 | MAE 7.10

or http://sms.scholarshipamerica.org/aff to apply. “We are very proud to support this program which so far, has put over 50 military spouses on the path to a college degree,” said Scott Kilgore, senior vice president of military affairs for Kaplan University. “They join the other 8,000 military or veteran students currently at Kaplan University, and we look forward to awarding many more during this application period.”

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and considered separately by the USAWF Scholarship Committee who will also determine the number of scholarships awarded for each level and the amounts of each scholarship. Army women will be considered in one category and the children of Army women will be considered in a separate category. In this way, peers will compete with peers. The scholarship funds may be used to assist with tuition, fees, books and school documented room and board. The funds will be sent to the academic institution for documented expenses and must be used in the academic year awarded. These funds may not be used for prior academic expenses. Criteria

1. Application materials, application form, essay, transcript, recommendations, proof of matriculation at designated accredited academic institution, as well as commander’s verification of active duty or documentation (Department of Defense From DD-214) of the sponsor or woman’s service must be postmarked by February 1, 2013. 2. The application must be accompanied by a short essay (2 pages or less, typed, double-spaced) highlighting why the recipient should be considered for this scholarship and address future plans as related to the program of study. This essay should also include pertinent information in assessing other areas to include community service, activities and work experience. 3. An official transcript from their college or university is required. For new applicants to a community college, high school transcripts or GED documentation must accompany the application. 4. The application must be accompanied by two letters of recommendation with titles and contact information. For college/university applicants, one instructor in the applicant’s program of study is preferred. 5. Applications and all materials must be postmarked by the deadline for consideration and selection. 6. All materials should be sent directly to: USAWF Scholarship Committee, P.O. Box 5030, Fort Lee, VA 23801 www.MAE-kmi.com

The advertisers index is provided as a service to our readers. KMI cannot be held responsible for discrepancies due to last-minute changes or alterations.

MAE RESOURCE CENTER Advertisers Index American Graduate University...................................................... 20 www.agu.edu American Military University........................................................ 54 www.amuonline.com/mae The Art Institutes...................................................................... 21 www.veterans.artinstitutes.edu Ashford University. . .................................................................... 5 www.military.ashford.edu/mae Auburn University..................................................................... 23 www.aubemba.org Baker College Online. . ................................................................. 3 www.bakercollegeonline.com Berkeley College........................................................................ 9 www.berkeleycollege.edu/military Capitol College......................................................................... 59 www.capitol-college.edu/mae Central Michigan University Global Campus.. .................................... 24 www.cmich.edu/military Columbia College...................................................................... 25 www.goforgreater.org DeVry University....................................................................... 14 http://lp.keller.devry.edu/mae1b Excelsior College. . ..................................................................... 50 http://success.excelsior.edu/degreesformilitary Florida International University.................................................... 11 www.fiupmba.com Fordham University................................................................... C2 www.fordham.edu/vets Fort. Hays State University........................................................... 27 www.fhsu.edu/virtualcollege/military The George Washington University................................................. 13 www.gwu.edu/cepl/publicleadership Globe University Inc................................................................... 59 www.globeuniversity.edu Hawai'i Paciific University........................................................... 29 www.hpu.edu/military Kansas State University. . ............................................................. 31 www.military.k-state.edu Kaplan University.. .................................................................... 49 www.military.kaplan.edu Liberty University. . .................................................................... 46 www.luonline.com/mae Los Angeles Film School............................................................... 7 www.lafsforvets.com McNally Smith College of Music. . ................................................... 48 www.mcnallysmith.edu Northern Virginia Community College. . ........................................... 52 www.nvcc.edu Park University........................................................................ 33 www.park.edu/mae Penn State World Campus........................................................... 55 www.worldcampus.psu.edu/mae12 Regis University. . ...................................................................... 51 www.cps.regis.edu/military Saint Leo University. . ................................................................. 34 www.saintleo.edu Stratford University................................................................... 35 www.stratford.edu Thomas Edison State College........................................................ 56 www.tesc.edu/militaryinfo University of the Incarnate Word................................................... 39 www.adulted.uiw.edu University of Maryland University College........................................ C4 http://military.umuc.edu/degreefits University of Nebraska.. .............................................................. 37 http://online.nebraska.edu/mission University of Phoenix................................................................. 15 www.phoenix.edu/mil University of Wisconsin-Platteville Online........................................ 10 www.gouwp.com/mae Upper Iowa University................................................................ 41 www.uiu.edu/mae Western Governors University....................................................... C3 www.wgu.edu/maeg

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master’s and doctorate programs in information assurance.

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We’re on your side. Earn a degree—with the support you deserve. • Dedicated military support services • Military scholarships to those who qualify

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February 25–28, 2013 CCME 2013 Symposium San Diego, Calif. www.ccmeonline.org

MAE  7.10 | 59

UNIVERSITY CORNER Military Advanced Education Trident University Lucille Sansing, Ph.D. President and CEO Q: Can you give us a brief background on your school’s history, mission and curriculum? A: Trident University International [TUI] began in 1998 as part of the Touro College system and became independent in 2009. TUI was the first completely online university to offer a regionally accredited Ph.D. with no residency requirement. WASC [Western Association of Schools and Colleges] accredited, and with over 90 percent of our faculty holding doctoral degrees in their field, Trident focuses on high-quality individualized graduate and undergraduate instruction in all areas of business administration, health sciences and information technology, and graduate work in educational leadership. Q: What is your school’s background in military education? A: TUI has been working with members of the military family for over 13 years. The experience was very exciting. Being a new university with a mission of bringing high-quality education online, we looked for the very best students available. We quickly found that military students tend to be diligent, smart, and most importantly, have a unique sense of integrity. Working with students who have this kind of ethic allows for a level of trust that produced magnificent educational results. Over the years, and particularly during the worst parts of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, it became clear that our dedication to online educational excellence and student service complemented the needs of the highly mobile military member. Today we find ourselves working with all facets of the U.S. military and veterans. What an honor it is!

student support remains a major objective, as military students need an extra level of care in administrative matters given their operational tempo. But what matters most is what happens in the ‘classroom.’ Trident faculty are experts in their field and they are trained to understand the unique needs of their military students. Excellence in teaching and an ethic of care for the military drives everything Trident does. Q: What are some of your most popular programs, and which are the most appealing to military students?

Q: What makes your school unique in the benefits and programs you offer to military servicemembers?

A: Military students need coursework that both helps them compete for promotion and then works to open doors when they make their transition into the civilian sector. Our programs in the College of Health Sciences effectively train military members in health care administration, health care education, and more. One of our most popular programs is in emergency and disaster management. With the recent effects of Hurricane Sandy reminding us of Katrina, Haiti and the tsunami in Southeast Asia, the need for programs of study in emergency and disaster management has never been greater—both within the military and as military members transition into corresponding civilian jobs. We also offer programs in logistics, human resource management, educational leadership, and information technology management to ensure that those who serve are competitive within the military and as they transition into civilian life.

A: TUI’s unique edge comes from the quality of the faculty and how they learn to interact with military students. Unparalleled

Q: What are some of TUI’s main goals in meeting the future challenges of online education for the military?

60 | MAE 7.10

A: Two specific things come to mind in terms of meeting the needs of today’s military learner. Education builds resiliency! A good education can help servicemembers deal with the effects of PTSD and stress by giving them a challenging and engaging way to improve their future. Individualized education and good student support services can help build resilient military personnel. Second, a good education can open doors in transition so servicemembers can get jobs in the civilian sector commensurate with their experience and military training. Our goal is to educate for resiliency and educate for transition. Q: What is the biggest lesson you’ve learned since assuming your current position? A: When I visited Brooke Army Medical Center and the Center for the Intrepid at Fort Sam Houston some months back, I had the opportunity to visit with soldiers who were severely injured by roadside IEDs. Their spirit, courage and unrelenting desire to excel taught me that when you work with military students there is no ‘impossible.’ If a soldier can ask to return to combat duty with a duffle bag full of spare prosthetic legs, then we can find a way to help them get a first-rate education—no matter the challenge. Q: Do you have any closing thoughts? A: Through distance learning, we reach members of the military family around the globe anytime, anywhere. We have the ability to reach out and deliver an excellent education with a flexible pedagogy that can work to fit the incredibly busy military schedule. Our faculty and support staff understand these needs well, and it allows TUI to take the lead in educating today’s military student. I speak for everyone at Trident when I say that it is not only an honor to serve those who serve, but a learning experience for us as well.O www.MAE-kmi.com

Learn More. Become More.

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Wherever your mission takes you, anywhere in the world, you’ll find University of Maryland University College (UMUC). We offer courses on base or on-site in more than 25 countries—and over 90 undergraduate or graduate programs entirely online. That’s our mission, because since 1947, UMUC has been educating America’s armed forces.

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University of Maryland University College is the nation’s largest public university.

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MAE 7-10 (Dec. 2012)