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⇒A STEM System⇐

Stemeter High School In 2050 This model presents only one person’s viewpoint of where time and the STEM revolution may take us. Others may have much clearer visions or may contribute major improvements to this one. The initiation point for this model, ⇒A STEM System⇐, was an invitation to participate in a meeting for developing a new high school building. Billed as an opportunity to rethink high school education from the ground up, the meeting actually was used to get input on the size of an atrium and associated study carrels for the new building. Input was neither sought or desired on what was to occur in the new building. Few schools have gone beyond participating in the special events and appendages of STEM activities that are so well-intended and, indeed, very useful for a limited number of individuals – much like the athletic programs of large schools that entertain, but directly affect the lives of a small percentage of the student bodies. Stemeter High School is a typical 300 to 500 student small-town school. Stemeter has a few small industries, several of which are multinationals, and a typical variety of small service companies and entrepreneurs.


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⇒A STEM System�

The School Name: Stemeter High School Location: Stemeter, VA, U.S.A. Character: A general high school of 400 students Student Body Served: African Americans: 100 Hispanic: 50 Caucasian: 250

Very few students hold or have held jobs outside food service and retail operations. Many have no financial management experience, have never used a wrench, have never faced a job requiring hourafter-hour of hard labor, or addressed a complicated maintenance issue. Low drop-out rate for all races; few discipline problems Community Served: High unemployment Several large factories, with R & D; chemical, electronics, consumer products Several large offices Many small businesses


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⇒A STEM System⇐

Societal Conditions in 2050: Automation of routine work has resulted in shortened workweeks for many of the employed. However, a significant fraction of employees and most small business owners find their work complexity and need for continuing education results in very long work days. Small business owners, managers in large companies, and teachers are in the latter group. Fewer than half of adults are needed for the nation’s workforce, STEM instruction now must develop skills needed by future employees for the workplace. Also, STEM classrooms seem to be appropriate for teaching basic maintenance skills that help the unemployed reduce their costs of having others perform many maintenance services.


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⇒A STEM System⇐

Stemeter High School began the shift to ⇒A STEM System⇐ in incremental steps starting 8 years ago: Years 1 and 2: Working with Association of STEM Catalysts and STEM Dynamos for Virginia, one Student Project was selected each year for each course in the standard science triumvirate. That enabled each science teacher to manage a Student Project, implement the project planning materials, and work with a STEM Catalyst. Year 3: The science teachers were constituted as a Teaching Team and selected the general standards (NGSS) for the STEM program. As a team, they then selected the Student Projects to be used. Year 4: AI programs were examined. By consensus, one program was selected for future implementation. Student Projects focused on a single science continued to be used. Year 5: Student Projects continued to be used as in previous years. Course titles changed as Biology became STEM 1, Chemistry = Stem 2, Physics = STEM 3, and STEM 4 was offered as an multidisciplinary elective. The Teaching Team taught STEM 4 and implemented the AI management program for it. Year 6: With the administration, the Teaching Team decided to implement ⇒A STEM System⇐.


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⇒A STEM System⇐

Year 7: The Teaching Team met regularly with an architect to design a new STEM classrooms/laboratory suite. External experts also were consulted. A transitionary version of ⇒A STEM System⇐ was implemented with multidisciplinary Student Projects being introduced, and the AI management system implemented parallel to the school grade/reporting system. Year 8: The large STEM classrooms/laboratory suite was under construction and would be completed during the following summer. Year 9: Plans for the year’s STEM program were developed during a full week of meetings of the Teaching Team just before the start of the school year. Bio and Chem were part of the Teaching Team.

Stemeter hs  
Stemeter hs