Page 1

culture shock

Foreign students have new experiences in America, page 12

NEWS 5

New law passed to reduce local graffiti has negative impact on student artists.

OPINIONS 10

Students review hot dog establishments around Wichita.

STUDENT 16 LIFE Senior Leslie Carrillo competes in state, national pageants.

SPORTS 20

As Homecoming approaches, students share their favorite parts of the festivities.


news

2

september

anna gonzalez

SHOWING HIS APPROVAL OF THE NEW GYM, Fr. Aaron Spexarth gives a thumbs-

up at the first All-school Mass Aug. 26. “Having Mass in the new gym was awesome because it was something so new,” Fr. Spexarth said. “It was the first of something that is going to be happening for a long time. We put a lot of planning into it. We had to set a precedent.”

NEWS briefs ‘Pigskins for Peanut Butter’[ drive scheduled Students are asked to bring peanut butter to the varsity football game against Bishop Carroll Oct. 8. The peanut butter will be donated to Catholic Charities and this is a COTY event. The goal is to collect 1,700 jars of peanut butter at the game. Catholic Charities is asking for peanut butter specifically because it is a high-protein food that is not donated enough.

2010 Homecoming court announced

infographic by bea tretbar

paladin

The 2010 Homecoming court was announced Sept. 14. King candidates are seniors David Auer, Jacob Ewers, Spencer Rotolo-Utz, Juan Salgado, Tom Wittler and Ryan Zwick. Queen candidates are seniors Bailey Buer, Leslie Carillo, Cabrini Ferraro, Katie Kempf, Brooke Poelstra and Margo Weninger. The Homecoming court will perform a dance at the pep rally Sept. 24. Practices for the pep rally began Sept. 15. The Homecoming

king and queen will be announced at the football game Sept. 24.

Seniors recognized by National Merit Corporation Seniors Seamus Bann, Andrew Betzen and Jacob Ewers were recognized as National Merit semi-finalists. Seniors Emily Lutz, Chandler Puritty and Matthew Reidl were named National Merit Commended Scholars. These students were awarded based on their PSAT scores from last year. A score of 211 or above was necessary to be a semi-finalist and Commended Scholars were required to score between 200 and 210.

Students attend the Back to School Dance After Fall Fest on Aug. 27, students attended the Back to School Dance. The dance was held in the newly finished gym. Unlike previous years, the dance was a sock hop in an effort to protect the new gym floors. Approximately 350 students attended. news briefs by alyssa scott

journalism.kapaun.org


news

september

3

Worship center plans cause controversy by HALSTEN HIGGINS staff writer Recent plans to build an Islamic Worship Center two blocks from Ground Zero have caused controversy. According to Imam Abdul Rauf and the American Society for Muslim Advancement, the worship center’s initiative is to regain an “atmosphere of interfaith tolerance and respect” in “Muslim-West relations.” According to a poll done by CNN/Opinion Research Corporation, 70 percent of Americans oppose plans for the center. “I think the majority of Sept. 11 victim’s families would take offense (to the Islamic worship center),” Colonel Pam Simonitsch said. Many supporters and opponents rallied near the site on the anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attack. “I don’t like the idea of a mosque being put there, but they have the right to put it wherever,” American Government teacher David Roberts said. Because it is on private property, there is no legal problem with build-

ing the $100 million center there. “Although they have legal right to build whatever they’d like, it’s probably not a good idea,” history teacher Kurt Sherry said. “It will generate controversy.” Speaking at the Pentagon on the Sept. 11 anniversary, President Barack Obama stated that “It was not a religion that attacked us that September day. It was Al Qaeda, a sorry band of men which perverts religion,” according to U.S. News. Not only will the center include a prayer space for Muslims, but also for other religions, as well as a Sept. 11 memorial. In addition, Rauf said the center will also revive Manhattan. “It’s ridiculous that people think (Rauf) shouldn’t build it,” junior Joe Cummings said. “They didn’t destroy the World Trade Center.” Support from leaders like Obama and New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg reinstate Rauf’s right to build. “It’s America’s obligation to defend the right of unpopular minorities,” Sherry said. “It is American principle to defend the rights of people, even if we find them appalling.”

katie hand

plans to build an Islamic center blocks away from Ground Zero arouse many different public view points. While some petition for freedom of religion, others fear the Mosque is disrespectful to those who were killed in the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attack. SURROUNDED BY CONTROVERSY,

Combat troops come home, war in Iraq winding down

information obtained by katie hand, hillary sevart; infographic by victoria gilliam; photos by anna gonzalez

journalism.kapaun.org

paladin


news

4

B.

A.

september

C.

Emma Diskin Parenting, Foods, Child Development

Derek Cochran Geometry, Standards Based Math

Kerry Beach Chemistry D.

E.

Maria Butler English I, III

Annie Lefebvre French I, Spanish I F.

G.

Lynn Miller Debate

H.

Linda Ponce Freshman Chemistry

Tony Brandt Salvation History, Morality, PLS

Which new teacher said it?

The first five people to bring the correct answers to room 215 will win a prize! Answers will be posted on journalism.kapaun.org Sept. 28 1. “I want to start a crochet club. It would be silly and fun.” 2. “I made my brother’s wedding cake when I was a senior in high school.” 3. “I went on the road with a band named ‘Fire and Rain.’ I also perform music every week professionally.” 4. “I love to scrapbook.” 5. “I am a huge Cowboys and Wildcats fan.” 6. “I have done a substantial amount of subbing the last four years.” 7. “In between years of being largely a journalist, I had teaching stints in the Philippines.” 8. “I drink rooseterdew-nilla. It is one third rooster booster slush, and two thirds diet mountain dew with a squirt of vanilla.” information obtained by alyssa scott; arthead by maddie sleconich; photos by brian norris, scott southern, mattie lonergan

paladin

journalism.kapaun.org


news

september

5

a minor problem photo illustration by tiana chin

Law bans local youth from having graffiti supplies within 100 feet of public property by EMMA KAISER

said. “I think most of them aren’t artists, just delinquents.” staff writer Some have concerns about what the $290,954. According to http://wichita. new law means for artists using these tools gov, that is the amount of money the Cen- for their own creations. “I always carry Sharpies for my art and tral Inspection Department spent in 2009 to remove graffiti in Wichita. This does not if I’m caught with them I hope it doesn’t look include city parks and buildings or graffiti like I’m automatically guilty,” junior Emily Loy said. removed by owners. Local officers interviewed by the Eagle When drawing on a bathroom stall or said they still must etching a name into have probable a playground slide, cause to search a one may not think minor’s backpack, about these conseIf I need spray paint for or accuse a public quences. In order to a stenciling or a canvas I artist of commitchange this, Wichita can’t get it in a convenient ting vandalism. passed a law on Aug. manner anymore. This law also 24, stating that grafjunior EMILY LOY prohibits the sellfiti tools such as ing of potential wide-tipped markers graffiti tools to and spray paint may anyone under the not be brought on or age of 18. within 100 feet of public property. “If I need spray paint for a stenciling or “It shouldn’t really be a problem unless you’re publicly waving spray paint around, a canvas I can’t get it in a convenient manner but then you’re just asking for trouble,” se- anymore,” Loy said. Fey said he thinks that many will just nior Matt Fey said. If found with these items in public ar- have their parents or older friends buy it for eas, the carrier can be fined $250 to $1,000 them. At Kapaun Mt. Carmel, graffiti costs and may also serve time in jail for up to six months. In a story in the Wichita Eagle local have been minimal. “We are very blessed to only have ocofficers said they are only targeting “graffiti casional graffiti in the restrooms that we can artists.” “I find the term ‘graffiti artist’ to be up remove [easily],” Principal David Kehres for discussion,” art teacher Lori Sprague said. “The most common medium we find is journalism.kapaun.org

permanent markers.” Even though KMC has not had a significant problem with graffiti, the city of Wichita has. According to the Eagle, many of the graffiti around Wichita has been done by gangs, marking their territory and warning other gangs. “Unfortunately, we live in a society that is a valid place for laws against graffiti art,” Sprague said. “It can be a very beautiful means of expression, but there are always people that will make us have to regulate that.”

photo illustration by brian norris

WITH THE NEW GRAFFITI LAW IN EFFECT,

people under the age of 18 will need a parent or guardian present when purchasing wide-tipped markers, spray paint, and other grafitti supplies. The law, passed Aug. 24, also bans these materials from being within 100 feet of public property. paladin


6

news

september

School and national ACT averages rise; students prepare for college entrance test second time they tested. Senior Molly Suellentrop is one student who noticed an improvement. Suellentrop has taken the test After walking the same crowded twice. She said she did not study at all halls for countless eight-hour days, it before she took it last December. To can become easy to picture oneself on a prepare for the second test, she studbeautiful college campus. Instead of algebra homework, one begins to dream ied every day for two weeks with an about dorm room color schemes and ACT preparation booklet. Suellentrop’s decorations. One aspect of preparing score increased four points the second time she took the test. for college is missing from this sce“I felt a lot more confident on than nario. Before students can make a list second test than I did on the first,” Suelof college essentials, they must pass an lentrop said. “I was a lot more prepared. unpopular but vital test: the ACT. When I got my scores I was so excited. “Standardized tests give an objective view of all students compared to I was hoping that my score raised a little but I wasn’t expecting that much of an one another,” counselor Liana Torkelincrease.” son said. “Colleges need something like Like Suellentrop, Torkelson has that because all schools are different. It seen scores increase due to practice. is the ‘grade equalizer.’” She recommends that students prepare According to the official ACT webby taking practice site, the ACT was tests. taken by nearly 1.6 Students are taking more “Students million students last go in cold turkey and more rigorous curyear, 209 of them without doing Kapaun Mt. Carmel riculum and when they sample problems,” seniors. The nationdo that they get better Torkelson said. “If al average score, scores. they don’t go over currently at 21 out of 36, is down from counselor LIANA TORKELSON sample tests, they will be caught off what it was three guard.” years ago but is steadily rising. Junior Arisa Shaw is just beginning “I think the average score is where it should be,” junior Kaleb Mueller said. the college entrance test process. She “Everyone is smart in their own way plans to take the ACT for the first time and scores higher in different areas. I this spring. She said that the first step will be to get a practice book from her think this score shows this and reprecounselor. sents many students’ abilities.” “My mom’s job is to help people The KMC average cumulative score of 24 is also up. KMC’s average prepare for tests and study, so she will help me,” Shaw said. “I’m probably goscore in each area tested on the ACT ing to be pretty nervous when I take the was above the national average. The average scores in Spring 2010 were 24 test, even if I am prepared. Hopefully I in English and reading and 23 in math can score in the mid-20s my first time.” According to http://collegeboard. and science. “Everybody is pleased that the com, standardized tests scores are important, but are not the only thing that scores are going up,” Torkelson said. “Students really are taking more colleges look at. A low score will not and more rigorous curriculum and ruin a student’s chances of being accepted and a high score will not guaranwhen they do that they get better test tee admittance. scores.” “There was one student I know Along with taking challenging classes, another method to raise scores of who got a perfect score,” Torkelson is to take the test more than one time. said. “He became overconfident and Torkelson recommends that students applied to Harvard. He didn’t get it. It take the test at least twice, once in the goes to show that schools are looking spring of their junior year and once for the ‘package person’– someone with good grades, leadership and service to in the fall of senior year. According to others. Good test scores alone will not http://act.org, 55 percent of test-takers get you in.” increased their composite score the

by HILLARY SEVART news editor

arthead and infographic by bea tretbar

paladin

journalism.kapaun.org


september

news

7

please patronize our paladin advertisers

journalism.kapaun.org

paladin


opinions

8

september

LETTER

PALADIN editorial

from the editor Dear PALADIN readers,

Sincerely, Katie Gilbaugh, Editor in Chief

KAPAUN MT. CARMEL

paladin 8506 E. Central Wichita, Kan. 67206 Phone: (316) 634-0315, ext. 232 Fax: (316) 636-2437 kmcjournalism@kapaun.org

COVER

shot

cover by beatrice tretbar

paladin

katie hand

Phase III construction improves KMC facilities After a year of construction trucks In addition to the indoor facilities, a blocking off parking spaces, sharing newly resurfaced track and turf football lunchtime in the commons with the field were included in the renovations. sounds of jackhammers and breaking The new complex is architecturally concrete and wondering when the engineered to make students happy inconveniences would end, finally the by way of more windows, Burrus said. Coach Herm and Jackie Bachrodt Burrus gave an example of a student A t h l e t i c choosing Complex is between KMC finished. This and Carroll. Yes, this is a high school, is all due to She chose KMC the hard work because of the but KMC’s accomplishof several large amount ments merit something members in of windows. worthy of our reputation the Kapaun The entire for excellence. Mt. Carmel student body, c o m m u n i t y. teachers and A m o n g administrators those who donated money, Herm can fit on the bleachers on one Bachrodt and his family are much side of the gym and the end zones. appreciated. Although he passed Fr. Aaron Spexarth said there away before its dedication or was a strong sense of unity at the completion, the new gym bears his first All-school Mass. Because there name in thanks of his generosity. were fewer distractions, the focus Others who are to thank for the was more on the Mass and less on completion of Phase III are President the discomfort of wood bleachers. Mike Burrus, Bishop Michael Jackels, With the new additions to the Superintendent Bob Voboril and school, everything seems more those on the Major Gifts Council, professional. Yes, this is a high school, which aided in soliciting money. but KMC’s accomplishments merit The new athletics complex something worthy of our reputation includes the gym, Crusader VIP room, for excellence. With both the facilities concession stand, spirit store, weights and academics of something much room, referee locker rooms, boys and more than a high school, KMC girls locker rooms, storage rooms, strives to exceed expectations. wrestling room and renovations to As one visitor put it, “Welcome to the old gym lobby and bathrooms. Kapaun Mt. Carmel University.”

The start of a new school year is always exciting. Energy is felt throughout the hallways and seen in the faces of freshmen ready for a new experience. The same can be said for the first issue of the Paladin. With the first deadlines of the year come a sort of chaos that cannot be replicated in any other class. Yet, throughout the craziness of the first month, the “first day of school” excitement remains. The same can be said of many other fall clubs, sports and activities. Students throughout KMC are finding ways to stay involved. As always, we invite your ideas, input and letters. All letters should be under 150 words and signed. We reserve the right to edit or omit any letters. Baseless accusations, libelous statements, insults or unsigned letters will not be considered for publication. Take letters to Room 215 or mail to the address below.

PALADIN

staff EDITOR IN CHIEF katie gilbaugh DESIGN EDITORS beatrice tretbar, maddie sleconich MANAGING EDITOR/ FEATURE EDITOR bailey buer WEB EDITOR/ CIRCULATION MANAGER madeline engel COPY EDITOR erika reals PHOTO EDITOR brian norris WEB PHOTO EDITOR scott southern BUSINESS MANAGER/ ASST. DESIGN EDITOR victoria gilliam NEWS EDITOR hillary sevart STUDENT LIFE EDITOR matt riedl OPINIONS EDITOR emily lutz SPORTS EDITOR rachel white ASST. NEWS EDITOR alyssa scott ASST. FEATURE EDITOR melissa hernandez ASST. SPORTS EDITOR katie hand STAFF WRITERS emma kaiser, halsten higgins STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS tiana chin, anna gonzalez, zach holland, mattie lonergan, alex scobee, emily wittler, sydney ain, juan espinosa, christopher evers, crystal klaichang, melissa mckinney, maggie stout, kasey weixelman ADVISER ashley perkins

EDITORIAL

policy The Paladin is a monthly, student-produced newsmagazine, published to inform and entertain the Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School community and educate journalism students. Each issue is produced with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Student staff members will be offered opportunities to inform, investigate, entertain, interpret and evaluate: all accepted functions of traditional American press. Included materials will be those of responsible journalism, including restraint by the students and adviser in matters such as libel, privacy, obscenity and copyright. The staff chooses to reflect the mission of Kapaun Mt. Carmel, a diocesan Catholic high school, to serve the interests and needs of the community and to provide fair, objective, accurate and truthful materials. Opinions do not necessarily reflect views of anyone other than the Paladin staff. Digital photos have not been altered to manipulate reality. Photo illustrations are labeled to reflect any technical alterations. Anonymity may be given in the following cases: the information is unable to be presented another way, the information warrants anonymity, the source’s privacy and/or reputation requires protection and the source must be protected from damages. A student or faculty member death during the coverage period will be covered with a short obituary. Advertising must meet the same guidelines as editorial content. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement by the school. Students pictured in advertising must sign a release and accept no monetary compensation. Advertising rates available on request. School organization discount rates are available. Corrections of errors will appear in the appropriate section of the next issue.

journalism.kapaun.org


opinions

9

YOUR turn -----------

I don’t like it at all because it’s trying to even everybody out. It’s like cheating us and lowering our standards and expectations.

JACK cantele

senior

MATTHEW ayres

It does lower the standards of KMC, because in the past we’ve been so tough. But it also makes us more competitive for scholarships

junior

I wish they were in effect last year but I definitely support it. Basically, it’s saving my life.

Things heard around the halls at KMC...

Parents. They are just not funny like us.

HANNAH bongers

sophomore

Who likes rap music? That’s good! It appeals to most upper class white children.

As a freshman coming in, I think it will really help me because I’m just getting used to all my honors classes.

Why would you want a flu shot? It’s warm outside!

illustration by Jordan Bohm

journalism.kapaun.org

I feel like a little midget is biting my calf and it really hurts.

-- - -

--

902-902. It’s a close vote and a 22 years of age, has no college educascary thought. Aug. 3, Butler County tion and stocks shelves for a living. made history in the Republican primaI applaud the 1,804 people who ry ballot when of the three open county did vote, but what about the other thoucommissioner seats, two ran unopposed sands within that district who did not? and the third candidate won his spot by They are at fault just as much as every a coin toss. Yes, a coin toss. person who does not vote in a national Voting is vitally important. I hear it election. So much time is spent on sharin school, read it in magazines and am ing opinions about candidates and what told so by my parents on a they stand for, and it seems regular basis. The rest of everyone has an opinion. If America hears that meseveryone has an opinion, then sage about as often. Yet, why does not everyone vote? about half of those who It would seem to make sense are able to vote, do not. that if you cannot inconveI tell myself I will always nience yourself to go and vote, get out and vote when I then do not inconvenience am 18, even for an election others who have to hear about many may say is inconsehow your candidate lost. EMILY LUTZ quential. Will I though? It A vote does make a difseems important now, but ference. Yes, this particular opinions editor will watching football, eatexample was a county primary ing fries or running get in and not one for the next presithe way? dent. What could the consequences It could, but after seeing this tie, my have been though had the coin landed mind is set. For weeks before, I heard on the other side? What will happen my dad talk about candidates. The first, when an important issue is put to balwho won the coin toss, has held the po- lot and it is a tie because you were too sition of representing District 5 since busy watching a movie to vote? Those 2004. He will run unopposed by a Dem- are a lot of questions and it is up to each ocrat on the November general election of us to answer them. It seems silly, imballot. The defeated Republican candi- plausible and far-fetched, but so does a date has the following credentials; he is 902-902 vote in a county primary.

----

Tie in Butler election prompts editor to vote

--

-

->

--

How do you feel about the grading scale change?

--

september

KATIE kaiser

freshman information obtained by Halsten Higgins

paladin


10

opinions

september

Four local and chain hot dog shops reviewed, three deemed satisfactor y A newly constructed red building stands on 37th street across from Pacific Coast Pizza with an interesting name, Linkhaus. Its odd appearance and name seemed to fit the character of the restaurant. Walking in, I saw eight plasma televisions on the red walls. Above these was written in cursive, “Wichita’s Finest Brauts.” The dining area had almost an outdoor feel because of the tall windows and ceilings. Friendly Linkhaus employees explained the procedure as I perused the menus displayed on three plasma screens. The gourmet hot dogs, including ones such as Tropic Thunder and South of the Border, are made with fresh ingredients and come with a side of perfectly seasoned tots. A Chicago Dog, tater tots and a drink came up to be a total of about $8 with tax. Once it arrived, it looked more like a piece of fancy art rather than classic American food. The combination of cherry tomatoes, relish, mustard, ketchup, white onions, sport peppers and a pickle on a juicy hot dog with a poppy seed bun were perfectly arranged on the tray but were also a very tasty combination for my taste buds. Although not cheap, the experience is worth a couple extra bucks. Also offered are free refills for those eco-friendly cups. They truly have Wichita’s finest brauts. erika reals

Several times it has happened that a restaurant I reviewed for the Paladin went out of business right before my review was published. I hoped this would not be the case for Dog-N-Shake, which started in Wichita in 1948. Driving up to the iconic yellow and orange Dog-N-Shake sign, I was expecting a hot dog worthy of a restaurant which has lasted more than five decades. The restaurant had a traditional “mom and pop” feel, and a definite retro vibe. As I ordered, I noticed several options for toppings on hot dogs. I chose the classic chili dog, complete with mustard, relish and onions. Dog-N-Shake is not only known for their hot dogs, but also for their shakes. One can choose from a variety of flavors, my favorite being the traditional chocolate. When I received my food, I noticed it looked just like any other fast food hot dog. Pushing away disappointment, I lifted up the dog to take a bite. I was surprised by a toasted bun that made a usually boring hot dog exciting. The prices were inexpensive and the food about average. I would visit Dog-N-Shake again, only for the fact that the butter-toasted bun made the meal memorable.

Formerly Let’s Be Frank, this hot dog heaven starts off fresh with a new location and a new name, ...And the Wiener is. The simple white walls are decorated with scattered pieces of artwork, but the place still has its former character, for example, a chair shaped like a hand sits next to the register. The place is small and easy to miss, nestled between two other businesses directly across from East. The menu is packed with delicious hot dog choices, anything ranging from the Classic Dog to the Thai Dog are available. The hot dogs are also very affordable, and you can add a drink for just $1. Service was fair, and the dogs were brought out in a timely manner. The music choice was particularly appealing, set on a playlist that included The Shins and The Postal Service. Unfortunately, the lighting was too dim and the hot dog was terribly difficult to eat, as it falls apart as you take a bite. Due to the messiness of the meal, it is definitely not a place I would go to on a date, but rather just to have a chill lunch with erika reals friends.

As I pulled up to Sonic, it was impossible to ignore the many posters advertising the footlong quarter pound coney. Aside from huge posters of the coney, there are multiple pictures on each of the menus. Of course, how could I not buy this “limited time” coney? For only $2.99, I would get 810 calories of hot dog, chili and cheese. It also came with a side of either tater tots or onion rings. To drink, I ordered the cherry limeade. As usual they overloaded the Route 44 cup with too much Sonic ice, leaving less room for delicious beverage. When the meal was brought to my car, I was astounded. How could I ever eat that much food? The hot dog was nothing new, but the chili topping was delicious. Among my complaints were the amount of cheese added on top of the chili and the size. I would return to Sonic for their onion rings and chicken strips, but I would not order the footlong quarter pound coney again.

photo illustrations by bea tretbar; photos by erika reals, katie gilbaugh, emily wittler, tiana chin

paladin

katie gilbaugh

katie gilbaugh

journalism.kapaun.org


september

opinions

11

Grading scale changes bring about mixed opinions from student population While public schools are finding ways to improve themselves, such as hiring qualified teachers, improving test scores and graduation rates, and providing greater innovation in the curriculum, we have lowered our standards on the grading scale. Last year an “A” would have been considered a 93 percent and above. This year that grade will be easier to obtain at a 92 percent, and an “F” will also be more difficult to receive. Many of the students are celebrating, but the truth is that although the change is small, it could have a big impact on our performance. I feel the new grading scale has lowered standards and expectations for students. Previous students have lived through the old grading scale, so why are we not being held MELISSA HERNANDEZ to the same standards? Why asst. feature editor has the bar been set lower for us? We have the potential to continue achieving As and Bs at the prior grade numbers; there is no reason to ‘dumb down’ the grading scale. I know many times I have caught myself saying, “Well that would have been an ‘A’ in a public school.” I remind myself that I am not in a public school, I am at Kapaun Mt. Carmel, where the grading scale is more challenging. This is no longer true and the grading scale could now be considered unstable. Not only could the change lead many of us students to slack off, but we may also find ourselves putting less effort into out schoolwork under the false pretense that we can pull that grade back up. Motivation to do our best could be lost and our work ethic could be hurt. KMC is known for its rigorous academics and its Cum Laude program. We have quality teachers, great facilities and all the tools needed to become successful. KMC is also known for “raising the bar” when it comes to academics. The previous grading scale encouraged students to work hard in order to achieve high grades, which we are capable of doing. Although KMC is still outstanding, I feel it has lost faith in us.

From your grade school days the matter has been discussed with public school friends. Who hasn’t stammered, “90 percent? That’s still an ‘A’?”, or “51 percent - you passed a class with a 51 percent?” Since elementary school, we, the product of parochial schools, have lamented all that is unjust in the world, especially that Catholic school grading scale - A, 100 - 93, B, 92 - 85, C, 84 - 78, D, 77 - 70, F, 69 and below. There is reason to rejoice, oppressed student body. With this year’s changes in the Kapaun Mt. Carmel grading system, the scales are tipping your way. In its defense, the old scale held students to a high- if not too high- standard. This harsher scale, however, puts KMC students at a disadvantage when applying to colleges. Students at KMC KATIE HAND compete with pubasst. sports editor lic school students for scholarships and admissions. Colleges don’t compare grading systems between schools, but look instead at students’ GPAs. Two students, one from East and one from KMC, earn 90 percent in all classes; the student from KMC will receive a 3.5 GPA whereas the student from East will receive a 4.0. The new grading scale will help to make these college admissions more fair to KMC students. Parents, oftentimes, only look at a student’s letter grades and not at percentages. The revised grading scale should help both students and parents reduce stress at home. The revised system will continue to hold KMC students to a higher standard compared to the public school system. School is meant to be difficult but not impossible. The new system should help students get more sleep and drink less caffeine battling essays into the wee hours of the morning. Hopefully, mom and dad can relax, and colleges can love KMC students that much more. Hopefully, we won’t get just that much lazier, and a more lax grading scale at KMC really is a great idea for students, parents and colleges.

Female vampire fixation questioned, critiqued Sharp teeth, pale skin, Edward Cullen The Vampire Diaries is about to launch - oh my! If it is not already evident, the vam- its second season on TV. I have fallen victim pire phenomenon of the last to this engrossing show. I even decade has teenage girls in read the books. As I began to rea frenzy. Between the books, alize more and more that most of movies and TV shows, it is virthe vampire books follow the same tually impossible to elude their basic outline, I enjoyed them less blood-sucking presence in the and less. They all involve a human media. damsel in distress stupid enough When the Twilight series to fall madly in love with someone became a hit, girls around the of the supernatural nature. It sadcountry took down their Brad dens me greatly to see girls idolizEMMA KAISER Pitt posters and replaced them ing Bella Swan from Twilight. The staff writer with portraits of the one and character has zero friend-making only Robert Pattinson. Believe skills and no personality whatsoit or not, I would definitely preever. fer a tanned Brad to Robert’s pale skin. As for the blood-sucking aspect of vamjournalism.kapaun.org

pires, I am still searching for an explanation as to why this is an attractive trait. For some reason, I am not particularly interested in having my body drained of blood. Vampires have definitely become the current “trend,” such as Silly Bandz or Sperrys. Hopefully, as the Twilight series comes to an end, this new fad will as well. If you have covered yourself in glitter and donned Halloween fangs for a midnight premiere or have posters of blood-sucking movie stars wallpapering your room, I have nothing against you. To each his own, but I still have yet to discover the intrigue found in the pale, century-old characters that want nothing more than to sink their teeth into my flesh. paladin


feature

12

september

by BAILEY BUER feature editor

design by bea tretbar; photos by brian norris and scott southern; photos provided by peggy schoenhofer

Acceptance Process Students go through several steps to be admitted to the country and KMC

paladin

A typical American teenager may practice a sport every day, attend a club regularly or participate in a play. It is a social norm to look another in the eye and not surprising to see a passerby wearing jeans at his knees. Teachers do not hit students nor take it personally when homework is incomplete. School gets out before 9 p.m., and not everything is in walking distance. For foreign students, new experiences like these are everywhere. “I wanted to learn English, and I wanted to learn culture and how the Americans live,” sophomore Tom Kim, who came to Kapaun Mt. Carmel last year said. “I wanted to try their culture and all the stuff. You can see all the culture through the TV or news, but you don’t really know unless you are there.” Other current students came for the education and adventure. Senior Suyoung Han, also known as Elizabeth, sophomore Tom Kim and freshman Sally Lee are from Korea and live with host mother Peggy Schoenhofer. Senior Bao Nguyen, from Vietnam and junior Su Yeon Hwang from Korea, also known as Annie, live with other host parents. Schoenhofer said she helps her students with school, keeping the faith, learning the culture and advice. She has also taken them on several road trips to places such as Kansas City and Oklahoma City. “The thing I stress to them is they came here to learn to American way,” Schoenhofer said. “They are here to integrate. I’ll forget they’re Korean. I really feel honored to be trusted with them.” Schoenhofer refers to herself as their “American mom.” All her students’ parents attend church together in Korea, so students come to live with her by referral. “I think what you do to my brethren you do to me,” Schoenhofer said. “I was in an orphanage, so I know what it’s like to be at people’s

Peggy Schoenhofer is a host mother of several foreign students. Most of her students’ parents go to church together and recommend her to each other. She said she has senior Suyong Han’s mother check the potential students out to make sure he or she is a good addition. journalism.kapaun.org


feature

september

13

mercy. It’s not a good feeling. I kind of relate to feel disappointed. American people are them when they feel alone. I try to make them really good about it. They say ‘I’m sorry,’ feel as comfortable as possible. They have a lot and ‘I love you.’ Whenever we talk, we to be thankful for and they know it.” don’t make eye contact. The first time In Korea, school runs from 7 a.m. - 9 it’s hard to make eye contact because p.m. during the week and some students have I think they’re reading my mind or my weekend tutors. Kim said there is not time to thoughts, but I know it’s a manner here. play sports or join clubs because there is so If I’m not, they might think I’m lying. I much pressure to study. He is now playing on don’t feel like I’m talking to a human bethe Crusader football team. Han said she was ing because they look so different.” surprised when she saw students who were All students said they miss their also good athletes in America. families, but keep in touch at least once “Education -- that is the purpose I came a week. Another thing that was hard for here,” Yeon said. “I think the education is some to deal with was different food. much better than Korea. I like when it’s short Many were nervous to come over here, because forcing them to study, if they don’t especially due to the language differfeel like it they won’t want to study. I would ence. be sick of it. In Korea they grade first place, “I think I’m having a hard time with second place. They’re rereligion,” Lee said. ally competitive. Some if I “Whenever I read ask to borrow notes, some the Bible, I read The first time it’s hard to will let me. Some will lie to again and again, but make eye contact because me and say, ‘I don’t have it doesn’t stick in I think they’re reading my notes.’” my mind.” mind or my thoughts, but I The academic style in Through learnknow it’s a manner here. Korea did not suit Han. ing the culture, lan“In Korea if you don’t guage and quirks do homework you get of America, the stusenior SUYOUNG HAN punished and no one likes dents have mostly that,” Han said. “I didn’t enjoyed their expewant to get used to that. Here, if you don’t do riences and recall some funny moments. homework it’s your own bad. In Korea they “Our house mother gives me many would hit you, and they think it’s disrespectful. point of views,” Han said. “I still have It makes you not want to do it.” problems with American expressions. According to the students, America is She will give me a straight explanation. full of differences. In fact, many saw no simiI remember I was really shocked when I larities. Sally Lee said she thought things such saw a guy wearing his pants at his knees. as parties and youths driving cars were cool. The first time my little sister saw it, she Nguyen said he likes the challenge of going asked loudly ‘Why is he showing his unsomewhere new and discovering things. derwear?’ House mom explained things “American people do really well about right there.” expressing how they feel,” Han said. “In our Overall the students said they have culture we don’t tell. We expect others to know had a positive experience in America. how we feel. It’s a good and bad thing. When “I like the challenge,” Nguyen said. some other kid understands you, you feel con“I like to go somewhere and discover nected and impressed, and if they don’t you things. I’m trying everything.”

The student must get a visa and pass a test. Most students have an I-20 Visa. According to http://travel.state.gov, the student must have a place to stay in the country, plan on leaving the country after completing studies and have the money in order to obtain the visa. journalism.kapaun.org

Schoenhofer said the students go to meet an embassy counselor who asks them questions they must reply to in English. Some have to redo this process. paladin


14

feature

september

Students speak about new experiences, future dreams, opinions on Korea

President Mike Burrus said the process for a foreign student to be accepted at KMC is different. “[The Catholic school office] processes the immigration papers,” Burrus said. “We require the student to be Catholic, the family they are with to have some connection to the school, and proper immigration paper work.” paladin

The students must stay in school in order to keep the visa. “If they have a grade below a C, they go home and never come back,” Schoenhofer said. “It’s Korean law.”

journalism.kapaun.org


september

student life

15

arthead by maddie sleconich

2

zach holland

emily wittler

11

tiana chin

4

3

anna gonzalez

1. AFTER WINNING THE SPELLING BEE, Barfee (senior Bruce

Hadley) celebrates in KMC’s production of The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee Sept. 15. 2. JUNIOR ROBIN HELGET carves into her “pinch pot” in Ceramics

class Sept. 3. “I really enjoy working with clay in general,” Helget said. “I want to be a pastry chef when I grow up, and watching all the cake shows, I realize there’s a lot of molding involved.”

3. BEARING THE CROSS, junior Matt Ayres serves at All-school

Mass Aug. 26. This was his first year to altar serve. “The day before Mass, they were asking for more servers,” Ayres said. “I had a nice seat.” 4. DOING THE “BABY FREEZE,” freshman Kody Ta breakdances

at the Back to School Dance Aug. 27. Ta started breakdancing a month ago. “It’s about expressing yourself through music,” Ta said. “Everyone’s got something special inside them to release, some hidden talent.” 5. AT THE ACTIVITIES FAIR, senior Michael Schlapp participates

in a Science Olympiad demonstration Aug. 25. Science Olympiad will begin their 2010 season starting in October. zach holland

journalism.kapaun.org

5 paladin


student life

16

september

Carrillo wins Miss Kansas Outstanding Teen after several years of competing monthly column Matt Riedl exWichita culture along the way.

This Labor Day, I took some time to kick back with Erika Reals, the first lucky gal selected for an outing with me for Matt in the City. The night began downtown, at the Keeper of the Plains plaza. We then had a refreshing bike ride down by the river, which sounded like a much better idea in the daytime than at night. We ran into no trouble, but anticipating the worst, I had really buffed up at the YMCA earlier that day. One thing is for sure: we are definitely not the best bikers in the world. Neither of us actually owns a bike so we each had to borrow a bike from a friend. I had this whole thing planned out so that we could return to the Keeper of the Plains at 9 p.m. sharp, where the Ring of Fire show happens every night. During this show, the rocks surrounding the keeper erupt in flame. As the rocks surrounding the Keeper flamed up, I quickly ran off and went to a secret cache in the rock where earlier I had stashed three flowers. Conveniently they were still there, so I took them out and ran back down to Erika and boom! Flowers! That’s how a classy gentleman rolls. We watched the fire show, feeling the heat of the towers of flame. As soon as it had begun, it was over, as was our date. It seemed really short, almost as short as the fuse on a firecracker. I know had a great time and Erika seemed to be enjoying herself too. That’s what I like to call a GT (good time)!

emily wittler

AT THE RING OF FIRE, seniors Erika Reals and

Matt Riedl end their date with a bang. “The bike ride was really chill and laid back, but the thing I remember the most was the fire show,” Reals said. “And the flowers were a nice surprise too.” paladin

by MATT RIEDL student life editor To walk down the runway, to model the dresses, to meet 52 outstanding young women – this is stuff of dreams for girls who aspire to be pageant participants. For senior Leslie Carrillo, the dream came true last June when she won the Miss Kansas Outstanding Teen title at the pageant in Pratt, Kan. “You never really know who’s going to win,” Carrillo said. “It took a lot of ‘Mom, did I really just win that?’ for it to sink in.” Potential pageant participants begin their quest to be Miss Kansas Outstanding Teen at the local level. Last year there were eleven local pageants in Kansas. Carrillo won Miss Wooded Hills’ Outstanding Teen. Pageant participants at the state level must have a platform they run on, and Carrillo’s was volunteering. Carrillo has recently been doing volunteer work with the Children’s Miracle Network and Strong Kids, a YMCA organization. “My thing is just getting involved in the community, showing people that it can be something that you enjoy,” Carrillo said. “I don’t do it to be famous, to be popular or cool. I do it because I enjoy doing it and I want to share that with other people.” Carrillo first began participating in pageants as soon as she was eligible for the Miss Kansas Outstanding Teen competition at 13. Her friend Megan Bushell, who was crowned Miss Kansas 2004, was her inspiration. “I grew up watching her compete and I watched her growth through [the pageants],” Carrillo said. “That sparked my first interest in competing. Megan and her family have always been there.” Carrillo won her first title as Sunflower Princess in 2004 with Bushell, and from there, her pageant career began. This year, she won her title along with Miss Kansas 2010 Lauren Werhan. “From the first moment I met Leslie, I knew that she had more energy than two ‘normal’ people combined,” Werhan said. “Her enthusiasm is very contagious.” Carrillo and Werhan have been making appearances together over the summer. This marks the first time Miss Outstanding Teen and Miss Kansas have regularly made appearances together. Consequently, Carrillo and Werhan have bonded together as the two Misses of Kansas.

courtesy of leslie carrillo

Matt in the City is a where student life editor plores and experiences firsthand, giving insight

CROWNED MISS KANSAS OUTSTANDING TEEN, senior Leslie Carrillo has her moment in

the spotlight. “You just have to put it all on the table, go in and just be yourself,” Carrillo said.

“Leslie has been bright sunshine to me during this year,” Werhan said. “I am so glad that we won our titles the same year. I love her lots.” Four weeks ago, Carrillo took her talents to Orlando to participate in the Miss America’s Outstanding Teen pageant. She did not place; however, Carrillo said she is all right with that, because pageants mean more to her than just winning. “I just wanted to meet the girls and have a good experience with it,” Carrillo said. “It’s not like I get to go back in two years; once it’s done, it’s done.” Carrillo said she plans on taking a few years off from pageantry to go to college. In a few years, she hopes to participate in the Miss Kansas pageant, when she has more wisdom, experience and age. She said she will not forget the lessons she has learned from the pageant soon. “I think the biggest thing that I’ve learned is that even though I’m just a 17year-old girl from Wichita, Kansas, I can make a huge difference, and I can impact other people’s lives whether I’m aware of it or not,” Carrillo said. “That’s what the power of the crown really is. It kind of makes you feel like a superstar but at the same time you feel very humbled that people look up to you like that.” journalism.kapaun.org


student life

september

Sponsor: LORI SPRAGUE President: TBA (first and third Wednesdays)

per days s e n Wed LD (two ) IBA H C h t R mon RT A E B RO TA sor: KODY n o p S t: iden Pres

17

Sponsor: FR. AARON SPEXARTH President: ERIC GEORGE (before Masses)

(ever y oth Spo er we nsor ek) : JI Pres MV iden A t: H ILL NEK ARY SEV ART

Spon Pres sor: KU R iden t: ST T SHER R EPH EN M Y (first OOR T E each uesday of mont h)

+ LIN G A R PAT TS : r o AR s ER ETB Spon D ROB R T A I DAV ent: BE y) le da id g s n e i r s P y (ever

(every Thursday)

Sponsor: CLAIR PENNYCUFF President: BRIAN PETR

Sponsor: KELLY DANDURAND President: ELLIE TOLBERD (once a week) infographic by maddie sleconich

Six juniors transfer this semester, adjust to new school

Welcome to the crusade KOBI MASHNOUK Previous school: The Independent School Best thing about KMC: The people Worst thing about KMC: Longer classes Reason for transfer: Change of environment and soccer Favorite teacher: Ms. [Ruth] Howard, because she’s very nice

TREY NELSON Previous school: Newton High School Best thing about KMC: Meeting new people Worst thing about KMC: Short lunches and passing periods Reason for transfer: Baseball and academics Favorite lunch: Shrimp poppers

journalism.kapaun.org

KORI MASHNOUK Previous school: The Independent School Best thing about KMC: Block schedule Worst thing about KMC: Uniforms Reason for transfer: For something new Favorite subject: Physics, because it makes me think

MICHAEL JACOBS Previous school: Fortuna High School (Calif.) Best thing about KMC: The food Worst thing about KMC: The uniforms, he assumes Miss most about old school: My friends and teachers Favorite teacher: [Jim] Vanek

AALIAH GOMILION Previous school: Ilion Junior/Senior High (N.Y.) Best thing about KMC: The golf, the people and the education Worst thing about KMC: Excessive homework Reason for transfer: Godmother thought a Catholic school would be more structured

ANDREW MUNDS Previous school: Wichita Collegiate Best thing about KMC: Block schedule Worst thing about KMC: Uniforms Miss most about old school: The drumline during Collegiate games information obtained by melissa hernandez; photos by brian norris

paladin


18

sports

september

please patronize our paladin advertisers

paladin

journalism.kapaun.org


sports

september

19

Senior Keaton Lewis has lightning speed, a phenomenal arm and the ability to make quick decisions, senior noseguard Will Hutton said. This football season, Lewis will be Kapaun Mt. Carmel’s starting varsity quarterback. As a junior, Lewis ran over 700 yards and received second team All-City football honors. “For this season my personal goals are based on making first team All-city,” Lewis said. “I hope to improve as a leader and help win games.” Lewis leads the offense, coach Dan Adelhardt said. “He will get us in the right play,” said Adelhardt. “ When we have the ball we expect for him to put us in a position to score.” One of seven returning seniors, Lewis is a team leader. “Without him it could be mass chaos,” Hutton said. “As leaders we’re striving to get the best out

of everyone, to get the team to believe in what were doing.” Lewis will be a key player in the Homecoming game on Friday Sept. 24, Adelhardt said. “We’re playing West, so we definitely expect to win,” Lewis said, “It’s the game right before Carroll so we’ll have an opportunity to prepare for that.” A football player since middle school, Lewis played first on the freshman and junior varsity teams. Last year he shared the position of starting quarterback with Chris Hayes, class of 2010, for the first five games before becoming KMC’s regular starting quarterback. Lewis plans to continue playing football in college. Currently, he is considering K-State, KU and the Airforce. “Football is really the number one thing for me right now, “ Lewis said. “I like competition; I hate losing and I love to win and I love the game.”

story by katie hand; photo by alex scobee; infographic by maddie sleconich

Last time we played Carroll we were still figuring it out, but now our team should be strong. I expect great things.

sophomore HANNAH BONGERS

“ 3

27

4

28

26

We are going to come out hungry for a win against a quality opponent.

junior BRENDAN BOMBARDIER varsity soccer

journalism.kapaun.org

crusader sports calendar 29

Boys Soccer vs. Heights @Str yker Athletic Complex, 7 p.m.

Girls Golf North High Invitational @Sim Park, 1 p.m.

5

6

Girls Volleyball vs. Bishop Carroll @ KMC 5 p.m.

For more Crusader sports scores and stories, go to journalism.kapaun. org!

30

24 H o m e c o m i n gFootball Game vs. West @Cessna Stadium, 7 p.m.

Varsity Girls Tennis Wichita Collegiate Invitational @Collegiate School, 8 a.m.

1

2

Boys Football Game vs. Wichita North @ Cessna Stadium, 7 p.m.

7

25

8

Boys Football vs. Bishop Carroll @ Cessna Stadium, 7 p.m.

Girls Tennis GWAL @ Wichita State University 7 p.m.

9 Cross Country Meet @ El Dorado State Park 9:45 a.m.

photos by mattie lonergan, emily wittler; photo illustration by tiana chin, alex scobee, scott southern

paladin


sports

20

september

SPIRIT WEEK Spirit Week is one of the many traditions Kapaun Mt. Carmel holds for Homecoming. It is the week before the dance, where students dress up each day according to the daily theme. The daily themes for this year included: Mirror day, Salad Dressing Day, Decade Day, Mass Day and Super Spirit Day. “It’s great because everyone really goes all out,” senior Liz Stasiewicz said. “Almost all of the students get involved and dress up. It gives the students a chance to express their school spirit.” PEP RALLY During the Homecoming pep rally, held the Friday of Spirit Week, the Homecoming court candidates perform a dance “The dance winds up the week of all for the entire student body. the festivities,” Erker said. “You don’t have “I like watching the candidates dance,” to worry about anything but tearing down junior Laurel Lujano said. “Especially how decorations.” they dress like famous couples.” There is a lot of individual preparation The candidates enter the assembly in for Homecompairs, with ing students costumes have to worry that match Homecoming means business. about, sophoaccordingly. It takes a lot of effort just to more Kylie Each couple get everything ready for the Wuestewald takes turns dance, not to mention Spirit said. Students throwing canWeek. must determine dy to the difoutfits for both ferent grades the dance and as they are sophomore KYLIE WUESTEWALD announced. Spirit Week, as well as plan The pep rally dates, restauis meant to rants, groups and more. raise school spirit for the Homecoming “Homecoming means business,” game later that night. Wuestewald said. “It takes a lot of effort just FOOTBALL GAME to get everything ready for the dance, not to Before every varsity game, the football mention Spirit Week.” team gathers to “burn” the other team.

Students reminisce over past Homecoming experiences, anticipate this year’s festivities

School is back in session and Homecoming is here at last. “How do I ask her? Who is going to ask me? What if she says no? What costume do I wear on Tuesday? Where should we go to eat? Is Sumo still taking reservations? Which dress looks better? Is my tie the right shade of purple?” These are just a few of the many questions students have panicked over as they count down the days until the Homecoming dance on Saturday, Sept. 25. Science teachers Abbie Erker and Jill Fisher were in charge of helping the sophomore Student Council members plan Homecoming. Every year, the sophomore class has the opportunity to decide the theme, decorations, music and other aspects of the dance. Erker said her favorite part of Homecoming is the dance and the decorations.

Spirit Week through the last four decades infographic by rachel white

paladin

1979 - Lori Novascone and Nellie Ablah pose as the “Frito Banditos,” on Crazy Day. The “crazy” outfits consisted of many weird shoes, long socks, freaky glasses and wild hats.

by RACHEL WHITE sports editor

1989 - Freshman Sean Fowler dresses as a nerd during Spirit Week. Students came to school wearing colored bell bottoms and glasses with tape in the middle. journalism.kapaun.org


sports

What is your favorite part of Homecoming?

Watching the crowning at the football game and Spirit Week.

senior LIZ STASIEWICZ

“ “

“ “

Spirit Week because we don’t have to pay to dress up and it is fun to see people’s crazy outfits.

All the excitement and the atmosphere.

Going to dinner. I don’t eat all day so I can have a really good dinner. junior LAUREL LUJANO

arthead by maddie sleconich

infographic by maddie sleconich

1999 - Seniors Matt Nelson, Jenny Gore and Matt Gegen walk through the halls on Decade Day. Senior Isabel Val said she had to squeeze into her 4th grade clothes in order to look like she was from the ‘70s. journalism.kapaun.org

seniors MICHAEL REYNOLDS and WILL HUTTON

“We burn a T-shirt or hat of the opposing team,” senior noseguard Will Hutton said. Coach Dan Adelhardt said the tradition began last year when Ark City left a stocking hat and he picked it up. Since the football field was recently upgraded to turf, the team will now start a tradition of burying something of their opponents in the football “cemetery” behind the track. Seniors defensive end Michael Reynolds and Hutton said there is a lot of anticipation for the Homecoming game. The players and the coaches try not to make the game any different than the others. “We do not want it to be a distraction,” Reynolds said. “The only difference with the Homecoming game is we have a lot more fans.” Adelhardt said he wants his players not to get distracted and work hard. “You are going to remember this game if you win, so let’s take care of business,” Adelhardt said. The Homecoming game for this year will be against West. KMC also played West last year at Homecoming, resulting in a 63-0 victory for KMC. Both Hutton and Reynolds said the victory was one of their most memorable Homecoming moments in their years at KMC. DANCE The theme chosen for this year’s dance is “Egyptian.” Sophomores chose six-foot tall Egyptian sphinxes to decorate KMC the night of the Homecoming dance. “STUCO has ordered some really cool stuff,” sophomore Rachel Walker said. “They are even making palm trees out of gold balloons.” Now that students are finalizing their Homecoming preparation, they have the pep rally, game and dance to look forward to. “Sophomores picked out a really good theme,” Lujano said. “People should definitely be there.”

21

september

2009 - Wearing the most obnoxious and flamboyant clothing he could find, senior Cody Saunders dresses up for Clash Day. “The outfit exemplified what I wanted.” Saunders said.

paladin


22

sports

september

please patronize our paladin advertisers

paladin

journalism.kapaun.org


sports

september

23

Fall athletes compete as individuals, teams

alex scobee

3

1. FACING HER OPPONENT, sophomore

Emma Brooks prepares to return a serve from Southeast Sept. 9. “We were having a pretty intense match,” Brooks said. “I was using my game face, zoning in on the ball.”

2. SENIOR MICHAEL EDWARD runs down

1

the sideline in the Titan Classic vs. Heights Sept. 6. The Crusaders lost, 0-1. “We came out expecting to win especially in the second half,” Edward said. “We had an opportunity to a get a goal but didn’t finish.”

emily wittler

3. BEFORE THE GAME VS. SOUTH,

freshman Wesley Crowdus, junior Jenna Golay, senior Liz Stasiewicz and juniors Rachel Shearrer and Olivia Smith put their hands together during the pregame talk Sept. 2. The girls won all 3 games. SATURDAY MORNING, sophomore Lukas Maki approaches the finish line at the JK Gold Classic Sept. 4. “People kept yelling at me to go faster,” Maki said. Both boys and girls finished 3rd at the meet. 4.

12

tiana chin

4

emily wittler

Varsity volleyball first to experience new gym by MADELINE ENGEL web editor It was built, dedicated and blessed and now it has been broken in. On Sept. 2, the Kapaun Mt. Carmel varsity volleyball team played in the first official sporting event in the new Coach Herm and Jackie Bachrodt Athletic Complex. The team competed against South, winning 3-0. “It is always great to start the season off with a win, but what made it even better was that we got to start in such a beautiful facility,” coach Terri Hessman said. “The girls always want to play well at home, and I know that having a nice facility and updated equipment made it easier for them to do their best.” Senior Jenny Gerlach said the new gym journalism.kapaun.org

has many improved features. The changes make it easier for the players to perform to their fullest potential, Gerlach said. “The best thing that we have now is better lighting,” junior Molly Faragher said. “We also have sturdier nets, three courts instead of two and more room for serving which will really help us improve our game.” “All in all, the whole gym just feels a lot more professional, and it is a lot more fun to play in.” Not only were the players and coaches excited by the new gym, but officials, spectators and the other team were also impressed with the new facility, Hessman said. “At the first match, the officials who had been here before were overwhelmed,” Hessman said. “We got tons of compliments from the other team and the officials. It’s nice that we can be proud of our facilities and others can enjoy them too.”

anna gonzalez

IN SERVE RECIEVE, the volleyball team plays

against South Sept. 2 in the Coach Herm and Jackie Bachrodt Athletic Complex. KMC won 3-0. “The new gym is brighter and more open,” Golay said. “I look forward to playing more games there.” paladin


advertising

24

september

please patronize our paladin advertisers

PALADIN

kapaun mt. carmel 8506 e. central wichita, ks 67206

NON-PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE

PAID

PERMIT NO. 1151 WICHITA, KS 67206

Return Service Requested

YOUR NAME SHOULD BE HERE! To subscribe, call 316-634-0315 ext. 232

paladin

journalism.kapaun.org

September 2010 Paladin  

The newsmagazine of Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you