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news

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february

NEWS 4

School clubs are numerous, but some quickly die out. Activities Director Chris Bloomer explains.

OPINIONS 9

The year 2001 is rediscovered, with trends and how they are relevant to 2010.

kim pham

WHILE MAKING ROSARIES, juniors Amanda Phillips and Kelly Pham check on

their progress. The Handmaids of Mary, Schola Latina and Letters from Home clubs had a combined meeting to make rosaries for the troops Jan. 27.

FEATURE 10

Students with military aspirations share their stories and motives.

STUDENT 12 LIFE

Crusaders for Life hosts Baby Drive

Crusaders for Life, sponsored by chemistry teacher Alan Oberley, held their annual Baby Supply Drive Jan. 25-29. The drive was a COTY event. A certain amount of points was awarded for each item that was brought in. All donations will benefit A Better Choice. The charity is in the most need for diapers, formula and bathing essentials such as shampoo and wipes.

Clubs make rosaries for troops

A survival guide to Kapaun Mt. Carmel provides important tips and knowledge.

SPORTS 16

This year’s Super Bowl is Feb. 27, between the Colts and the Saints. Many students have traditions for this iconic event.

photos by emily baudouin, lindsey weixelman, brian norris, scott southern and marcella brooks; photo illustrations by emily baudouin

paladin

NEWS briefs

Handmaids of Mary, Letters from Home and Schola Latina (Latin Club) joined together to support the United States Army after school Jan. 27. The students were taught how to make both beaded and knot rosaries. Knot rosaries are important for people in the armed forces because they do not make noise that could give away their location during battle, religion and language teacher Helen Hund said.

Students place in art competition

Several students placed in the 2010 Scholastic Art competition. Senior Maria Lopez received a general display award for her mixed media piece titled The Tears and the

Rose. Senior Daniel Val received an honorable mention award for Portrait of a Girl, and a Silver Key award for Self-Portrait. Both are oil paintings. Senior Hannah Sattler received a Silver Key award for her mixed media piece Teddy Bear. Junior Chandler Puritty received a general display award for her ink drawing Classmates. Junior Matthew Fey also received a Silver Key award for his charcoal drawing The Streets of Rome. Sophomore Tianna Todd received an Honorable mention award for her ink drawing Contour Drawing. All of the award winning art will be on display at the Wichita Center for the Arts until Feb. 21.

Scholar’s Bowl places in Derby

The Novice Scholar’s Bowl team placed fourth at the Derby Invitational Jan. 25. Team members included sophomores Joe Cummings, Charles Brooks, Aaron Wolf and captain Charles Mohr, and freshmen Tony Raper and Josh Lund.

Drama department prepares for next production

Auditions for the spring musical Les Miserables were Jan. 22 and 26. The play centers around the struggles of ex-convict Jean Veljean and his search for redemption. The play will be performed later this semester. news briefs by hillary sevart


february

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Fr. Spexarth settling in as chaplain by ERIKA REALS asst. student life editor A new and unfamiliar face has been seen in the halls since the beginning of the semester. With his all-black attire and carefree smile, one would recognize this new face as Fr. Aaron Spexarth. He has been appointed as the new chaplain, replacing former chaplain Fr. Benjamin Shockey. “I was surprised because I didn’t know I’d get moved so soon,” Fr. Spexarth said. “The possibility of being a chaplain at a high school is one thing that drew me to the priesthood, and getting to carry that out is exciting.” Spexarth came to Kapaun Mt. Carmel from Church of the Magdalen at the beginning of the semester. He said he is slowly getting used to his job and learns something new every day. “Working at a parish church, there is the ability to work with people one-on-one and spiritual direction,” Fr. Spexarth said. “At a high school, I teach a class and get to know [students] individually.” Spexarth said his role as the school chaplain consists of many duties. “I organize retreats, say Masses, am a teacher, [help with] school council and March for Life, and anything else they tell

you,” Fr. Spexarth said. On Jan. 19, Fr. Spexarth and KMC students departed for Washington, D.C. for the March for Life on Jan. 22, the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. It was Fr. Spexarth’s first major event as the chaplain. “It was a good experience. The students helped keep things interesting and keeping me responsible,” Fr. Spexarth said. “Overall, they were great though.” While in Washington D.C., they spent their time visiting several museums, a few being the Air and Space Museum, National Archives and the Holocaust Museum. “The times that stood out to me were just getting to know the students,” Fr. Spexarth said. “From the small groups touring D.C. or the big groups at the March, to be with each other and just getting to know one another.” The KMC March for Life group left Washington, D.C. on the night of Jan. 23. “It was meaningful to me by witnessing the students at Kapaun Mt. Carmel make such a bold stand for

something they believe in, for the first time,” Fr. Spexarth said. Fr. Spexarth is not only coming in as a new chaplain to the school, but also as a new teacher to the seniors. He and Beth Ferraro collaborate to teach Christian Vocations. “I wanted to do a good job,” Fr. Spexarth said. “I’ve never been a full-time teacher and I worried about lesson plans.” Senior Melissa Davied said he seems to really enjoy working with students. “He didn’t even act frazzled or nervous the first day of class,” Davied said. “He started class off with a game, then got right on to teaching.” Davied said he really tries to make class fun, from teaching from the Cathechism and covering required material, but also incorporating his own stories. “[Teaching class at a high school] is exciting and Christian Vocations is a great course,” Fr. Spexarth said. “Teaching kids how to find their vocation in life is a very exciting part of my day.” photo by emily baudouin; photo illustration by lindsey weixelman

infographic by sean doyle; information obtained by danielle valliere; photo courtesy of cris stoddard; information from http://gallup.com, http://recovery.gov and http://opencongress.org

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february

Students have opportunity to create, join clubs with some restrictions; clubs occasionally die out before end of school year for variety of reasons by HILLARY SEVART asst. news editor

lindsey weixelman

AT THE LETTERS FROM HOME TABLE, junior

Haley Hungate waits for students to sign up at Back to School Night Aug. 26, 2009.

abuse their club privileges. “I think this [abuse] happens in a number of ways: students who join clubs simply to be Ideally, school clubs offer students a in the yearbook or students who rely on the place to fit in and a place to make friends adult sponsor to plan, set-up and execute all with people who share common interests. of the clubs activities,” Bloomer said. “Clubs At Back to School Night, the commons was are designed by students and for students filled with students signing up for every club to help them grow and while some students that caught their interest, but by the end take advantage of these opportunities, others of the first semester, club participation had pursue individual interests at the expense of begun to dwindle and some clubs became the club.” inactive. When clubs are being abused, there Chris Bloomer, is a chance that they assistant principal can become inactive. and activities “So many schools, ours included, KSHAA regulations director, is in charge are senior-led and the seniors tend help to prevent this. of regulating clubs at to care more about graduating dur“All clubs have to Kapaun Mt. Carmel. ing the second semester than about fill out an application He says it is his job that identifies their anything else and so the clubs take mission, how they to “help identify students’ interests a hit for that reason.” plan to support the and create a format in administrator CHRIS BLOOMER school’s mission and which those interests how they will establish can be pursued membership,” within the framework of a Catholic school Bloomer said. “Clubs then have to work to environment.” To do this, he finds out what develop requirements for their individual clubs students want and then ensures they club. Each club is asked to have at least four support the mission of the school, have adult major events. Depending upon the club, this supervision and meet Kansas State High has worked, for others it’s not quite doable.” School Activities Association (KSHSAA) Student Council is the largest club standards. at KMC. Bloomer said there is no major Currently eight out of 27 clubs are activity that occurs at the school without inactive. Bloomer says that students can StuCo involvement. Other clubs that remain PLAYING ROCK BAND,

marcella brooks

DURING A QUILL & SCROLL MEETING, seniors

Danielle Valliere, Emily Bengtson and Sarah Stadler and junior Michael Huff decorate boxes for the club’s annual book drive in November. The collected books were then donated to Via Christi and HeadStart. paladin

lindsey weixelman

senior Philip Pham, freshman Mathew Kaysen, senior Geoff Atkinson and senior Danny Huff recruit members to their Leisure Club at Back to School Night. The club has been labeled inactive.


february

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Getting involved not always as easy as it sounds infographic by sean doyle

strong are Ecology Club, Crusaders for Life and language clubs. Junior Leslie Carrillo has been involved with StuCo, as well as other clubs, since freshman year. “Right now, I am involved with StuCo, Letters from Home and [Thespian Troupe 695],” Carrillo said. “The reason I signed up for clubs was to get involved at school. By going to meetings, I get to meet people I wouldn’t normally meet.” Towards the beginning of second semester, some clubs began to have fewer meetings. “So many schools, ours included, are senior-led and the seniors tend to care more about graduating during the second semester than about anything else and so the clubs take a hit for that reason,” Bloomer said. “Also, our clubs tend to be led by the

infographic by bea tretbar

same group of people and when schedules conflict, clubs take a hit. The final and maybe greatest reason that clubs die out is that there is little to no dedicated time within the school day for clubs.” Even though some clubs have issues to work out, Bloomer said those at KMC are still successful. “I think that clubs are successful in getting kids involved and successful in allowing kids to see another side of KMC other than athletic or academic,” Bloomer said. “With that being said, are our clubs all that they could be? Not even close. I think that there is tremendous potential for club growth and participation; however, there would need to be some creative scheduling within the school day to support that growth.” additional reporting by danielle valliere

Freshman year presents several questions. One of these questions is: How do I get involved? Do not be fooled. This seemingly innocent question’s double meaning is asking: who will I be during my highschool career? Will I devote my time to being a thespian, artist, peppyperson, Mary devotee, HALSTEN HIGGINS eco-geek etc.? staff writer I remember getting Mr. Bloomer’s “get involved” speech. I look back and think he may have been talking more about sports, but I naturally ruled that out (the unathletic usually do). His talk inspired me. When the grand doors to the Activities Fair opened, I was thrilled to find an assortment of clubs readily awaiting my membership. “Sign here,” “Be a member here,” “Join here,” was sounding through the commons. And I did. I signed up for about 10 clubs, one of which I attended the meetings for. One club in particular had a grand poster, right up front, baiting all the innocent students into its awful plan. I signed up and attended the first meeting. We talked of shirts, field trips, guest speakers—all great ideas. The meeting left me wanting more. This was where I would fit in. I waited for information about the next meeting, but recieved none. I even went as far to ask the president, a senior, when it was. She answered, very indifferently, she did not know when. After four months with no mention of a future meeting, I began to question the club’s existence. When five months went by, I knew the end had come and moved on. Following this sad death, I attended ecology club and found it fit my wounded morale well. The activities were fun and the meetings were consistent—all great attributes of a club. The moral of this story: finding a hobby is important, and persistence is vital in finding it. For those not blessed with the balance and strength necessary for athletics or the talent necessary for art or acting, clubs are the next best thing. paladin


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news

february

infographic by sean doyle; photos by lindsay weixelman and kim pham

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february

opinions

7

LETTER

PALADIN

from the editor

staff EDITOR IN CHIEF katie moore DESIGN EDITORS bea tretbar, sean doyle ONLINE/COPY EDITOR katie gilbaugh PHOTO EDITOR emily baudouin ONLINE PHOTO EDITOR kelsey prather ADVERTISING/ BUSINESS MANAGER victoria gillam NEWS EDITOR danielle valliere OPINIONS EDITOR meredith osborne FEATURE EDITOR anna le STUDENT LIFE EDITOR alyssa bambick SPORTS EDITOR bailey buer ASST. NEWS EDITOR hillary sevart ASST. STUDENT LIFE EDITOR erika reals ASST. SPORTS EDITOR madeline engel ASST. COPY EDITOR emily lutz CIRCULATION MANAGER katelyn real STAFF WRITERS katie hand, emma kaiser, kyle bomgardner, matthew riedl, alyssa scott, halsten higgins STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS marcella brooks, tiana chin, anna gonzalez, zach holland, mattie lonergan, cindy nguyen, brian norris, kim pham, alex scobee, maddie sleconich, scott southern, lindsey weixelman, emily wittler ADVISER ashley perkins

EDITORIAL

policy The Paladin is a monthly, studentproduced newsmagazine, published to inform and entertain the Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School community and educate journalism students. Each issue is produced with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Student staff members will be offered opportunities to inform, investigate, entertain, interpret and evaluate: all accepted functions of traditional American press. Included materials will be those of responsible journalism, including restraint by the students and adviser in matters such as libel, privacy, obscenity and copyright. The staff chooses to reflect the mission of Kapaun Mt. Carmel, a diocesan Catholic high school, to serve the interests and needs of the community and to provide fair, objective, accurate and truthful materials. Opinions do not necessarily reflect views of anyone other than the Paladin staff. Digital photos have not been altered to manipulate reality. Photo illustrations are labeled to reflect any technical alterations. Anonymity may be given in the following cases: the information is unable to be presented another way, the information warrants anonymity, the source’s privacy and/or reputation requires protection and the source must be protected from damages. A student or faculty member death during the coverage period will be covered with a short obituary. Advertising must meet the same guidelines as editorial content. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement by the school. Students pictured in advertising must sign a release and accept no monetary compensation. Advertising rates available on request. School organization discount rates are available. Corrections of errors will appear in the appropriate section of the next issue.

Dear PALADIN readers,

PALADIN editorial

leah grant

emily wittler

Popularity and politics, Obama’s first year in office according to http://nobelprize.org/ Gracing the covers of Rolling nobel_prize/peace/laureates. Whether Stone, Men’s Vogue, Vanity Fair and he was more qualified than the other US Weekly over the past year, Barack 205 nominated to win the award is Obama has been depicted as a trendy questionable to some, yet what cannot and fresh alternative to the typically be denied is how his election brought stuffy, old presidents of the past. The out young voters to become more only problem is if this “cool kid” can politically active. handle the very tricky popularity Lastly, one of the most contest he won while still managing our controversial country. topics is America’s On page 3, “Barack Obama has been Affordable Health the Paladin looks back at Obama’s depicted as a trendy and Choices Act of 2009. first year as fresh alternative to the typi- This bill had new acts added to it last President of the cally stuffy, old presidents minute that the United States. of the past.” majority of congress First discussed had not read, and is his $787 billion has caused the stimulus package government to pay for certain state’s in February 2009. With this package, health care, Nebraska for example, in American began to see a popular trend in congress: passing a bill without most order to get senate votes according to http://abcnews.go.com/Business/ legislators reading it. Obama promised wireStory?id=9490499. For Catholics, that with this stimulus package, this bill is something to be feared, unemployment would not increase funding abortions according to http:// from eight percent. A year later, the www.lifenews.com/nat5818.html. majority of the stimulus money has not Despite much criticism in his been spent and unemployment is now first year, there is room for President 10 percent nationally since the bill was Obama to improve if he listens to the passed, reaching 16 percent in several people of the United States — the urban areas according to http://www. people who believed he would be truly foxnews.com/opinion/2010/01/18/ a fresh start to positive changes. This bradley-blakeman-obama-year. can still happen. We live in a country In his first year, Obama also where all men are created equal, received the Nobel Peace Prize. Past endowed with certain inalienable rights recipients include the 14th Dalai Lama, including life, liberty and the pursuit Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther of happiness. This should also include King Jr. Obama is said to have received the award “for his extraordinary efforts the right to have Obama make more out of his popularity contest — er, his to strengthen international diplomacy presidency. and cooperation between peoples”

Traditions give a school dimension and uniqueness. Kapaun Mt. Carmel is different from other schools not only because it is Catholic, but also because of the personalities we all contribute to the school. Not every school has students who march for life (page 10), people who have distinct Super Bowl traditions (page 16) and coaches with identifiable quirky traits (page 17). We are fortunate to attend a school where all these personalities have an opportunity to come together in common interests to create or join a club, although some diminish over time, as can be read on pages 3-4. As always, we invite your ideas, input and letters. All letters should be under 150 words and signed. We reserve the right to edit or omit any letters. Baseless accusations, libelous statements, insults or unsigned letters will not be considered for publication. Take letters to Room 215 or mail to the address below. Sincerely, Katie Moore, Editor in Chief

KAPAUN MT. CARMEL

paladin 8506 E. Central Wichita, Kan. 67206 Phone: (316) 634-0315, ext. 232 Fax: (316) 636-2437 kmcjournalism@kapaun.org

COVER

shot

IN PE CLASS, coach Bernie

Pearson Jan. 26.

directs

students

cover by sean doyle photo by brian norris

paladin


opinions

8

Do you have any advice for surviving Kapaun Mt. Carmel?

Watch out for Ms. Dandurand when you are not in dress code.

JANAYE GILBERTSON

senior

Develop a great prayer life, finish all of your assignments, get involved and do your best.

JARED DREILING

junior

Be organized and get involved - do sports and clubs. StuCo is a lot of fun, too.

PAUL LIEVENS

sophomore

.

“ ”

Just keep swimming.

TYLER JENNINGS

freshman information obtained by emma kaiser and halsen higgins

paladin

february

Sitting in a top secret place in my room I found myself laughing to the point of tears are a stack of eleven notebooks. Some are on several occasions. Because of an ad seen in a magazine, I decorated with stickers and pictures, some came already adorned with polka dots and became a vegetarian, a reformed sort that a few are plain wire bound notebooks, but wouldn’t eat pork, but every other type of all have one thing in common: they are full meat was acceptable. My animal rights movement was not of ridiculous musings, pointless stories and limited only to not eating naïve daydreams. (certain) animals, but to This stack of notebooks comforting animals in their makes up the story of my life times of need: from sixth grade on - they are “In science class 2day my diaries. we dissected frogs. I held Recently, I tackled the the frog’s hand while they dusty pile of my old journals. were cutting him up. I wantI was excited and a little nered 2 let him outside, but he vous to re- read them - mainly wuz already dead. Plus that the entries written during might freak everyone out a middle school (a.k.a. the worst time of everyone’s life. MEREDITH OSBORNE little bit 2 c a dead frog lying outside.” If someone says it is not- they opinions editor Due to an incident are lying.) where a boy pointed out that I opened the cover to see my vegetarianism was not the date: Monday, March 8, 2004, followed by a language that hardly qualified as Eng- authentic, my activism after that was shortlish. “You” had turned into “u,” “because” lived. The rest of my entries range from my had morphed into “cuz” and every sentence was followed by about five exclamation crusade for a push -up bra (“I need some lift”) to friend drama to five page entries points and/or a smiley face. A standard entry began with what boy about said boyfriend. It is fun to rediscover asked me to borrow a pencil that day, my the person that I was, and how I see myself predictions for the American Idol finale and doing the same things six years later, although I can assure you that my understandended with my plans for that weekend. I analyzed every move my then-boy- ing of the english language has improved. My boyfriend and I may have split in friend made, although our only interactions consisted of passing notes and holding eighth grade and I am sure the frog we dihands after school. If he looked at me during sected has long forgotten me, but at least I class when the teacher said the word “love” can access them whenever I want through it meant that we would definitely be “2gether by way of my diaries. Thanx 4 reading my column, hope you thot it was gr8!!! :) 4ever.” Just Smile Back is a monthly column While revisiting my middle school past, Overheard in the halls of KMC...

“Dude, toes are like fingers but on your foot!” “I wish alarm clocks could punch you in the face.” “Patrick Swayze is so hot.” “I think he’s like, dead?” “Who cares? He’s still hot.” “Freshmen, can’t live with them, can’t throw them in the ocean - it’s too far away.” illustration by maria lopez


opinions

february

A bi-monthly Paladin feature that examines past trends and explains how they can still be relevant today.

Movie TV

The trend...

Ocean’s Eleven

Scrubs

Movie

Trend Music

iPod

Room for Squares by John Mayer

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...in 1999...

...and today.

A plot to break into three casinos in the same night is accompanied by an attractive cast. The humor brought in gave the film the perfect balance of action and comedy.

After a terrible sequel and a mediocre third movie, Danny Ocean’s team proved that you can’t mess with perfection.

Following a hilarious group of doctors at the wacky Sacred Heart Hospital, episodes of Scrubs never ceased to make audiences laugh.

Now in the ninth season, viewers can still tune in on Tuesday at 8 p.m. to get their Scrubs fix for the week.

The release of the first generation iPod had the majority of society bidding farewell to clunky portable CD and cassette players forever.

Although the overall design has changed drastically, the basic concept has stayed the same: music portability and functionality.

The introduction of John Mayer’s brooding vocals and master guitar playing came with his first single, No Such Thing.

Mayer’s albums continue to revolutionize the music world. His new album provides a different sound than previous releases, but still promises to be satisfying.

Despite discomfort, donating blood is worth it Once I had recovered from the slight “This may result in dizziness, fainting in front of a gym full of people and utter embar- discomfort, my lovely phlebotomist said, “Oops, didn’t quite get into rassment.” the vein.” If only the American Red After uttering these Cross employees had warned horrifying words, she prome of these possible “side efceeded to move the needle fects” of giving blood, I might around in my arm for aphave avoided all of the above. proximately 30 seconds. I am glad they did not. Inside, I was screaming, To help the community, I “Why did I sign up for signed up to donate blood for this?” the first time at the annual blood After this initial tordrive last February. DANIELLE VALLIERE ture, the actual giving of The day came quickly. Durthe blood was somewhat ing second block, I walked confinews editor painless, disregarding the dently to the gym and sat in line nausea. Finally, after about for about 30 minutes. Soon, I was ushered to something that nine minutes, I was done. I popped right up out of the beach chair looked like a beach chair. My phlebotomist took my left arm and, in a slightly disgrun- and sauntered over to the canteen area. Then, as if I had not experienced enough, tled tone, said, “Ooooh, you have teeny tiny my head started to swim. “Don’t puke, please veins.” At that point, I was feeling slightly un- don’t puke,” I whispered to myself. By then, people had noticed something certain about my decision. As I clutched the was wrong: “Danielle, are you okay? You’re chair, the needle poked into my left arm.

really pale.” They ran and told some Red Cross ladies about my condition. Meanwhile, I was teetering over the line of unconsciousness. The ladies ran over and laid the ailing ol’ me on the floor, all the while proclaiming my courage: “Give Danielle that crown, because she’s a princess.” After a couple minutes on the floor, they determined I was okay to get up. At that moment, I decided that I would never give blood again. But then, a couple months later, I received a shiny, red blood donor card in the mail and a postcard declaring I had helped save lives. Soon after, the Red Cross called me to ask if I would donate again. How could I say no? In July, I gave again and everything went much more smoothly. This was probably because I had recognized something: the slight discomfort of giving blood was completely worth it. Thinking of the infants, children, adults and elderly I could help made me realize donating blood was the easiest thing I have ever done. paladin


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photos by emily baudouin, lindsay weixelman; infographic, arthead and design by bea tretbar

After discovering call to ser ve countr y, Huff joins Marines by MATT RIEDL staff writer

There are many career paths one can choose in life. Some are easy; some are difficult. Going into the military is not one of the easier paths; however, senior Danny Huff has already made the decision to enlist in the Marines. “I know that I’m meant to go into the military,” Huff said. “Nothing triggered my decision. I guess I’ve just always known.” For Huff, the Marines appealed more to him than any other branch of the military, as he believes it is more physically demanding.

“Since I’m going into the military, I want to go all the way,” Huff said. “I wanted the best training and I found all the best aspects in the Marines.” Huff’s family background also helped him to choose the Marines. “My uncle George Lizarlde definitely influenced me to join the Marines,” Huff said. “He was a 20year Marine.” The Marines require that their recruits be very physically fit. Huff said he has been preparing ever since he enlisted. “I’ve been training every day,” Huff said. “[I have been] working out with the Marines, doing basic training every Wednesday and doing [St. Gianna Catho-

lic] Health Academy, doing some medical training.” When one joins the Marines, academics cannot be ignored. According to http://www. marines.com, the Marines require that their recruits be well versed in United States war history, first aid skills, and Marine customs. The Marines develop leadership skills in its recruits. All recruits learn the 11 Leadership Principles and the 14 Leadership Traits. Huff said he will continue to train until he officially joins the Marine ranks, on the front line infantry. His true desire is to be on special forces but first he must prove himself as an infantryman. “All I want to be is one of the few, the proud, the Marines,” Huff said.

Students prepare themselves for Air Force after complex enlisting process by ANNA LE features editor

Throughout history, there have been many children who followed in the footsteps of their fathers, such as the Kennedys, Bushes, Barrymores and Rockefellers. This is the case for senior Jennifer Erskin, who plans on joining the United States Air Force. “My dad retired a colonel from the Air Force,” Erskin said. “Growing up in a military style household has definitely influenced me to enlist.” Enlisting is a complex process, Erskin said. It requires a good score on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Batter (ASVAB) exam and one must take a physical Military Entrance Processing Station (MEPS) exam in Kansas City before enlisting. Next, one fills out paperwork for top-security

paladin

clearance. The final step is signing the enlistment papers and taking the official oath. The whole process can be long or short depending on how quickly the requirements are completed. To be involved with the Air Force one must understand teamwork, selflessness, hard work, patriotism and willingness to make sacrifices, Erskin said. “For starters, after completing basic training and Topographic Engineering Center (TEC) school next year, I will be a year behind the class I’m graduating with this year,” Erskin said. “Also, I am devoting the next six years of my life to the Air Force before I can consider another full-time career if I choose to. I must also be willing to go on a combat tour if I am sent.”

One must also have the passion and desire to serve the country. Although he does not have a family member in the military to influence his decision, senior Landis Goodman said the military life is something he has always wanted. “I have always known that I was going to end up enlisting in the military,” Goodman said. “My parents didn’t seem surprised when I turned in my paperwork and enlisted.” Goodman and Erskin have prepared themselves for the military by doing well in school and staying in good physical shape. “I am excited and eager for all of the things I’m going to be able to do,” Erskin said. “I can’t wait to get through basic and really start my career.”


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A

Navy allows ser vice to countr y, leadership, self-esteem opportunity by MATT RIEDL staff writer

Everyone responds to the call of service in a different way. Some people know exactly what they want to do, while others spend years discerning their call. Senior Gabe Czepiel has known that he wanted to go into the Navy for years. “I’ve always been fascinated with ships,” Czepiel said. The Navy offers several benefits to those who enlist, and Czepiel especially enjoys the financial benefits. “You won’t be in debt in college,” Czepiel said. “You’ll get paid to go to college.” Czepiel, however, is not planning to go to college before joining the Navy. “I am immediately going to boot camp in Great Lakes, outside of Chicago,” Czepiel said. “It’s going to be rough.” Before one arrives at the boot camp, he or she has to go through the enlistment process, which sometimes can be difficult with protective parents. “My parents knew I had interest in the Navy since I was 12,” Czepiel said. “Before I signed the papers [at the Military Entrance Processing Station in Kansas City], I called my mom and told her I was going to join,” Czepiel said. “She said she was proud of me, and is glad I’m not going to be in debt after school.” Ever since he enlisted, Czepiel has been preparing for the shock of the new experience. “I’ve been keeping out of trouble, mak-

ing sure I drive perfectly,” Czepiel said. “I’ve been packing away everything in my room.” Military life is extremely different than civilian life, especially in the amount of commitments one has to make. “You can’t get attached to a place for too long,” Czepiel said. “You have to [learn to] take orders, and you can’t be stubborn.” Czepiel’s position in the Navy is going to be that of intelligence specialist. Czepiel is going to be stationed for six years in Ramstein, Germany, at the Navy intelligence headquarters. Other students are considering the Navy besides Czepiel. One such student is senior Stephanie Solis, who attended the Naval Academy Summer Seminar in Annapolis, Maryland, last summer. At this camp, Solis learned all about the Navy and was given a crash course in being a naval student. “It showed me how rigorous the curriculum [is] and how much dedication it would take,” Solis said. “I got physically fit.” The camp is designed for juniors going into their senior year in high school, to educate them about the Academy. “My dad signed me up,” Solis said. “I think my dad chose the Naval Academy because of [its] amazing academic program, focusing mostly on math and sciences.” Solis is still considering the Navy, but she is currently weighing her options. “I am considering it, but I am not sure that I would like to join [yet],” Solis said.

Solis says that if she did decide to join the Navy, her family and friends would be very supportive and proud of her. “The Navy serves our country as well as develops our future leaders,” Solis said. “We [owe a lot] to them because they protect our waters and get less credit than those who are in the Army.” To both Czepiel and Solis, the Navy represents an opportunity to serve the country that they both love; an opportunity that will not last forever. Navy Aviation Structural Mechanic 2nd Class Scott Smith said that the benefits of the Navy are too good to pass up. “You get self-pride and independence when you join the Navy,” Smith said. “It’s the intangible things that you can’t really measure by anything. It’s the pride you have in yourself, knowing that you have served your country.” Smith believes that the Navy is the best branch of the military to enlist in because of what sets the Navy apart from other branches. “The Navy does a lot more humanitarian work,” Smith said. “Everybody sees the military as war mongers, but I’ve got to see us go to the Dominican Republic and Haiti [to] save lives.” Whatever path one decides to take in life, one always has to remember to thank those that keep the country a safe place to live. “Be respectful to your armed forces, because they’re fighting for us and giving us everything we have,” Czepiel said.

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12

student life

february

1

arthead by bea tretbar

This month on “Student Survivor” the three remaining contestants participated in a Valentine’s Day challenge. Each student wrote a short love poem about something or someone that he or she finds significant in life. No student will be exempt this month. Senior Shannon O’Neill was eliminated lastmonth. The next month will be the final “Student Survivor” challenge. All students are invited to watch the two remaining contestants compete for the title of “Student Survivor.” The time and date are to be announced. Who do you think should be voted off this month? Bring this ballot to Room 215 by Feb. 10. Mesfin Small

ShaNiece Pyles

Laurel Lujano paladin

My Dearest ShaNiece by senior Mesfin Small ShaNiece...I love everything that you do. My dearest ShaNiece, I hope you love me like I love you. Seeing you in the hall just makes my day. Especially the way that you make your pants sway. My dearest ShaNiece, I hope that someday you’ll notice me out of the blue... I’m just kidding, I don’t even like you.

Mom by junior Laurel Lujano

She always makes me feel better or never lets me quit, she even takes care of me when I’m really sick. I can’t live without her and I miss her when I’m gone. she’s my role model, hero, and my amazing mom.

For My Funny Valentine =) by junior ShaNiece Pyles Roses are red, violets are blue when I am with you I feel so cool. You make me smile and sometimes mad too, but it’s okay, I still like you. So just to remind you, roses are red, violets are blue, but I like milk chocolate and stuffed teddy bears too!


february

student life

13

arthead by bea tretbar

1

1

marcella brooks

1

2

marcella brooks

marcella brooks

3

2

3

3

4

marcella brooks

marcella brooks

5

1. AT A PRO-LIFE RALLY, junior Alejandra Martinez and seniors Emily Siegman and Leah

Grant listen to pro-life speakers Jan. 22. The rally marked the start of the March for Life. “It is an experience I will never forget,” Siegman said. 2. SENIORS JOHN STOUT AND KELSEY BALL stay warm during the March for Life on Jan.

22. “It was powerful having so many people together for the same cause,” Ball said.

3. IN FRONT OF THE WHITE HOUSE, junior Katie Hand and senior Marie Schaller take

pictures with the rest of the group. The students walked by the White House before heading to the Capitol Building to begin the March. “I had a really great time,” Schaller said. “I was really amazed at how many people showed up to march.”

4. CONGREGATING BEFORE THE MARCH, a group of Kapaun Mount Carmel students

await the walk. The 37 students who attended the March protested against abortion. “I thought 4 it was amazing that so many people came together for a common cause. You can hear a number, but to see is different,” senior Chris Kliewer said. 5. AS THE MARCH COMES TO AN END, senior Courtney Phillips stands near the Supreme

Court building. “I was surprised that I didn’t see more pro-choice people trying to change our minds, ” Phillips said. The March came to a close around 5:30 p.m. 6. AMONG APPROXIMATELY 300,000 PROTESTERS senior Sam Felts walks from emily baudouin

6

Constitution Avenue to Capitol Hill and to the Supreme Court and Congress Jan. 22.

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february


sports

february

15

INSIDE THE LINES CODY LONERGAN

ACTIVITY: Senior Cody Lonergan prepares to compete against Bishop Carroll Jan. 28.

lindsey weixelman

When he did not make the basketball team freshman year, senior Cody Lonergan was not sure what to do. Lonergan’s uncle suggested that he try out for the swim team. “My uncle was a big time high school swimmer,” Lonergan said. “I just thought ‘Why not?’ and went for it.” Lonergan has been swimming for the Kapaun Mt. Carmel team for four years. Both his swimming ability and relationship with the team has developed over the years, Lonergan said. “Some of my favorite memories of the swim team are from carb meals at Fazoli’s,” Lonergan said. “It may seem odd, but it’s a lot of fun for us and connects us as a team.” Another way that Lonergan bonds with the team is through his leadership and positive, encouraging attitude, coach Chris Erikson said. “Cody is a very vocal leader, but he leads by example too,” senior Christian Kehr said. “Mainly he helps them by cheering them on when they are racing.” The two accomplishments that stick out to Lonergan most are winning the 200 medley relay at City League and qualifying for state in 2009. “Although he didn’t place at state last year, Cody continues to improve,” Erikson said. “He wasn’t disheartened or anything after state. Cody has very high goals for himself, and he will do whatever it takes to reach and accomplish them.” madeline engel

Boys Swim State @ TBD, 8 a.m.

@ KMC, 6 p.m.

Bowling vs. Northwest @TBD, 4 p.m.

23

Boys, Girls Basketball vs. South @KMC 6 p.m.

Boys Swim vs. GWAL @ TBD

Wrestling vs. Southeast @Southeast, 7 p.m.

18

25

Bowling GWAL JV Tournament TBD, 2:30 p.m.

FRIDAY

11

FRIDAY

Girls 16vs. Boys, Basketball Northwest

THURDAY

MONDAY

Bowling vs. Collegiate @TBD, 3:30 p.m.

THURSDAY

20

8

THURSDAY

Wrestling GWAL @ Heights 8 a.m.

TUESDAY

13

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Boys, Girls Basketball vs. Heights @Heights, 6 p.m.

SATURDAY SATURDAY

5

crusader sports calendar 12

Boys, Girls Basketball vs. Bishop Carroll @Bishop Carroll, 6 p.m.

19

Boys, Girls Basketball vs. East @ KMC, 6 p.m.

Boys, Girls Basketball vs. North @ KMC, 6 p.m. infographic by sean doyle; photos by emily baudouin and marcella brooks

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sports

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february

arthead and infographic by sean doyle; photo by scott southern; information obtained by alyssa scott and madeline engel; 120 students surveyed on Jan. 15 and Jan. 18

Yearly customs create memorable Super Bowl experiences by BAILEY BUER sports editor Chips crunching, fans shouting, laughter bouncing off the walls – all are noises one may hear during a party for what is called the biggest football game of the year, the Super Bowl. Some watch for the game. Others find entertainment during the commercials, and some have no interest in the event at all. According to http://www. superbowlhistory.net, the Super Bowl was created when the American Football League and National Football League merged in 1966. The first Super Bowl Championship took place in 1967. This year the Colts will be playing the Saints in Miami Feb. 7. Many football fans tune into the game no matter what teams are playing. “If you follow football, it’s for the game,” junior Keaton Lewis said. ‘The Titans played in 2000, [and] lost in the last play. If that would have happened now I would have cried.” Lewis said commercials lure non-football fans into watching the game.

“Some are really stupid,” freshman Phoebe Loher said. “Some are really funny to watch, and everyone puts that on their Facebook status.” Some students, such as freshman Mari Hoffman, host parties for the game. “We always have a big party with the same families, and we have a lot of fun hanging out together,” Hoffman said. “We usually sit downstairs and watch the game. We always have chips and dip, hamburgers, little smokies and fruit pizza.” The amount of preparation that goes into planning the party caused Lewis’ parents to quit hosting about two years ago. “My parents used to throw this huge Super Bowl party with like 300 people there,” Lewis said. “I think they just got tired

of it every single year – sending out all the invitations, getting all the food, cleaning the house and all that.” Commercial watchers, football fans, chip eaters and party attendees alike may be surprised to learn some peers do not share in the Super Bowl experience. “I just don’t watch it,” freshman Tony Silveira said. “I have better things to do. I’m not really a football fan, so it doesn’t really matter to me. We’re not a football family.” Whether one watches the game, the commercials or does not participate at all, the Super Bowl continues to be an American tradition. “[The Super Bowl] is what football is famous for,” Lewis said. “It is the most watched game in the United States.”

Three recipes to satisfy one’s football party cravings Cheesy Football

Serves: 12 Ingredients: 2 (8 oz.) packages cream cheese, softened 1 (8 oz.) package shredded sharp cheddar cheese 1/2 c. grated parmesan cheese 1/2 c. Miracle Whip 1/4 c. chopped green onions 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1 c. chopped pecans Directions: Beat cheeses and dressing with electric mixer on medium speed until well blended. Add onions and black pepper; mix well. Chill several hours or overnight. Form into football shape, roll in pecans. Garnish with pimento strips or roasted red pepper strips.

Basic Buffalo Wings

Makes 36 appetizers Ingredients: 6 tblsps. of butter of margarine 1/4 c. of hot sauce 18 chicken wings (about 3 pounds), disjointed with tips discarded Vegetable oil, for frying Directions: Melt better in a small sauce pan. Add hot sauce and remove from the heat. Set aside. In a large frying pan or deep-fat fryer, heat one inch of oil to 360 degrees. Fry wings in batches, without crowding, for about 10 - 15 minutes or until golden brown. Drain on paper towels. Brush wings with spicy butter mixture and serve warm.

recipes from http://www.cooksrecipes.com and http://www.cdkitchen.com

paladin

Chili Beef Express

Serves: 4 Ingredients: 1 lb. 95 percent lean ground beef 1/4 tsp. of salt 1/4 tsp. of pepper 1 (15 1/2 oz.) can chili beans in chili sauce, undrained 1 (14 1/2 oz.) can chili-style chunky tomatoes, undrained 1 c. frozen corn Directions: Cook ground beef in a large nonstick skillet over medium heat 10 minutes, breaking up into 3/4 inch crumbles. Pour off drippings; season with salt and pepper. Stir in beans, tomatoes and corn; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 10 minutes.


february

sports

17

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19

Wrestling defeats Carroll after several years of loss

CRUSADER

scores

by DYLAN ROGERSON

class. McCormick was competing against Carroll’s John Morgan; neither wrestler would be considered a ‘normal’ heavy weight wrestler, as neither of The Kapaun Mt. Carmel wrestling them weighed over 250 pounds. team celebrated in victory against BishThe match was close; in fact, Mcop Carroll Jan. 21 for the first time in 12 Cormick was down by three points until years. he caught Morgan on his back. KMC The KMC started off well, winning won with a final score 39-34. three of the first four matches of the The win against Carroll only adds dual. to the team’s suc“We felt fairly cess which ingood going into the “Most people won matches cludes winning its dual,” senior Dylan home tournament Matheny said. “We that they normally would Jan. 16. 1 are solid through the not have. Our coaches were “I was really entire team.” ecstatic about the victory. happy [that we Senior Jona- They were jumping up and won] because I than Truman won knew it was godown. ” his match in the 189 ing to be a tough, weight class which junior TYLER DRYDEN tough match,” left the score 27-34, sophomore Chase with Carroll in the Upchurch said. lead. “Our coaches pushed us to make us With only two matches left it was work harder.” important that KMC win both in order The team practiced a week more to win the dual. than it usually would to prepare for the Carroll had only one other com- match against Carroll. petitor for the evening giving KMC six “Most people won matches that points for an open spot. Unfortunately they normally would not have,” junior for Matheny, whose season record is Tyler Dryden said. “Our coaches were currently 29-1, he received the only bye all ecstatic about the victory. They were of the evening. jumping up and down.” 2 “I was a little frustrated,” Matheny The team has more competitions said. “It shows tremendous respect that this year including City League Feb. 13 they didn’t want to take their chances at Heights and state March 5 and 6 at against me, but I still wanted to wres- the new downtown Intrust Bank Arena. tle.” “We need to finish top in City and This left the score 33-34, with Car- do well at state; beating Carroll was one roll barely hanging onto the lead and of the first steps, now we just need to go junior Joe McCormick the final com- the next few steps,” Matheny said. additional reporting by alyssa scott petitor of the night in the heavy weight

w

boys BASKETBALL VARSITY Southeast 12/4

KMC

83

87

West 12/8

53

64

Heights 12/11

63

57

Northwest 12/18

75

63

St. James Academy 12/19

Bishop Carroll 1/5

East 1/8

74

61

South 1/12

44

50

West 1/15

50

76

Circle 1/21

39

71

Collegiate 1/22

70

61

El Dorado 1/23

50

JV

54

60

35

40

59

North 1/26

78

66

Southeast 12/4

37

55 69

Newton 12/7

28

West 12/8

62

Heights 12/11

58

54

Northwest 12/18

42

59

St. James Academy 12/19

51

49

32

46

Bishop Carroll 1/5 East 1/8

70

63

South 1/12

34

68

West 1/15

47

57

69

girls BASKETBALL VARSITY

Southeast 12/4

Opponent KMC

51

39

West 12/8

26

82

Northwest 12/18

67

48

St. James Academy 12/19

37

36

Bishop Carroll 1/5

34

31

East 1/8

44

39

South 1/12

21

53

West 1/15

15

50

North 1/19

68

Heights 1/22

64

34

Southeast 12/4

39

45

West 12/8

22

71

Northwest 12/18

53

St. James Academy 12/19

36

39

Bishop Carroll 1/5

43

25

JV

59

50

East 1/8

31

30

South 1/12

13

42

West 1/15

30

66

North 1/19

27

55

Heights 1/22

57

30

boys WRESTLING VARSITY

Opponent 15

63

East 12/10

12

66

Douglas Tournament 12/12

South 12/17

Raytown South Tournament 12/18

39

West 1/6

Augusta Tournament 1/9

Kapaun Mt. Carmel Tournament 1/16

Bishop Carroll 1/21

22

VARSITY

Third 26 Eighth 56 Second First

34

boys SWIMMING

KMC

North 12/3

4

Opponent

Opponent

39

KMC

East 12/3

96

87

Northwest 12/3

60

110

North 12/10

11

83

Southeast 1/6

55

116

El Dorado Inv. 1/9

Second

South 1/14

Heights 1/21

team BOWLING

VARSITY

122

54

55

39

Girls

Boys

Bishop Carroll 1/9

Eigth

Sixteenth

Southeast 1/14

1880

1970

West 1/21

1702

2035

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February 2010 Paladin  

February 2010 Paladin

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