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december

NEWS 5

The evolution of new technologies and their effects on the young generation are assessed.

OPINIONS 8

Rediscover 1989 critiques trends from that year and how they are relevant today.

marcella brooks

IN FOODS CLASS, sophomore Abigail Rinkenbaugh stirs cucumbers, broccoli,

mushrooms and carrots into a stir-fry pan Nov. 11. The class focuses on preparing dessert items, but occasionally makes meals.

FEATURE 10

The psychology of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder is explained.

STUDENT 12 LIFE Having trouble finding the perfect gift for a friend or family member? Check out the gift-giving guide.

NHS announces new members

Inductees of National Honor Society were announced Nov. 30. They include seniors Kaitlin Basto, Maddie Hesse, Bridget Lienhard, Lindsay McGrath, Kiley Riegel, Daniel Stuart and juniors Jack Cantele, Kayla Rathert, Katie McGreevy, Chloe Haffley, Will Hutton, Matthew Riedl, Natalie Santiago, Katie Staats, Bea Tretbar and Tom Wittler. To be eligible to apply for NHS, students must have a 3.8 or above GPA, and receive five or more votes from the faculty and be interviewed by a panel of teachers.

Drama performs Lucky Stiff

SPORTS 16

Staying fit year-round leads to a healthier lifestyle and makes losing weight easier.

photo illustrations by emily baudouin; photos by emily baudouin, sean doyle

paladin

NEWS briefs

The drama department performed Lucky Stiff, a musical farce starring seniors Sean Doyle, Anna Le, Elizabeth Strunk, Heidi Hurtig, Patrick Pirtle, Dylan Rogerson, juniors Spencer Rotolo-Utz, Bruce Hadley, Leslie Carillo and sophomore Rachel Conrad, Nov. 19-21 in the KMC auditorium. The play was about the adventures of a nephew fulfilling his uncle’s dying wish of a vacation to Monte Carlo. The department’s next play has yet to be announced and will be performed in the spring.

Scholars’ Bowl succeeds

The varsity Scholars’ Bowl team placed third at the Northeast Magnet tournament Nov. 28. Team members included senior Caitlin Lahey, juniors Seamus Bann, Matthew Riedl and Joey Wenberg and captain sophomore Jared Ojile.

Feeder schools visit

Eighth graders from various Wichita schools attended Future Crusader Day Dec. 3. Student Council members led the students in a tour of the school. The eighth graders were shown what classes are like at KMC and received a KMC T-shirt before they left.

Fr. Kapaun documentary to be shown

The school will show the film documenting Fr. Kapaun’s life Sunday, Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. in the auditorium. The documentary focuses on Kapaun’s heroic actions during the Korean War and the efforts to canonize him.

Thanksgiving Food Drive concludes

The annual Thanksgiving Food Drive took place Nov. 16-20. Just over 9,000 cans were donated. The senior class brought in the most cans and earned 200 COTY points. news briefs by hillary sevart


december

news

arthead and infographic by bea tretbar

City of Wichita in process of revamping, popularizing downtown area with $500,000 budget; improvements to be completed within two years by EMILY LUTZ asst. copy editor Over the past several years, downtown Wichita has undergone much transformation. Previously a weakening city section, it is emerging as a cultural downtown that many hope to be the next great “American River City,” according to the Wichita Downtown Development Corporation [WDDC]. The WDDC consists of a 35-member board made up of local stockholders and was launched in 2002. The organization has been working to invigorate and rejuvenate downtown Wichita. Ann Keefer, the vice-president of marketing for the WDDC, said that because of the economy and the election of a new mayor, the plan has had to evolve. “The master plan will be a direct reflection of the wants, needs and desires of the community.” Keefer said. “We must ask ‘What do we want our downtown to look and feel like in ten years?’ Once these questions are answered we will then start to begin adding and subtracting.” Currently, there is $500,000 available for developing the Master Plan, to be completed within 24 months. The expected result is to join and make the most of the Intrust Bank Arena, River Corridor and Old Town. Students of Kapaun Mt. Carmel are already seeing and using new additions to downtown. The WDDC recently has been promoting “First” and “Final” Friday to draw

people downtown. “‘First’ and ‘Final’ Friday help bring people downtown to see the local musicians and artists,” senior Sarah Brennan said. “It’s really cool to see all the talent in Wichita. Not only do the restaurants and art halls that host ‘First’ and ‘Final’ Friday get business, but the restaurants and shops nearby do as well.” When downtown, she and friends also have gone to The Keeper of the Plains and the Waterwalk, and have visited the shops. “The shops and restaurants downtown have a much more interesting and beautiful architecture than those that are speedily thrown up today,” Brennan said. “We need to preserve our city’s history and culture by supporting the local businesses downtown.” William Vallar Jr., who owns Mexico Café Delano, is one downtown business proprietor. He is anticipating and ready for the Master Plan to be completed. “The parking with the arena is going to be a large problem,” Vallar said. “It’s going to be up to the nearby businesses as to where they allow people to park. I am hoping that it will proceed well.” Regardless of problems associated with parking or money, the revitalization of downtown Wichita will be an ongoing process for the next 15-20 years, Keefer said. “The redevelopment of downtown Wichita will serve the community well in coming years,” Keefer said. “It is about building a strong community identity. A healthy downtown is a symbol of community pride and history.”

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What would you like to see downtown or at the Intrust Bank Arena? “Popular concerts and good restaurants in general would bring me downtown.”

SIDNEY WASHINGTON freshman

“I think we should have more parking so people don’t have to walk so far. More people would come dowtown.”

MOLLY SCHMITZ sophomore

“If they had better concerts or if they had teen clubs downtown, that would be kind of cool.”

SOPHIE POPE junior

“Mostly just concerts, because that seems like more of an attraction to bring people in.”

photos by kelsey prather

JOSH PFEIFER senior paladin


news

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december

Phase III construction underway IN A HALLWAY, a

lindsey weixelman

ON NOV. 18, construction workers labor on the Coach Herm and Jackie Bachrodt

Athletic Complex. The complex should be finished by Summer 2010. In February, President Mike Burrus will decide if graduation will be held in the space.

kelsey prather

worker uses a ladder to reach an air duct outside the gym, which will seat 2,200 people, up from 1,100 seats that the current gym contains. The complex is named in recognition of former longtime coach and athletic director Herm Bachrodt.

EQUPPED WITH MASKS AND HARD HATS,

workers cut cinder blocks for the walls of the new building. According to architect Brett Prather of Architectural Innovations, all components of contruction are on schedule.

brian norris

LAYING CINDER BLOCKS, employees of Dondlinger and Sons build the back wall of kelsey prather

the complex. Part of the Facilities Master Plan, Phase III includes a gym, four locker rooms, wrestling, training and referees’ rooms, coaches’ offices, a concession stand and a school spirit store. Construction began in June 2009.

Students help community through drives by HILLARY SEVART asst. news editor The economy’s downfall has had a major impact on Kansans. People have lost their jobs, rising gas prices have put a burden on wallets and an ever-increasing number of people in the community cannot afford to feed themselves or their families. According to the Kansas Food Bank Web site, Kansas has the seventh highest percentage of residents who are either cutting back on the quality of food or skipping meals. “From Independence to Wichita to Hays to Garden City, the Kansas Food Bank works in partnership with more than 500 hungerrelief partners across 86 counties to provide food for hungry families, children and senior paladin

citizens,” Brian Walker, President and CEO of the Kansas Food Bank, said. The Kansas Food Bank is trying to make sure that everyone in Kansas gets the food that he or she needs. “Whether it’s nutritious groceries from a food pantry, a filling meal at a senior center or a healthy after-school snack at a Kid’s Kitchen, the support of this community is being used to feed our hungry neighbors every day,” Walker said. Like the Kansas Food Bank, Kapaun Mt. Carmel is also working to help the less fortunate in the community. Some school service projects include the Quill and Scroll book drive, the shoe drive and the Thanksgiving food drive, which brought in more than 9.000 canned food items. Many students not only help the community through school sponsored

events, but also through personal service projects. For example, junior Erin Coulter has been volunteering at the Lord’s Diner for several years. “I’ve been volunteering since I was 12 years old,” Coulter said. “I work there about once a month and I get involved either through the chancery or Resurrection parish.” Senior Sara Ciccolari-Micaldi is also involved in volunteer activities, such as Big Brother, Big Sister. “I help my little [sister] with her math and then we usually play games,” CiccolariMicaldi said. Serving the community has had a positive impact on Ciccolari-Micaldi. “I enjoy volunteering,” Ciccolari-Micaldi said. “It is good to help others, and after I volunteer I feel good too.”


december

news

5 arthead by sean doyle; photos by lindsey weixelman

Use of new technologies brings varied effects upon users by DANIELLE VALLIERE news editor From texting to social-networking: a new age has begun. High school students of the 21st century have many kinds of communication available to them, including cell phones, e-mail, instant messaging and text messaging. According to an article in The Wall Street Journal, some worry that being too connected, newly dubbed “hyper-socializing,” negatively affects teens, while others believe it benefits them. “Facebook, blogs, Twitter,” Principal David Kehres said. “In years past, people had one-on-one direct contact via phone or conversation. Now it’s mass communication.” High school students began carrying cell phones in the mid-1990s, Kehres said. Today, cell phone use is the norm, as 250 million Americans own them, according to the International Association for the Wireless Telecommunications Industry. Despite this recent surge in cell phone ownership, school policies regarding cellular devices have always been similar. “There has basically always been the same [cell phone] policy at Kapaun Mt. Carmel,” Kehres said. “They are not allowed in the classroom, but students can have them in their lockers and check them during passing periods.” Over the years, new features have been added to the cell phone, including camera, text messaging, picture messaging and Internet capabilities. According to The Nielson Company, the average teenager sends 2,900 texts per month. Senior Bridget Lienhard said she sends out about 150 per day, which would put her at 4,500 per month. “I think [texting] is easier,” Lienhard said. “I know calling’s quicker. When you’re busy, you can text someone but continue what you’re doing.” Another phenomenon has descended since the cell phone: Facebook.

Founded by Harvard University student Mark Zuckerberg in February 2004, Facebook was first limited to Harvard, then other American universities and now, the world. “Over time, Facebook will continue to be as strong as all of the connections you make,” Zuckerberg wrote. “We’ll continue building new and better things to make connecting with the people you care about as easy and rewarding as possible.” Freshman Rachel Walker said she gets on Facebook about five times per day for a total of about one hour. “Facebook allows me to talk to so many people and see what they’re doing,” Walker said. “It makes me put myself out there.” According to the five-year Stanford Study of Writing, conducted by Professor Andrea Lunsford, online communication methods might actually be improving students’ writing skills. The study found that today’s young generation is writing more than ever before due to online socializing methods, such as Facebook. In the past, Americans have graduated from college and usually given up writing, unless their careers included it. Thirty-eight percent of writing by students who participated in the study was unrelated to school. In blogging, tweeting and Facebooking, or “life writing,” students communicate to an audience. They learn to argue, organize and

persuade in their writing, thanks to these sites. “Facebook makes me write a lot more,” Walker said. “It helps with knowing how to address people other than verbally.” There are arguments against both texting and Facebook, despite their convenience, connection and writing advancement. Kehres said he worries about losing the human aspect of communication through technology. “Someone may or may not know the person they are communicating with,” Kehres said. “In this way, communication has lost its human aspect. You don’t see the person. You can’t see the person’s face to know if what you’ve said offends him.” Facebook Addiction Disorder (FAD) is the most prevalent of Internet Addiction Disorders, according to http://futurelab. net. “Facebook mainly distracts me from my homework,” Lienhard said. “I’m in my room more, on my laptop. I don’t talk to my family as much.” In the end, Kehres said he thinks people choose to make technology beneficial or destructive. “Technology, like anything else man has invented, can have a positive or negative spin,” Kehres said. “It’s an improved opportunity for education. It just depends on how it’s being used, which makes it positive or negative.”

marcella brooks

AFTER SCHOOL, sophomores Emilee Strecker and Taylor Kruse, junior Kory Glasgow and sophomore

Emily Abay read a text in the commons Dec. 3. According to Verizon Wireless, 70 percent of Americans send out at least one text message per day. Properly called short messaging service (SMS), texting was first intended to be an add-on for business people, according to http://tcnj.edu. paladin


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news

december

infographic by sean doyle; photos by emily baudouin and marcella brooks

please patronize our paladin advertisers

paladin


december

opinions

PALADIN

staff EDITOR IN CHIEF katie moore DESIGN EDITORS bea tretbar, sean doyle ONLINE/COPY EDITOR katie gilbaugh PHOTO EDITOR emily baudouin ONLINE PHOTO EDITOR kelsey prather ADVERTISING/ BUSINESS MANAGER victoria gillam NEWS EDITOR danielle valliere OPINIONS EDITOR meredith osborne FEATURE EDITOR anna le STUDENT LIFE EDITOR alyssa bambick SPORTS EDITOR bailey buer ASST. NEWS EDITOR hillary sevart ASST. STUDENT LIFE EDITOR erika reals ASST. SPORTS EDITOR madeline engel ASST. COPY EDITOR emily lutz CIRCULATION MANAGER katelyn real STAFF PHOTOGRAPHERS marcella brooks, tiana chin, anna gonzalez, zach holland, mattie lonergan, cindy nguyen, brian norris, kim pham, alex scobee, maddie sleconich, scott southern, lindsey weixelman, emily wittler ADVISER ashley perkins

EDITORIAL

policy The Paladin is a monthly, student-produced newsmagazine, published to inform and entertain the Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School community and educate journalism students. Each issue is produced with the guidance of a faculty adviser. Student staff members will be offered opportunities to inform, investigate, entertain, interpret and evaluate: all accepted functions of traditional American press. Included materials will be those of responsible journalism, including restraint by the students and adviser in matters such as libel, privacy, obscenity and copyright. The staff chooses to reflect the mission of Kapaun Mt. Carmel, a diocesan Catholic high school, to serve the interests and needs of the community and to provide fair, objective, accurate and truthful materials. Opinions do not necessarily reflect views of anyone other than the Paladin staff. Digital photos have not been altered to manipulate reality. Photo illustrations are labeled to reflect any technical alterations. Anonymity may be given in the following cases: the information is unable to be presented another way, the information warrants anonymity, the source’s privacy and/or reputation requires protection and the source must be protected from damages. A student or faculty member death during the coverage period will be covered with a short obituary. Advertising must meet the same guidelines as editorial content. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute an endorsement by the school. Students pictured in advertising must sign a release and accept no monetary compensation. Advertising rates available on request. School organization discount rates are available. Corrections of errors will appear in the appropriate section of the next issue.

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LETTER

PALADIN editorial

from the editor Dear PALADIN readers,

emily wittler

Social technology more harm than help for teens Walking into a restaurant, one A person will not know how to discuss a is bound to witness a familiar scene: problem at his future job with his boss, a group out to eat, all members of the or work through a problem with his party silently sitting with their heads future spouse if he has not experienced bowed. This moment of silence is not talking through issues face-to-face. Those who distract themselves used for prayer but rather, texting. A common misconception in with their phones instead of talking to today’s society is that since technology friends and family fail to really get to is making it easier to stay connected know them and connect. These people might not get to with people, it must learn all the lessons be making friends and family closer. Within Information can be their parents or seconds a text message shared with others with- grandparents have to teach them, can be sent to someone no matter where he is. in seconds, but develop- or funny things In moments a person ing genuine relationships their family says can “tweet” on Twitter with others takes much because they are too concerned with updating all his friends longer. texting, Twitter or on what he is doing Facebook. Some instantly. With the push of a button, one can publish photos to his people find staying connected so social networking site from his cell phone. important that they do it while driving. The advances in today’s technology In a worst case scenario, texting are helpful for those who live far from while driving can result in death. What one needs to realize is the their loved ones or travel frequently. The problem, however, is found in the difference between staying connected misuse of easy communication. Those and real communication. Information can who text while driving, who get on be shared with others within seconds, Twitter or Facebook at dinner instead of but developing genuine relationships talking to their family, who use texting with others takes much longer. A person or Facebook messaging to confront who texts to see what other people are others — these are the people that doing while ignoring those around him suffer the disconnect. Ironically, even does not keep close relationships with though the technology used to stay both groups. People need to remember connected with others is beneficial, it the importance of personal contact with is making people isolated, disconnected others and not take it for granted. Maybe and sometimes putting them in danger. if we put our phones down and actually Many teenagers today replace listened to the lessons our family has face-to-face discussions with texting. to teach us, we would be reminded Sadly, the people skills one learns while that silently bowing our heads at the talking with someone in person are lost. table should be for praying, not texting.

Attending a Catholic school, we are reminded constantly of the importance of giving back to the community. With canned food and book drives, students have a handson experience with this, featured on page 3. When the cans and books are packed and sent away, however, it is easy to forget about the need that still exists in Wichita. We must remember that although what we do at KMC helps the unfortunate, it does not put an end to their struggles. We should remember to continue volunteering to help others even when it does not count for COTY points. As always, we invite your ideas, input and letters. All letters should be under 150 words and signed. We reserve the right to edit or omit any letters. Baseless accusations, libelous statements, insults or unsigned letters will not be considered for publication. Take letters to Room 215 or mail to the address below. Sincerely, Katie Moore, Editor in Chief

KAPAUN MT. CARMEL

paladin 8506 E. Central Wichita, Kan. 67206 Phone: (316) 634-0315, ext. 232 Fax: (316) 636-2437 kmcjournalism@kapaun.org

COVER

shot

cover and photo by sean doyle

paladin


opinions

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december arthead by bea tretbar; reviews by katelyn real; photo illustrations by emily baudouin

A bi-monthly Paladin feature that examines past trends and explains how they can still be relevant today.

Movie TV Fashion Music

...in 1989...

...and today.

This film featured John Cusack as an unmotivated kickboxer, who falls in love with the smartest girl in school. The catch is that she is leaving after the summer for a scholarship in England.

The classic scene when Lloyd stands on Diane’s lawn with his boom box raised overhead has been referenced in modern pop culture, from music to TV shows.

Saved by the Bell

Teens were introduced to the cast from Bayside High School. With topics including high school relationships this was the show to watch.

The show is still aired, weekdays 7-9 a.m. and is the perfect show for sick-days. Although the characters may be twenty-years-old, they are still relatable today.

Aviator Sunglasses

These “shades” were paired with aviator jackets, giving an overall bad boy effect. Those that wore the sunglasses at night stepped up the rebel factor.

Surprise! Aviator sunglasses are back in a big way. At least two pairs of Ray-Bans can be found in a crowd, although I have yet to see any bad boy sporting them at night.

Open Up and Say...Ahh! by Poison

This album contained Poison’s hit song Every Rose Has Its Thorn. The songs lyrics highlight the typical drugs, sex and rock and roll of the decade.

Bret Michaels is back! With of his VH1 show, Rock of Love, hopeful girls flocking to audition for the show prove the bandanna and eyeliner combination still works.

The trend...

Say Anything

From Kanye to Posh: Celebs are not role models When we think of role models, firefight- hearted as a haircut, or as damaging as the ers, police officers, and teachers often come actions taken after being abused. Rihanna to mind. They are examples of was severely beaten by Chris people worthy of being emulatBrown, her boyfriend at the ed. What some do not want to time. She returned to him after admit, however, is that celebthe abuses she suffered, and rities have taken the place of stayed with him for two weeks. these worthy exemplars. The Abused women were given effect celebrites have on peothe impression that a second ple is overwhelming because chance should be given to an of the mass coverage of their abuser. lives through the media. Religion, something that I have tried to think of should be a personal belief, KATIE GILBAUGH has been made into a fad by reasons why the lives of these celebrities are so exciting that celebrities. Tom Cruise, John online/copy editor we have to know every detail. Travolta and Kirstie Alley Whether famous through the believe in Scientology. They music or film industry or for having a ridicu- bring up their religious beliefs in interviews, lous amount of money, celebrities are the and some are known more for their erratic subject of much discussion. beliefs than their acting skills. Posh Spice (Victoria Beckham) gets a When Madonna was seen wearing a red new haircut, and thousands of women rush Kabbalah bracelet, accessory stores began to emulate her new style. selling the bracelets, along with a pamphlet The impact of celebrities can be as light- explaining the religion. paladin

Celebrities lead by example, and their actions are not always appropriate. An example of this was Kanye West’s interruption of Taylor Swift as she accepted the Best Female Video of the Year award at the MTV’s Video Music Awards. West, clearly intoxicated, stole the microphone and declared Beyonce the more talented artist. Swift was upset by this outburst, but the support she recieved after the incident was amazing. Beyonce called Swift to the stage during her own award, and allowed Swift to finish her acceptance speech. During the Country Music Awards, several coutry artists made jokes at Kanye’s expense. Swift herself joked about the incident on her apperance on Saturday Night Live. Yes, hearing about celebrities’ uncustomary lives is interesting. The line should be drawn when people look to celebrities as role models, referring to their favorite actress’ actions when they don’t know what to do. One must form their own opinions of the world instead of blindly following celebrities.


opinions

december

and began to rub my nails with a sponge and  I have a problem with thinking that I soak them in oil. “Close your eyes (insert have personal relationships with salespeople. dramatic pause, all clearly part of a calculated I feel that by turning down their product, routine), now...vopen!” I “vopened”my eyes the chance of us being friends is completely and looked down at my nails. I was shocked. eliminated. I picture the Never had my nails been so salesperson going home and shiny, so healthy looking! saying to their family, “If only “Wow,” I said, not realizing that girl would have bought what was about to happen. my curler/straightener-in-one He told me the kit was $75, product at the mall today, we but today he would make would have dinner tonight.” me a special offer, and The kids grow up emaciated today only - I would get the and sad, only because I kit for $40. I had been too turned down their parent at enchanted to understand Towne East that morning. If this spur of the moment thought out, though, this role MEREDITH OSBORNE manicure was not a reward could be reversed. for working late the night opinions editor Someday, I might come before. I only had $30, and home to my family unable to thought if I let him know, feed them because my erroneous thinking he would forgive me for wasting his time, tell Movie had caused me to buy my family coordinating me he loved me and we would get married. I Snuggies. With that thought in mind, I thought wrong. He made me an even better realized my ridiculous spending must stop. deal, offering the kit for $30. I am not only endangering myself and my I sighed, and handed over the money. well- being, but my possible family as well. I cut short my shopping trip instantly, and Who wears Snuggies anyway? was stuck lugging home a nail kit that I have Lets go back to the where the problem absolutely no use for. (To this day, I have no started. One summer day, as I was browsing idea where it is.) the stores at the mall, I was stopped by a I am pleased to report that my problem man offering samples of lotion. Had his has lessened recently. A speeding ticket that good looks not been complimented by an cost my whole paycheck may have played a interesting accent, I may have passed up major role in this, but neverless, it has caused the lotion, but, under his spell, I gave in and me to bypass good looking salespeople and rubbed the lotion on my hands. “Vis votion is made from dead sea salt,” say, “Thanks, but no thanks. Can we still be he purred. He asked if I wanted a manicure friends?” Just Smile Back is a monthly column and wordless, I nodded. He took my hand

9

What is the best Christmas present you ever recieved?

My iPod because I listen to it every day, and when I thought it died, I was really bummed.

senior

A jade necklace from my mom. She made a rhyme card with it. She took time out of her day to do it and that meant the most.

junior

My 2003 Grand Am because it gives me freedom to what I want to.

“I’m single and on the prowl, so watch out!”

YASSIN YOUSIF

illustration by maria lopez

When my grandma gave me this Nitendo DS gamebox a few years ago. Being that she’s older it was a heartfelt moment.

“Lesser isn’t a word!”

“Does anyone know someone who can read Wingdings?”

sophomore

“Is it true that Vin Diesel invented the Venn diagram?”

RAVEN TAYLOR

Overheard in the halls of KMC...

“I take pride in my hair. Like, I really do wash it thoughly. Rinse and repeat!”

CAROLINE LINNABARY

ERICH MEITZNER

freshman

information obtainted by emily lutz

paladin


december

feature

10

arthead and design by sean doyle

Obsession Compulsive Disorder causes anxiety, stress for students by ANNA LE feature editor Papers out of order, items out of place, pencils not correctly aligned; things such as these would cause junior Stephanie Steven to experience anxiety. Steven is diagnosed with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder [OCD]. “When things are out of place it drives me crazy,” Steven said. “Sometimes I’ll start to tremble and hyperventilate which can lead to an anxiety attack.” According to Dr. Thomas Tran, pediatrician with Dr. Thomas M. Tran, Family Practice, OCD is an anxiety disorder and is characterized by recurrent, unwanted thoughts (obsessions) and/or repetitive behaviors (compulsions). “[OCD] traps people in endless cycles of repetitive thoughts and behaviors,” Tran said. Obsessions and compulsions exist in a variety of different behaviors according to http://helpguild.org. There are some who are concerned about contamination and germs and are referred to as “washers.” Those who obsess over order and symmetry and may have superstitions about certain colors, numbers or

arrangements are called “counters.” As for senior Courtney Phillips and Steven, they often have compulsions about things in life being “just right.” “Every day I constantly have to battle with my OCD not to distract others while I am working to fix my own well being,” Phillips said. “If something is out of place or order I have to drop everything to fix it or else it would distract me

“When things are out of place it drives me crazy. Sometimes I’ll start to tremble and hyperventilate which can lead to an anxiety attack.” junior STEPHANIE

STEVEN

from everything.” Although there is no proven cause of OCD, research suggests that OCD involves problems in communication between the front part of the brain and deeper structures. Some evidence also shows that OCD may have a genetic component. OCD may be a result of changes in a person’s body’s own natural chemistry or brain functions, according

to http://mayoclinic.org. “Unfortunately, OCD often goes unrecognized,” Tran said. “With earlier diagnosis and proper treatments, it lessens the risk of developing other problems, such as depression, marital and work problems.” Several medicines are available to treat OCD including Anafranil, Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil and Luvox, according to http://familydoctor.org. “I take prescription medication, but I don’t trust that it will fully cure my OCD,” Steven said. “Medication helps about 10 percent but the other 90 percent is up to you in order to heal.” Behavioral therapy, under the guidance of a trained therapist, can also be used to treat OCD. These therapy sessions can take place one-on-one, in a group setting with others or in the presence of family members. “Therapy is very calming and effective,” senior Andrew Leivian said. “The therapist uses relaxation techniques including meditation. I always felt so calm walking out of it.” Steven said her OCD has gotten a lot better over the years and will continue to do so. “My OCD forces me to be organized, have everything in place and keep my room and locker clean,” Phillips said.

information obtained from http://helpguide.org/mental/obsessive_disorder_ocd.htm; infographic by sean doyle

paladin


december

feature

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photo by brian norris; photo illustration by sean doyle

Term ‘OCD’ skewed, inappropriately used by population “Oh yeah, I’m just OCD.” This line is casually thrown in beats upon the desk does not qualify one to be examined for around by students on a daily basis. According to the Inter- OCD, a friend’s mania with always closing the door behind her national Obsessive Complusive Disorder [OCD] Foundation, does not send her to the mental hospital. there are more than 7 million adults and children suffering Beyond even that point, not every person who has OCD from the condition in the United States alone. If everyone who is unable to function in society. In fact, very rarely do OCD grumbles about their self-proclaimed case of OCD patients have the incapacity to operate in standard does have the illness, then this estimate must be civilization. quite off in numbers. Most people probably have one or two friends Fortunately for most of those who use that who actually have OCD. Their OCD is a minor phrase, it is likely that they do not have the disorpart of them and does not need to be repeatedly der. Although joked about, OCD is not the minor pointed out. A personal attempt to change the beailment it is made out to be. havior in all probability will not and cannot work. In a true case of OCD, an individual has irChastisement or gentle teasing is not going to rational feelings that induce him or her to perform work either. In most cases, medicine or counsela behavior. What makes OCD so hard to control is ing is the only way to fix it. the fact that when one tries to stop the compulsive Be mindful of the silent friend scrutinizing EMILY LUTZ behavior, he experiences anxiety that drives him others’ overuse of the term OCD. The proclaimer asst. copy editor to do the action more. probably does not have it, and those who sit quiIf this description is not an accurate depiction etly observing the conversation might be the ones of your friend, then perhaps that friend does not who do have it. have OCD. Her desire to touch the top of every door she walks Please do those who have OCD an act of kindness, and through and use Purell every ten minutes is probably just an don’t loudly declare a fake case. To those who do have OCD, odd fixation. politely confine to mildly rolling your eyes in annoyance at What makes each individual unique is his eccentricities those who will continue to carry on their hypothetical self-diand quirks. Just as a personal fascination with tapping a pencil agnosis. paladin


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student life

december arthead by bea tretbar; photos by brian norris and kelsey prather

arthead by bea tretbar

marcella brooksase

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Freshman Sarah Frangenberg was eliminated this month leaving the five remaining contestants to wrap junior Katelyn Real like a Christmas present. Senior Shannon O’Neill most efficiently wrapped Real in the shortest time; she is exempt. 1. WRAPPED FROM HEAD TO TOE, Real holds

still while O’Neill completes her “Student Survivor” challenge Nov. 18. O’Neill had Real bite the paper to hold it in place. 2. JUNIOR SHANIECE PYLES tries a different

wrapping technique. She had Real lie on the ground, while she used many rolls of wrapping paper to finish the challenge. Who do you think should be eliminated from “Student Survivior” this month? Bring this ballot to Room 215 by Dec. 18. Mesfin Small

Laurel Lujano

ShaNiece Pyles

Sam Wescott

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student life

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1. SENIOR NICK CATANESE

plays Amazing Grace on his bagpipes during Chris VanSickle’s College Algebra class. Catanese, who has been playing since Feb. 2009, brought the bagpipes to school Nov. 12 for music teacher, Bryan Miller to hear. “They didn’t fit in my locker,” Catanese said. “I just took them to all of my classes.” 2. TESTING HIS MOUSE TRAP VEHICLE, sophomore arthead by bea tretbar

Aaron Wolf participates in Science Olympiad Nov. 11. The vehicle had to be adjustable and be able to go a certain distance while starting and stopping.

lindsey weixelman

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3. BACKSTAGE, senior Elizabeth Strunk’s wig is changed by junior Katie Marney

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during the Lucky Stiff performance Nov. 17. “It was frantic backstage,” Marney said. “Each wig had to be changed in 10 seconds.” 4. AFTER THE FOOD DRIVE, social science teacher David Roberts and senior John Stout load cans Nov. 20. Approximately 9,000 cans were brought in by students Nov. 16-20. The seniors received 200 COTY points for bringing in the most cans. The food was donated to Catholic Charities. 5. IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT CLASS, seniors Christian Kehr and Karen Akao act out a skit about the Eighth Amendment. “I liked how we were given the freedom to interpret the amendment how we wanted,” Akao said. “We presented it in a way that would make it more memorable to us.” paladin


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december


sports

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INSIDE THE LINES DYLAN MATHENY

ACTIVITY: Senior Dylan Matheny wrestles a player from North Dec. 13. “Dylan is very determined when he is wrestling,” coach Tim Dryden said.

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When senior Dylan Matheny was a child, he had a tendency to “roughhouse” with other children at his day care center. It was this experience that led him to try wrestling for the first time. “The lady who was in charge of the day care actually recommended that I become a wrestler,” Matheny said. “My parents let me try it, and it just stuck.” Matheny has been wrestling for almost 11 years. Many of his teammates look to him as a leader, coach Tim Dryden said. They know he not only has the experience, but also the attitude one needs to be a successful wrestler. “Dylan is a great wrestler,” senior Joseph O’Connor said. “He is always willing to help out the less experienced guys on the team, and [his] attitude sets an example.” Dryden said Matheny always has high expectations for himself, and he will do whatever it takes to reach these goals. Matheny has won a junior varsity City League title, two varsity City League titles and a fifth and fourth place finish at state. Matheny has also been nominated for Westpoint. “Dylan definitely has the skills to be a state champion,” Dryden said. “But I think the major component that will help him reach that goal is his hard working, head-strong attitude.” madeline engel

SATURDAY

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El Dorado Invitational @ El Dorado High School, 9 a.m.

Hesston Invitational @ 9 a.m.

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Boys, Girls Basketball vs Bishop Carroll @ KMC, 6 p.m.

FRIDAY

Wrestling Douglass Goodwill Tournament @ 9 a.m.

Girls 19 18 Boys, Basketball vs Northwest @ Northwest, 6 p.m.

Swim 6Boys vs South-

east @ Wichita Swim Club, 7 p.m.

FRIDAY SATURDAY

DECEMBER 23 JANUARY 4 CHRISTMAS BREAK

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THURSDAY WEDNESDAY

vs Heights @ KMC, 6 p.m.

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Girls 11Boys, Basketball

TUESDAY SATURDAY

crusader sports calendar Boys, Girls Basketball vs St. James Academy @ KMC, 4:15p.m. Wrestling Raytown Tournament @ 9 a.m. Girls 8 Boys, Basketball vs East @ East, 6 p.m.

Girls 12 Boys, 14 Basketball vs South @ South 6 p.m.

Bowling, @ Southeast 4 p.m.

infographic by sean doyle; photos by emily baudouin and marcella brooks

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december

arthead and infographic by bea tretbar; photos by brain norris, emily baudouin and lindsey weixelman; reviews by madeline engel

Active students give insight, tips about winter exercise by BAILEY BUER sports editor The weather outside is frightful; cookies, candies, pies taste so delightful. These factors associated with the winter holiday season can make it hard to stay healthy. According to http://MedicineNet.com, statistics indicate that the average American gains one to 10 pounds during the holidays. Marie Thomas, PE teacher, said weight gain in the winter is caused by many things. “Many times it is too cold to get outside,” Thomas said. “With a sedentary lifestyle, it’s easier to stay warm, sit inside and watch TV. It’s also not swim suit season. You’re always covered up because of the weather here.” Jamie Erickson, a personal trainer at the YMCA, said every day one takes a break from exercising, it takes about two or three days for that person to get back to the place he left off. “If you’re a person involved in sports, a break in winter is not bad to relax and rest,” Thomas said.  “If not, when you rest in the winter, you’re resting from the time you [have not been active]. “People have to realize if they continue

Although Wichita State University is a college, it offers to the comminity its workout facilites at the Heskett Center. The Heskett Center has a range of fitness opportunities such as an indoor swimming pool and track, five basketball courts, cardio and weightlifting equiptment and tennis and racquetball courts. To use the facilites, one must become a member of WSU Alumni Association. paladin

to work out the whole year it’s easier to shed working out Erickson said. those pounds instead of not doing anything “If you talk to [who you are working out until March.” with], they can help you get into what you Thomas said each person needs to find need to do,” Erickson said. his or her own motivation to continue to “Also try to work off the pounds you exercise. will gain during the holidays ahead of time “My motivation is just the drive to get and keep it up. The longer it has been since better in everything I do, stay in shape you’ve been active, the more your motivation and stay healthy,” junior Katie McGreevey dwindles.” said. “You’re so much Erickson said there more energized and are many things one can do healthy when you “There is never an excuse for during the winter at work work out. It makes you you not to work out. If you out facilities such as using happier because of the have little kids around the machines or participating endorphins and you in sports. house you can chase them feel accomplished.” Junior Austin Rickert Senior Brison around. You could dance in said fitness magazines Schulte said it’s front of the mirror.” give many good tips and important to continue workout routines. Thomas working out especially pe teacher MARIE THOMAS said doing any type of work for athletes. out is better than nothing. “You can put “There is never an on muscle and work on your skills while excuse for you to not work out,” Thomas others are taking it easy,” Schulte said. “I said. enjoy working out in the winter because I “If you have little kids around the house feel it gives me an advantage [over] other you can chase them around. You could dance athletes.” in front of the mirror. If there’s some reason Working out with a group, personal you cannot work out you have to put it upon trainer, or a partner helps one to focus on yourself to eat healthier.”

With a newly remodeled tennis and workout facility, the Wichita Country Club has a lot of health options. The exercise room is filled with a vahigh-end workout machines and freeweights. The center also has two studios dedicated to an assortment of fitness calsses including yoga, pilates and cycling. One must be a member to use the facilites, and different rates apply for a variety of plans.

Genesis Health Club aims to be a healthy beginning for its members. It offers a variety of different opportunities such as fitness classes, personal trainers, aquatics programs and tennis programs. One Genesis is located at 1551 N. Rock Road and is open Monday-Thursday from 5 a.m.-11 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m.-7 a.m. One must have a membership to use the facilities, and rates and plans vary.

The YMCA offers many exercise opportunities and facilities. Along with a large workout center, the YMCA has competitive teams for youth to participate in. The YMCA is known for being family oriented and has a relaxed atmosphere The closest YMCA to Kapaun Mt. Carmel is at 9333 E. Douglas. One must be a member to use facilities, and choose between the single or family plan when joining.


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photo by brian norris; photo illustration by sean doyle; information obtained by katie moore and bailey buer

Athletic teams scrimage, perform at Wintefest by KATELYN REAL circulation manager Kapaun Mount Carmel students, faculty and students from feeder schools gathered together Saturday, Nov. 21 for Winterfest. 4 This year’s festivities included a performance from the cheer squad and pom squad, senior vs. faculty basketball scrimmage, feeder school basketball team scrimmages and a performance from the Magdalen cheer squad. Girls basketball assistant coach Dan Phillips participated in the senior vs. faculty basketball scrimmage. Phillips said he thought there was a physical disadvantage, the faculty had a mental advantage over the

students. “The practice was hectic because there “[The scrimmage] were a lot of girls, but was rough,” Phillips we didn’t have any probsaid. “It’s hard going “It’s hard going against lems,” Solis said. “I liked against younger bodies working with the pomthat are in better shape younger bodies that are in mies because cheer is than we are. The faculty better shape than we are. usually a lot of stunting. won off of experience The faculty won off of expe- This gave the cheer girls because we’re a lot old- rience because we’re a lot that like to dance more of er and wiser.” an opportunity to dance older and wiser.” One unique aspect instead of just cheer and of this year’s Winterfest coach DAN PHILLIPS stunt.” was the pom and cheer “I thought it was squads performance tocool how they did the gether. dances together,” Sevart said. “It showed the Although the squads mostly practiced unity of the school. The scrimmage was very the dance separately, they did have one com- entertaining. I think the night was an overall bined practice, senior Stephanie Solis said. success.” paladin


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December 2009 Paladin