Page 1


un se en r ea l i ti e s Karolina Ĺ uckiewicz

Blurb Publications


Copyright © 2017, Karolina Łuckiewicz Bachelor of Architecture Design Thesis / 2016-2017 Advisor / Karen Lange

California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, California

College of Architecture and Environmental Design All Rights Reserved The following content is believed to be either in the public domain or used appropriately according to the standards of “fair use” and attribution.

Inaccuracies may be directed to the attention of the

author and will be corrected in subsequent editions.


Special thanks to my family, Karen Lange, and everyone in studio 400 for helping me discover the unseen.


contents Open

05

I. Issue Issue

07

Thesis II. Thesis

13

Research Research III.

19

Experiment IV. Experiment

43

V. Context Contextualize

79

VDesign I. Design

89

Close

133

Notes

134


open Unseen Realities is an opening into a vast field of indefiniteness, unpredictability, and ambiguity. Each individual can lend meaning to it by their own projections, thereby attaining more than a single use alone.

04 / 05


i ssue


“There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.� 1.01 - a l dou s h u x l e y


pa r t I issue Non-linear relationships are fundamental to a numerous amount of intriguing physical and social phenomena in our environments. Between

man

and

his/her

environment,this essential nonlinear relationship lies within an enmeshed experience. This experience, however, is limited by our current perception of a seemingly fixed, static position that architecture holds.

08 / 09


Pa rt I

p erce ption Perception (n.) per·cep·tion \ pər-ˈsep-shən\ 1. The act or faculty of perceiving, or apprehending by means of the senses or of the mind; cognition; understanding. 2.Immediate

or

intuitive

recognition or appreciation, as of moral, psychological, or aesthetic qualities; insight; intuition; discernment. 3. A single unified awareness derived from sensory processes while a stimulus is present.1.02


issue

UNKNOWN fig [1.01] / Perception(s) of Reality

10 / 11


t h esi s


“ p l e a s u r e t o m e i s w o n d e r - t h e u n e x p l o r e d, t h e u n e x p e c t e d , t h e t h i n g t h at i s h i d d e n . . . t h e r e m o t e i n t h e i m m e d i at e ; t h e e t e r n a l i n t h e e p h e m e r a l ; t h e pa s t i n t h e p r e s e n t; t h e infinite in the finite...� 2.01 - h . p. l ove c ra ft


pa r t i I thesis This thesis will challenge challengethe current perception of architecture and our environment as it explores the “unknown� and the complexity of non-linear relations. By redefining the dynamics of architecture in space-time, a new way of thinking arises that begins to question the in-between of reality and spatiality.

14 / 15


Pa rt I i

the ory Pre-conceived notions of “how

referred

something should be” hinder our

the known”. In other words,

ability to understand architecture

architecture must change our

as

of

perception of space, time and

interlocking space, time and

matter to reveal the layers of

culture. This boundary between our

reality that are not immediately

cerebral and physical environments

visible. These ambiguous relations

must be dissected to create an

create an experience in-between

environment that is ambiguous,

perception and imagination, which

yet thought-provoking. To convert

provide new spatial experiences

something that we already know into

and possibilities for a constantly

something that we do not know is

changing and unpredictable world.

a

complex

spatiality

to

as

“unknowing


thesis

AMBIGUITY

fig [2.01]

16 / 17


r esea r c h


“a d o p p l e r a r c h i t e c t u r e a c k n o w l e d g e s t h e adaptive synthesis of architecture’s many contingencies... and focuses on the effects a n d e xc h a n g e s o f a r c h i t e c t u r e ’ s i n h e r e n t multiplicities.” 3.01 - rob e rt s om ol , s a ra h w h it i n g


pa r t I i i research Phenomenlogical

philosopher,

Merleau-Ponty, explains that we must begin to understand the world around us through the visible [object] and the invisible [field]. The crossover between these two dimensions expand the possibilities of a more dynamic architecture which gradually enters the realms of experience and perception.

20 / 21


Pa rt I i i

re a li t y s hift Driven

by

his

interests

in

perception, movement, embodied

perceptions of a reality which is not immediately visible.

experience and feelings of self, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur

The artist further engages viewers

Eliasson brings about new meaning

with the Big Bang Fountain (2014)

to the term reality. How one

- an installation placed in his

defines reality is in part created

Reality Machines exhibition that

by their senses and the artist

illuminates quick bursts of water

invites the viewer to challenge,

with a strobe light. Eliasson’s

renegotiate

reinterpret

art is “about becoming aware of

their understanding of the world.

what we are seeing as much as it

and

is about observing ourselves when In his exhibition, the Listening

we are seeing – acknowledging

Dimension, Eliasson reveals the

our presence and participation

invisible visible with Space

in any given situation.”

Resonates Regardless of our

As viewers observe the ever-

Presence (2017). By placing an

changing forms before them,

LED at the end of a steel bracket

they begin to question how their

that supports a glass ring, the

reality is transformed. Not only

light shines back towards the ring

does the use of a machine alter

which acts as a prism and projects

their perception of reality, but

thin bands of rainbow light

so, too, do their own actions

on the wall.

contribute

3.02

Eliasson uses

in

3.03

visualizing

light as a malleable material in

the space and object before

this experiment to change one’s

them; in other words, viewers


research

fig [3.01] / Space Resonates Regardless of our Presence (2017)

become co-creators in their own understanding of reality. Our picture of the world is neither constant nor static. Through the use of natural elements and technical

devices,

Eliasson

is able to produce immersive environments that allow viewers to recreate their own realities.

22 / 23


Pa rt I i i

fig [3.02] / Big Bang Fountain (2014)


research

“I want to expose and evaluate the fact that the seeing and sensing process is a system that should not be taken for granted as natural - it’s a cultivated means of reality production that, as a system, can be negotiated and changed.”

3.04

- Olafur Eliasson

24 / 25


Pa rt I i i

a mb i guous percept i o n s “In understanding the results

interprets the boundary condition

of their Rorschach tests, then,

of the inkblot - whether it is

patients learn what this how means

the entire figure or one of its

about their inner mechanisms,

details - and reveals a form

which they ordinarily cannot

(F), movement (M) or color (C)

see

beauty

response. While form responses

of the Rorschach lies in its

are simply interpretations of the

psychoeducational potential... It

blot alone, movement responses

makes the invisible visible.”

3.05

consist of form perceptions plus

- Noriko Nakamura

kinesthetic factors. The subject

or

explain.

The

imagines the object interpreted Named

after

its

creator,

to be in motion as visual memories

Swiss

psychologist

Hermann

of movements have previously been

Rorschach, the Rorschach test

observed, imagined or executed.

is a psychological test in which

The form of the blot and its color,

subjects’ perceptions of ambiguous

shading, and negative space can

inkblots are evaluated using

also significantly influence one’s

psychological interpretations,

perception of the inkblots.

3.06

complex algorithms, or both. The beauty of the Rorschach test Published in 1921, the test is

lies in its psychoeducational

primarily an analysis of one’s

potential,

“interpretation of accidental

perceptional

forms”. By searching amongst

translated into architecture?

their visual memories, the subject

There is a boundary line that

but

how

can

this

analysis

be


research

[IN]VISIBLE fig [3.03] / Rorschach Test

initiates

a

real

vs.

unreal

condition as an irregular inkblot is transformed into a symmetrical image that one can fully perceive based

on

visual

there

an

in-between

appearing

and

memory. of

Is

this

disappearing

state, which can affect the user?

26 / 27


Pa rt I i i

p i xe l s mear Light is constantly changing in a

the cycle of light, a viewer is

cycle giving the natural element

able to experience the entire

an eternal characteristic. In

cycle of light in a single view. A

reality, however, no one is able

three-dimensional screen invites

to visualize the entire cycle of

viewers to a fully immersive

light in a single view.

visual experience in which the screen of strings transforms

In

design

into light and allows users to

studio collaborated with Torafu

step into the image, rather than

Architects and Canon technology

viewing it as a flat screen.

at

2011,

the

WOW

visual

Milan

Superstudio

exhibition

Più

to

in

create

a

Neoreal Wonder is an exhibition

digital experiential space that

that

materialized the experience of

previously unthinkable. Torafu

light. Known as Neoreal Wonder,

architects explains, “it is a

the exhibition uses the visual

view that can be seen either as

design of motion graphics to

real or virtual, projected on

express an atmosphere of airiness

a screen as delicate as air and

and ephemerality.

made of innumerable strings. It is

3.07

awakens

an

imagination

no longer something substantive As one moves through a visual

enough to be called an image, as it

tunnel

main

comes and goes as waves, and flies,

exhibition space, an unrealistic

disappears and appears again like

space reveals itself as sunrise

fireworks.”

and sunset coexist. By condensing

the physical and non-physical

and

into

the

3.08

The merge between


research

fig [3.04a] / Neoreal Wonder

creates a captivating effect that brings users into a different world and accentuates the relationship between image and people.

28 / 29


Pa rt I i i

fig [3.04b]


research

“[The light] appears to weave in the space while capturing the continuously moving light. This space called the “Light Loom” imparts mystical sense of unity and atmosphere, as if the light and images have fused into the space, and lets visitors experience a new type of reality.”

3.09

- WOW (visual design studio)

30 / 31


Pa rt I i i

i nterrupted g rid P.0 1 During the twentieth century, an

A myriad of proposals presented,

important artistic, philosophical

such as Arata Isozaki’s City in

and architectural movement emerged

the Air, interprets this symbiotic

in Japan: Metabolism. The movement

relationship

developed directly from a period

whole. As explained by Fumihiko

of rapid economic growth in 1960s

Maki in Nurturing Dreams, this

Japan,

and

megastructural form is a “… system

theorists proposed a more organic

that contributes to the whole

growth to buildings and cities,

[and] maintains its identity and

alike.

longevity without being affected

where

architects

of

element

to

by the others, while at the same At the World Design Congress in

time engages in dynamic contact

1960, a few of these Japanese

with the others.” 3.12 The building

architects and theorists, including

proposal emphasizes an expansion

Kenzo Tange, Kisho Kurokawa,

to new heights and horizontally and

Kiyonori Kikutake, Fumihiko Maki,

vertically interrupts the grid,

and Masato Otaka, introduced a

as the boundary line constantly

manifesto called “Metabolism:

shifts with the movement of the

Proposals for a New Urbanism”.

elements.

3.10

Their vision established a new

spatial order for the continuously

Isozaki took an approach of

expanding and transforming, and

“unknowing the known” as he

developed a notion on the symbiotic

challenged pre-conceived notions

relationships

whole

of what architecture should be

and part, and the permanent and

and created a design that was

transient.

3.11

between


research

fig [3.05] / City in the Air Proposal

dynamic in its movement and form.

for a constantly changing and

These dynamic forces in the static

unpredictable world.

collective brought about a new wave of spatial experiences in response to the growing and changing needs of society. Through a dynamic system, the architect reveals the layers of reality on an urban scale and provides new possibilities

32 / 33


Pa rt I i i

i nterrupted g rid P.0 2 Designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro

zones. 3.13 Due to the vast amount of

for the sixth Swiss National Expo in

high-pressure nozzles used within

2002, the Blur Building rests just

the structure, the released water

above the surface of Lake Neuchatel

droplets floating in the mist create

in Switzerland. The building defies

a highly concentrated zone, which

an atmospheric architecture by

contributes to the blur effect.

creating an ambiguous edge line; a line that becomes an indefinite

The

ambiguous

edge

line

is

boundary condition through a

perceived differently by all users

combination of both natural and

of the building as it is constantly

man-made forces.

shifting throughout the day. In high winds, long fog trails are

With 35,000 high-pressure nozzles

produced and when the temperature

placed strategically around the

changes, the fog moves up and down

site, the filtered lake water is

the platform of the building. What

exposed into the environment

is visible at one moment, suddenly

as a mist, creating a cloud-

becomes invisible as the boundary

like situation for the users in

changes in space-time.

the building. The architects integrated a smart weather system

The Blur Building has challenged

into their design that identifies

traditional notions of a fixed,

the

of

static architecture by merging

humidity, temperature, and wind

a dynamic boundary line that

speed and direction to regulate

blurs perception and heightens

the water pressure in certain

experience. The cloud-like mist,

climactic

conditions


research

fig [3.06] / Blur Building

mixed with the site’s natural fog condition, erases all visual and acoustic references, except for an “optical ‘white out’ and ‘white noise’ of pulsing nozzles”.

3.14

Users rely solely on

this “white vision” to navigate through the blur, creating an

TRANSIENT

experience enmeshed within the building itself.

34 / 35


Pa rt I i i

b ound[les s ] limits p.0 1 Japanese fashion designer Rei

a thing with and without shape — not

Kawakubo shocked the fashion world

defined by concrete boundaries.”

with her droopy, dark silhouettes

Kawakubo expresses this concept of

at her first Paris show in 1981.

mu in a monochromatic color palette

Founder of Comme des Garçons

while redefining the boundaries on

(Like Boys), she continues to

fashion with outsized, shapeless

design with a radical abandonment

and loose-fitting attire.

3.15

of the conventional notions of attractiveness. By exploring

The

designer’s

aesthetic

is

the relationship of the body to

generated by her ability to explore

clothing in raw and uncompromising

fashion within her own realm of

ways she is able to speak more

freedom; a freedom driven by the

broadly of a new formality.

dichotic relationships between the bound/unbound, order/chaos,

Kawakubo’s art expresses a meaning

object/subject, form/function,

of the “in-between” in which the

and absence/presence. With this

designer blurs the boundaries

intersection between art and

between body and dress. Her work

design, Kawakubo makes these

emphasizes “mu (emptiness) through

functional objects more unfamiliar

the architectural leitmotif of

and newly vulnerable.

the circle, which in Zen Buddhism symbolizes the void, and ma (space)

But can this exploration of space

which is evoked through the

between

interplay of structural forms. Ma

functional object in fashion begin

expresses void as well as volume,

to merge into the architectural

sculptural

form

and


research

fig [3.07a] / Comme des Garรงons

realm? Can space become more

through a design with bound[less]

meaningful as the integration

limits?

between art and architecture becomes more exaggerated? Can deep engagement with materials alter the reality of static spatial can

conditions?

conventional

And

notions

how of

experiencing space be transformed

36 / 37


Pa rt I i i

fig [3.07b]


research

“I work around the figure, but I am never limited by what the figure has to be.�

3.16

- Rei Kawakubo

38 / 39


Pa rt I i i

b ound[les s ] limits p.0 2 Avant-garde Japanese artist Yayoi

rooms, including The Souls of

Kusama emerged as an influential

Millions of Light Years Away

figure in the postwar New York

(2013), the spaces offer an

art

works

immersive environment which foster

such as Infinity Nets, physical

an out-of-body experience and

representations of infinity through

heighten an individual’s senses.

scene.

Exhibiting

hallucinatory paintings of loops and dots, the artist revealed

The artist continues to explore

her psychological disengagement

the relationship between the finite

from the world as “curtains which

and infinite as both the objects

separated me from people and

and visitors engaged within the

reality”.

installation suspend space and

3.17

time. As visitors enter Kusama’s Her obsession with the infinite realm

work, they are able to contemplate

would soon have its breakthrough

their existence, reflect on the

in 1965 when she experimented

passage of time and think about

with mirrors in Phalli’s Field,

their relationship to the outer

transforming

world. 3.18

the

repetitive

patterns of her earlier works into a perceptual experience; this

With today’s renewed interest in

experience carried forward through

experiential practices and virtual

the course of her career as Kusama

spaces, Kusama’s work becomes an

provided viewers the chance to step

integral part in imagining the

into an illusion of infinite space.

bound[less] limits of space.

Exhibiting more than twenty mirror


research

fig [3.08] / The Souls of Millions of Light Years Away (2013)

40 / 41


ex pe r i m ent


“The pendulum continues to swing from one side to the other - from the need for certainty to the desire for escape, from the claims of memory to the demands of the imagination.� 4.01 - fu mih iko ma ki


pa r t I v experiment To explore the “unknown�, one must dive into an exploration that moves past comfort and into the realm of unpredictability. With this notion, a new way of thinking arises that begins to question the in-between of reality and imagination.

44 / 45


Pa rt I v

tra nsient s pace Through a multiplicity of layers,

an atmosphere of phantasmic and

Transient Space is an experiment

mystical qualities inside the

that

of

box. Fog interweaves, creating

traditional boundaries and their

indeterminacy and a shift in what

inside/outside relationships. The

boundaries can be; these are the

inscribed manifesto challenges

layers of the known and unknown.

boundaries to bring forth a new

As the fog dissipates, an infinite

dimension of space that lies

series of reflections becomes

within and around these perceptive

visible and repeats the suspended

layers of reality.

physical

redefines

the

notion

objects

indefinitely

into space. With these fleeting As the user approaches the white

effects, one starts to question

acrylic box, boundaries speak as

whether these physical objects

edges with no parameters. This

are dissolving or accumulating in

fixed, static object suddenly

space-time.

disappears as one is pulled into


experiment

fig [4.01]

ATMOSPHERE 46 / 47


Pa rt I v

A boundary is both an edge, and a parameter. It is ethereal in its nature, Exposing itself as a visible and tangible form, But gradually transitioning into the invisible. A boundary is an edge, but not a parameter. It is an emergent threshold, Interweaving capacities and creating indeterminacy, But bounding two spaces as one. A boundary is an edge, but not a parameter. It is a transgressive force, Evoking deeper and more intuitive relationships, That enables change and renewed experiences.


experiment

A boundary is not an edge, but is a parameter. It appears as an amorphous and blurred zone, In which free movement and exchange within, Accept the polarities on both ends. A boundary is not an edge, but is a parameter. It is a vibrating zone, pulsing back and forth, Whose dynamic character creates an atmosphere, Defined by mystery beyond ordinary understanding. A boundary is neither an edge, nor a parameter. It is an intangible oddity, Prompting curiosity and wonder, As it redefines movement and perception through space.

48 / 49


Pa rt I v

fig [4.02a]

fig [4.02b]

fig [4.02c]


experiment

Boundaries

should

not

be

monotonous patterns of static elements. When elements come together coterminously, dynamic boundaries

emerge

and

space

becomes elastic, ethereal and impermanent.

50 / 51


Pa rt I v

warp ed matter The dichotomy between simplicity

With the use of a heat gun,

and complexity is a relationship

the plastics morphed to become

for constant exploration in design;

an organic form that gave new

within every material, there lies

characteristics

this juxtaposed understanding.

and transparency. Flexibility in

of

lightness

form developed as expandable foam In an attempt to better understand

pushed through mesh boundaries

these dimensions, this experiment

and plastic lacing weaved around

focuses on formally and spatially

the structure of a 3d printed

expanding the limits of certain

surface.

materials. Transluscent plastic lacing and sheets, textile and

What

is

seemingly

static,

plastic mesh grids, and expandable

gradually becomes dynamic as

foam were manipulated to reveal

there is continuous change in our

the diversity of form and function.

expectations of these materials.


experiment

TRANSFORM

fig [4.03]

52 / 53


Pa rt I v

fig [4.04a]


experiment

fig [4.04b]

fig [4.05]

54 / 55


Pa rt I v

or p hi c relatio ns Orphic (adj.) [or·phic\ˈȯr-fik\]

from these fundamental terms to widen the spectrum of relations

1. Mysterious and entrancing;

between objects and how they exist,

beyond ordinary understanding.4.02

act and live beyond the realm of human perception. According to

In

contrast

to

dominant

Harman, there are only two kinds

of

of objects: “the real object that

the 20th century that identify

withdraws from all experience,

things as only real if they are

and

sensible

exists

phenomenological

to

claims

humans,

object-

the

sensual only

in

object

that

experience”.

oriented ontology (OOO) claims

Similarly, there are only two

that inanimate objects have lives

kinds of qualities: “sensual

and wider spheres of experience

qualities that we experience

than the way in which they relate

and real qualities that withdraw

to humans.

from

experience”.4.03

Harman’s

object-oriented philosophy is an the

imaginative realism that creates

movement’s founders, outlines

a shift in perceivable qualities

two essential dichotomies in

and guides the discipline into

his book The Quadruple Object:

deeper realities.

Graham

Harman,

one

of

sensual vs. real and object vs. qualities. Four distinguishable

With this OOO philosophy in mind,

expressions

object,

Orphic Relations explores the

real object, sensual qualities,

notion that all objects exert

and real qualities) are produced

a power over the objects around

(sensual


OOO-

experiment

fig [4.06a] / Object-Oriented Ontology

56 / 57


Pa rt I v

fig [4.06b]


experiment

them. A push-pull relationship between objects is defined with a 5 x 5 grid of acrylic circles suspended by an array of suction cups. Harman’s description of objects as “unified realities – physical or otherwise – that cannot be reduced either downwards to their pieces or upwards to their effects” is applied to this experiment.4.04 The pink objects create a boundless matrix of “suction space” and make one question the reality of objects and their qualities.

58 / 59


Pa rt I v

b lop In an effort to alter established

Plop. The lightweight, 3D printed

notions

through

mass allows for the user to easily

space, BLOP combines a formal

grip the amorphous blob, and plop

exploration of boundary with the

the object onto any non-porous

functional qualities of suction

surface.

of

movement

cups to create a dynamic object. Pop. The user can change the Blob. The amorphous mass becomes

object’s orientation from surface

indefinite as it creates blurred

to surface; suction cups permit

zones and indeterminacy through

easy removal and allow for greater

its form and functional qualities.

flexibility in all directions.


experiment

fig [4.07]

BLOBPLOPPOP60 / 61


Pa rt I v

fig [4.08a] / Trial A

fig [4.08b] / Trial B


experiment

fig [4.09]

62 / 63


Pa rt I v


experiment

fig [4.10] / A Blob that Plops and Pops

64 / 65


Pa rt I v

p i p e dream Pipe Dream is an installation

chloride (PVC) pipes creates a

produced by Studio 400 to showcase

forest-like screen to enclose

fall quarter thesis books. It

collaborators while inviting

aimed to produce a field of implied

public

space in vast darkness. As users

Dream provides opportunities for

move through the installation,

intimate collaboration, moments

their

of

perspective

shifts

interaction.

personal

As

reflection

Pipe

arise

between obscurity and clarity.

where the mind begins to wander

The dense matrix of polyvinyl

into an imaginative realm.


PC: JACK GAMBOA

experiment

fig [4.11]

66 / 67


Pa rt I v

fig [4.12a]


experiment

fig [4.12b]

68 / 69


Pa rt I v


PC: BEN JOHNSON

experiment

fig [4.13] / Imaginative Realm

70 / 71


fig [4.14]

PC: ANDREW MINNICH

Pa rt I v


experiment

wooden pegs x 3,512 2.5’ PVC x 1,756 8.5’ PVC x 379

fig [4.15]

72 / 73


Pa rt I v


PC: JACK GAMBOA

experiment

fig [4.16] / Intimate Reading Spaces

74 / 75


Pa rt I v

fig [4.17]


experiment

In collaboration with studio 400: Michelle Amaris, Caroline Angell, Colleen Beckman, Sophie de Christopher, David Do, Kelsi Doyle, Regan Dyer, Jack Gamboa, Katie Gray, Cecil Green, Harry Gutchinov, Ben Johnson, Chris Jordano, Lucas Kivimaki, Ian Levenson, Karolina Ĺ uckiewicz, Aaron Ly, Andrew Minnich, Gabi Osias, Nabila Sarkar

76 / 77


context


“[urban sites] involve recognizing the overlay and interplay of multiple realities operating at the same time, on the same place.� 5 .0 1 - c a rol j. b u rn s


pa r t v context Enmeshed with various layers of information, Tokyo, Japan is a dynamic and provisional space where the inside/outside relationship of boundaries becomes unclear. The following text characterizes the urban site as a porous and shifting

space

that

extends

beyond traditional boundaries to create a new definition of spatial elasticity.

80 / 81


Pa rt v

u rb a n matrix Midway along Japan’s greatest

With Tokyo’s cycle of change,

island,

boundaries

Honshū,

lies

the

are

continuously

world’s largest and most dynamic

shifted and redrawn. Bordered

metropolis – Tokyo. Formerly

by the Japanese Alps and the

known as Edo, Tokyo officially

Yamanashi Prefecture to the west,

became the capital after a shift

by Tokyo Bay and Chiba Prefecture

in movement from the old capital

to the east, by the Tamagawa River

of Kyoto in 1868.

From the

and the Kanagawa Prefecture to

city’s origin as capital through

the south, and by the Saitama

present time, Tokyo’s growth

Prefecture to the north, Tokyo,

has paradoxically benefited from

extends

its location in the country’s

city boundaries today. As one

largest

Kantō

of the largest urban sprawls

plain. After the Great Kantō

in the world, the population

earthquake of 1923 and the allied

keeps growing and the need for

air raids strike during World

expansion continuously creates

War II, widespread damage filled

new limits. Roman Cybriwsky,

the region. Tokyoites, however,

author of Tokyo: the Shogun’s

rebuilt the city twice in the

City at the Twenty-first Century,

flatland, positively transforming

explains that Tokyo’s expansion

the metropolis into a vibrant,

into the future “…will build

fast-paced urban space; a space

upward to new heights, outward

that is able to accommodate the

beyond its present limits, and

constant change and perpetual

downward

transitions through time.

below the surface.”

flatland,

5.02

the

beyond

to

its

the

original

‘geofront’ 5.03

While the


context

tokyo fig [5.01]

82 / 83


Pa rt v

LABYRINTH fig [5.02]


context

region

undergoes

various

contribute

to

its

labyrinth

transformations, the past becomes

image. As Edward Seidensticker,

further engraved into the fabric

author of Tokyo from Edo to Showa

of the city. These expansions

1867-1989: The Emergence of the

cause

in

World’s Greatest City, describes,

the city as the old and new are

“[Tokyo] has always accommodated

completely enmeshed, and deep-

side by side the extremely well

rooted layers spontaneously peek

placed and the extremely poorly

through the present urban fabric.

placed… The bank and the pinball

a

dynamic

layering

parlour, the beauty shop and the The

impermanent

atmosphere

flophouse are juxtaposed.”

5.05

The

naturally created by Tokyo has

little sense of order in the city

defined the chaos and disorder

combined with its amorphous street

of the city. Dubbed the ‘urban

plan give Tokyo a new definition

labyrinth’, Tokyo has no geometric

of space: the urban matrix. With

framework and no spatial hierarchy

hidden

as any Western city would.

5.04

environment of multi-level mazes,

The city has a lack of zoning

one can only discover this space

and thus, an agglomeration of

through personal experience of

different typologies that further

getting lost in the labyrinth. 5.06

expansions

in

a

vast

84 / 85


Pa rt v

b ounded infinity With the population growing at an

transportation lines: The Shuto

ever-changing pace in the giant

Expressway (top deck), Route 482

metropolis, Tokyo’s boundaries

(top deck) and the New Transit

are constantly being shifted.

Yurikamome (bottom deck).

Today, the ‘urban labyrinth’ has

bridge is connected to the ground

vastly expanded into areas within

with a curved loop that stretches

and around Tokyo, including its

270m in diameter. Pedestrians

movement into Tokyo Bay. After

are able to use two walkways

Tokyo’s explosion in the 1960s and

on the lower deck of the bridge

1970s, a fast growth occurred into

to view inner Tokyo harbor and

the body of water and grew steadily

Tokyo Tower on the north side,

from there.5.07 The expansion of

and Tokyo Bay and occasionally

infrastructure into Tokyo Bay is

Mount Fuji on the south side.

a constant test to the limits of

With constant movement around the

the city and the boundary between

Rainbow Bridge loop, there is a

land and water.

sense of limitless involved. The

5.08

The

5.09

‘urban labyrinth’, thus, becomes In 1993, the labyrinth expanded

a bounded infinity at this site;

beyond its former limits with the

the site is a push and pull of

extension of an infrastructure

boundary as one is pulled off

that suspends 50m over the Bay

the land in a horizontal motion,

– the Rainbow Bridge. The 798m

circulated through the loop in a

long bridge connects Shibaura

vertical motion, and pushed back

with

into the urban matrix suspended

the

seaside

sub-center

across Tokyo Bay and carries three transportation

above the water.


context

fig [5.03] / Rainbow Bridge Loop

Throughout history, Tokyo has

by

established itself as a dynamic

and

and

the atmosphere of this place

multifaceted

city

that

embraces sudden transitions,

an

indefinite

will

continue

continuity to

define

for generations to come.

5.10

constant flux, and change. The complex urban fabric, with its tangled

infrastructure

and

curious spatial patterns, holds the past and present together

86 / 87


desi g n


“reality is indeed parametrically mutable: by adjusting the parameters of parts and sections of reality we can fabricate anew.� 6.01 - ma rk ra kata n s ky


pa r t v I design The urban labyrinth reveals a new perception of the built environment as it forms an architecture that blurs the boundary between our physical and cerebral environments. With this bound[less] notion, space becomes a dream machine - an exploration of endless possibilities through mixed realms.

90 / 91


Pa rt vi

u nsee n real ities Ensō [円 相 / en·so]

limits of an architecture with

1. Circle.

endless possibilities. As individuals

2. In Zen buddhism, a state

step away from their everyday

of mind where everything and

routine in Tokyo and towards the

nothing exists.6.02

open unknown, reality shifts. Users

A skyscraper of indefiniteness, unpredictability and ambiguity, Unseen

Realities

architecture

as

redefines an

unknown

complexity in the vastness of a known world. With both visual and symbolic parallels to Ensō, the Rainbow Bridge loop serves as a boundary condition that emphasizes the inside-outside relationship of the known and the unknown. While a static energy on the certainty of program, circulation and structure exists beyond the bounds of the loop, a dynamic energy of neverending surprise exists within the loop.

immerse themselves in spaces which cross-over between dimensions: a field of water vapor blurs the boundary between the defined path and the invitation to get lost in an infinite realm; a room that multiplies to no end encloses a range of elevators that transport users through both physical and augmented realities; and a space of surreal fluidity where surfaces warp the physical dimension and provide a blank canvas for the fleeting effects of a digital realm. Built-in systems throughout the megastructure have an algorithmically defined control unit which function to constantly transform experiences. One’s reality will, thus, never

This dynamic energy pushes the

be experienced by another user;


design

LIMITLESSNESS

fig [6.01]

92 / 93


Pa rt vi

Known

Unknown fig [6.02]


design

this is the unseen. With these ever-changing conditions, Unseen Realities Unseen Realities becomes a perspective-shifting machine; a machine which allows users to understand themselves, objects and the space surrounding them in different ways. By multiplying and overlapping various realities, pre-conceived notions on what architecture and objects should be are taken apart. Perceptions change and destabilize one’s assumptions of reality, making one question their presence in this world.

94 / 95


Pa rt vi


design

fig [6.03a] / 1:1500m Site Model

96 / 97


Pa rt vi

“[Tokyo] cannot be experienced as an entity. But to the stranger lost in its limitless labyrinths, it offers the joy of discovery and never-ending surprise.”

6.03

- Erhard Hürsch


design

fig [6.03b]

98 / 99


Pa rt vi

fig [6.03c]


design

“[Tokyo] remains an in(de)finite city, a ‘dream machine’, where urban reality and fiction form an inseparable entity.”

6.04

- Botond Bognar

100 / 101


Pa rt vi


design

fig [6.04] / Rainbow Bridge Loop

102 / 103


Pa rt vi

fig [6.05]


design

fig [6.06]

104 / 105


Pa rt vi

[01] [02] [03] [04] [05] [06] [07] [08]

Opening Ethereal Field Infinity Room Emergency Exit Pod Capsules Dreamscape Warped Matter Spatial Oddity


design

fig [6.07]

106 / 107


Pa rt vi 東 京 湾 = Tokyo Bay


design

Opening. The urban labyrinth disappears for a moment as the Tokyoite moves down the ramp and towards the unseen. A stainless steel ball appears as a link between two dimensions; a link which reflects the routine lifestyle one is about to depart to enter into the unknown. Ethereal Field. As one moves through the visual tunnel and into the main public space, an unrealistic site reveals itself. A mystic atmosphere of vapor lies around the main structural core, providing an amorphous transition zone between two dimensions; one seeks the unknown as they capture a glimpse of something inside the blurred zone. A single motion through the main elevator and the user is suddenly pushed into another dimension of the urban labyrinth.

108 / 109


Pa rt vi

fig [6.08b] / Opening + Ethereal Field


design

fig [6.08c] / Main Elevator Entrance

110 / 111


Pa rt vi

Infinity Room. Comprised of 88 elevators, the room full of mirrors becomes spatially elastic as a bound[less] extension of space is created. This dynamic shift in boundary obliterates the senses and transforms an individual’s awareness of physical self in an engrossing environment.


design

A

B

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

01

d24-01

02 03

e47-02

04 05 06 07 08

b9 2 - 0 5

09 10

fig [6.09a] Emergency Exit Structural Column

112 / 113


Pa rt vi


design

fig [6.09b] / Infinity Room

114 / 115


Pa rt vi

fig [6.10] / Immersive Experience


design

Pod

Capsules.

Users

control

which capsule they enter, but are uncertain of the length of time [30 sec - 3:00 min] and ever-changing experience that awaits them. Each pod is designed with a digital surface technology to create an immersive visual experience and allow for multiple realities to exist; one can only question which reality exists.

116 / 117


Pa rt vi

Dreamscape. Once a user enters a pod, they are transported into a space where movement resembles the urban labyrinth and creates a sense of limitlessness. Rigid boundaries begin to dissolve as one moves away from the gridded infinity room and towards the realm of warped space.


design

fig [6.11] / 1:500m Physical Model

118 / 119


Pa rt vi

fig [6.12]


design

fig [6.13]

120 / 121


Pa rt vi

[ 0 1] [02]

[03]

[04] [05]

[01] [02] [03] [04] [05]

5’ Round Capsule 3” Steel Structure 1/8” Stainless Steel Panels 4” Steel Connection 1/8” Frosted Glass Panels

fig [6.14a]


design

Warped

Matter.

An

alternate

reality of surreal fluidity where opaque, reflective and translucent surfaces alter one’s perception of physical space. As pods enter this field and interweave an immersive digital realm, boundaries blur and interconnect two realities - actual/fictional and physical/ augmented.

This

experiential

architecture provides users with a temporary release from their habitual perceptions about being in the world, enabling them to perceive themselves, objects and the space surrounding them in different ways.

122 / 123


Pa rt vi


design

fig [6.14b] / Warped Matter

124 / 125


Pa rt vi

fig [6.15]


design

fig [6.16]

126 / 127


Pa rt vi

Spatial

Oddity.

The

oddity

which engages imagination as it pulls one from the mundane into something fantastical.

構 造 層 = Structural Layers


design

200 m

01 02

100 m

03

構 造 層

01

Highly-reflective Stainless Steel panels

02

Space Frame Structure

03

glass fiber reinforced polymer [GFRP] Panels

50 m

fig [6.17] / Section A

128 / 129


re

ve

al

-

Pa rt vi

The

y

Oddity.

nc

Spatial

oddity

which engages imagination as it

re

pulls one from the mundane into

-t

ra

ns

pa

something fantastical.

構 造 層 = Structural Layers


design

200 m

100 m

構 造 層

50 m

fig [6.17] / Section A

128 / 129


Pa rt vi

fig [6.18]


design

fig [6.19]

130 / 131


close Unseen Realities invites individuals to re-examine architecture as an open structure, in which both everything and nothing exists. By entering this unknown, one loses all sense of time through an endless search for meaning.

132 / 133


notes

par t i [1.01]

Huxley, Aldous. The Doors of Perception. New York: Harper & Row, 1963. p 62. Print.

fig [1.01] [1.02]

Magno, Heitor. “Untitled.” Flickr. 2014. Web. “Perception.” Dictionary.com. 2016. Web.

par t II [2.01]

Lovecraft, Howard Phillips, and S. T. Joshi. The Call of Cthulhu and Other Weird Stories. New York: Penguin, 1999.

Introduction, p xx. Print. fig [2.01]

Author, Collage.

par t III [3.01]

Somol, Robert, and Sarah Whiting. “Notes around the Doppler

Effect and Other Moods of Modernism.” Perspecta 33 (2002): 72-77. Web. fig [3.01]

Eliasson, Olafur. “Space Resonates Regardless of Our Presence.” Studio Olafur Eliasson. 2017. Web.

[3.02] fig [3.02]

Eliasson, Olafur. Web. Eliasson, Olafur. “Big Bang Fountain.” Studio Olafur Eliasson. 2014. Web.


par t iII

(continued)

[3.03]

Olof-Ors, Matilda, Daniel Birnbaum, and Timothy Morton. Olafur Eliasson: Reality Machines. London: Koenig, 2015. p 03. Print.

fig [3.03] [3.04]

Ducmanis, Reinis. “Rorschach.” Reinisducmanis. 2017. Web. “Olafur Eliasson.” Artnet. 2017. Web.

fig [3.04a]

Ohki, Daisuke. “Neoreal Wonder - The World of Canon’s Digital

fig [3.04b]

Ohki, Daisuke. Web.

Imaging.” 2011. Web. [3.05]

Schubach, Alanna. “Why the Rorschach Test Is So Big in Japan.” The Atlantic. Atlantic Media Company, 2015. Web.

fig [3.05] [3.06]

“City in the Air by Arata Isozaki.” ArtStack. 2015. Web. Rorschach, Hermann, and Paul Victor Lemkau. Psychodiagnostics: A Diagnostic Test Based on Perception. 5th ed. N.p.: Grune & Stratton, 1942. p 22-36. Print.

fig [3.06] [3.07]

Diller Scofidio + Renfro. “Blur Building.” DS + R. 2012. Web. WOW Visual Design. Tokyo: WOW, 2011. p 30. Print.

fig [3.07a]

LaCava, Stephanie. “The Radical Success of Comme Des Garçons.”

fig [3.07b]

Feliciano, K. “Nadav Kander Photographs Model in Comme Des

The New York Review of Books. 2017. Web. Garçons for Garage Magazine Fashion Story.” Stockland

Martel Blog. 2016. Web. [3.08] fig [3.08]

Hernandez, Ricardo. “Neoreal Wonder by Canon.” Yatzer. 2011. Web. “Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirror Rooms.” Hirshhorn Museum. 2017. Web.

[3.09]

Hernandez, Ricardo. Web.

[3.10]

“Metabolism, the City of the Future.” Mori Art Museum, 2011. Web.

[3.11]

Lin, Zhongjie. “Urban Structure for the Expanding Metropolis: Kenzo Tange’s 1960 Plan for Tokyo.” Journal of

Architectural and Planning Research 24.2 (2007): 109-24. Web. [3.12]

Maki, Fumihiko, and Mark Mulligan. Nurturing Dreams: Collected Essays on Architecture and the City. Cambridge, MA: MIT, 2008. p 50. Print.

[3.13]

Diller Scofidio + Renfro. “Blur Building.” DS + R. 2012. Web.

[3.14]

Diller Scofidio + Renfro. Web.

[3.15]

Kawakubo, Rei. Rei Kawakubo/Comme Des Garçons: Art of the In-

[3.16]

Kawakubo, Rei. p 37. Print.

Between. The Met, 2017. p 3. Print.

134 / 135


par t iII

(continued)

[3.17]

Munroe, Alexandra. “Obsession, Fantasy and Outrage: The Art of

[3.18]

“Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirror Rooms.” Hirshhorn Museum. 2017. Web.

Yayoi Kusama.” Alexandra Munroe Blog. 2015. Web.

par t IV [4.01] fig [4.01] [4.02]

Maki, Fumihiko, and Mark Mulligan. p 121. Print. Author, Photograph. “Orphic.” Merriam-Webster. 2017. Web.

fig [4.02a]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.02b]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.02c]

Author, Photograph.

[4.03]

Harman, Graham. The Quadruple Object. Winchester, U.K. 2011. Print.

fig [4.03] [4.04]

Author, Photograph. Kerr, Dylan. “What Is Object-Oriented Ontology? A Guide to the Philosophical Movement Sweeping the Art World.” Artspace. 2016. Web.

fig [4.04a]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.04b]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.05]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.06a]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.06b]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.07]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.08a]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.08b]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.09]

Author, Diagram.

fig [4.10]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.11]

Jack Gamboa, Photograph.

fig [4.12a]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.12b]

Author, Photograph.

fig [4.13]

Ben Johnson, Photograph.

fig [4.14]

Andrew Minnich, Photograph.

fig [4.15]

Nabila Sarkar, Exploded Axonometric Drawing.

fig [4.16]

Jack Gamboa, Photograph.

fig [4.17]

Author, Photograph.


notes

par t V [5.01]

Khan, Andrea. Defining Urban Sites. New York: Routledge, 2004. p 286. Print.

fig [5.01] [5.02]

“Tokyo Black Stadskaart Poster.” Kunst in Kaart. 2015. Web. Mansfield, Stephen. Tokyo: A Cultural History. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2009. Print.

fig [5.02] [5.03]

Author, Map. Cybriwsky, Roman A. Tokyo: The Shogun’s City at the Twenty-first Century. Chichester: J. Wiley & Sons, 1998. Print.

fig [5.03]

Birke, Thomas. “Untitled.” Flickr. 2017. Web.

[5.04]

Jinnai, Hidenobu. Tokyo: A Spatial Anthropology. Berkeley: U of

[5.05]

Seidensticker, Edward. Tokyo from Edo to Showa 1867-1989: The

California, 1995. Print. Emergence of the World’s Greatest City. Tokyo: Tuttle Pub., 2010. Print. [5.06]

Bognar, Botond. World Cities: Tokyo. London: Academy Editions,

[5.07]

Siebert, Loren. “Using GIS to Document, Visualize, and Interpret

1997. Print. Tokyo’s Spatial History.” Social Science History 24.03 (2000): 537-74. Web. [5.08]

“Minato City Sightseeing Database.” Minato City Sightseeing

Database. Web. [5.09]

Hayley, Ashley. “Rainbow Bridge.” JapanTravel. 2016. Web.

[5.10]

Mansfield, Stephen. Print.

par t V I [6.01]

Rakatansky, Mark. “Fabricators.” Tectonic Acts of Desire and Doubt. London: Architectural Association, 2012. p 12. Print.

fig [6.01]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

[6.02]

“Enso.” Modern Zen. 2017. Web.

fig [6.02] [6.03]

Author, Diagram. Hürsch, Erhard. Tokyo. 1965. Print.

fig [6.03a]

Author, Physical Model. 1:1500m

fig [6.03b]

Author, Physical Model. 1:1500m

fig [6.03c]

Author, Physical Model. 1:1500m

[6.04]

Bognar, Botond. Print.

136 / 137


par t V I

(continued)

fig [6.04]

Author, Exterior Perspective Render.

fig [6.05]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.06]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.07]

Author, Components Diagram.

fig [6.08a]

Author, Site Plan.

fig [6.08b]

Author, Opening + Ethereal Field Render.

fig [6.08c]

Author, Main Elevator Entrance Render.

fig [6.09a]

Author, Floor Plan.

fig [6.09b]

Author, Infinity Room Render.

fig [6.10]

Author, Immersive Experience Render.

fig [6.11]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.12]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.13]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.14a]

Author, Warped Matter Diagram.

fig [6.14b]

Author, Warped Matter Render.

fig [6.15]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.16]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.17]

Author, Section Drawing.

fig [6.18]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m

fig [6.19]

Author, Physical Model. 1:500m


Unseen Realities  

Bachelor of Architecture Design Thesis / 2016 - 2017

Unseen Realities  

Bachelor of Architecture Design Thesis / 2016 - 2017

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