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Loachapoka Preservation Plan

Katherine Martin CPLN 6970


Introduction Loachapoka, Alabama is located within Lee County just over 12 miles from Auburn and 14 miles from Opelika. The town has a population of 180, but at one time Auburn and Opelika were more like suburbs of Loachapoka. Currently, there are very few businesses located in the area and just over 86 occupied residences. However quiet, Loachapoka still emits a small-town charm that is appealing to many. “Main Street,” or Stage Road, is roughly one-fifth of a mile long and is anchored by Fred’s Feed and Seed and Pioneer Park. Downtown is made up of sixteen structures including Pioneer Park, which consists of a history museum run by local volunteers and outbuildings including an amphitheater and other outbuildings. In this area, the Lee County Historical Society hosts a monthly event, Second Saturday, where visitors can expect to see volunteers dressed in period attire demonstrating and exhibiting arts and crafts representative of the area’s historical past.

Table of Contents I. Introduction II. History III. Demographics and Economic Data IV. Preservation Plan i. Railroad Park ii. Pioneer Park iii. Historic Building Plan iv. Street Design VIII. Conclusion IX. Building Survey

In addition to Second Saturday, the Loachapoka Ruritan Club, Ladies Improvement Club, and the Lee County Historical Society have hosted Syrup Sopping Day each fall since 1972. At this event, visitors witness the traditional methods used by local farmer to make syrup from sorghum and ribbon cane. An estimated 15,000 people from all across the south east attend the free event each year. Because of it’s rich history dating back to Native American settlement of the area, the town has developed a unique identity that deserves to shared with local citizens, potential residents, and the floating visiting population. Through preservation and infrastructure improvements, along with proper marketing, the area has the potential to appeal many individuals. This report discusses the history and current conditions of Loachapoka and proposes ideas for the preservation of the area.


History As early as the 1540s, Creek Indians and their allies settled into to parts of East Alabama. A group of Creeks, known as the Upper Creeks, located in the area of what is now known as Loachapoka. The town got its name from two Creek words “locha,” meaning turtle or terrapin, and “polga,” meaning resort, or killing place. A broader interpretation has usually been “terrapin resort,” or “land where terrapins live.” As with many Native American settlements, the town is believed to have been originally settled elsewhere, in Randolph County on the Tallapoosa River, and relocated to its current location as the Creeks migrated. Another legend tells of a group of white hunters who ran into a group of Native Americans somewhere on the Sougahatchee River while hunting. They could not understand each other, experimented with sign language, and finally, after some time, a white hunter saw a turtle sunning and set a fire on its back. The Creek onlookers thought this action was entertaining, and shouted “lutcha poga,” or “turtle run.” According to history, the culture and standards of living of Creek Indian tribes were well above average for Native Americans. They were known as good farmers to a host of crops, corn being their most important. Their homes were substantially built, neat, and attractive. Author and former Loachapoka resident Alexander Nunn explains in his book Yesterdays in Loachapoka and Communities Nearby that there are some home site locations that exist in the area. Pottery, arrow markers, and other artifacts have found in and around the neighboring area. The 1832 Census shows that the area of Loachapoka was densely settled, with 564 Native American residents representing 164 families. With the signing of the Treaty of Cusseta on March 24, 1832, all Creek tribal holdings east of the Mississippi River were eliminated, opening the State of Alabama for white settlement. The treaty provided, that any Native American family that wished to stay could take an allotment of land and establish their home there. However, according to Nunn, many Creeks preferred to resettle among their own people. It is also stated they had strong opinions of how long the government and their white neighbors would protect them from a “villainous type if white.” The first recorded white settler in the immediate Loachapoka area was a man named Square Talley, who moved west from Auburn with five of six slaves. After Talley arrived it is said many more followed. Plans for a railroad connecting Montgomery, Alabama to West Point, Georgia in 1833 spurred growth in the developing town

of Loachapoka. Land clearing began on March 1, 1836, and the tracks reached Loachapoka in 1845. The inclusion of the railroad led churches and schools to quickly establish in the town, the first of which were the Baptist Church, which was deeded on March 31, 1853 and Loachapoka Academy in 1852 or earlier. Williamson W. Plant owned and operated the town’s first general merchandise and whiskey house located one mile west of the city’s present site. The first store in the present location was built and owned by Jule Phillips and his family. The store was known as a trading center for residents and passersby. Throughout the Civil War, until the midsummer of 1864, the railroad was the main route for supplies from the breadbasket of Confederacy in the Blackbelt of Alabama and Mississippi. The town of Loachapoka was thriving - in addition the Baptist Church, the Methodist Church, and the Masonic Lodge had many regular participants. Because of the topography of the land, the area was not ideal for plantation farming, thus, there were very few families in the area owned slaves. Local farmers began to realize the importance of cotton farming, and by 1860, output was worth more than $45 million. Between 1861 and 1865, many Loachapoka men were enlisted with the very first Confederate units in the Civil War. The most devastating battle of the war for the area was Seven Pines in Virginia, which was fought in 1862. The Loachapoka Rifles lost five soldiers and many more were wounded. On July 10, 1864 Gen. L. H. Rousseau staged another battle that would shake the town of Loachapoka when he set out from Decatur with these instructions from Gen. Sherman: “Be sure to go to Opelika and break up the railroad between it and Montgomery. There is but a single road there which unites the Mississippi road with the Alabama road.” Gen. Sherman expected total destruction of the road to prevent the continued shipment of army supplies east toward Atlanta, this also included burning warehouses and supply centers. The Carlisle building was one of these centers that escaped the flames of Rousseau’s raiders. However, the Depot and other “tax-in-kind” homes were burned at Loachapoka, Auburn, and Opelika.


Following the Civil War, hardship reached Loachapoka. The few slaves in the area were free, economic and social order had been destroyed, and an era of rebuilding began. For many, living became a matter of survival. Based on the age of homes built in the area, growth came to a halt, as many were built prior to 1860, between 1906 and 1917, or after the Great Depression. Records of the Loachapoka Baptist Church reflect the economic conditions of the day.

Loachapoka High School about 1894

In late 1893, the Rev. G. S. Anderson became pastor at the church and at the end of his third year, records indicate that $95.50 had been subscribed for the pastor for that year and only about one-third had been paid to date. Other records of paychecks, such of that of a local sexton who was paid 40 cents per month, also speak to the times.


Demographics and Economic Conditions A total of 180 individuals currently reside in the town of Loachapoka, according to the 2010 U.S. Census. Within the population, there are 86 households, of which 47 are categorized as “family households.” Husband-wife households make up 38.4% of all family households, which is the most common in Loachapoka. Fourteen percent of family households are headed by females, half of which have children under 18 years old. The average family household size is 2.79 individuals. Non-family households make up 45.3 percent of the total households in Loachapoka. It is interesting to point out that of these non-related households, 31 of the 39 individuals live alone. The town has a median age of 47 years old and 83.3 percent of the population is 18 years of age or older. The male to female ratio is 1:1, which makes out to be 90 males and 90 females. The median age of males in Loachapoka is 40.5 years old, while the median age of the female population is 50. In Loachapoka, 98.9 percent of the population reports identifying with one race. Whites make up 58.9 percent of the population—a total of 106 individuals. Sixty-seven individuals are black or African American, a total of 37.2 percent of the population. Other minority races in the town include five individuals who identify as Asian, two individuals identify as Hispanic or Latino, and two individuals who report being two or more races. It is interesting to point out that despite being first settled by Native Americans, no member of the population identifies as even being part American Indian. There are a total of 106 housing units located in Loachapoka, of which 86—or 81.1 percent—are occupied. The 20 housing units classified as vacant fall into different categories: 14 are for rent; one is rented, but not occupied; three are for seasonal, recreational or occasional use; and two others are not classified. The majority of occupied homes - 73.3 percent - are owner-occupied with a total of 141 individuals living in these homes. The remaining population rents homes in the area. The American Community Survey (ACS) produces population, demographic, and housing unit estimates for the United States. According to the latest survey,

84.1 percent of the Loachapoka population has a high school diploma or higher, and 46.4% of those individuals received a bachelor’s degree or higher. When it comes to employment statistics, the ACS estimates of the 165 individuals over 16 years old, 119 are employed in the civilian labor force. The educational services and health care and social assistance industry is the largest industry represented in Loachapoka with 55 individuals estimated to work within the category. Management, business, science, and arts occupations are the majority at 47.9 percent followed by sales and office occupations at 31.9 percent. The majority of the labor force, 52.9 percent, is private wage and salary workers, 42 percent are government workers, and the remaining 5 percent are self-employed. Of the 87 households estimated in the ACS survey, 40.2 percent make between $35,000 and $49,999 annually. The median household income in Loachapoka is estimated at $47,708 annually and the mean income is $73,147. Almost 3 percent of the population live below the poverty level.


Population Density Population per square mile (2010 Census)

14.9 to 14.9 14.9 to 14.9 14.9 to 53.9 53.9 to 104.1 104.1 to 115.3

November 18, 2013 Š2013 Esri

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Income Average household income by block group (Esri 2013).

32,233 to 32,233 32,233 to 32,233 32,233 to 43,003 43,003 to 84,399 84,399 to 115,025

November 18, 2013 Š2013 Esri

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Preservation Plan Concept Map

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1 Railroad Park 2 Pioneer Park 3 Historic Building Plan 4 Street Design


1

Railroad Park

Existing Conditions The currently under-utilized green space across from Pioneer Park has the available space and potential to be a destination for Loachapoka residents and visitors to the area alike. As it sits, it does not resemble a park that would be practical for families due to many safety hazards. One of the main concerns is the proximity of the land to both the railroad and

two lanes of traffic traveling at high speeds. No barriers are currently in place to prevent people or pets from walking onto the tracks or into the street. Additionally, the existing park furniture is close to the street and the trees planted in the park do not provide much shade for park-goers.


Proposals Establishing a redesigned park, which could potentially be named Railroad Park due to both it’s proximity to the railroad and Loachapoka’s historical connection to the railroad culture during it’s early days. One of the first steps proposed in creating a more user-friendly atmosphere at Railroad Park is addressing the aforementioned safety issues. Fencing along the railroad would help prevent access to the tracks. A simple wooden structure with a screen barrier that would prevent children and pets from slipping between the horizontal posts would eliminate this safety concern. A planting strip, like the one seen in the photo to the right, would add an additional barrier. When addressing visitor interaction with passing vehicles, more safety measures are needed. A similar type fence is proposed on one side of the sidewalk closest to traffic, a more detailed proposal will be discussed in section four, street design. There is also a need for additional landscaping in Railroad Park. Currently, there is a lack of indigenous plants to the area. As mentioned in Alexander Nunn’s book, cape Jessamine, oaks, wisteria, roses, lilac, blue violets, phlox, jonquils, larkspur, iris, gladiolus, English boxwoods, and crepe myrtles were extremely prevalent in the area in the early days. Reintroducing these plants to the park could relate back to Pioneer Park’s goal of teaching visitors about the history of Loachapoka.

Wood fencing with some kind of screen, like one seen above, could line the railroad for safety.

Finally, appropriate park furniture - picnic tables, benches, and possibly a playground for children - should be placed Railroad Park to provide comfort and entertainment for all visitors.

Placing benches and other park comforts will draw more people into the area.


Cape Jessamine Gardenia

Oak Tree

Wisteria

Phlox

Jonquil

Larkspur

Above are a few of the plant species that were said to be widely found in Loachapoka dating back at least to the 1850s.


2

Pioneer Park

Existing Conditions

Proposals

Pioneer Park is owned and operated by the Lee County Historical Society and is made of a museum and exhibits including the Dr. McLain’s Office, the Ruth Purdy Speake Cabin, the Cook House, and the Loachapoka Gin Office.

This plan proposes removing the chain fence surrounding the park and opening it up to encourage people gather under the shade trees or move about the exhibits. For those concerned with the proximity of the park to Highway 14, as you will see in the street design section, a fence is proposed along the road that will block pedestrian traffic on the sidewalk from traffic.

Currently Pioneer Park is separated from Stage Road/Highway 14 by a chainlinked fence that makes it appear unimportant and unapproachable. Behind the fence, there are historic makers, but they can not be read unless visitors enter the park through a gate, which is often locked. There is a lack of signage in the and information that would guide visitors around the park without first going into the museum office.

Signs, like the National Register markers, should be placed in front of each exhibit explaining it’s history and how guests are to interact. Landscaping could also be update to reflect some of the species in Railroad Park.


3

Historic building plan

Existing Conditions Many of the buildings in downtown Loachapoka appear to be falling apart and of little historical significance. Sixteen buildings and structures have been identified in the study area, all with different uses. Eight of the 16 buildings - Pioneer Park Museum, Ruth Purdy Speake Cabin, Taylor Whatley Building, Doctor McLain’s Office, the Loachapoka Gin Office, the Band Stand, Cook House, and McLain Gardens - are a part of Pioneer Park. The Museum, or the Old Trade Center, which was built around 1845, is the oldest commercial structure in Lee County. It is built in a basic Colonial style and is in good condition. The downstairs of the building contains exhibits of the history of Lee County and examples of items sold in the Old Trade Center, including hand-made laces and glass bottles. Upstairs, the museum recreates the home of the previous owner of the building. There are also displays different fiber arts made by locals. The Ruth Purdy Speake Cabin, built during the 1840s in Chambers County, was moved to it’s current location to offer visitors a glimpse of the area’s past. The style of the building is classic vernacular dogtrot architecture. The cabin hosts demonstrations of open hearth cooking and contains a school room typical of the late 1800s. The Taylor Whatley building exhibit, built in the 1970s, displays farming tools and other machinery. It has long, low roof line and is made out of wood. These items show the importance of agriculture, mechanics, blacksmithing, dairy, and many other areas to the Loachapoka area. Dr. McLain’s Office is an homage to Dr. McLain of Salem, which is in eastern Lee County. McClain practiced medicine for more than 50 years, and many original furnishings from his office are on display in the exhbit. It contains a pharmacy, soda shop, and the old Salem Post Office just like in his former office. The current building was originally a barn and warehouse for the cotton gin that operated on the same site and was renovated between 2007 and 2008. The building has a long sloping roof and new wood construction and is in excellent

condition. The Loachapoka Gin office, also known as the Ward Brothers Gin, was the only industry in Loachapoka until it burned down in 1969. The office and the cotton scale have been restored and the building now hosts a history of cotton production exhibit. The same small, simple wooden building also served as Town Hall and polling place for Loachapoka. The Cook House and the Band Stand are used mostly during special events. The Cook House prepares and serves meals and the Band Stand hosts outdoor concerts and classes. Near Dr. McLain’s Office, the McLain Garden is a collection of culinary and medicinal herbs, some of which McLain used in his practice. In addition to the herb garden, the Crops Garden is an annual garden of field crops typical of the area in the late 1800s and contains sweet potatoes, sugarcane, sorghum, peanuts, and cotton. Grandma’s Garden contains flowers and other plants that could be found 100 years ago, it is also equip with a millstone fountain that aids in rainwater collection used to irrigate the garden. Outside of Pioneer Park, Fred’s Feed and Seed, Fred’s Pickin’ Parlor, and Town Hall line Stage Road. Fred’s Feed and Seed is filled with nick-knacks and the Pickin’ Parlor offers music lessons and hosts barn dances twice a month. Both of buildings are in fair condition and made of wood. The Feed and Seed building is a typical town feed store with a tall porch with a weathered storefront and the Pickin’ Parlor appears to be a barn conversion. Loachapoka Town Hall opens only a few days of the week and is a small, onestory building made of red brick. The former location of the Rattling Gourd Art Gallery, which is currently for sale, across North Park Street from Fred’s. It is built


Across Stage Road, on the east side of South Park street, four more structures sit in the study area. The Syrup Sop Shop and two devices used to make syrup are used during the annual Syrup Sopping Day. The shop sells the syrup that is made using the devices, which are operated by horses.

Foundation; the Alabama Humanities Foundation; the Gwyn Turner Endowed Fund; and the Sybil H. Smith Trust in the private sector. In the public sector, the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs and the Alabama State Council on the Arts offer assistance as well.

In the same area, the Loachapoka Community Club building, which is used as a food court during Syrup Sopping Day and a large metal shed building that sits close to Stage Road. It’s use is unknown and does not appear to be of any historical significance.

Another program available for small town development is the Alabama Main Street Program, which is a highly focused, long-term, incremental program that capitalizes on the unique character of historic downtowns. The Main Street program has been around for more than 25 years and has worked in more 2,000 communities nationwide. Currently, only 13 Alabama communities are using the Main Street Four Points Approach to invest in existing infrastructure, create new jobs and retain and attract businesses. Downtown Loachapoka may be eligible to participate in this program.

Proposals Because some of the structures located in Loachapoka are of local significance, the regulations provided by the Alabama Historic Preservation Office were consulted when deciding proposals. Under these regulations, properties must be at least 40 years old and associated with events of state or local significance, and/or representative of a type, style, or period of architecture, and/or associated with Alabama’s history or prehistory. Three of the sixteen structures in the study appear eligible for the Alabama Register: the Pioneer Park Museum, Ruth Purdy Speake Cabin, and Fred’s Feed and Seed, all of which are significant on the local level. In order to be put on the Alabama Register, a property owner must complete an Alabama Register form and be approved by the Alabama Register Review Committee. Tax credits and grant money are available through both the public and private sector. In August 2013, the Alabama Historical Commission approved regulations for the Alabama Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit, which gives tax credits to owners who rehabilitate residential and commercial property. There are $20 million in tax credits available each year for this program. Because the Pioneer Park Museum and the Ruth Purdy Speake Cabin are currently neither commercial or residential, it is encouraged the Park begin to charge an admission fee in order to apply for these tax incentives. If they do not wish to charge admission, there are a few state funding sources, both private and public, these buildings can look into. These include Community Foundations in Alabama, which has assets that total more than $190 million; the Daniel Foundation that offers grants in four program areas; the Alabama Power

In addition to acquiring funding to preserve the buildings in the study area, the town could purchase historical markers that educate the public about historically significant sites, structures, buildings, objects, cemeteries, and districts in the state. In order to do so, the buildings must individually be listed on the National Register of Historic Places or the Alabama Register of Landmarks and Heritage or be a contributing resource in a listed National Register or Alabama Register historic district. Since Loachapoka is listed on the National Register of Historic places, the buildings meet the qualifications. In addition, the Syrup Sop device could receive a marker since objects are also listed as a part of the program.


16 3 7 4 11 12 15 14 9 6 21 10 8 5 13

Map of identified structures in downtown Loachapoka.

1. Fred’s Feed and Seed 2. Fred’s Pickin’ Parlor 3. McLain Building 4. Cook House 5. Syrup Sop Shop 6. Town Hall 7. Taylor Whatley Building 8. Metal Shed Building

9. Pioneer Park Museum 10. Syrup Sop Device 11. Band Stand 12. Ruth Purdy Speake Building 13. Citizen Hardware and Building Supply 14. Rattling Gourd Gallery (For Sale) 15. Loachapoka Gin Office 16. McLain Garden


4

Street Design

Existing Conditions Currently, Main Street Loachapoka gives passers-by little reason to stop and take a look at what’s around the area. There is no visible parking area even if they did wish to stop. Those who do want to visit the area must cross a twolane road with speed limits of 45 mph, no sidewalks or crosswalks, making area uncomfortable for pedestrians. Another safety issue is the proximity of the site to the railroad tracks. There are no barriers preventing people from walking on to the tracks, or cars from driving through if there is a train approaching. The right side of the street, on

which Fred’s Feed and Seed and Pioneer Park are located, the shoulder of the paved road is slightly inclined making it an uneasy surface to walk on. This is most likely in place to deal with runoff from rainwater and could make it difficult to put in sidewalks and other street infrastructure. The left side of the road, where the park is situated, poses even more problems when it comes to adding infrastructure. There is a ditch that runs parallel to the highway that would have to be addressed. In order to get more people to visit the area, these issues will need to be considered.


The photo above shows a view from Stage Road looking toward South Park Street. This photo shows the of barriers preventing accidents.

Stage Road looking east toward Auburn.


Proposals

One of the first things that should be addressed to create a more comfortable atmosphere for visitors should be the street design. Upon visiting the site, there is enough room to add a 6-foot sidewalk on either side of the two-lane road. Some kind of buffer, like a wooden fence, should separate pedestrians from vehicle traffic. Street furniture, such as benches or lighting will also make pedestrians feel more welcome. A crosswalk that is well-indicated should also be added to the street design. Proper signage directing both pedestrians and vehicles will help with safety in the area. In addition to addressing the street design of Main Street Loachapoka, it is necessary to address South Park Street, as it will be the main access point for Railroad Park. This area is also a point of concern because of the proximity to the railroad tracks. Some kind of barrier should be put in place to stop cars from

crossing train tracks when there is a train approaching. Along the main park boundaries another type of barrier should be added to indicate no crossing of the railroad tracts. It is undetermined whether there is currently a need for additional parking to access the park, but if in the future more parking is needed, this proposal suggests adding unpaved parking along the railroad tracks, which would add an additional safety barrier for visitors. Parking areas should be well marked for visitors. Local businesses and citizens should also work together to provide nonpermanent parking for special events like Syrup Sopping Day and Second Saturday.


Additional Parking

Railroad New Parking Stage Road Crosswalk Connection


Conclusion In order for any of these proposals to materialize in downtown Loachapoka, the assets of the town must be properly marketed and money for improvement projects needs to be secured. One of the first things that comes to mind as a source of income for projects is to suggest a donation price for the annual Syrup Sopping Day. With an estimated 15,000 visitor each year, this has the potential to generate substantial funding. One company that has successfully adopted this process is the Sam Adams Brewery in Boston, Mass.. The brewery does not require visitors to pay an entrance fee, but upon arrival they are told there is a suggested donation of $5.00 that allows them to continue tours. However, if the hosts of Syrup Sopping Days are comfortable with an admission fee, that would ensure money from each year of the event. A comparable event to Syrup Sopping Day is the Moundville Native American Festival head annually in Moundville, near Tuscaloosa, Alabama. This festival charges admission for both children and adults, $10 and $8 respectively. It is well attended each year and is repeatedly named as one of Alabama’s Top 20 Tourism Events. When it comes to the Second Saturday event, creating an opportunity for local and nearby school children to visit Pioneer Park and have their own version of the event could generate additional revenue from field trip fees. The event could be run by volunteers from the Lee County Historical Society or, with the proximity to Auburn University, students. It could be offered as a volunteer opportunity through student organizations to come out and help with demonstrations and crafts. The existing amphitheater provides an additional way to generate revenue. Currently it is sometimes used for local shows., but could be used to draw a broader crowd. The charm of the area is different from With the implementation of these proposals and marketing suggestions, Downtown Loachapoka has the potential to draw in more visitors. It will also be a more enjoyable place to live for its residents.


Building Survey Fred’s Feed & Seed

Fred’s Pickin’ Parlor

Address: 6434 Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Fair Remaining Historic Fabric: Medium Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Commercial retail Exterior Architecture Description: Typical town feed store, tall porch, weathered storefront, wood Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: Yes Level of Significance: Local

Address: 6434 Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Poor Remaining Historic Fabric: Medium Number of Stories/Approximate Height: Two Current Use of Property: Offers music lessons and hosts barn dances Exterior Architecture Description: Period reused, barn conversion, weathered wood Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


McLain Building

Cook House

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Pioneer Park) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Pioneer Park) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee

Physical Condition: Excellent Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Historic Use of Property: Barn and warehouse for nearby cotton gin Current Use of Property: Museum Exhibit of the medical office of Dr. McClain of Salem, Ala. Exterior Architecture Description: long slopping roof, wood Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No

Physical Condition: Fair Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Used during events to serve meals Exterior Architecture Description: stable conversion, large porch structure, high celing, wood Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


The Syrup Sop Shop

Address: Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Used during Syrup Sopping Day to sell goods Exterior Architecture Description: high ceiling, wood construction, modified to serve multi-use, rustic/pioneer Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No

Town Hall

Address: Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Town Hall Exterior Architecture Description: Typical brick storefront, short awning Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


Taylor Whatley Building

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Display exhibit for agricultural machinery Exterior Architecture Description: Low roof line, storage house, wood construction Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No

Metal Shed Building

Address: Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Fair Remaining Historic Fabric: Medium Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Unknown Exterior Architecture Description: Metal shed Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


Pioneer Park Museum

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: Two Historic Use of Property: Old Trade Center, oldest commercial structure in Lee County Current Use of Building: Museum Exterior Architecture Description: Bare colonial architecture Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: Yes Level of Significance: Local

Syrup Sop Device

Address: 6434 Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Current Use of Property: Used to make syrup Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


Band Stand

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Pioneer Park) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Current Use of Property: Used to host performances Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No

Ruth Purdy Speake Cabin

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Pioneer Park) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Historic Use of Property: Cabin Current Use of Property: Pioneer Park exhibit of one-room school house Exterior Architecture Description: Classic dog trot architecture, vernacular, cabin, wood construction Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: Yes Level of Significance: Local


Loachapoka Community Club

Rattling Gourd Gallery

Address: Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee

Address: Stage Road (Highway 14) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: Two Historic Use of Property: Art Gallery Current Use of Property: For Sale Exterior Architecture Description: Bare American craftsman, wrap porch Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No

Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: Medium Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Historic Use of Property: Meeting place Current Use of Property: Used to serve food on Syrup Sopping Day Exterior Architecture Description: Ranch-style depot or storage, wrap porch Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


Loachapoka Gin Office

Garden Area

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Pioneer Park) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee

Address: 6500 Stage Road (Pioneer Park) City, State, Zip Code: Loachapoka, AL 36865 County: Lee

Physical Condition: Good Remaining Historic Fabric: High Number of Stories/Approximate Height: One Historic Use of Property: Once used as Loachapoka Town Hall Current Use of Property: Exhibit of the history of cotton production Exterior Architecture Description: Simple wood construction Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No

Physical Condition: High Current Use of Property: Pioneer Park garden exhibit of local agriculture Appears Eligible for Alabama Register: No


References Lee County Historical Society, "Pioneer Park, Loachapoka." Accessed U.S. Census Bureau (2010). American FactFinder fact scheet: Loachapoka November 20, 2013. http://www.leecountyhistoricalsociety.org/buildings. Town, AL. Retrieved November 2013 from, http://factfinder2.census.gov/ html. faces/nav/jsf/pages/community_facts.xhtml. Moundville Archaeological Park, "Moundville Archaeological Park." Last modified 2013. Accessed November 20, 2013. moundville.ua.edu. Nunn , Alexander. Yesterdays in Loachapoka and Communities Nearby: Roxana, Rocky Mount, Macon's Mill, Beehive, Pine Knot, Armstrong, Crossroads, Concord . Homecoming Association, 1968. Nunn , Alexander. Lee County and Her Forebears. Herff Jones, 1983. State of Alabama Historic Preservation Office, "2013 AHC Operating Grants." Accessed November 20, 2013. http://preserveala.org/grantsprogram2. aspx?sm=i_a. State of Alabama Historic Preservation Office, "Alabama Main Street Program." Accessed November 20, 2013. http://preserveala.org/ mainstreetprogram.aspx?sm=f_d. State of Alabama Historic Preservation Office, "Alabama Register of Historic Places." Accessed November 20, 2013. http://preserveala.org/ alabamaregister.aspx?sm=f_b. State of Alabama Historic Preservation Office, "Historic Marker Program." Accessed November 20, 2013. http://preserveala.org/ histmarkerprogram.aspx?sm=f_g. State of Alabama Historic Preservation Office, "Tax Incentives for Historic Buildings." Accessed November 20, 2013. http://preserveala.org/ taxcredits.aspx?sm=i_b. "Syrup Sopping Day at Loachapoka." Accessed November 20, 2013. www. syrupsopping.org.

Loachapoka Preservation Plan  

Loachapoka, Alabama is located within Lee County just over 12 miles from Auburn and 14 miles from Opelika. The town has a population of 180,...

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