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Breaking Through

University of South Florida College of Medicine


tic s i m i t p o n a g n i t Crea future for health

glass. But the ature breaking fe t n’ es do rt rs about the al repo r mental barrie traditional annu ou e k th ea at br th to ow by I kn We all need ry level of care ures our task: t a revolutiona an w e metaphor capt w if y, pl 2020. Quite sim t until 2019. health care of w. We can’t wai no t ar st to ed 2020, we ne ange, ace creating ch m s e’ in ic ed M ollege of rs who are e, of the USF C faculty membe of ds re The cover imag nd hu e th hes on their r deep pride in report only touc is Th . w symbolizes ou no ht , rig ture right here care. building that fu , discovery and ng ni ar le in ts en accomplishm Our students ional change. at rm fo ns tra r to the call fo ur patients ve responded ong learning. O el lif e, tiv Our faculty ha ac r fo s ery have create the tool lenges of discov al ch e th nd challenge us to A . care integrate their nce home. challenge us to ek to bring scie se e w as e ns te in become more

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see ba ges, you’ll a p e s e h t In n down: we’ve take

rriculum integrated cu ping a model lo ve de re e’ W al students. for our medic spital community ho with the best ack. up tr ed ip sh am er te We’ve new MD lead a te ea cr to y in the countr e opportunity r’s students th te as m d re fe We’ve of hers. our best teac to learn from iplines of tween the disc be rs ie y rr ba ysical therap We’ve broken blic health, ph pu g, in rs nu medicine, macy. and now phar d seen faculty arch cores an se re tion. w ne d nding in the na We’ve create k of federal fu ac tr t es st fa build the oral program st public doct fir s e’ at st e th We’ve started erapy. th al ic ys ph in built atient centers lutionary outp vo re o tw ilt We’ve bu d safety. on quality an

journey for our g the learning in rm r fo ns tra at althcare for ou 2020 is th e journey of he th Our vision for rm fo e ns or tra m is ientists will is a place that students and sc F Health: “This S U of id sa r to visi patients. As a its past.” t its future than ou ab optimistic

ko, MD, MBA Stephen K. Klas USF Health ent and CEO, id es Pr ce Vi Senior of Medicine Dean, College uth Florida So of University


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start a revolution

If you’re going to , you’ve got to make some noise. And that’s just what USF Health is doing: starting a revolution in health care.We’re shattering old assumptions and procedures

so that patients come first. Breaking down walls between

medicine, public health, nursing and physical

Smashing old ideas

therapy. about medical records to blaze a trail to an electronic future. Starting a revolution means being bold.

Visionary. Sometimes things even get a little scary.

But we believe that “just a little better” isn’t good enough to fix the challenges of the healthcare system. The health care

Breaking of the future needs a revolution. Through It needs USF Health.

University of South Florida College of Medicine


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Table of Contents l a n io t a n r o f e iv str We continue thorough excellence, prominence t , diversity, timeliness, professionalistm h. t w o r g ic g e t a r and s

t n i r p e u l B Our

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ction & Succes

for Strategic A

ence National Promin Matters Research Really

tional Models Creative Educa l Entrepreneuria llence Academic Exce F Health, Integration: US artners USF and Our P

’s eport r this r n e o Cov mace seen edicine

he e ceremonial College of M e mace was t n O design th er the USF n 1971. Th , God of

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s to aft ts i we ulapiu Plans soon tuden s n f a o g Aesc en as f e v s o b s E f a r . f l re, c ta cove isdom lth ca the s s first a w t i e e t d h d a n f r e a d o o tt admi helpe ivery ncorp dicine e del d to i have g me h e t n y i n e z n i g i l i h o des nges how t symb pect al cha s cine, c i e i r d d e a d n M ke r ons a to ma raditi t nts. e work s i tho pat e r e i u e l h a t we v onor ians h ing gh c i s y BreakThrou ph e

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MediCin


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on 04 Educati ulum 06

12 14 16 18

Curric Interdisciplinary py Physical Thera ences Biomedical Sci

g Athletic Trainin ievements Educational Ach

h 20 Researc

etes Targeting Diab h ience Researc 27 Neurosc ment & Develop Disparities 28 Health cilities 29 Core Fa ts h Achievemen 30 Researc

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are 32 Healthc y 33

34 36 38 40

pa Ba PaperFree Tam mbulatory Care Revolution in A nce Hubs of Excelle obotics Simulation & R ievements Healthcare Ach

res u g i F & s ct a 42 F 45 49 51 54

Philanthropy ent Student Enrollm rds Research Awa Financials


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n o i t a Educ The College’s integrated educational programs broaden students’ perspectives of medicine and health.


BREAKING TO THROUGH HING C EA T F O S W WAY NE

the future. Getting of care lth hea the is envisioning the the journey for transform The first step to a shift in culture . there requires physician leaders of generation next

Culture shift

st Toward 21 ls Century Skil

the We are among to ed ne e osen to Recognizing th institutions ch n io at uc ed Carnegie shift medical be part of the e or m s ational to cultural norm Foundation’s N g in er liv de ical Curricula conducive to Review of Med , re ca th al yzing high-quality he -- a study anal ical ed m its ed ul innovative USF overha standard and s ar ye l ra teaching curriculum seve approaches to ng ni ar le e tiv ea re in the ago. The cr medicine. We’ e th by ed gory – model embrac innovative cate e in ic ed M ts and College of teaching studen th ng re st owledge, leverages the sidents the kn re ith hips w ills they of our partners attitudes and sk , th al he ic bl r in the 21st nursing and pu need to prospe s with and collaborate century. colleges d an ts en m rt depa itional outside the trad health, like boundaries of siness and engineering, bu es. We value arts and scienc ation that integrated educ e, mutually is collaborativ tient and accountable, pa ntered, and community ce sed. outcomes focu

linary interdiscip Curriculum

curriculum This evolving epreneurial values the entr llence that academic exce n, while drives innovatio ents to preparing stud essionals on practice as prof y teams and interdisciplinar perspectives to respect the lines. We’ve of other discip ities for added opportun including dual degrees, D-MPH, an MD-PhD, M r’s in and MD-Maste hip in Entrepreneurs logies, Applied Techno offerings and expanded ogram in to include a pr ion training, athletic educat Physical a Doctorate in soon, a Therapy, and, m. PharmD progra

Next gen: ders Health lea

itted to We are comm ents for an preparing stud pidly changing exciting but ra scape. And healthcare land llent students because exce teachers, the require superb compasses commitment en pment and faculty develo t means leadership. Tha teach striving daily to rewarding our creativity and culty for it. students and fa a dynamic We’re creating at aligns environment th dergraduate premedical, un medical and graduate ting a education, igni ong learning passion for lifel the next and preparing healthcare generation of leaders.

cuses ueprint fo l B n io t a c OUR Edu rities: ategic prio on five str Leaders tury Healthcare en C st 21 re • Prepa ty llectual Curiosi • Awaken Inte e nc cator Excelle cation • Invest in Edu l rofessiona Edu rp te In to it m • Com tion • Value Educa

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Education

Years 1-4

Curriculum interdisciplinary

Across their four years, USF medical students have opportunities to learn alongside their peers in other disciplines, including physical therapy, athletic training and nursing.

The first two years of the USF College of Medicine curricula emphasize applying essential scientific concepts to clinical medicine, including an integrated neurosciences course team-taught by basic science and clinical faculty. Students are introduced to medical ethics and humanities and evidence-based medicine. Through the Longitudinal Clinical Experience, or LCE, students gain early supervised clinical experience while shadowing community physicians, who also introduce them to the knowledge needed to operate the business side of a medical practice. The curriculum’s third- and fourth-year interdisciplinary clerkships are keeping pace with today’s rapidly changing healthcare environment. Programs offer integrated clinical experiences that expose students to disorders commonly seen in ambulatory and inpatient settings. Skin and Bones is a new fourth-year musculoskeletal clerkship jointly taught by faculty in dermatology, rheumatology, orthopaedics and sports medicine --- disciplines historically underrepresented in medical curricula. Students in the Interdisciplinary Oncology clerkship follow cancer patients through their staging, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation at Moffitt Cancer Center, a nationally ranked NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center affiliated with USF.


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Scholarly Concentrations The best way to predict your future is to create it. That’s why the College of Medicine provides students with dynamic opportunities for faculty-mentored scholarly concentrations in areas of special interest.

Exploring different disciplines Students can select a “minor” in one of several scholarly concentrations, recognized by the dean with a certificate of completion at graduation: • Business and Entrepreneurship • Health Disparities • Health Systems Engineering • International Medicine • Law and Medicine • Medical Education • Medical Humanities • Public Health • Research

with g n i r e n t r a P ley l a V h g i h e L

a k 1094 miles is Some folks thin us, distance is r fo t u B y. a w long rrier to break. just another ba

Innovative Electives

Innovative electives at the College of Medicine include a fourthyear Honors Surgery course, where students can practice basic surgery skills and minimally invasive procedures at the cuttingedge USF Health Simulation Center at Tampa General Hospital, the first of its kind in the Southeast. Human Error and Patient Safety is a novel USF course, where graduate students from various colleges (including medicine) team up and bring different perspectives to the table to resolve real patient safety problems.

has started a ge of Medicine The USF Colle Valley Health with the Lehigh p hi rs ne rt pa s of the new medical leader e th e at uc ed Network to Lehigh gan talking with be e w n he W . future ship program eating a leader Valley about cr partner ts, we chose to en ud st al ic ed for m e of the best use they’re on with them beca Who cares in the country. s em st sy l ita hosp r palmt exactly in ou n’ is , PA n, ow that Allent tive program, nder this innova U ? ry ito rr te tree mpa for ses here in Ta as cl ke ta ill w students lley for two go to Lehigh Va en th s, ar ye two This health ical education. in cl on s cu fo SF years to e more way U program is on ip sh er ad le en care r stud ts ways to help ou e tiv va no in is finding tential. reach their po


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Education

Greeted with nothing but a smile

Connecting To humanities

Life

Drawing

Reframes Medicine

A drawing class offers medical students a different experience and non-clinical lessons about patient movement and perspective.

Recently, students taking the On Doctoring course at the USF College of Medicine were invited to participate in a Life Drawing class to consider medicine’s central focus – the human body – in a slightly different way. The intention was to provide a Medical Humanities connection to behavioral sciences, patient diagnosis, and anatomy so that students could focus on the human figure in a non-medical setting -- a figure that might laugh, fidget, cough, and scratch. “Students often draw things to learn or observe diagrams in their books. It seemed like a natural correlation with the sciences,” said Lois LaCivita Nixon, PhD, course director of On Doctoring. “These students know the body well. They are able to name all the parts of it, and now they get to consider simultaneously both its subjective and objective nature.”

The students entered a room with colorful posters, stools, and jars of brushes, pens, sharpeners -- not a lab coat, test tube, or thick medical book in sight. Instead, the untidy classroom was arranged with spindly easels circling a central platform, and new tools, including charcoal sticks and large pads of paper. A 60-year-old man, serving as their nude model, greeted them with a smile. The two-hour session started with a short presentation on figure art by Neil Bender, assistant professor of visual and performing arts. The students then sketched seven one-minute drawings, capturing the essence of the model as he struck different poses. Bender energetically assisted them as as they completed rapid sketches of the arm or the foot before moving to a more detailed drawing of the full human figure.

Reducing tension

Noting that good patient care requires a level of comfort between doctors and patients, Dr. Nixon said the drawing exercise is another lens for seeing and interpreting and a way for reducing tension between the doctor and patient. The aspiring physicians enthusiastically tackled the drawing assignments and did well flexing their creative muscles. “You guys are better than my intermediate class,” joked Bender. “Any of you want to change majors?”


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Communication Patient-Centered

Like all aspects of the curriculum, the Center for Advanced Clinical Learning has become a model for teaching and assessing patient-centered care that enhances communication.

Hands-on training

At the College of Medicine’s Center for Advanced Clinical Learning, medical students from the first year through the fourth receive hands-on training needed to become physicians who not only possess strong clinical skills, but who practice with character, integrity and cultural sensitivity. More than 52 students a day rotate through the Center, including students from physical therapy, athletic training and nursing.

Doctor-Patient Relationship

The Center’s standardized patient program, one of the most comprehensive in the country, strongly emphasizes teaching and assessing communication and interpersonal skills so vital to patient safety, satisfaction and quality care. This includes teaching students how to convey sensitive or difficult news in a way that respects patients and their families. Each of the Center’s 12 state-of-the-art exam rooms is equipped with ceiling-mounted cameras to record all student-patient interactions, viewed at a monitoring station outside the exam room or observed live through a one-way glass window. Students work with standardized patients, people trained to realistically portray a set of symptoms and give a medical history much like patients would do in a real-life situation. The students elicit a comprehensive history, perform a physical exam and practice other important clinical skills. The standardized patients offer critical feedback on student performance, including the aspiring physician’s ability to communicate effectively.

Safe Learning Environment

A training and procedures area houses computerized patient simulators, including a heart-sounds simulator to teach cardiac exam skills, and a full simulator that advances the student’s clinical experience with disease management at every stage of the curriculum. Through simulation and standardized patients, the Center provides a safe place for students to practice, make judgments and learn from errors without putting real patients at risk.


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Education

Out

REACHING

Whether testing blood sugars in a city neighborhood next to the University or digging latrines in a rural village halfway around the world, medical students have no shortage of opportunities to extend USF’s vision of healthy and sustainable communities.

Creating meaningful links

Through these educationally enriching service projects, students link USF with local and global communities. The emphasis is on interprofessional teamwork, so medical students often work with their peers in nursing, public health and other health disciplines. The faculty-supervised, hands-on experiences expose students to social, ethnic, cultural and economic barriers to health, helping cultivate an awareness and empathy that can affect how they relate to patients throughout their careers.

Service without borders

In 2009, a team of students with USF Health’s International Health Service Collaborative, in partnership with the Peace Corps, traveled to Oma, Panama, to provide health care and education in the impoverished village’s busy clinic and built latrines and aqueducts to supply running water. For the past several years, medical students in the Family Practice Student Organization’s Project World Health have spent their spring breaks in Jarabacoa, a mountainous region of


Bridge

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Clinic

A national prototype, the student-run BRIDGE Healthcare Clinic brings free primary care and social services to uninsured people living near the University. Helping the uninsured next door

When Sylvia Martinez had her blood pressure checked at a community health fair, it was high. But Martinez, who does not have medical insurance, was pleasantly surprised when directed to a place where she could actually get examined and treated for free. At the BRIDGE Clinic, founded by USF medical students in 2007, Martinez received a comprehensive medical history and exam, counseling about diet and exercise, a gift card to cover the cost of blood pressure medication, and an appointment for a followup visit. BRIDGE stands for Building Relationships and Initiatives Dedicated to Gaining Equality. The clinic serves people where they live -- in one of the community’s most economically vulnerable neighborhoods, next to the University. “I’ve never had anyone help me like this before,” Martinez said.

the Dominican Republic, where they set up temporary health clinics to examine and treat thousands of patients; distribute medications, vitamins and toiletries; and educate the community about the basics of hygiene and sanitation. Volunteering through the USF Area Health Education Center’s Health Service Corps, students dedicated nearly 1,500 hours in 2008-09 to health screenings, health education, and fitness and safety activities in medically diverse communities across West Central Florida.

National model with community Support

The BRIDGE Clinic has garnered support from the American Medical Association, Florida Department of Health, Hillsborough County Health Department and private industry for bringing together students in several health disciplines, including medicine, physical therapy and social work, to provide faculty-supervised care to underserved patients. Many have high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol – chronic conditions that can result in costly complications without treatment. “If someone’s blood pressure was high at one of our health screenings, the best we could do before was send them home with a brochure,” said Dr. Sam Crane, one of the clinic’s founding student directors now in a family medicine residency. “Now, if they qualify, they can be referred to the BRIDGE clinic.”


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Education

Schools

Schools

Physical

Therapy

Since admitting its charter Doctor of Physical Therapy students in 2005, the USF School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences has been nationally recognized for the excellence of its graduates and innovative interprofessional curriculum.


Interprofessional curriculum USF was the first public university in Florida to offer the clinical

Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree, rapidly becoming the standard for the profession. Enrollment in the three-year professional program, housed within the College of Medicine, has grown 34 percent since 2006. The School of Physical Therapy & Rehabilitation Sciences, located near the USF Physical Therapy Center, combines a strong first-year curriculum incorporating interdisciplinary instruction in a wireless environment with extensive clinical education. DPT students learn alongside medical students and are taught by physicians, nurses, public health professionals and basic scientists – laying the foundation for successful collaborative practice needed in today’s healthcare environment. They have opportunities to pursue a dual degree in public health (DPT-MPH), specialty clinical electives and mentored research experiences. The school’s graduates consistently score at or above state and national averages on the physical therapy licensing examination.

New Genroesrtahettiiocsn of P

Applying the science of movement

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Faculty have attracted federal and private funding to test prototype prostheses like computer-powered knees and to develop pilot devices, such as an artificial hand for kayakers. They create online educational materials on prosthetics and orthotics both for those who work in the field and for patients. Working with the College of Engineering, the VA and manufacturers, USF’s physical therapy researchers evaluate rehabilitative technologies and devices for rock climbing, running, dancing and other athletic activities. Their studies may benefit not only amputee athletes, but also the increasing numbers of soldiers seeking to resume active lives after returning from war with limb loss. Preparing to be practitioners skilled in the science of movement, USF DPT students have access to a state-of-the-art Motion Analysis Laboratory the school operates with Engineering and a fully-equipped Human Functional Performance Laboratory. These facilities serve as the core for USF clinical and translational research, striving to prevent and more effectively treat neuromusculoskeletal disease and injury.

ight up into ping 20 feet stra m ju or ur ho r ollar g 60 miles pe e Six-Million D Forget runnin rheroes like Th pe su rg bo bs. cy lim of t ats placemen the air. Those fe hen selecting re w r fo ok lo le t peop be able to get Man are not wha ee just want to kn e th e ov ab ply climb a e lost a leg tions, or to sim or Those who’v nt co or ce an the USF without assist ant professor at up from a chair mith, an assist hs ig H n has so Ja m said nces. Highs ith flight of stairs, abilitation Scie eh R & y ap er ge ical Th m Colle of School of Phys ee with help fro Kn er w Po ur ss s on the O performed test . ees aduate students her prosthetic kn Engineering gr ee to several ot Kn er w Po d k re al w mpa wn or The group co stand up, sit do it helps the user ly nt ie fic an incredible ef be w to see ho granted can r fo ke ta le op on with a ity most pe e body. A pers stairs. An activ ning parts of th ai m re de in e th s un in to their so d si chore that stra ld have to shift ou w g le ic et th os conventional pr or sit down. up t lems in the long ge order to can cause prob r he ot e th er becomes side ov while the other Favoring one de will atrophy si ne O . id increased sa so . There is al run, Highsmith e risk for injury th ng si ea cr in ing early onset over developed, potentially caus g, le ng ni ai m re to the wear-and-tear re sensors arthritis. through pressu ks or w ee Kn e rized Power g and in an ankl The compute on the sound le oe sh e sensors th e of th , le ts or rises hidden in the so the amputee si n he W g. le e al sam Physic bracelet on that lling it to move. prosthetic leg te e th to m the ge fro sa t es illion gran send a m orted by a $1-m pp su as w g in st Therapy’s te Education. Department of


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Education

Schools

Schools

Sciences

Biomedical

The School of Biomedical Sciences serves as the hub of the College of Medicine’s resources for graduate studies and research.

Responding to Student demand All basic sciences are housed within this school. The college’s hallmark research centers and institutes are part of the school, and so are biomedical graduate studies and postdoctoral affairs. The educational continuum spans certificate, master’s and doctoral programs with a diverse array of concentrations – from aging and neuroscience to women’s health. An integrated PhD in Medical Sciences program encourages collaboration among scientists of all disciplines, and students can tailor programs to their individual needs and interests. Participation in the college’s graduate programs has risen 50 percent in the last three years, driven largely by innovative master’s and graduate certificate programs responsive to market demands. Students have a wealth of opportunities to join faculty in cuttingedge basic science and translational research sponsored by academia, industry and government.

PhD in Medical Sciences • Allergy, Immunology and Infectious Diseases • Clinical and Translational Research • Molecular Medicine • Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology • Neuroscience • Pathology and Cell Biology

Master’s in Medical Sciences (MS) • Aging and Neuroscience • Anatomy • Health Sciences

Graduate Certificates**

• Interdisciplinary Medical Sciences

• Aging and Neuroscience

• Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine

• Bioinformatics

• Molecular Medicine

• Biomedical Ethics

• Pharmacology

• Biotechnology

• Women’s Health

• Cardiovascular Engineering (joint with Engineering)

• Clinical and Translational Research

• Clinical Investigation

Interdisciplinary Master’s • Bioinformatics and Computational Biology • Bioethics and Medical Humanities

MD/PhD Program

The combined MD/PhD program is designed to foster development of the next generation of physician-scientists who will help advance translational medicine to enhance diagnosis and treatment of human disease.

• Biotechnology * *Students have the opportunity to earn a dual master’s in Biotechnology and Entrepreneurship through collaboration of the College of Medicine with the College of Business Administration. The combined degree can be earned in less time than each degree separately, without compromising in-depth training.

• Health Sciences • Medical Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology • Medicine and Gender • Metabolic and Nutritional Medicine • Molecular Medicine • Pharmacy Sciences (joint with Pharmacy) **For non-degree seeking students; the option to pursue a master’s degree is always available.


Professional ’s Science Master

re people grams train mo ro p M S P o tw USF’s growing bal economy’s lo g e th t e e m to rce ss-savvy workfo e n si u b a r fo d deman and technology. ce n ie sc in d e ill sk

ve a ars

Graduate Program Grows 50% Academic Year

and

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

7000 0 00

Credit Hours

6000 00 5000 00 4000 00 3000 00 2000 00 1000 100 00 0

Semesters:

Summer

Fall

Spring

e programs – th e USF master’s tiv va no in s o ic Tw nformat and m and the Bioi ra og pr y og ol Biotechn designated program – are y og ol Bi l na ms by Computatio (PSM) Progra ience Master’s Sc al on si d by the re es te of is Pr ols. Admin ho Sc e at du ra G ize the Council of rams emphas two-year prog th bo , ol ho sc culty medical m taught by fa inary curriculu arts and , th an interdiscipl al g, public he in er ne gi en e, as from medicin tration as well siness adminis bu d an ogy es ol nc hn scie and biotec from industry es iv ut ec ex senior companies. e one of the cognized as th re en be s ha ation The PSM graduate educ innovations in g in is om ing pr t tra mos graduate in hile traditional W s. ar ye nt in rece r independent es students fo ents typically prepar rams help stud ers, PSM prog , ss ne research care s in busi e-based career nc ie sc h is bl ou ta es tions with t nprofit organiza no or t en m rn gove pursuing a or more years e fiv it m m co having to PhD degree. ous science or s combine rigor m ra og ss pr e Th ht-after busine ation with soug uc ed s ic at m n mathe , communicatio ing leadership skills emphasiz internship in a ey include an Th g. in ild bu idges and team Training that br world” setting. al “re nt es va ar le ep re siness pr nology with bu ch te d an e nc at scie g. And th ’s a ground runnin e th t hi to s te gradua mpetitive increasingly co s y’ da to in us definite pl job market.

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Education

Schools

Programs

Competitive advantage

Athletic

Training

The USF Athletic Training Education Program serves as a national model of excellence. It is one of few located within a medical school and the first housed in an Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine Department.

Approximately 250 pre-athletic training majors compete yearly for 30 admission slots in the two-year undergraduate program, which recently moved into new space with a cutting-edge Athletic Training Lab to accommodate its largest class ever. Strategically positioning the program within the College of Medicine allows athletic training students to collaborate with medical faculty and residents, expands clinical training opportunities and facilitates cross-disciplinary education. About 70 percent of USF’s athletic training graduates continue on to earn another professional degree, including the MD degree or an advanced degree in physical therapy. The Athletic Training Education Program strengthens USF’s Sports Medicine and Athletic Related Trauma Institute, a state-sponsored safety outreach program providing certified athletic trainers to high schools across the Tampa Bay region.


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Pharmacy

Doctor of

The newly approved Pharmacy School will be a university-wide model of collaboration, emphasizing geriatric medication management, research-based drug discovery and development and personalized care for chronic illness.

Addressing a critical shortage

Combine aging Baby Boomers, the nation’s highest percentage of seniors and a plethora of new drugs. It’s a mix that puts Florida at the high end of the nationwide shortage of trained pharmacists. To answer this pressing need, USF Health is building a comprehensive School of Pharmacy within its College of Medicine. Since medications touch on virtually all aspects of health care, the PharmD program emphasizes interdisciplinary collaborations with faculty from the colleges of Nursing and Public Health. The patient-centered program will develop clinical research between the PharmD program and other USF doctoral and master’s programs, including a center dedicated to the discovery, design and development of new drugs and drug delivery models for the prevention and cure of human diseases. As with everything at USF Health, the school, scheduled to admit its first students in Fall 2011, is being designed as a critical hub in the future of health care.


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ucation esidency Ed R in r e d a e L

residents, USF objectives for l na io at uc ed experiences establish rsity of clinical movement to ve e di th ve in si er en ad eh le A most compr cancer and nts among the range from elite s te si offers its reside ng ni ai Tr try. host of public, ties in the coun hospitals to a ity un m m and opportuni co p and to ialty hospitals children’s spec s. te ia fil mmunity af private and co

with Lehigh 1. Partnering Network, Valley Health tion’s best one of the na eate an hospitals, to cr odel that educational m e next will prepare th healthcare generation of leaders.

odel of 4. National m r integrating excellence fo ucation an athletic ed m within an training progra department. orthopaedics

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S T ACHIEVEMEN


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11 l 11. Internationa ms with health progra s to educational tie erica and Asia, Latin Am ing the Europe, includ lth office at first USF Hea wledge the City of Kno in Panama.

6 ’s 6. The College ast dc innovative po with “Straight Talk tional na a Dr. D,” won American Association of ges award. Medical Colle a’s public 7. First in Florid em to offer a university syst of Physical clinical Doctor degree. Therapy (DPT)

cognized 8. Nationally re itute for leadership inst lty leaders emerging facu business now offered to is USF executives. Th ship Institute Health Leader health fields. intergrates all NIH 9. $1.36 million ational Fogarty Intern y research interdisciplinar help training grant to of AIDS control spread cents among adoles in India.

Hispanic 10. Ranked by her Outlook in Hig e of the on Education as 25 medical country’s top lling schools enro ents. Hispanic stud

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ts 12. USF studen tperform consistently ou students other medical try in across the coun and pass average scores tional rates on the na ng medical licensi n. io examinat


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3-D structure of a Ras oncogene protein. Defects in the Ras gene occur in more than 30 percent of human cancers.

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Translating research

21

rams With these prog Health in mind, USF inues leadership cont tanding to nurture outs and clinical basic science always research, while s to bridge looking for way dition to the two. In ad ate-of-theinvesting in st expand art facilities to pacity, our research ca ed to we’re committ n talented ow growing our ional and basic, translat ts who are clinical scientis out tackling passionate ab allenges. intellectual ch e discoveries They will mak better that will lead to patients and health for our es. our communiti

BREAKING TO ORM F HROUGH T RANS T T HA T DISCOVERIES university’s the ead l , ar in particul edicine M of federally sponsored ege of l l o C growth , and the the fastest USF Health chieve A to drive aggressive the nation. research in ging Areas

linary Interdiscip ograms r Signature P and Infectious Diseases unology • Allergy, Imm gy • Cancer Biolo r Research la cu • Cardiovas e Research • Neuroscienc

Emer of Interest

ngineering • Biomedical E e • Nanomedicin rs skeletal Disorde lo cu • Neuromus omics • Pharmacogen Medicine • Regenerative ine • Sports Medic lth ea H • Women’s


22

Research

Diabetes

Targeting

Already the national epicenter for research on the epidemiology of Type I diabetes, USF launches model diabetes center. USF Health has launched a bold new initiative to fight diabetes on every front. Already the national leader in the epidemiological research to understand and prevent Type I diabetes, USF is working to dramatically increase its clinical research and create family-centered education for people with diabetes and related autoimmune disorders. The university is planning a comprehensive center that will offer evidence-based care – an inviting place where the diabetes community can be part of the science that contributes to a cure. This pioneering initiative builds upon the proven success of the USF Pediatrics Center led by

Jeffrey Krischer, PhD. Dr. Krischer’s team has attracted more than $400 million to USF, primarily NIH funding, to coordinate research on the epidemiology of diabetes – a disease of epidemic proportions. The research in diabetes complements our other projects in rare diseases, many of which also have an autoimmune component and may share common pathways. “I believe we have the right combination of science and strategy to be able to eliminate Type I diabetes for the next generation,” says Dr. Krischer, who also directs the rare diseases network for the NIH.


with LiDfe iabetes

her minives jumping on lo ry e m E ce ra G school. y dreams of law d a e lr a t u b e lin trampo r st looking at he ju h is m a e u sq She still gets about grown-up ch u m o to s w o own veins but kn s. s Type I diabete a h d n a 7 1 is fears. Grace o limits No escape, n ands attention e, one that dem

nic diseas the tennis team She fits a chro her life around to in y, da y er n and and energy ev it limit what I ca ass. “I don’t let cl g in nc off, no fe r ys he da and are no it’s hard. There es im et m So et .” can’t do have diab es, ops. When you st st re no , ks coffee brea go on with it. it. So you just pe ca es t n’ ca you

is The diagnos

She’d lost 15 Grace was 14. n he w d ge an ty and running Everything ch as always thirs w e Sh . on as re s pounds for no a USF pediatric Frank Diamond, r. D . om fore ro be th ba ys to the sis two da e official diagno th r he ve ght ga ou r, th Grace professo were easier than ns io ct je in e le Th ort need s Christmas. lin pens, with sh su in es us e Sh her stomach they would be. , most often in in sk r he to in ctly she injects dire y. five times a da t ou ab or thigh,

ct full Balancing a diabetes with a to balance her d ne cise has lear

Grace r activities. Exer d extracurricula an ol ho sc of d roun s on the school , and Grace play es et ab di l ro nt e keeps a helps co fencing class. Sh a s ke ta d an sugar gets tennis team when her blood on p m ju to e rge mini-trampolin accepted at Geo fun. She’s been r fo st ju a lawyer. or be – high wants to , and says she ity rs ve ni U n to Washing

ctive rs in perspe Keeping fea as well. Every re tu out the fu

s fears ab that can come Still… Grace ha e complications th s ar fe es et t, my child with diab f a list: “My hear d she rattled of an , id be sa e sh sh r, late whether e’ll biggest worry is er H .” et fe fears y e m os hands, to keep th But Grace tries n. re ild s ch ve sh able to ha re, at least e’ raid of the futu af s e’ sh If e. fe ead. With ar in perspectiv out what lies ah ab ng ki in th e a positive,” spent more tim try to see it as “I . th ng re st d an who comes maturity ves to other kids e advice she gi th ’s at th ary d sc An . she said ink it’s a little d. “You may th se no ag di en and believe in have just be did... Be strong I ow kn “I . id at first,” she sa it.” ow you can do yourself, and kn

23


24

Research

Disease

Decoding

Scientists like Robert Deschenes ask the biggest of questions. What happens to people’s brains when they get Alzheimer’s disease? How can we stop tumors from spreading? But Dr. Deschenes sees the answers to those questions by looking at the tiniest of things: the structures of proteins and the inner workings of molecules.


COMMUNITY PUBLIC HE

ALTH MEDICINE

ealth is part of the Unive rsity of Sout h Florida, lo Bay region. cated in the With more than $360 m illion in rese tracts last ye arch grants ar, USF is on e of the natio ties as well n’s top publ ic research as a design ated comm unity-engag arnegie Foun ed university dation for th e Advancem ent of Teachi ng.

NURSING RESEARCH LEARNING

Medicine College of itutes* t Centers/Ins

YOUR DOO RWAYS MO Louise Silver ary-H EenLteTr H • Archie A. & T ent CA hild Developm C

(813) 974-33 00 health.usf.e du USF Hea lth 12901 Bruc e B. Downs Blv Tampa, FL 33 612

MOLECULAR ANSWERS Robert Deschenes, PhD, is USF’s chair of molecular medicine. He’s convinced that seeing and understanding how different molecules interact is the key to solving some of medicine’s biggest mysteries. Dr. Deschenes’ work offers unusual opportunities for collaboration, since studying how molecules interact applies to every branch of medicine. He also is the associate dean for the USF/Moffitt Research Partnership. In that role, he is working with a leading scientist at Moffitt Cancer Center to establish a collaborative research consortium. He also works extensively with scientists based at the USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute. Dr. Deschenes’ own research centers on cancer cell signaling, using yeast as a model system. Dr. Deschenes has been looking at a particular gene and how it tells cancer cells to grow – or not grow. If you could figure out how to stop the signals from that gene, you could stop various types of cancer in its tracks.

he

alth.usf.e e Center du on m or H ac di • Car epair ng and Brain R • Center for Agi Disorders g and Weight in at E r fo r te • Cen e Care and ospice, Palliativ • Center for H tudies End of Life S earch Informatics Res oph or M an um • Center for H Institute ional Science at sl an Tr d an • Clinical ter • Diabetes Cen imer ’s and Suncoast Alzhe • Eric Pfeiffer Center Gerontology enter ious Disease C • Florida Infect chiatry esearch in Psy • Institute for R enter Culverhouse C • Joy McCann rs g Disorde for Swallowin enter e Research C • Nanomedicin ter demiology Cen • Pediatrics Epi ’s Institute Byrd Alzheimer • USF Health d on’s Disease an • USF Parkins r, te en C isorders Movement D Excellence of r NPF Cente

*Source: USF

Provost’s Office


26

Research

Power

Brain

Building on USF’s world-renowned expertise in neurosciences, we are creating a leading Alzheimer’s disease research center where scientists in our laboratories can rapidly test their ideas with patients seen in our clinics. One vision, one center This effort was recently re-invigorated when the statewide Byrd Alzheimer’s Center and Research Institute became an entity of USF Health. This change integrated the college’s research and clinical care related to Alzheimer’s and other dementias under one roof as the USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute. We continue to build a team of scientists, each of whom works on a different piece of the Alzheimer’s puzzle and then shares the knowledge with others to come up with novel insights. For example, when researchers with expertise testing therapies in Alzheimer’s mice team with experts in molecular medicine, they may discover more about the abnormal tangles of beta amyloid proteins associated with Alzheimer’s. The singular focus of these interdisciplinary collaborations is to advance our statewide mission -- finding new ways to treat, or better yet prevent, this mind-robbing neurodegenerative disease affecting more than 5 million Americans.

NeedArtwork: 1.) Brain MRI


27 The USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute integrates research and clinical care related to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias under one roof.

Neuroscience Research & Development The neurosciences are a centerpiece of USF research. Other nationally prominent programs within the College include: Aging & Brain repair

At the Center for Aging and Brain Repair, neuroscientists across USF work with clinicians to develop new treatments to repair and regenerate the aging and diseased brain. They study the potential of neural cells and alternatives to embryonic stem cells, including adult bone marrow stem cells and cord blood cells, as therapies for Parkinson’s disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, ALS and other neurological disorders.

parkinson’s DISEASE

Two privately funded centers focus on translational and clinical research for Parkinson’s disease, tremor, dystonia and other movement disorders – The USF Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center, a National Parkinson’s Research Foundation Center of Excellence on our south campus, and the Parkinson’s Research Foundation Center of Excellence on our north campus. In addition to testing and developing new medications, investigators at these statewide referral centers evaluate new surgeries and other therapies that may offer hope for patients who no longer benefit from medications.

Ataxia

The USF Ataxia Research Center, spearheading several multi-site clinical trials, has partnered with national organizations, including the Friedrich’s Ataxia Research Alliance and National Ataxia Foundation, to advance promising compounds to human testing. The center is one of few nationwide with a multidisciplinary, translational approach to ataxia -- bringing basic scientists, physical therapists and clinicians to the table to make the best use of current research for symptom management and to test new treatments.


28

Research

Health

Disparities

reducing Inequities

Why in Florida are African-American men 71 percent more likely to develop prostate cancer and nearly three times more likely to die from the disease than white men? That’s among the questions USF and Moffitt researchers hope to answer with the help of a $6-million federal grant to establish a National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities Center of Excellence. The five-year program grant from the NIH focuses on research, education, and community outreach activities to reduce cancer-related health disparities among minority and underserved communities in Florida. The new Center of Excellence is among 50 nationwide, and one of three in Florida.

Building research infrastructure

USF and Moffitt Cancer Center have created a new Center of Excellence that focuses on narrowing the state’s racial, ethnic and socioeconomic gaps in cancer care.

More research is needed to help explain why health disparities occur so more effective solutions can be found. The Center will support basic, clinical, behavioral, population-based and preventive studies needed to reduce cancer health disparities, improve minority health, or both. The initial USF-Moffitt study funded by the Center grant is investigating molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the disproportionately high rates of prostate cancer among African-American men. The researchers will also examine whether isoflavones, a plant-derived estrogen found in soy products, may prevent prostate cancer or delay its progression in this population.

Managing chronic illnesses

Through innovative training and faculty development programs, the Center aims to boost the number of cancer researchers interested in investigating and addressing inequities in care and poorer health outcomes. The Center’s staff will enlist the help of neighborhood organizations, churches and other partners to empower minority and disadvantaged communities to shape their own research agendas. Opportunities for increased participation in clinical trials will be offered. The research is vital – and not just for underserved populations. Without effective solutions, we’ll all pay the price in terms of human suffering and higher health care costs.


Core

0929

facilities

The College of Medicine invested more than $8 million over the last several years to renovate and build core facilities that enhance collaboration and interdisciplinary research. collaboration For innovation

core Labs

Biostatistics & Medical Writing

Cellular Electrophysiology

Flow

Human Performance & Motion Analysis

Biosafety Level 3

Hyperbaric

In Vivo Animal Imaging

Behavior

Microscopy & Cell Imaging

In addition to the nine core laboratories listed here, the college’s investigators are a major part of the Florida Center of Excellence for Biomolecular Identification and Targeted Therapeutics (FCoE-BITT). This comprehensive center supports collaboration across the USF College of Arts and Sciences, College of Engineering and USF Health, as well as several technology transfer resources at USF and in the community – all intended to develop innovative biomolecular techniques for diagnosing, preventing and treating diseases. FCoE-BITT, encompassing the full range from discovery to commercialization, includes a multipurpose Biotechnology Development and Testing Facility, a Proteomics Facility, and a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility. The core facilities have been strategically developed to transcend college and departmental boundaries and bring together scholars from across USF and the community. By helping to seamlessly integrate research at the molecular, cellular, organ and systems levels, these resources help USF recruit and retain outstanding faculty, staff and students.


30

eal aceutical d m r a h p B 1 $ nter of s is ed drug ce t n e t a ine researcher -p USF ollege of Medic

SF C d by a team of U Zeneca PLC an d and patented company Astra te al ea tic cr eu drug, ug ac e dr m Th ar . to date global ph A depression patent royalties deal between e ng iv si at cr en lu lic t a nt os adjuva to ty its m at the center of as a promising ing the universi rn ed ea ew vi lly is ia y nt s, te or , po e recept could be read Targacept, Inc. arch on nicotin ned, the drug se an re pl m as fro d ss re ve evol s prog TC-5214, which t. If clinical trial ly on the marke nt rre cu ts an antidepress al in 2013. for final approv

Medicine’s 1. College of ds increased research awar 12 million in to a record $2 -percent jump 2008-09, a 57 e years. in the last thre r’s team, Jeffrey Krische acted more which has attr ion to USF to than $400 mill search on the coordinate re of diabetes, epidemiology boost. catalyzed the

1

th factor 3. Human grow d stem cells stimulating bloo the bone to proliferate in es memory marrow revers imer ’s decline in Alzhe ers at mice, research es A. Haley USF and Jam pital reported Veterans’ Hos e. Based in Neuroscienc eclinical on promising pr SF Health findings, the U ’s Institute Byrd Alzheimer ing GCSF in has begun test ild to patients with m imer ’s. moderate Alzhe

Byrd 2. USF Health itute st Alzheimer ’s In are part neuroscientists n, five-year of a $9.8-millio te on Aging National Institu ct Grant Program Proje er a “dream” bringing togeth institutions team from five ogy of one to examine biol portant risk of the most im imer ’s factors in Alzhe olesteroldisease, the ch n ApoE and carrying protei its receptors.

from 4. Scientists armacology Molecular Ph gy found that and Physiolo substance resveratrol, a es, red found in grap nuts, may wine and pea liver disease prevent fatty ronic alcohol caused by ch . It’s just one consumption studies of several USF s to unlock looking at way health the potential mpounds in benefits of co erages. foods and bev

Research

4 more 6. A potentially in s cher test for 5. USF resear nsitive clinical se d icine an , based on Molecular Med ovarian cancer g on am are the protein Global Health inary levels of ur perts in loped the leading ex Bcl-2, was deve a ii, nd s at USF toxoplasma go by researcher ex pl m co t Cell Biology common ye Pathology and ly ad de be n r Center. parasite that ca d Moffitt Cance an e nts, caus for AIDS patie d provide birth defects an pon for a potential wea ombining bioterrorists. C om approaches fr genetics and biochemistry, y, they look structural biolog to combat for new ways , the disease toxoplasmosis widespread caused by this pathogen.

S T ACHIEVEMEN


2331

leading 12. One of the ’s untry for 9. The College sites in the co l ally na n io io at at sl rn an te Tr In d 7. l clinical Clinical an ongoing nationa e field th in ed iz as n w g te reco Science Institu vestigating etics. from trials in n io ill of immunogen -m .3 $4 ve awarded a smallinimally invasi Using fish as efense to m D of t en lorectal tm co ar an to Dep r hum approaches al ic scale model fo in cl ed ov pr at y that archers support im cancer surger immunity, rese g, in ak s m ic et on si en tr rG ce eatment deci the Molecula rds may redu co re al ic ed ’s n m d hildre electronic mplications an Laboratory, C e Tampa co e re av F h er , te ap u s. P it te e st ra th In and Research improve cure es en g l t. ve o ec Bay proj discovered n into t h g si in r own g in offer 13. Growing ou stem sy e n u m im e ational and how th talented transl ns. io ct n fu d an chers with develops clinical resear Scholars in a thriving K30 ed Patient-Orient gram, Research Pro $1.5-million sponsored by esearch NIH Clinical R t and Curriculum gran competitive supported by awards. Dean’s Scholar

14

7

ne of 10. Home to o leading ont of the country’s 8. At the forefr ll biology hyperbaric ce c science si ba g in at sl tran where laboratories, to the best discoveries in funded treatment federally ed as -b ce en id udy how ev researchers st rns, bo w ne e ur at ressure for prem changes in p y og in. USF neonatol affect the bra y ud st s er research tween the interplay be . Working on nment. 11 ro vi rgical en d an s genetic plications for su ap s the effect forensics, They focus on simulation and , ss Human stre the Center for of intrauterine s atics her factor Morpho-Inform nutrition and ot advances wborn draws on rapid on fetal and ne ing in medical imag development. render technology to ensional accurate 3-dim els computer mod ical at and mathem of reconstructions ctures. anatomical stru

10

$1.39 14. With a new rant to million NIH g faculty and support core ent, the staff recruitm e Research Nanomedicin eloping Center is dev detect better ways to rt, lung and treat hea eases and blood dis iseased by targeting d gs or cells with dru carried gene therapy ly small by exceeding particles. chers 15. USF resear two participate in te studies si federal multisafety examining the ess of the and effectiven -- one for H1N1 vaccine egnant HIV-positive pr e other women and th IV-infected vaccinating H federal children. A third uating project is eval s for H1N1 novel therapie italized disease in hosp ults. children and ad


32 08

USF Physicians bring new models for lifelong health to the community.

e r a c h t l a He


e

BREAKING TO HROUGH e n T i c i d e m n i s d n e r t Set

33

healthy models for new who for people life,” USF creates for home y’s “partner brings science isease D Parkinson’s The communit ong and l ’s Life for lzheimer Center l diabetes, A ike l living. Our in the nationa nesses l il eader l a is chronic care. ay partnership suffer from B effective ampa more T , l to safer PaperFree lution vita disease. Our revo health records electronic so surveyed switch. They al lth ea H F S U ve gone This spring doctors who ha ms ai se ea is D ld a bo t how to for Lifelong embarked on electronic abou kable ar m of e re g m e th so in k g ge ocess. to brid Brin project to brea improve the pr c e ni g m ro in o lp ch H by he working advances in Science those barriers Now USF is etes ab e es di th e as n lik se w di es do partners diseas Lifelong doctors start with statewide d an al or ic ire vi on qu ha tr elec ral and with the be like diabetes re road to using to secure fede elong s lif les for ha of ty F s S es ct U lif pe s. w as rd ne to expand social learning medical reco private funding e th , es by ts ud ip d cl cr in he Alls yond care. This someone touc partnered with the program be th s ves al nt gi he tie ce ic pa en on g ci tr in S bringing provid disease. a leading elec prescribing by r ith fo w ts es os ili m to ep , ny records and their fa us critical guid records compa tronic medical ec el es iti d un rt an pa po care ree Tam rmation meaningful op good diabetes launch PaperF and health info e at le ip ic op rt e pe pa t uc d bu od intr ral rural to shape an management, Bay, a plan to ange into seve ch ex ch e ar n ar te se re are of ing softw s. in the clinical with diabetes free e-prescrib Florida countie t n, ac tio d en an e ev th in pr ta in to ob g or in ct to ad do le y le ab un to ever ts and ation. They ogram would better treatmen on that inform region. The pr re. pported ibing the potentially a cu may feel unsu make e-prescr of e lifetim nverting to in handling a first step to co hey may ical records challenges. T electronic med ey ils th ’s proven perFree a P forget the deta a change that – y he spital. T ical safety, heard in the ho Tampa Bay to improve med gh es. enou may not have ality and outcom A USF Health qu th r own heal nverting , USF access to thei partnership co This summer ns ea m his ea of firstinformation. T Tampa Bay ar hired a corps c ifi ic nt ie on tr sc ec at udents el that much th physicians to year medical st g ht tin ug ar st ta s jumpealth investigation ha prescribing is to work as “e-h it n. e tio ak lu m t vo n’ re ” us often does healthcare’s eambassadors, of the , ity ey al on re m e how easy th g gh to tin ou “home” monstra Not en de mily. e. Fear of is to doctors patient and fa not enough tim e-prescribing ity . w un mm ng ne ade the Through co trying somethi who haven’t m r te our Cen partnerships,


34

Healthcare

Revolution in

Ambulatory Care

Built around quality, safety, technology and superior education, USF’s two new outpatient centers are places where systems center around the patient’s needs and concerns.

Patients First

Carol & Frank Morsani Center for Advanced Healthcare

The Center was made possible by a founding gift from Carol and Frank Morsani, matched by the state, with a commitment by the Florida legislature and USF faculty physicians. Instead of patients moving from doctor to doctor, services like X-rays, CT’s, ultrasounds, MRIs and lab tests are brought to the patient. Patients don’t have to schedule appointments at three different locations for their annual exam anymore, because everything is taken care of in just one visit to the Morsani Center.

USF Health invested more than $150 million in its Centers for Advanced Healthcare -- the

The new Monsour Executive Wellness Center

Carol & Frank Morsani Center and the South Tampa Center. The centers were created with a

within the Morsani Center combines medical ex-

customer-service focus and concierge-level staff to accommodate patients and their families.

pertise with the latest in advanced technology to

Sophisticated electronic health records (EHR) greatly reduce paperwork and provide online

efficiently meet the needs of today’s busy execu-

access for making appointments. EHR allows patients to email physicians and request

tives. The one-day, confidential Executive Health

prescriptions, giving patients more control over their care.

Program offers a personal healthcare concierge,

Both centers house comprehensive diagnostic imaging centers and on-site pharmacies,

comprehensive pre-assessment and a thorough,

which offer convenient, rapid access to prescriptions sent electronically from the exam

individualized examination with full access to the

rooms to the pharmacy downstairs.

team of specialists and resources at USF Health.


ilding Rebu lth care

Hea

to caring for When it comes Health wants patients, USF the kind of to give patients e one else will b care that every ars from now. providing 10 ye Today.

South Tampa

Center for Advanced Healthcare This center offers a full range of specialized services, including a highly trained team of maternal-fetal medicine specialists, neonatologists and pediatric surgeons to care for women expecting babies with birth defects or other high-risk conditions requiring complex testing and treatment. In partnership with Tampa General Hospital, USF Women’s Health (gynecology) jumped to number 22 in U.S. News and World Report’s 2009 hospital rankings of specialty programs. The South Tampa Center also houses an advanced Urogynecology and Reconstructive Surgery group with extensive experience treating pelvic floor disorders. USF Health physicians are skilled in minimally invasive, robotic, open and vaginal procedures and offer sacral nerve stimulation for severe bladder control problems, and botox with pelvic floor physical therapy for pelvic pain.

ed ters for Advanc At the Cen ve to make ha tients don’t pa , re ca lth ea H rent intments at diffe separate appo who an sting. A wom locations for te a ith w t appointmen schedules an enter C ni sa ther the Mor ei at n ia ic ys ph n receive mpa Center ca Ta h ut So e th or and l-woman exam her annual wel e results Th y. the same da m ra og m am m ian the e to her physic will be availabl p. -u w icker follo next day for qu

igher Reaching Hs six-year anniversary

35

Approaching hi Klasko ical school, Dr. e r u leading the med t u vator. F no e in h t an Vision for charge of educating has built a reputation as re-organized is in year, USF USF Health public During his first edicine, s, nurses and or ct do ’s ges to bring m w lle ro tomor s another the health co ha it t er Bu os s. cl al on blic health health professi nursing and pu e care that th g as in w ov e pr ris im l: w enterp mission as wel gether. The ne oviders to pr re es ca ag th ur al co he d ealth. It en USF doctors an dubbed USF H work on to s ge lle s. different co m fro give to patient lty t cu ou fa ab udents to began to talk projects and st ch ar When USF se re t in jo e s. health clinic, th different college renovating its nts a take classes in tie Health pa SF ve U gi s, to ar d te e past few ye th r r university wan fe ve of O st ju t lty members of care – no in leading facu t gh whole new kind ou e br s Th r. ha , from the a little bit bette ious institutions tig es the same care w pr ne m o tw fro n University. bloomed into Clinic to Brow nd idea eventually la ni ve sa le or C M t that arol & Frank an ambitious lis centers. The C It’s only part of care opened lth medical ea H ce du ed nc tro project to in a Center for Adva es ud pa cl m in Ta the region and d the South doctors around ed to last summer, an s en rd op co re re ca care. nced Health SF’s diabetes Center for Adva transforming U ing to ok lo is ove: USF in 2007. The next m g key nture, targetin unch a new ve la nter that to create a ce CENTERED ON ronic diseases ch lp them le safe and he PATIENT’S NEEDS will keep peop are set up s er disease. nt ce ng lo w ene lif with The way the doctors to consult e optimistically liv , where USF for step is diabetes . makes it easier st re fir ca ne ’s O nt tie , the Patterson r about a pa s a new partner es ha with each othe lti ia lth ec ea H sp y orting ways to e of USF’s ke n, which is supp tio Similarly, som da un e Fo th nd st ways to nized arou ers learn the be ag have been orga en te e lp th he an ent, rather th ite diabetes. medical treatm succeed desp ts. USF’s en rtm pa de school’s faculty ices, iovascular serv division of card gists lo io cludes card for example, in ine ic ed . Its sports m and surgeons family , ts is es orthoped program includ edicine, m ts or ined in sp tra rs ne io tit ac pr erapists. and physical th es as n’t view their liv do “Patients Klasko, n he ep said Dr. St ,” ts en rtm pa de of the ealth and dean CEO of USF H u have yo “If Medicine. USF College of ther he w ow u don’t kn a headache, yo a , he ac ad urologic he you have a ne atric hi yc ps a , headache family practice headache. neurosurgical headache or a go to four you’d have to But in Tampa, t.” s to find that ou different doctor


36

Healthcare

HubS of

Excellence

USF Health has developed strategic partnerships with several of the Tampa Bay area’s leading hospitals. USF medical students, residents and faculty benefit from these hubs of excellence. Together, we raise the standard of care in the communities we serve. Moffitt Cancer Center

Designated a National Cancer Institute Comprehensive Cancer Center, Moffitt Cancer Center belongs to an elite group of cancer centers nationwide that focus on the quick translation of research advances to improvements in patient care. Moffitt is listed in U.S. News & World Report as one of “America’s Best Hospitals” for cancer. Moffitt and USF continue to strengthen their scholarly collaborations, building upon Moffitt’s strength in cancer research and treatment, USF’s interdisciplinary education expertise, and both institutions’ links with the community. Moffitt’s Total Cancer Care™ initiative emphasizes individualized,

evidence-based care based on the largescale integration of information technology, scientific discovery and health outcomes. It is designed to match the best treatment to individual patients based on the unique genetic makeup of their tumors. Recently, USF and Moffitt merged two distinct areas of expertise – molecular and structural biology and drug discovery/ molecular medicine – to figure out innovative ways to fight cancer. The research partnership holds promise for developing new compounds that may prevent the kinds of protein-protein interactions that cause cancer.

Lehigh Valley Health Network USF’s newest partner is the Lehigh Valley Health Network, cited as one of the 10 Best Hospitals in America by Becker’s Hospital Review. USF is working with Lehigh Valley to create a nationally innovative leadership track for medical students. The Pennsylvania hospital’s extensive system includes eight health centers caring for diverse communities in four counties.


HosPpairttanlers HOSPITAL TAMPA GENERAL has been affiliated with USF since l ta pi General Hos s and is the

70 Tampa d in the early 19 hool was create residents are 5 28 the medical sc e m affiliate. So ng hi ac te y ar ing in areas College’s prim r specialty train fo al er en G pa m gery. In assigned to Ta ine to neurosur l internal medic ra ne ge rams m fro pr g rangin l specialty og Health, severa SF U ith w n U tio the 2009 .S. collabora a top-50 spot in ed rn ea al er cular, at Tampa Gen nkings. In parti eport hospital ra R ld or W to 22nd in & 08 s New ranking in 20 th 27 a m fro rose e South. Tampa General programs in th one of the top it g in ak tive m , gy gynecolo H to an innova by USF and TG t en itm m m ic co d urolog A visionary gynecologic an m emphasizing ra og nce. pr y er rg e su on for th adva part of the reas as w y er rg l role su ca iti robotic ay a cr and residents pl lty cu fa SF U n, on H’s ne atal In additio ers, including TG nt ce e fil ro -p gh center, and in several hi ncy and trauma ge er em it, un intensive care nter. regional burn ce

n’s Hospital All Childre pital has grown Children’s Hos

story, All highest level In its 83-year hi l center for the rra fe re al on gi ren’s to become a re e of the top child lty care and on ia ec sp n’s ric re at ld di hi of pe 10, All C n. In January 20 tio na ore e th in ex ls hospita on compl , m a new $402-milli to in e ov m . The et its fe square completed size to 795,000 l’s ita sp ho e th e to holders than doubling Institute is hom h rc ea es R s n’ re ular USF-ACH Child ratories in Molec chairs and labo ed w do earch en l es ra R of seve natology munology, Neo Im d an y rg le Al Genetics, cular Research. and Cardiovas

al rans’ Hospit e t e V y e l a H James A. James A Haley ships was with

st partner the VA One of USF’s fir e early 1960s, Beginning in th l. ta pi a os H ’ ns bu Vetera e state to ild ators to prod th sl gi le ea ar ol ith scho worked w campus so the hool on the USF sources re al ic new medical sc in search and cl re , ng hi ac te ip could share its l. That partnersh mpa VA hospita Ta nt ce n of ja tio ad la e with th ning popu Florida’s burgeo ith w ed unit, en th um ng has stre l’s polytra a n of the hospita tio di d ad e th d t injuries suffere veterans an to treat comba em st sy VA e the busiest in th Afghanistan. g from Iraq and in rn tu re rs ie ld by so

37


38

Healthcare

Robotics

Simulation &

The USF College of Medicine is at the forefront of surgical and clinical training emphasizing the highest quality care, innovation and patient safety. In 2009, the College opened three groundbreaking centers. Also planned is a world-class, high-tech conference complex with an advanced surgical skills laboratory, simulation center and virtual hospital.


39 USF Health Simulation Center at TGH

Pediatrics Department Teams Center

da Vinci® Center

The lights are low and the EKG monitor beeps as the vascular surgery fellow, observed by an attending physician, inserts a balloon catheter to open the blocked kidney artery of a “patient” lying on the table. It looks and feels like an operating room, but it’s not. The 2,800-square-foot USF Health Simulation Center at Tampa General Hospital is one of the first of its kind in the Southeast – incorporating a comprehensive variety of both basic and high-end simulators to teach students, physicians and other health professionals advanced techniques for medical, surgical and interventional procedures. The virtual reality simulators mimic the look and feel of actual procedures, such as the lifelike Simantha™ used to practice endovascular procedures like placing stents to prop open clogged blood vessels. This state-of-the-art simulation provides hands-on experience before performing complex procedures or using new devices on real patients, building clinicians’ confidence in a realistic, risk-free environment. USF partnered with affiliate Tampa General Hospital and several leading innovators of advanced simulation technology to create the center.

According to the Institute of Medicine, medical errors are often the culmination of lack of teamwork and miscommunication, not necessarily inadequate medical knowledge. That makes the value of simulation centers like the USF Department of Pediatrics Team Education and Multidisciplinary Simulation (TEAMS) Center all the more vital. The 2,300-square-foot center houses high-fidelity patient simulators – adults, children and newborns – each with a computer-driven, age-appropriate physiology that can mimic routine and crisis medical scenarios. The center is intended to do more than allow physicians, nurses and medical students to practice, hone or retool their clinical skills in an environment without risk to real patients. Team training scenarios focus on multidisciplinary group dynamics, leadership, interpersonal communication skills and decision making under pressure. The simulations strategically teach team members how to leverage the strengths of different disciplines and deal with conflict and emotional distractions. Exercises are recorded for evaluation during debriefings in the center’s hi-tech conference room.

The USF Health da Vinci® Center for Computer-Assisted Surgery strategically positions USF as a center of excellence to teach the latest robotic techniques for minimally invasive surgery. USF’s center is one of two nationwide chosen to teach physicians how to use the Si model of the da Vinci® Surgical System. The system’s dual console promotes hands-on teaching and enhances real-time collaboration between two surgeons during a procedure. This robot, along with USF’s S-model of the da Vinci®, can be used by specialists in many disciplines, including gynecology, urology and colorectal surgery. The center combines innovation, education and cutting-edge technology and spotlights USF’s commitment to improving health care, in this case surgical skills, so the best quality care is easily accessible to patients. When surgeons use the robots, patients experience faster recoveries and less pain than they would with many traditional open surgeries. As many as 600 surgeons a year are expected to train at the center, a partnership between USF and Intuitive Surgical, Inc.

egion’s l advance r il w r e t n arch e C edical rese m r o f n io t reputa g al and trainin nter for medic

world-class ce ans to build a pl lth ea H re, create new SF U e the urban co liz ta vi re lp he ill rs and other learning that w ce manufacture vi de al ic ed m ct square-foot jobs and attra oposed 53,000 pr e Th . ill es ss ne d Simulation w high-tech busi al Learning an ic ed M ne rli ed ai nc similar to Center for Adva for physicians g in in will tra es ity qu al ni -re and tech provide virtual otype devices ot Pr d n. io an at d ul te m ter-assis pilot training si robotic, compu and tested for d pe lo ve de be ns surgeries. vasive surgeo image-guided p minimally in to ith w nce, g te on pe al nical com This center, to assess tech gy lo ty no fe ch sa te d quality an and proprietary the healthcare in e tory, ra nc bo va la ad ical skills will be a major advanced surg an and to l n te tio ho di a call for revolution. In ad hospital, plans al rtu th vi al d he an r er he ns and ot simulation cent odate physicia m m n. co io ac at fic to rti and ce parking garage ceive training who travel to re s al on si es of pr

for Computer-Assisted Surgery


40

top 25 m Ranked in a r g o r P GYN port & World Re ews N . .S U y B

cs ent of Obstetri USF Departm e th n ee tw for g be in 25 rank partnership tal led to a top pi A strengthened os H al er en ings. One of y and Tampa G 09 hospital rank 20 t’s and Gynecolog or ep R ld or , up from U.S. News & W climbed to 22nd y og ol ec Gynecology in yn G rams, p specialty prog the South’s to 27th in 2008.

hysician’s 1. The USF P largest Group is the y group multispecialt lorida’s Gulf practice on F 0 physicians coast with 46 lth and other hea practitioners.

1

ns, pioneers 3. USF surgeo scopic in Laparoendo gery that Single-Site Sur no scar, leaves virtually e first to were among th -incision perform single moval without gallbladder re anesthesia. using general eons across They train surg work with the nation and s to refine industry leader revolutionize tools needed to ly invasive these minimal procedures.

hletic 2. Certified at the USF trainers with ine and Sports Medic ed Trauma Athletic Relat ateInstitute, a st gram for supported pro , work in high sports safety ss the Tampa schools acro care daily Bay area. They ent athletes for 4,500 stud e playing on and off th

4

2

plinary 4. A multidisci physicians team of USF rmed the recently perfo Intrapartum first Ex Utero ) at Treatment (EXIT al Hospital Tampa Gener securing -- successfully a baby girl an airway for enign tumor with a large b nd her neck wrapped arou elivering before fully d C-section. the infant by doctors and More than 20 rofessionals other health p for the were present unusual challenging, birth.

neonatal 5. A world-class rship center, a partne Health and between USF al Hospital to Tampa Gener arch and care transform rese is expected for newborns, . The to open in 2011 it will include redesigned un to replicate private rooms iet, nurturing the relatively qu the mother’s environment of phasize womb and em d care. family-centere

field.

e r a c h t l a He

S T ACHIEVEMEN


41

ealth 10. The USF H ter of Rothman Cen ry at All Neuropsychiat pital is Children’s Hos lly for known nationa e outpatient using intensiv ioral cognitive-behav to reduce or therapy (CBT) ssiveeliminate obse d anxiety compulsive an Center’s disorders. The -million team leads a $1 te of Child National Institu elopment Health and Dev studying multi-site trial tment for CBT as a trea ith autism. adolescents w

7 ealth Breast 6. The USF H is one of Health Program e to offer few in the stat ppleskin-sparing, ni ctomies. sparing maste e procedure The alternativ cisions to uses smaller in ring and minimize scar st’s skin leaves the brea ct. and nipple inta

epartment of 7. The USF D tners with Pediatrics par nald House Ronald McDo mpa Bay Charities of Ta onald to bring the R e Mobile™ McDonald Car ousands program to th leged of underprivi adolescents children and s where in communitie 40-foot they live. The dental clinic medical and staffed by on wheels is lty and pediatrics facu dents and residents, stu others.

ampa 11. The USF-T ital General Hosp ve Epilepsy Comprehensi eds Program exce for the es the guidelin medical and highest-level r (Level 4), surgical cente dards by based on stan ssociation the National A enters. It of Epilepsy C highest is one of the al epilepsy volume surgic rida. centers in Flo

ensive USF 9. The compreh e Sleep Medicin gs in Program br from together faculty ology, medicine, neur hiatry and pediatrics, psyc , as well otolaryngology r hospitals as three partne ratories, with sleep labo conduct to train fellows, provide research and y care to multidisciplinar cents and children, adoles p disorders. adults with slee

atopathology 8. USF’s Derm one of the Laboratory is in the top referral labs U.S. Southeastern

11


42

Figure Facts &


es

USF President Judy Genshaft

43

nation’s fastest The

University

of

South

Florida

was

the

growing

university in federal research expenditures from 2000 to 2007 in that seven-- growing year period. The top ranking was reported in The Chronicle of Higher Education. This growth and in the creation of new knowledge was driven largely by the USF College of

213 %

discovery

Medicine, which consistently accounts for the

awards

greatest percentage of the university’s total research

system offers

programs

.

The USF

232 degree

at the undergraduate,

graduate, specialist and doctoral levels,

including the doctor of medicine. It has

impact ,

a $1.8 billion budget, an annual economic

billion

than

of $3.2

and serves more

47,000 students

within

institutions/campuses in Tampa, St. Petersburg,

Sarasota-Manatee,

Lakeland. USF is a member of the

East Athletic Conference.

and

Big


44

Facts & Figures

Profile

Our Promise We promise aspiring, passionate students an open culture of accessibility to faculty, patients and technology through a challenging curriculum with diverse educational experiences. Transcending old paradigms, we are empowered by a fresh perspective on learning. We foster an environment where students realize their own creativity and innovation to make a difference in the lives of patients and their community. Upon graduation, our students will possess the skills and confidence as leaders in the everchanging business of healthcare without ever sacrificing their initial inspiration to care for patients.

Snapshot of USF College of Medicine | 2009-10 Year opened: 1971 Faculty: 483 Students: 482 MD Average GPA of entering MD students: 3.7 overall, 3.7 science Applicants in first-year class: 2,991 for 120 seats (25 to 1) School of Biomedical Sciences Students: 1 MD/PhD; 87 PhD; 353 MS/MA; 135 Graduate Certificate Average GPA and GRE of entering students: 3.58, 1190 MD/PhD; 3.4,1138 PhD; 3.29, 1067 MS/MA

School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences Students: 106 DPT Average GPA of entering students: 3.6 Residents: 680 in 87 specialty & subspecialty programs Alumni: 3,056 MD; 251 PhD; 123 MSPT; 50 DPT; 332 MS; 33 MA; 38 BS (Athletic Training) USF Physicians Group: The college’s practice plan is the largest multispecialty group practice on Florida’s Gulf Coast, with 460 physicians and other health practitioners.


Philanthropy

Philanthropy is critical to success. Through the generosity of donors, the College raised more than $9.5 million in 2008-09. The College’s $141 million worth of endowments include:

57 Scholarships

14 Fellowships 34 Chairs 5 Professorships 13 Lectureships 115 Research Funds

Philanthropic supporters of USF Health enable the best minds in research, medicine, and education to address today’s most pressing health issues. Our faculty apply basic science research to cutting-edge clinical studies for chronic diseases such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, HIV-AIDS and depression, and build model programs for healthy living at important life stages. The ground-breaking research, innovative techniques and communities of learning and caring pioneered here reach beyond the walls of the institution, and will continue to define a new era in health regionally, nationally, and internationally. USF launched a comprehensive campaign in 2009. Monies raised support leading-edge research, advanced care, the lastest technology, and our talented team of educators, scientists, doctors, clinicians, and clinicianscientists who work tirelessly to transform health so all people can reach their potential. Private donor investments play a critical role in helping scientists and physician scientists to understand and conquer disease, illness, and injury and prepare the next generation of physicians for a rapidly changing healthcare environment.

45


46

Facts & Figures

Strategic Hires

David Birk, PhD • Professor and Vice Chair, Pathology and Cell Biology; Scientific Director, Muma Advanced Microscopy & Cell Imaging Core • Expertise: Cell and developmental biology of connective tissue • From Thomas Jefferson University, March 2008

Benjamin Djulbegovic, ScD, MD • Professor of Medicine and Director, Center for Evidence Based Medicine and Health Outcomes, and Co-director, Clinical and Translational Science Institute • Expertise: Comparative research effectiveness; decision sciences; ethics of clinical trials; outcomes research; hematology/oncology • From Moffitt Cancer Center, July 2008

Cesario Borlongan, PhD • Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair • Expertise: Cell therapy research for stroke • From Medical College of Georgia, December 2008

Clifton Gooch, MD • Professor and Chair, Neurology • Expertise: Neuropathy; autoimmune neuromuscular disease; motor neuron diseases; EMG; novel therapeutics research • From Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, May 2008

Robert Brooks, MD, MBA, MPH • Associate Vice President for Health Leadership; Professor of Medicine and Public Health; Former Florida Health Secretary • Expertise: Patient safety; health informatics research; health policy decisions • From Florida State University, August 2009

Lennox Hoyte, MD • Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Director of Center for Urogynecology and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery, and Medical Director of daVinci® Center for Computer Assisted Surgery • Expertise: Pelvic floor disorders • From Harvard Medical School, June 2006

Jay Dean, PhD • Professor, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology; Director, Hyperbaric Biomedical Research Laboratory • Expertise: Hyperbaric neurophysiology; respiratory control • From Wright State University, July 2006

Jeff Konin, PhD, ATC, PT • Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, and Executive Director, Sports Medicine and Athletic Related Trauma Institute • Expertise: Youth sport injuries and evidence based sports medicine • From James Madison University, Harrisburg, VA, August 2006

Robert Deschenes, PhD • Professor and Chair, Molecular Medicine; Fred Wright Endowed Chair in Cancer Biology; and Associate Dean for Research • Expertise: Cancer cell signaling using yeast as a model system • From Medical College of Wisconsin, January 2009

David Leffers, MD • Associate Professor and Chair, Department of Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine • Expertise: Sports medicine; arthroscopic knee and shoulder surgery • From Florida Orthopaedic Institute, July 2006


Strategic Hires 47

John Mayer, DC, PhD • Associate Professor, Physical Therapy; Lincoln College Endowed Chair in Biomechanical & Chiropractic Research • Expertise: Applied exercise physiology; physical rehabilitation of musculoskeletal disorders • From U.S. Spine & Sport Foundation, October 2007

Lewis Rubin, MD • Professor of Pediatrics, Director of Division of Neonatology, and Muma Endowed Chair in Neonatology. • Expertise: Fetal and newborn medicine; human development • From the Cleveland Clinic Foundation, April 2008

Alicia Monroe, MD • Vice Dean for Education, College of Medicine • Expertise: Leader in teaching new models of physician communication • Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, May 2008

Kevin Sneed, PharmD • Associate Professor, Department of Family Medicine; Founding Dean, School of Pharmacy • Expertise: Geriatric medication management and pharmacogenetics • From Florida A&M University College of Pharmacy, May 2007

Tanya Murphy, MD • Professor, Pediatrics and Psychiatry, Rothman Endowed Chair of Developmental Pediatrics • Expertise: Medical and psychological treatments for Tourette’s syndrome, autism and obssessive-complusive disorder • From University of Florida, July 2008

Edwin Weeber, PhD • Associate Professor, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology; Scientific Director, Cellular Physiology and Neurobehavior Laboratories • Expertise: Neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders affecting cognitive ability • From Vanderbilt University, June 2007

Jonnie Perez • Director of MD Admissions • Expertise: Best practices admissions; web-based application • From Stanford University School of Medicine, June 2009

Michael White, PhD • Professor, Molecular Medicine and Global Health • Expertise: Genetics of AIDS pathogen; Toxoplasma gondii • From Montana State University, April 2009

Shayne Plosker, MD • Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology; Director of Reproductive Medicine and Infertility Division; Director of IVF Program • Expertise: Reproductive endocrinology and infertility • From Brown University Medical School, October 2006

Min You, PhD • Associate Professor, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology • Expertise: Molecular mechanisms underlying development of alcoholic fatty liver • From Indiana University School of Medicine, January 2007


48

Facts & Figures

Departmental Chairs

Cardiology Anne Curtis, MD MD: Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY Primary Interests: Arrhythmias; implantable devices

Ophthalmology Peter Reed Pavan, MD MD: Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA Primary Interests: Vitreous/retina surgery; macular degeneration; diabetic retinopathy; uveitis

Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery Neil A. Fenske, MD MD: St. Louis University, St. Louis, MO Primary Interests: Aging skin; skin cancer/melanoma; psoriasis

Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine David Leffers, MD MD: University Of Tennessee, Memphis, TN Primary Interests: Sports medicine; athroscopic knee and shoulder surgery

Family Medicine H. James Brownlee, MD MD: State University of New York, Syracuse, N.Y. Primary Interests: Diabetes; metabolic syndrome Internal Medicine Allan Goldman, MD MD: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN Primary Interests: Pulmonary disease; occupational lung disease; lung cancer

Otolaryngology Thomas McCaffrey, MD, PhD MD: Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University, Chicago, IL PhDs: University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (Otolaryngology) and Loyola University, Chicago, IL (Physiology) Primary Interests: Nasal physiology; airway mucociliary function; treatment of spastic dysphonia with botulinum toxin; evaluation and treatment of clinical voice disorders; role of HPV in head and neck cancer

Molecular Medicine Robert Deschenes, PhD PhD: Biochemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN Primary Interests: Genetic and biochemical mechanisms of cell growth regulation in yeast; signaling pathways related to cancer

Pathology and Cell Biology Santo Nicosia, MD MD: Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Rome, Italy Primary interests: Reproductive pathobiology; ovarian cancer; aspiration biopsy cytology; image analysis cytometry

Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology Bruce G. Lindsey, PhD PhD: University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Primary Interests: Neurophysiology and computational neuroscience; neural control of breathing; modeling of neural networks

Pediatrics Robert M. Nelson, Jr, MD MD: University of Washington, Seattle, WA Primary Interests: Administrative medicine; medical education

Neurology Clifton Gooch, MD MD: Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX Primary Interests: Peripheral neuropathy, with focus on CIDP, MMN and diabetic neuropathy; myasthenia gravis and autoimmune nerve and muscle diseases; motor neuron diseases, EMG and nerve conduction studies; physiology of motor unit in health and disease, novel experimental therapies for neuromuscular disease Neurosurgery and Brain Repair Harry van Loveren, MD MD: University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH Primary Interests: Trigeminal neuralgia; cerebrovascular and skull base surgery Obstetrics and Gynecology Catherine M. Lynch, MD MD: University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Primary Interests: General OB/GYN; contraceptive and hormonal therapy; urogynecology and pelvic reconstruction Oncologic Sciences Lynn Moscinski, MD MD: Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI Primary Interests: Acute myeloid leukemia; myelodysplasia

Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine Francisco Fernandez, MD MD: Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA Primary Interests: Integrated behavioral and medical care systems; neurostimulation and neurotherapies; treatment-resistant mood disorders; cognitive disorders; traumatic brain injury; psychiatric complications in Alzheimer’s disease, critically ill and AIDS patients Radiology Todd Hazelton, MD MD: University of South Florida, Tampa, FL Primary Interests: Imaging of the heart and lungs Surgery David J. Smith, Jr, MD MD: Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN Primary Interests: Wound pathophysiology and healing, particularly related to burn injury Urology Jorge L. Lockhart, MD MD: University of Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay Primary Interests: Urinary diversion and pelvic reconstruction


008 / 09

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Student Enrollment

49

Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009 $300M

FY 2007

FY 2008

FY 2009

$39,062,575

$39,687,110

$52,323,119

State/Local

3,918,318

6,572,219

7,439,499

Private*

2,075,384

1,853,788

Federal

$250M

Total $300M

0

45,482

42,555

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

FY 2007 $62,621,119

Federal $39,062,575 NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit organizations State/Local 3,918,318 such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, aPrivate* state-designated Center of Excellence 2,075,384

$150M $250M

FY2006

2,815,945

Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

Center of Excellence**

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009

$200M

FY2007 $200M

FY2008

Center of Excellence**

FY2009

Total

FY 2008

FY 2009

$39,687,110

$52,323,119

6,572,219 1,853,788

7,439,499 2,815,945

0

45,482

42,555

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

$62,621,119

NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit organizations such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

$150M

FY2006

FY2007

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009

FY2008

FY2009

$120M

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009

$100M

$120M

$80M $100M

$60M

$80M

$60M

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009

Y2008FY2009FY2009

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009

$3M

$3M

$2.5M $2.5M

$2M

$2M

$1.5M

$1.5M

FY2006

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2009

College’s educational programs College’s educational programs

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009 350K 350K

09

300K

300K

250K

200K

250K

FY2006

200K

FY2006

FY2007

FY2007

FY2008

FY2008

2009 / 10

College’s educational programs PhD 2009 / 10

2008 / 09

2007 / 08 PhD

2009 / 10 2008 / 09 2007 / 08 2006 / 07

2006 / 07

Master’s ––

College’s educational programs Master’s

––

––

87

353

DPT

ATC*

––

106

59

87

353

105

52

83 DPT

196 ATC*

90

40

93

105

79**

40

106

105

59

52

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed Sports Medicine 83 196 in Department of 90Othopaedics and40 ** Includes 23 MSPT students

93

105

79**

USF College of Medicine FY2009

The College of Medicine is dedicated to education,

research, and patient care, while providing its students with

FY2009

009

Y2008

2009 / 10

2008 / 09 2008 / 09 MD 2008 / 09

2008 / 09 2008 / 09 2007 / 08 2007 //08 2008 09

educational experiences of the highest quality. USF Health and

87 482 PhD

––

PhD

106

Master’s

106

353 87 Master’s

59

59

105 353 DPT

the College have strong ties with other university programs

52 105

87 83 353 480

105 196 83 353

52 90105 196

90 90

2006 / 07 2006 2007 / 08 83 2007 / 08 2006 / 07 480 2007//07 08

93 196 480 83

105 93 196 90

79** 90 105 90

40 79*

2006 / 07 2006 / 07 2006 / 07

on Medical Education for the

79** 105

40 79*

The Master’s Program has more than tripled its enrollment since 2006-07 COM Masters programs 400

Health Network and other disciplines within the University, The college is fully accredited by the Liaison Committee

Number of Students

105 93

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students

recognition. Relationships with other USF Health colleges,

provide a strong academic and research base.

93 480

NOTES: Number of Students * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students * Includes 23 MSPT students

teaching hospitals, the Moffitt Cancer Center, Lehigh Valley

COM Masters programs 300

353

400 200

196 300

FY2009

DPT

87 482

2007 / 08

and certain programs have achieved national and international

maximum period.

––

MD

40

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students

Y2008

Graduate Programs –– ––

FY2009

FY2009

200

100

100

105 2006-07

2007-08

2008-09


50

Facts & Figures

Research Expenditures

4

RESEARCH EXPENDITURES

Research Expenditures 2007-09 College research expenditures byFY source

rivate

815,946

12

al

State / Local $7,482,054

4

eral

23,119

FY 2007

FY 2008

FY 2009

$39,062,575

$39,687,111

$52,323,119

State/Local

3,918,318

6,617,702

7,482,054

Private*

2,075,384

1,853,788

2,815,946

Federal

Research Expenditures FY 2007-09 Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

Total

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

FY 2007

$62,621,119

FY 2008

FY 2007 FY 2009

*Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit Federal etc. $39,062,575 organizations suchFederal as American Heart Assn,$39,062,575 American Cancer Society, $39,687,111 $52,323,119 State/Local

3,918,318

NOTES: State/Local 3,918,318 6,617,702 7,482,054 * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, Private* and nonprofit organizations 2,075,384 such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. Private* 2,075,384 1,853,788 2,815,946 Total ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence $45,056,277

4

Total

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

FY 2008 $39,687,111 6,617,702 1,853,788 $48,158,601

$62,621,119

NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonp such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of E

PrivateNOTES:

* Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit organizations $2,815,946 such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

12

Federal Research Expenditures

Federal Research Expenditur

Federal research expenditures up 34%

$50M

State / Local $7,482,054 $40M

$50M $40M

Federal Research Expenditures

$30M

$30M

84

$50M

$52,323,119 FY2007

$40M

FY2007 $30M

Federal

$52,323,119

$39,062,575

$39,687,110

FY2008

FY2007

FY2009

FY2008

FY2009

Total Research Awards Increase 57%

NIH Grands

$200M

$150M

$150M

$100M

FY2008

F


Federal

$39,062,575

College of Medicine faculty earned 56% Privateof the university’s Private $2,815,946 $2,815,946 total awards

43 Research Awards 51

3,918,318 3,918,318

6,617,702 6,617,702

7,482,054 7,482,054

Private* Private*

2,075,384 2,075,384

1,853,788 1,853,788

2,815,946 2,815,946

$45,056,277$48,158,601 $48,158,601$62,621,119 $62,621,119 $45,056,277

USF(Entire University)

NOTES: NOTES: * Private includes funds donors/philanthropic foundations, nonprofit organizations * Private includes funds fromfrom donors/philanthropic foundations, and and nonprofit organizations as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, suchsuch as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. etc. ** USF Center for Aging Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence ** USF Center for Aging and and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

USF (Entire University)

$380,325,875 $212,177,283

USF COM Entire Un USF( ive rsi ty)

12 12

Federal Research Expenditures Federal Research Expenditures $50M $50M

56%

State/ Local / Local State

$40M $40M

$7,482,054 $7,482,054

College of Medicine

lR ta To

$30M $30M

FY2007 FY2007 es ea rc hA war ds FY 2008-09

84 84

$52,323,119

State/Local State/Local

Total Total

44

$39,687,111

Federal ederal

FY2008 FY2008

FY2009 FY2009

52,323,119 ,323,119

College’s total research awards grew 57% over 3 years

College’s NIH awards more than doubled over 3 years

Total Research Awards Increase 57% Total Research Awards Increase 57%

NIH Grands NIH Grands

$200M $200M

$150M $150M

$212,177,283

$150M $150M

$181,552,851

$100M $100M

$113,608,569 $98,045,959

$100M $100M

$134,806,130

$50M $50M

2006-07 FY FY 2007-08 FY FY 2008-09 FY FY 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09

$380,325,875 USF (Entire University) $380,325,875 USF (Entire University) USF COM USF COM

$212,177,283 $212,177,283

$55,319,598

FY 2006-07 FY 2007-08 FY 2007-08 FY 2008-09 FY 2008-09 FY 2006-07


Patient Volume

Serving Our Communities

Facts & Figures 500,000

52

450,000

400,000

400,000

300,000 2006 / 07

2007 / 08

2008/ 09

Inpatient & Outpatient

PENNSYLVANIA

FLORIDA FLORIDA

Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

Federal

FY 2007

FY 2008

FY 2009

$39,062,575

$39,687,111

$52,323,119

Sites of Care

Major USF Health Sites State/Local

3,918,318

6,617,702

Private*

2,075,384

1,853,788

2,815,946

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

$62,621,119

Total

4

7,482,054

USF Health Centers for Advanced Healthcare NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit organizations such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

- Carol & Frank Morsani Center (includes endoscopy and ambulatory surgery suites)

vate

5,946

- South Tampa Center - USF Medical Center

12

Federal Research Expenditures

State / Local $7,482,054

USF Children’s Medical Services $50M

USF Health Eye Institute $40M

2007

$30M

USF Health Byrd Alzheimer’s Institute FY2007

4

FY2008

FY2009

USF Health Physical Therapy Center USF Health Psychiatry Center

ral

119

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

Patient Volume | FY 2007 - 2009 500K

350K

450K

300K

400K

250K

350K

Key Hospital Partners

$200M

$150M

$150M

200K

NIH Grands

Total Research Awards Increase 57%

300K

FY2006-07

FY2007-08 FY2008 / 09

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Inpatient & Outpatient Visits

$100M

All Children’s Hospital

$100M

$50M

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009 Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

Moffitt Cancer Center

FY 2006-07

FY 2007-08

USF (Entire University)

ANIA USF COM

FY 2008-09

FY 2006-07

FY 2007-08

FY 2008-09

$380,325,875 James A. Haley Veterans’ Hospital $212,177,283

Lehigh Valley Health Network

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009

$300M

$250M

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009

$200M

$150M

Shriners Hospital for Children

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Tampa General Hospital USF(Entire University)

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

College’s educational programs

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009 $120M

Entire Un USF( ive rsi ty)

College’s educational programs

$100M

56%

College of Medicine

$80M

MD

––

PhD

––

106

Master’s

59

DPT

2008 / 09 2008 / 09 2008 / 09

87 482

353 87

105 353

2007 / 08 2007 / 08 2007 / 08

83 480

196 83

90 196

90 90

2006 / 07 2006 / 07 2006 / 07

93 480

105 93

79** 105

40 79*

52 105

Number of Students

$60M

lR ta To

es ea rc hA war ds FY 2008-09

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009

of Care

2009 / 10

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students

COM Masters programs

USF Health treats patients, educates students, and trains residents in more than 60 locations. $3M

400

$2.5M

300

$2M

200

$1.5M

100

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

2006-07

2007-08

2008-09

2008

2009


Patient Care

400K

250K

350K

53

200K

2007

rands 300K

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

FY2007

FY2008

F

Inpatient & Outpatient Visits

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009 Charges 2006 - 2009 339,643Total Outpatient Visit| FY Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

Patient Volume | FY 2007 - 2009 500K

350K

300K

Research Expenditures FY 200

250K 450K 400K

250,827

Visits FY2006-07

FY2009

USF Faculty Patient Care

$150M

200K

FY2007-08 FY2008 / 09

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2007

FY2007 FY2008

FY2008 FY2009

Charges increased 29% FY 2008

FY 2009

$39,687,110

$52,323,119

3,918,318

6,572,219

7,439,499

2,075,384

1,853,788

2,815,945

0

45,482

42,555

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

$62,621,119

Total

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009

$60M

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009 $3M

FY2009

$2.5M

$2M

Federal

FY 2008

FY 2009

$39,062,575

$39,687,110

$52,323,119

3,918,318

6,572,219

7,439,499

Private*

2,075,384 Research Expenditures FY1,853,788 2007-09

$120M

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009

Center of Excellence**

45,482

FY 2008

FY2008

FY2009

350K

300K

250K

200K

2,815,945

$48,158,601

$39,062,575

$39,687,110

Private*

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Total

$100M

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008

2,075,384

Center of Excellence**

$200M

1,853,788

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

$52,323,119

College’s educational programs

2,815,945

0

45,482

42,555

$45,056,277

$48,158,601

$62,621,119

PhD

physician productivity.

NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit organizations such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

FY2009

FY2006

42,555

FY 2009

$62,621,119

NOTES: * State/Local Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic and nonprofit organizations 3,918,318 foundations, 6,572,219 7,439,499 such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

$250M

Master’s

DPT

ATC*

2009 / 10

––

––

106

59

2008 / 09

87

353

105

52

2007 / 08

83

196

90

40

2006 / 07

93

105

79**

40

$120M

$60M

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students

$100M FY2008

FY2007

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

centers and increases in

$45,056,277

Federal

$150M

$251,453,399

0

FY 2007

Total

$300M

$227,335,142

$80M

FY 2007

State/Local

$250M

$150M

$250M $200M

FY2006

with the opening of two major outpatient

$300M

$100M

FY2009

$80M

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009 $80M

$200M Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009 $150M

$120M $60M $100M FY2006

$3M

$80M

$2.5M

$60M

$150M

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

$60M

Global RVUs | FYFY2007 2006 - 2009 FY2006 FY2008

$2M

FY2007 FY2007

FY2009

$80M

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009 $200M

$120M

FY2006

FY2008

$100M

Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

$292,836,807

FY2009

$300M $250M Collections | FY 2006 - 2009

$1.5M

FY2007

$120M

practice group has been strong,

NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundations, and nonprofit organizations such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, etc. ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated Center of Excellence

$150M

FY2008

FY 2007

$39,062,575

Private*

Center of Excellence**

$200M

FY2007

4

$48,15

Research Expenditures FY 2007-09

State/Local

Federal

Charges $300M | FY 2006 - 2009

FY2006

6,57

1,85

0 $45,056,277

NOTES: * Private includes funds from donors/philanthropic foundation such as American Heart Assn, American Cancer Society, et ** USF Center for Aging and Brain Repair, a state-designated

performance of the College’s faculty

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009

FY2007

$39,68

$1.5M

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009 FY2006

2,075,384

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009

Over the last three years, the

Inpatient & Outpatient Visits

$250M

3,918,318

Private*

Total

FY2006

$200M

FY 2

$39,062,575

State/Local

Center of Excellence**

$150M

$250M

300K Inpatient FY2006-07 & Outpatient Visits FY2007-08 FY2008 / 09

$300M

Federal

$200M

250K 200K FY2008

FY 2007

$300M

$250M

300K 250K

FY2007

Charges | FY 2006 - 2009

$300M

350K 300K

200K

400K 350K 350K 300K

293,495

FY 2008-09

450K

University)

2009

FY2007-08 FY2008 / 09

Outpatient visits jumped 35%

350K Patient Volume | FY 2007 - 2009

FY 2006-07500K FY 2007-08

2009

FY2006-07

FY2008

FY2008

FY2009

$3M

FY2009

$2.5M

FY2009

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009 $2M

FY2007

Total Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

FY2008

FY2009

FY2007

$3M $1.5M

FY2008

College’s educational programs

FY2009

$2.5M

FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

$2M

350K

$1.5M

300K

250K

College’s educational programs

Total Outpatient Visit Increase | FY 2006 - 2009 FY2006 FY2007 FY2008 43% FY2009 350K

200K

300K

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009 FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

Total 250K Outpatient Visit Increase 43% | FY 2006 - 2009

College’s educational programs

Collections | FY 2006 - 2009 $120M

Collections up 30% PhD

2009 / 10

2008 / 09 2007 / 08

$120M $100M 2006 / 07

Master’s

DPT

––

106

59

87

353

83

196

90

40

93

105

79**

105

52

40

––

350K 200K 300K

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

250K

2008 / 09 2008 / 09 2008 / 09

87 482

200K

College’s educational programs FY2006

FY2007

FY2008

PhD

2007 / 08 2007 / 08 2007 / 08 2009 / 10

2008 / 09

–– 87

2007 / 08

83

2006 / 07

PhD 93

2006 / 07 2006 / 07 2006 / 07 2009 / 10

101,652,988

––

$3M DPT

College’s educational programs 59

83 480 ––

353 196

Master’s 105

106

59

105

52

90

40

DPT 79**

ATC* 40

$2.5M 93 480 ––

ATC*

59

2008 / 09 87 353 105 NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine **2007 Includes 23 MSPT students / 08 83 196 90

52

93

DPT

Global up/ 1010530% 353 105 2009 52 87 RVUs* 353

106

2006 / 07

$87,650,631

106

FY2009

Master’s

College’s educational programs

$100M $80M

––

MD Global RVUs | FYPhD 2006 -Master’s 2009 FY2006

ATC*

––

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students

$80M $60M

2009 / 10

105

79**

NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine ** Includes 23 MSPT students

$2M

196 83 105 93

40 40

90 2008 90 196 2009//09 10 2008 / 90 09 2008 / 09 $2,855,671

79** 2007 40 105 79* 2008//08 09 2008 09 2007 // 08 2008 // 08 09 2007

$2,512,024

Number of Students $2,195,565

2007//07 08 2007 08 2006 2006 // 07 2007 // 07 08 2006

MD

––

–– 87 482

MD

PhD

–– 353 87

PhD

$60M FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

FY2007

FY2008

FY2009

$3M

106 105 353

Master’s

87 482 83 480

353 87 196 83

105 353 90 196

83 480 93 480

196 83 105 93

90 196 79** 105

2006 / 07 93 105 79** 2006 / 07 480 93 105 NOTES: 2006 / 07 * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports Medicine Number of Students ** Includes 23 MSPT students $1.5M NOTES: * Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sports ** Includes 23 MSPT students NOTES: FY2007

FY2008

* FY2009 Undergraduate program housed in Department of Othopaedics and Sport ** Includes 23 MSPT students

* Relative value unit, a measure that COM Masters programs

Global RVUs $3M | FY 2006 - 2009

106

Master’s

Number of Students

$78,201,259

Global RVUs | FY 2006 - 2009

––

includes physician productivity.

400

300

COM Masters programs COM 400 Masters programs 400


54

Facts & Figures

Financials

USF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE CONSOLIDATED REVENUES & EXPENDITURES FOR FISCAL YEARS 2006-07 THROUGH 2008-09 FY 06/07

FY 07/08

FY 08/09

REVENUES: State Appropriations *

37,370,203

35,878,528

31,633,799

Tuition

12,368,209

12,072,817

11,726,574

Contracts and Grant Awards - Restricted **

134,806,130

181,552,851

212,177,283

Practice Plan ***

138,771,279

155,789,758

160,236,213

40,584,684

42,386,372

46,042,120

4,236,757

3,263,345

5,194,940

Hospital Resident Support Gifts - Spendable Endowment Earnings Continuing Education and Service Revenues TOTAL REVENUES

6,097,665

6,597,102

7,786,423

15,006,621

14,520,726

19,589,258

389,241,548

452,061,499

494,386,610

FY 06/07 FY 07/08

FY 08/09

EXPENDITURES: State Appropriations *

27,984,630

27,855,607

Tuition

12,310,343

12,072,817

11,625,511

Contracts and Grants - Restricted **

45,056,277

48,158,602

62,621,119

135,395,954

154,158,049

172,761,140

39,525,653

41,362,650

45,167,744

Gifts Expenditures

2,765,940

4,436,564

4,692,687

Endowment Expenditures

6,002,714

4,648,679

6,711,310

13,850,347

14,096,753

18,819,830

282,891,858

306,789,721

Practice Plan *** Hospital Resident Support

Continuing Education and Service Expenditures TOTAL EXPENDITURES

NOTES: *

General revenue and lottery fund allocations

** Awards received in current fiscal year can be for multiple years in future; C&G expenditures are for current year only; *** Does not include Moffitt Cancer Center.

27,070,344

349,469,685


USF

The University of South Florida is one of the nation’s top 63 public research universities and one of only 25 public research universities nationwide with very high research activity that is designated as community engaged by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. USF was awarded $380.4 million in research contracts and grants in FY 2008/2009. The university offers 232 degree programs at the undergraduate, graduate, specialist and doctoral levels, including the doctor of medicine. The USF System has a $1.8 billion annual budget, an annual economic impact of $3.2 billion, and serves more than 47,000 students on institutions/campuses in Tampa, St. Petersburg, SarasotaManatee and Lakeland. USF is a member of the Big East Athletic Conference.

USF Health

USF Health is dedicated to creating a model of health care

President University of South Florida Judy Genshaft, PhD Senior Vice President and CEO, USF Health Dean, USF College of Medicine Stephen K. Klasko MD, MBA Vice President USF Communications & Marketing Michael Hoad Editor/ Writer Anne DeLotto Baier Art Director Klaus Herdocia Contributing Writers Lisa Greene, Michael Hoad, Susanna Martinez Tarokh, Elizabeth Peacock, Sarah Worth Senior Photographer Eric Younghans

based on understanding the full spectrum of health. It includes the University of South Florida’s colleges of medicine, nursing, and public health; the schools of biomedical sciences as well as physical therapy & rehabilitation sciences; and the USF Physicians Group.

Contributing Photographers Dick Dickinson, Joseph Gamble, Candace Mundy Production Coordinator Monica Matos

The College of Medicine Annual Report is produced by: USF Health Office of Communications 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulevard, MDC 47 Tampa, FL 33612 P. (813) 974-3300 F. (813) 974-5422 health.usf.edu


start a

o t g n i o g e r ’ u o If y e k a m o t t o g e v , you’ F S U t a h w t s u j s ’ t a h t d n A . e s i o n some n i n o i t u l o v e r a g n i t r a t s : g n i o d s Health i d l o g n i r e t t a h s e r ’ e W . e health car s e r u d e c o r p d assumptions an n e e w t e b s l l a w n w o d g Breakin ealth, nursing and physical h c i l b u p , e n i c i d me therapy. a e z a l b o t s d r o c e r l a c i d e m about tion u l o v e r a g n i t r a t S . e r u t u f c i n o r t trail to an elec etimes

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Medicine Annual Report