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ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO CAMILA KAKAZU


Education Bachelor of Architecture and Urbanism University of Brasilia__Jan 2010/Jul 2016

Camila Kakazu kakazu.harumi@gmail.com www.behance.net/kkzu www.vimeo.com/kkzu https://issuu.com/kkzu current location: Brazil +55 (61) 9 94072495

Academic Exchange Program in U.S. Science without Borders__Sep 2014/Jun 2015 Savannah College of Art & Design Basic French Cooplem idiomas_2013 Revit Basic Course Grupo Alex Justi__Jul 2012

Professional Experience Internship__Federal Court of Accounts, Brasília, Brazil Jan 2014/Jun 2014 Developed architectural survey, environment control survey, drafting, rendering and projects’ presentation Freelancer Internship__Patrícia Azevedo Architecture May 2014 Developed drafts, 3D-modeling and renderings and project’s presentation Freelancer Internship__Fontaine Ville Dec 2013 Developed drafts, renders and presentation of a multi-family condominium

Advanced English IELTS overall band score: 7.0 Thomas Jefferson__Mar 2006

Internship__ VMF Architecture Apr 2013/Aug 2013 Developed drafts, 3-D models and presentation of Quiznos franchises through Brazil and residential projects

Qualifications

Intership__Mooca Architecture Mar 2012/Aug 2013 Assisted in interior design projects and developed architectural surveys, drafts, renders, projects’ presentations

AutoCAD Revit SketchUp+Vray Rhino Grasshopper 3ds Max Vectorworks Photoshop Illustrator InDesign After Effects Lightroom

Freelancer Internship__Elani Lima Architecture Aug 2012/Oct 2012 Developed architectural survey, drafts and renders for residential projects Voluntary__Apartment’s reform Jul 2011/Sep 2011 Measurements, drafts, furniture and prices research Voluntary__Pro Bono Office CASAS Mar 2010/Aug 2010 Measurements and materials and low-cost constructions survey


CONTENTS

BRAZLANDIA’S PUBLIC MARKET

DRIVE-IN THEATER

OFFICE BUILDING

Academic Project - Individual Level: Final Project - 13th semester Date: 1st semester/2016 Professor: Cláudia Garcia

Academic Project - Individual Level: 9th semester Date: 1st semester/2014 Professor: Oscar Ferreira

Academic Project - Group Level: Final Project - 5th semester Date: 1st semester/2012 Professor: Cláudia Amorim


BRAZLANDIA’S PUBLIC MARKET

WHY BRAZLANDIA?

Academic Project - Individual Level: Final Project - 13th semester Date: 1st semester/2016 Professor: Cláudia Garcia garcia.unb@gmail.com

Link between rural and urban economy

Opportunities of work and small business

Public health promotion

THE PUBLIC MARKET The casual and spontaneous nature of public markets sets an ambiance far beyond from a place for exchanges. The atmosphere there created happens to add a new dimension to the public space: it becomes a stage for events, leisure and hangouts. Therefore it grows into a part of a city’s daily life. Public markets usually enriches the local community. They create a link between rural and urban economy, generate employment and business and promote public health. Accordingly to the North American non-profit company, Project for Public Spaces (PPS), along with these benefits public markets also revitalize urban centers due to their essence to bring a diverse occupation.

Diverse occupation

Active public spaces

Revitalize urban centers

Brazlandia is an area nearby the capital of Brazil, Brasilia. It was chosen for the project under some varied concerns. First, the intent to create a point of attraction for visitors apart from the mainstream locations, as an incentive for people to know Brasilia’s surroundings and communities, which have their own culture and values to offer. The area is also a center of agribusiness that provides about 65% of the agricultural products consumed in the federal unit. Brazlandia is mostly rural but, although small, the urban center has great tourism potential. Once a year locals traditionally perform the Strawberry Festival, to promote their strongest harvest along with gastronomy, music and crafts.

98% of total area is rural 65% of agricultural production Agribusiness center Harvest festivals Local’s culture Disperse visitor attraction Tourism potential Draw attention to other community


URBAN INTERVENTION

Mixed-Use + Pedestrian Zone Commerce, Culture and Leisure

PUBLIC MARKET

Mixed-Use Street Commerce, Culture, Residence

CHURCH

Along with strawberry, the strongest symbols of Brazlandia are Veredinha Lake and the main church, Santuårio Menino Jesus. They are frequently maintained by public investments and represent great affection to the locals. However, despite this support, it’s clear that the needs of interventions are further than punctual ones. Hence, it was developed a work ranging from architectural to urban scale, aiming a coherent project that inspire an active, diverse and multi-functional occupation.

AL

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The areas were diagnosed with problems due to the arrangements of the lots and lack of mixed-used activities and urban equipments.

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It was defined 2 main axis for intervention. First, the one perpendicular to the lake, that flows towards it from the church. Second, a parallel one that follows the shore, which currently is a local street. The site chosen for the public market sets the point of intersection between both axis and connects the three symbols from Brazlandia.

Street profiles were changed by the inclusion of a bike lane network connecting the most visited places. The main intervention next to the lake is the renewal into a pedestrian zone, expanding the contact and relation with the water. Meanwhile, since the street is already established, for the church axis was proposed a two-stages of urban reconfiguration.

BRAZLANDIA BRASILIA FEDERAL DISTRICT

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URBAN INTERVENTION CONNECTION AXIS

Street’s improvements Although the axis that connects the church to the lake is established, it currently presents problems related to the urban design. The street faces lengthy walls and requires better lighting structure. The area is no longer determined by law as residential-use only, but there hasn’t been proposed a new configuration. Thus, the street is very exposed to the sun, there barely are shelters provided by constructions or vegetation. Overall the area is inadequate in terms of security, comfort and aesthetic aspects.

Kiosks and murals

The proposal was an urban revitalization applied in two stages in order to reduce the impact from the renovation to locals. At first, the intervention was focused on the improvements of the street. The profile is already well dimensioned and the changes implied in the inclusion of a bike lane and upgrades in sidewalks.

to promote identity to community and a sense of belonging. In a smaller scale, benches were also carefully conceived.

The landscape project concerned visual and comfort features. The same design were applied to the market and the area as a whole

Kiosks were placed through sidewalks with the intention to offer some activity to the area to stimulate pedestrian’s visit and flow.

Since the buildings remained as their current disposal, the walls were used as well as part of an aesthetic urban element, exploiting them as massive canvas.

Bike lane Graffiti walls New kiosks N

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URBAN INTERVENTION CONNECTION AXIS

The second part of intervention is about the buildings bordering the connection axis. It involved changing the disposal of the lots, occupation and types of use in the area. The intervention occurred mostly in one side of the street since the other already presents similarity to the purpose. The margin lots had their fronts turned to the street with the aim to increase pedestrian’s flow all the way down from the church. Thus, the creation of openings (windows and doors) facing sidewalks affords a higher sense of security. The buildings also had their heights elevated to stimulate higher occupation density. The project follows the new legislation of use that organize the region, which determines mixed-use buildings. It tends to enhance public spaces because of its nature to attract varied visitors and to maintain the area active through longer periods of the day. Therefore, is was proposed a building type with offices and stores in the ground floor and residences on the higher level.

Occupation proposal

Circular bench

Benches

Bike lane New kiosks New lots’ disposal N

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50m


URBAN INTERVENTION LAKE SHORE

3

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The proposal was to bring life next to the lots and to liberate part of the shore for other activities. Some kiosks were moved closer to the walls which were used to compose the scene as well, with paintings and graffiti. The area was filled with vegetation, providing not only comfort to pedestrians, but also embellishment and identity to the public space. Benches were distributed trough the whole project along with a deck and a bleacher facing the lake, creating many spots for rest and contemplation. Accessibility was incorporated into the project so everyone can wander through the shore. Since the lake is suitable to swim, it was also included a rental store for kayaks, floats and other sports items.

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The street profile depicts an area that has potential to hold a great variety of leisuretype activities. However, the currently scenario only offers 5 bar kiosks, and one multi-sports court. There are almost no urban equipments to provide comfort and security to the users. Thus, the margin lots have their backs facing the street, which results in extensive walled paths.

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Graffiti walls

Kiosks

Bike lane

Rental Store

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100m

Deck

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Lake promenade

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Kiosk and Graffiti

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Bleacher

Rental store and Floor fountain


ARCHITECTURE 1 The site is currently the only free spot in the block. Since the lots are all surrounded by walls, the site displays as the main path for pedestrians to cross the area to get to the lake. It has approximately 77x101m and has a slope of 5,1%, which results in a level difference between the front ant the back margins of about 4 meters. 2 It was decided not to create barriers in the site to maintain a free walking. The project was designed semi-buried instead of operating great cuts or fills in the terrain. As an extension of the connection axis, it was drawn a symmetry line to emphasize the pedestrian’s flow. Besides the main access to the lower level through the stairs, secondary routes were done for both accessibility and supply purposes. 3 The residual spaces in the site after the building’s delimitation were distributed as separated parking areas, one for the public and other for general services. Kiosks were set at the market entrance to serve as attractive points to the public in the lake axis. 4 The upper floor was designed for complementary uses to keep the market more active and to extend the opening hours.

Access - Lake level

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Access - Street Level

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ARCHITECTURE The structure was projected to provide a plan as free as possible for the market area. To create large spans, a roof was designed inspired by the technique of the Japanese architect, Shigeru Ban. One of his most famous work is the Pompidou Metz, a museum in France. Ban frequently designs a mixed structural system, combining gluedlaminated timber (glulam) and tensile structures.

Tensile Structure

Pompidou Metz

The system allows a light structure with versatile organic shapes. As a former concept, it was desired an overall visual that reminds Japanese architecture, because Brazlandia accommodates the biggest Japanese colony in the federal unit.

Access - Lake level

The roof was designed in three separated parts: two smaller pieces that were used to emphasize the entrances, and the main roof which shelters most of the market.

Access - Street level

The smaller parts were worked after an abstraction of traditional Japanese gates. The result was a three-sided gate, inviting visitors from all around. Although identical, they are perceived through different perspectives. While at the street level the roof rests directly on the ground, the one in the lake level is supported by concrete columns.

Tessellated Roof

Street Level

Lake Level


ARCHITECTURE The main structure performs as a selfsupport tessellated roof. It was developed from a grid that created axis to the timber network. The lattice was composed by a set of six overlapped timber layers, which were configured in 3 pairs of beams in the axis’. At every grid node two pairs intersect where they are assembled.

Symmetry axis’

Tessellation grid

The roof has two symmetry axis. The guide lines were drawn at angles of 0, 30 and 60 degrees, and a fourth one was drawn intersecting the starting/ending points from each line of the grid, creating the border beams’ axis. Original image extracted from Project Report by Mikhail Grinwald and Karen Chi Lin

Except by the two support points at the street level entrance, the whole glulam structure is elevated by concrete columns. The two materials are associated by steel connectors. The columns’ heads are involved by cementbase ornamental pieces.

Beam layers and connection

60o axis An architectural fabric is stretched over the whole structure, coating the roof. The membrane is a combination of fiberglass and Teflon (PTFE) and presents high water resistance. It’s stressed through the glulam funnel where is associated to a steel ring connected to the timber.

30o axis 0o axis

Steel connection Concrete column Column view

Column view


ENVIRONMENT ANALYSIS The roof’s curves direct the rain water through the funnels formed by the associated system of glulam and tensile structure. The rain system collects the water through column’s hollows. The solar study illustrates facades’ exposition to the sun over a year period. To provide shelter, the occupancy was planned 2.5m set back from the roof projection. Thus, for the north facade, the critical area, was designed a sun shading commonly used in Brazil, the cobogó. To improve shading and rain protection, it were proposed vegetation barriers and retractable awnings, that can be used accordingly to the weather.

Water flow

Weather protections

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Tensile membrane N

Steel connection Steel ring S

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Solar study

Concrete column Pipe Roof drainage

Weather protections


ARCHITECTURE B

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LAKE LEVEL - FLOOR PLAN

SECTION A

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LAKE LEVEL - FLOOR PLAN

SECTION B

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ARCHITECTURE

The market ‘s interior was designed holding a simple circulation plan, with an orthogonal distribution of boxes and one main corridor accentuated by its dimensions and facilities’ access. At the market plan, there were settled 61 boxes, an administration and a support office and a service area, exclusive for workers and supply routes.

The upper level was designed with the intend to explore the site’s visual potential with 3 balcony areas facing the lake. Also, there was proposed an expressive courtyard marked by a huge mural with one of the works from the Brazilian artist, Beatriz Milhazes. The upper level plan includes events area, a drop-off child care service, multi purpose room, the balconies areas and restaurants.


DRIVE-IN THEATER

CINE DRIVE-IN

SCHOOL OF CINEMA AND TELEVISION Academic Project - Individual Level: 9th semester Date: 1st semester/2014 Professor: Oscar Ferreira oscar@unb.br Cine Drive-in is located in Brazil’s capital Brasilia. The last remaining drive-in theater of Latin America was inaugurated on August 25 th, 1973. In 2014, the place was almost demolished for the surrounding area’s renovation. Thanks to a petition signed by 18,000 people its survival was granted. The controversy moved the whole community and even culminated in the development of two movies for Brasilia Film Festival. The drive-in consists of about 15,000 square meters of asphalted surface and can hold 500 vehicles in the parking area. It has the largest movie screen in the country, with dimensions of 26x12 meters. DRIVE-IN THEATERS “The drive-in theater is Eden for chubby people, who can just spread without guilt over the car’s seat. It’s the solution for smokers, that only open the windows to puff to the outside cold. It’s peace for the old ladies, specialists in commenting each scene from the movie with a few tones louder than what is suitable for theaters. It’s redemption for sloppy people, that can appear with slippers and pj’s. It’s Arcadia for the modern anxious, free to stay tied to their countless mobiles. And, above all, is the nest for the utterly in love.” - Augusto Nunes for Veja Magazine’ blog The long date cinema structure has lost a lot of it’s space to the latest modern theaters. Although, it’s undeniable the worth that drive-in theaters hold. Beyond their fundamental role, they offer us immaterial value and culture, given by their own existence over the decades, building up tradition, affection and history.

Currently, the project is oversized to its public, daily receiving only around 200 visitors. It has been able to keep working despite the expenditures and low profit with the help from public investments. The owner considers the possibility of modifying the area, by promoting new activity types. In this context, it was brought to class the reflection on relevant interventions for the drive-in theater and the task to develop a small technical school of cinema and television.


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Drive-in Theater access

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Administration and support

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Restaurant

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Residence

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Restrooms

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Acoustic Shell - Oscar Niemeyer

The drive-in theater has only a few facilities at the present. Both restaurant and residence hasn’t been operating in years, remaining only as a ruin. The rest of the buildings, although functional, requires maintenance.

City of Music - Christian de Portzamparc

The first guide line for the project development was an axis following parallel to the back limit of the lot, matching with the typology of the drive-in theater’s site. The program was grouped by types of activity and distributed over the axis which direction also defined visitors’ and cars’ flow through the area.

It was created a bleacher and a separated access for pedestrian visitors, allowing other modes of transportation users to take advantage of the space as well. The most relevant facade, faced to the screen, was completed exposed to the sun, which implied in the design of a huge marquise to provide protection along with the bleachers barriers.

Car’s flow

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Pedestrian’s flow Bleacher DRIVE-IN

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PEDESTRIAN ACCESS TO DRIVE-IN

Main axis

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The site’s is settled next to the most noble street of Brasilia, the Monumental Axis, which holds the great majority of the iconic constructions of the city. Therefore, the project’s concepts were influenced by the architectural modernist style that prevails in capital.


ARCHITECTURE

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INTERVENTION

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The non-operational buildings were removed. It was proposed a floor design to organize pedestrian’s and car’s flows, by the end to avoid accidents.

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1 School of cinema and television

The accesses were placed separated to permit the owner to control visitors and clients.

2 School’s access 3 Drive-in Theater Access

The building was proposed interfering the least the current urban scenario, with an architecture coherent to the surroundings and an occupation projected towards underground. After the intervention, 168 parking spots remained for the drive-in and 51 were created for the school. The bleachers capacity is around 300 people.

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4 Administration and support 5 Pedestrian’s access to drive-in 6 Restrooms

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LANDSCAPE AND FACILITES

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ARCHITECTURE 1 Bike racks 2 Administration

LEISURE

3 Kitchenette area for staff 4 Storage

STUDY

5 Staff restrooms 6 Professors’ office 7 Cafeteria/Restaurant 8 Lobby

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9 Public restrooms 10 Classroom 11 Laboratory

Ramp Passenger and service elevators 0 1

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

3 Foyer 4 Restrooms 5 Multi-purpose rooms

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Ramp Passenger and service elevators

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The expressive linearity of the project was used to place a ramp attending accessibility norms. Corridors were projected with generous space to also promote an area for people to come together and interact.

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UNDERGROUND FLOOR PLAN

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ARCHITECTURE RAMP VIEW

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OCCUPATION AND FIELDS OF VIEW

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RAMP PLAN

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ARCHITECTURE

EAST FACADE

WEST FACADE

WEST FACADE


ARCHITECTURE

LOBBY

SCHOOL’S ENTRANCE

FOYER

CLASSROOMS

FOYER


OFFICE BUILDING

NORTH COMMERCIAL SECTOR

Academic Project - Group Level: Final Project - 5th semester Date: 1st semester/2012 Professor: Cláudia Amorim clamorim@unb.br BRASILIA’S PILOT PROJECT

Residential Monumental

OFFICE BUILDING This project is located at the center of Brasilia, Brazil. It’s about creating an office building at the North Commercial Sector of the capital, where the constructions have their own characteristics. They are higher than the usual buildings in the city and consist of a main tower, where the offices are sheltered, and a gallery, which is meant to supply the area’s users with restaurants, banks and cafeterias. After an overall analysis, the students were challenged to create a design that explores beyond the visuals and functions of the site’s area zone.

Social Bucolic

The North Commercial Sector is one of the areas of Brasilia that illustrates the most the problems related to the cities’ rigid zoning urban planning. Due to it’s strict use for business, it depicts two opposite scenarios during the day: the operating hours, characterized by an overcrowd of people and vehicles, and the out of service periods, when the sector rests completely abandoned and susceptible to vandalism.

The main core of Brasilia, the Pilot Project, is the part of the city that was built under the Modernist Movement’s principles. It was designed after the intersection of two main axis, with an expressive hierarchical road system network. It was conceived with strong organization and logical precepts, assigning four main scales that provide the same type of use and architectural identity. The scales were defined as monumental, residential, social and bucolic.

The occupancy rules were created to stimulate pedestrian’s flow and interaction through the buildings’ interiors. However, the area was clearly built corresponding to business purposes only. The poor design doesn’t relate to the public space and portraits as physical barriers compromising the circulation. Thus, parking areas continually grow through the surroundings overcoming sidewalks or any non-occupied space. The area is mostly asphalted, resulting in extensive paths exposed to the sun and a severe micro-climate.

The current project was set at the social scale, that surrounds the intersection of the two main axis. It is divided into different sectors that operate for the strict uses of banks, hotels, commerce and services.

The buildings don’t demonstrate visual or identity concerns, with generic glazed facades and lack of maintenance. Furthermore, the neglected environmental aspects entailed a large dependency of expensive cooler systems.


ARCHITECTURE

The building was designed in a Brutalist style, evoking the prevailing architecture developed in Brasília, and, at the same time, composing with an expressive use of windows to match the surrounding’s constructions. The form enhances the geometric shapes that marks Modernism and offers different and dynamic perspectives. The architectural program was elaborated with the intention to extend the opening hours of the building, concentrating flexible areas for events and offering multiple activities. Those purposes were mostly applied in the gallery, which has a closer contact to pedestrians and the public space.

Camila Kakazu

Edna Marques

Thaís Lacerda

TOWER PROGRAM

The main ideia for the gallery was to create an environment that merges with the public space. Although the limits of the private area are clearly defined, it invites the people to walk through and wander around with its highly opened structure facing sidewalks. The distinction between exterior and interior spaces was designed with nuance providing a sense of being outdoors and also suggests a transitional area to get to the enclosed office rooms of the tower. The tower had its program more developed particularly in the common areas, to provide fixed support and different activities for workers and visitors. As for the office’s levels, it was only purposed a basic use, since the main objective was to develop a flexible area with a free plan to be occupied accordingly to the floors’ holders.

ROOFTOP HELIPAD

GALLERY PROGRAM GALLERY AUDITORIUM STORES LIVING AREAS MEZZANINE

1st FLOOR RESTAURANT CULTURAL SPACE WC

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

The work was divided in a way that every member could practice all the skills required to develop the project as whole. The issues concerning the project were all discussed in group sections and then the assignments would be redistributed.

Amanda Brasil

VERTICAL CIRCULATION

Starting from a collective gather of data and an elaboration of the architectural program, the first concepts and sketches for the project were developed individually. Then, the members would chose the one that fitted the best the group’s purposes to advance over the semester.

FLOOR PLAN OFFICE FLOORS REUNION ROOM WC

GROUNDFLOOR RECEPTION KITCHENETTE CHANGING ROOM WC

GARAGE


B

ARCHITECTURE GROUND FLOOR

MEZZANINE

1 Garage access 2 Auditorium

1 Stores 2 Stairs

5 Restrooms 6 Disabled/Service elevator 7 Reception 8 Lobby and passenger elevators 9 Fire escape 10 Kitchenette

5 Events area

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The tower’s elevators don’t stop at the mezzanine to allow supervision of the tower’s visitors and general public.

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GROUNDFLOOR PLAN

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11 Workers restroom and changing room

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3 Disabled/Service elevator 4 Fire escape

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3 Stairs 4 Stores

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MEZZANINE PLAN

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ARCHITECTURE

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1st FLOOR 7 Storage 8 Disabled/Service elevator 9 Fire escape 10 Passenger elevator

5 Kitchen 6 Kitchen/Hygiene

11 Restrooms 12 Cultural space

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1st FLOOR PLAN

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Spider fitting Glass sheet

TERRACE

Metallic profile

Center hinge windows

Steel connection

Impermeable coating

Gutter

DETAIL 1 - TERRACE


ARCHITECTURE OFFICE FLOOR (FLEXIBLE)

ROOFTOP

1 Office 2 Reunion room

1 Helipad 2 Roofing

3 Restroom 4 Passenger elevator

3 Water tank 4 Elevators’ machine room

5 Reception 6 Fire escape

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OFFICE FLOOR PLAN

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ARCHITECTURE Ceiling

The software SOL-AR, developed by the Laboratory of Energy Efficiency in Buildings (LABEEE), provides a solar study that illustrates temperatures and the sun path over a year period in Brasilia.

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The site’s orientation is slightly rotated in relation to the north’s direction. It’s evident that the west and north facades are the most affected considering a year cycle. While one receives the higher temperatures of the day, the other is exposed to sun through a longer period, accumulating heat along the day.

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Based on the analysis, sun shadings were purposed for the building’s east and north face orientations, accordingly to their characteristics. The vertical circulations, elevators and stairs, were placed in the west facade since they are used only as transitional spaces.

SOLAR MASCARA STUDY - EAST FACADE

SUN SHADING - EAST FACADE

Ceiling

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SOLAR STUDY

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SOLAR MASCARA STUDY - NORTH FACADE

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SUN SHADING - NORTH FACADE


ARCHITECTURE

NORTH FACADE

EAST FACADE


ARCHITECTURE

SOUTH FACADE

WEST FACADE


CAMILA KAKAZU kakazu.harumi@gmail.com


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