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AUSTRALIA

URGE urge.com.au

150 BEAUTY

MUST-BUY

SPECIAL MAKE UP

THE NEW TRENCH DRESS

TREND REPORT RUNWAY LOOKS YOU ‘LL LOVE

Winter Romance

Supper Winter Collection

Boudoir-Inspired Looks, Patains To Wear Now

Where To Be Seen This Winter Cosmo’s Edit of The Hottest Bars In Your City

Jet’Aime When Birkin Met Gaultier

TE I H W T R A E H

D ES I G N / A R T / P H OTOTG R A P H Y /

FA S H I O N / T R AV E L / M U S I C /

LI FE


ZARA MEN 2012


URGE REGULARS 10

ENGLISH EXTRA

12 WALKABOUT AUSTRALIA 16 & 17

BOOK & FILM REVIEW

18

MUSIC

20

MY LIFE

22

EVENT CALENDAR

34

SUPANOVA

26

CREATIVE

29

ART REPORT

30

RESTAURANT REVIEW

32 RECIPES 34

BE ACTIVE

36

FOOD GUIDE

40

MIX & MATCH

42

STREET STYLE

45

COMIC


ADD


w w w.u r g en m a ga z i ne .c om PUBLISHER iStudent EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Cassandra Lavery EDITOR Kristina Carag CREATIVE DIRECTORS Thirawit Munsanwe KK Grace Gao HEAD OF DESIGN KK Grace Gao DESIGNERS Kelly Lin Tran Masayo Colley Phoebe Pulido EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS Ana Fernandez Gaby Pimentel Bernard John Atkinson Benjamin Murray Daniel Backhouse Daniel Santos PHOTOGRAPHIC CONTRIBUTORS Thirawit Munsane Kevin Luu Siwawut Munesane Kelly Lin Tran

Contact us Suite 2, Level 2, 630 George Street, Sydney NSW 200 contact@istudent.ws Advertising Enquiries advertise@istudent.ws (+61)420 922 122 Editorial Enquiries editor@istudent.ws

MARKETING DIRECTOR George Lipinski MARKETING MANAGER Jack Wang MARKETING Daniel Santos Maikon Bruno Be seen by thousands of students in Sydney! Promote your business via iStudent. advertise@istudent.ws Missed the last issue of iStudent? Catch up online at istudentmagazine.net.au

MODELS PHOTOS

Disclaimer

iStudent magazine is Bi-monthly puplication. The contents of this publication are copyright and cannot be reproduction in any form, in whole written permission from the publisher. Whist all case is taken. iStudent will not take responsibility for the opinions expressed by contributors or advertisers. Information contained on the iStudent website or in the magazine,whether it be editorial or advertisement or otherwise including, but limited to prices and technical information is not published on the basis that the publisher or any team member of iStudent will assume liability or responsibility in respect to its correctness.

CO CO FUKUI THIRAWIT MUNSANE


EDITOR LETTER

“Where we’re from16 °C/61°F is a heatwave”

I

hate winter. I despise being cold. My European and North American counterparts (including my newly acquired Minnesotan husband) take great delight in reminding me that they are from the Arctic Circle and the cold weather I suffer through in Sydney is, in fact, nothing at all to them. The one winter past time I absolutely adore, is wearing scarves. Or perhaps it’s the acquisition of new scarves. There’s also the joy of thick hot chocolate, warm cuddles and sweet moments spent snuggling into a blanket when exams and house-

mates are not sapping the remaining dregs of my sanity. I guess winter isn’t all bad. All I know is I’ll happily suffer through this cold weather if it means in a few short months I’ll be soaking up the sun on a lovely Sydney beach, just a stone’s throw from the CBD. Write in and tell us the things you love or loathe about this season and all the wintery things you miss (or not) from home. Enjoy this month’s offerings!


CONTRIBUTORS NINA GREEN Editor “I’ll detach the can of energy drink, or over-sized coffee cup, from my hand and sleep for a day. Then I’ll convince my friends that I’m not actually an imaginary friend and ask them to bring me up to date on what has been happening in the world outside of uni work.”

GEORGE LIPINSKI Marketing “I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”

THE HEAT IS... AS INTERPRETED by our conributors GEORGE LIPINSKI Marketing “I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”

GEORGE LIPINSKI Marketing “I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”

GEORGE LIPINSKI Marketing “I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”


TREND

SEXY SWEATER WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui


SEXY PATAINS WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today! 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are. e.g. “Bob has tickets on himself. He talked for hours about how great he was.”

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!”

8. To have not come down in the last shower Use this idiom, when you feel someone is trying to trick you or is speaking to you like you are stupid. We use this to tell people that we are not stupid and do not believe the story they are telling us. e.g. “I made $10,000 last night” “I didn’t come down in the last shower!” A common alternative is “I wasn’t born yesterday!”

5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little

9. To be not with it This is used to describe someone who is not very bright or clever. It can also mean your mind isn’t working. e.g. “I’m not with it today (I keep making mistakes today)”


“I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”


SEXY PATAINS WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

“I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”


E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today! 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

tive is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is overconfident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are. e.g. “Bob has tickets on himself. He talked for hours about how great he was.”

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!”

8. To have not come down in the last shower Use this idiom, when you feel someone is trying to trick you or is speaking to you like you are stupid. We use this to tell people that we are not stupid and do not believe the story they are telling us. e.g. “I made $10,000 last night” “I didn’t come down in the last shower!” A common alternative is “I wasn’t born yesterday!”

5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alterna-

9. To be not with it This is used to describe someone who is not very bright or clever. It can also mean your mind isn’t working. e.g. “I’m not with it today (I keep making mistakes today)”


SEXY PATAINS WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


“I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”


SEXY PATAINS WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


SEXY PATAINS WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


“I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”


YES’ CHANEL WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


CRAFT EDGES WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


“I would sleep for 18 hours, get rid of junk food, tidy up my room and once my battery is fully charged…it’s party time.”


WEDDING WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


TUTU WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


LIVE

PEACE LIVE WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


PROFILE

THEWINTER CLASSICIST PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui


E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


IN PERSON

I’M AFRAID

WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!”


BOOKS

IANBOOK FLEMING COLLECTOR by our contributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


MUSIC

The Urge RECORDS Press repeat We share albums from the archives and more

Carina Round

For Everything A Reason To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours.

Ellen Allien Our Utopie

To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt

Steve Kuhn

Dark Eyes

To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt


IANBOOK FLEMING COLLECTOR by our contributors WORDS Paul Bui


MUSIC

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today! 1. (Be) a pain in the neck

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is overconfident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


ZARA MEN 2012


ARTS

SEXY PATAINS WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


URGE FASHION


TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection


HOT ITEMS

WINTER PATAINS by our contributors WORDS Paul Bui

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection


WINTER COLLECTION choose your items

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

THE HEAT IS... WINTER COLLECTION choose your items


TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection


TABITHA SIMMONS fal

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

THE HEAT IS... TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

WINTER COLLECTION choose your items

TABITHA SIMMONS fall wi


ll winter 2011 collection

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection

WINTER COLLECTION choose your items

inter 2011 collection

TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection


TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection


TABITHA SIMMONS fall winter 2011 collection


MY LOVE WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


COLORFUL HAIR BRING IT. WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English.

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today! 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoy-

ing. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you” 4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!”


URGE BEAUTY


BEAUTY

SUPER EYE LINER WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!”


SUPER HAIR STYLE WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui


COLOR NEIL WINTER PATAINS WORDS Paul Bui


HEALTH

EAT ALL WINTER PATAINS by our conributors WORDS Paul Bui

E

ver been told you’re a pain in the neck? Or heard ‘he’s as mad as a hatter!’ and didn’t quite understand? This is because you have experienced idiomatic language. Idioms are set phrases which are very common in everyday spoken language. They care very useful just to understand people around you but also to use, so that you sound natural when speaking English. To better understand them, here’s a list of some common idioms. Try and use them today!

SEXY PATAINS by our contributors 1. (Be) a pain in the neck Used to express that someone or a situation is annoying. e.g. “George is such a pain in the neck!” 2. Cost and arm and a leg To say something is really expensive. e.g. “Living in Sydney costs an arm and a leg.” 3. To barrack for To cheer for and/or support a team. e.g. I barrack for the Blues (a sports team). If your friend needs support or courage to do something you can also cheer them on by saying, “I’ll barrack for you”

4. Don’t come the raw prawn with me! Used particularly in Australia. This colourful expression is used to mean - do not aggressive or try to treat me like an idiot. Use it next time someone wants to have an argument with you. Just reply ‘Don’t come the raw prawn with me!” 5. As mad as a hatter Is an international idiom that describes a person as crazy or eccentric. It originates from the time in history when hat makers used mercury to curve the hats they made. Of course mercury poisoned them causing them to go crazy! So next time your friend is acting a little crazy say to them ‘You’re as mad as a hatter!’ A common alternative is to say they are “Not full quid.” 6. To hear through the grapevine This is used o show that you learnt about news through friends and/or can’t remember how you exactly learnt about the news. It usually is used to refer to rumours. e.g. “Did you hear through the grapevine that Angelina is breaking up with Brad?” or “I heard through the grapevine that they are changing visa conditions” 7. To have tickets on themselves This idiom is used to describe someone is over-confident and thinks that they are better than everyone else. This person has the tendency to talk about themselves a lot especially about their achievements and to tell you are wonderful they are.


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Mock_FashionMagazine_2011

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