Issuu on Google+

Kitchener Centre’s Voice at Queen’s Park John Milloy, MPP Kitchener Centre

1770 King Street East, Unit 6C, Kitchener, ON N2G 2P1 | (519) 579-5460 | www.johnmilloy.onmpp.ca

1324

[Conve

rted].

pdf

6/22/0

9

12:11:

37 PM

Book a complimentary assessment!

KITCHENER’S ORIGINAL COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

Call 519-742-7373 or drop by 1170 Fischer-Hallman Rd.

West Edition

www.kitchenercitizen.com • Thursday, October 10, 2013 • Circulation 32,500 1324 [Converted].pdf

6/22/09

12:11:37 PM

Opportunity Centre for adults with brain injuries moves to Driftwood Plaza in Kitchener’s west end By Carrie Debrone hen Paula Mahoney was 13 years old, she was hit by a car while riding her bicycle. After being in a coma for over five weeks she woke up, but her life was never the same. The accident left her with a brain injury. She grew up and had a child. Every day was a struggle to hold a job and to make a life for herself and her son. “It was really hard. I was working and I was a hockey mom. When I was 38 I had a breakdown. I think it was all just too much for me,” she said. “I was angry at everything.” Six years ago she found the Opportunity Centre, which offers programs to adults with brain injuries run by the Brain Injury Association of Waterloo-Wellington and

W

Traverse Independence, a notfor-profit organization that provides support to people with acquired brain injuries and physical disabilities. For ten years, the organizations ran their programs from three buildings located at a plaza at 607 King St. W. in Kitchener. On September 24, they celebrated the opening of the new Opportunity Centre at 450 Westheights Drive, Driftwood Plaza, in Kitchener, where all the centre’s programs are now operating under one roof. “I was so angry before, but now I’m better. I like it here. I’ve made a lot of friends and found a lot of support. I learned to play the guitar and I’m in a band,” Mahoney said, adding that she also volunteers with the centre’s music and food bank programs. ...continued on page 3

NEW!

Currently on exhibit to Jan. 5, 2014 Discover this interactive exhibit for children that creates an awareness and understanding of trees.

C

519-748-1914 • waterlooregionmuseum.com

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

What’s Inside...

CMY

K

Opportunity Centre Executive Director Patti Lehman and Past President of the Brain Injury Association of Waterloo-Wellington Jean Taylor stand in front of a quilt hanging in the recentlyopened Opportunity Centre, that symbolizes the coming together of the two organizations that provide programs there for brain injury survivors. 1324 [Converted].pdf

6/22/09

12:11:37 PM

C

M

Regional airport flight path change... page 2 New federal riding in the region... page 5 Opinion... pages 7 Surface Tension: Future of Water... page 10 Sports.... pages 16-17 Councillor Columns... pages 18-19 Arts & Entertainment pages 20-22 www.kitchenercitizen.com • twitter@KitchCitizen

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

SMILE while you save! Visit us at

The Brain Injury Association of Waterloo-Wellington (BIAWW) and Traverse Independence’s (TI) new facility called the Opportunity Centre officially opened September 24 with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The centre is located at 450 Westheights Drive in Kitchener (in Driftwood Plaza). From left: brain injury survivor Mike Cameron, Waterloo Region Chair Ken Seiling, Kitchener councillor Bil Ioannidis, BIAWW President Doug Wetheral, TI Board President Brandee Faulds, Waterloo Wellington LHIN Tony Lemon, survivor Ken Fletcher (cutting ribbon), TI CEO Toby Harris, Kitchener Centre MP Stephen Woodworth, survivor and volunteer Jean Williams.

Forest Glen Plaza 700 Strasburg Rd. Kitchener Store hours: Monday to Friday 8:00am to 9:00pm Saturday 8:00am to 8:00pm and Sunday 9:00am to 6:00pm


Page 2 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

24 t h A N N U A L

Breslau P.S. Craft Show

90+Vendors Hot Food Raffle Prizes Something for Everyone!

Saturday, Oct. 19th, 2013

9AM - 3 PM at Breslau Public School For more info please contact Jen Webster: 519-648-9754

AFFORDABLE, EXPERIENCED

INCOME TAX SPECIALIST

49

$

Plus HST

income tax return

• Expert service for late filing • Financial advice planning your annual tax return Benefit from my 13 years with Revenue Canada

(up to 6 information slips)

519-744-9928

Frederick Street Mall Unit 4, Kitchener

www.simpsonfinancial.ca

Next issue of the Kitchener Citizen November 7, 2013

Meeting on local airport’s flight path changes set for November 7 at the council chambers By Carrie Debrone proposal to change the flight path of planes taking off from runway 26 at the Region of Waterloo International Airport appears to be on a collision course with residents. A meeting of the airport’s Noise Management Committee to discuss the results of an information session held September 24 at the airport on proposed changes to its flight path, will take place Thursday, November 7 at 5pm in the Region of Waterloo council chambers. The meeting is open to the public and it is expected there will be several delegations. The Region of Waterloo International Airport General Manager Chris Wood said the region will be contacting those who signed up to be kept informed about further meetings, about the November 7 meeting. People planning to speak as a delegation must register with the region, preferably by noon on October 31 - a week before the meeting. The new flight plan calls for planes taking off from runway 26, which faces west, to follow a consistent path southeast of the 401 to a fixed target point called “Kitch-Fix”. Only after the plane crosses that point will it be allowed to proceed on its charted course, increasing in altitude and turning toward

A

Help shape our community! Kitchener City Council is looking for citizens and community members to get involved in civic life through various citizen committees and boards. - Centre in the Square - Kitchener Housing Inc. - Kitchener Public Library Apply online at www.kitchener.ca/citizencommittees Application forms and background information may also be obtained by contacting the Office of the City Clerk at 519-741-2200 x7591, or in person at any Kitchener branch library, or community centre. The final date for submitting completed applications is Friday, Oct. 25, 2013 at 5 p.m.

the direction it needs to go. Currently planes follow a path southwest of the 401 to KitchFix before beginning their destination routes. Under the new plan, planes will also be required to keep closer to the ground for a longer time after take off until they get to Kitch-Fix in an effort to keep the noise closer to the airport. Planes are now required to fly at least 600 feet above ground in take-off, but the new proposal would allow them to fly at about 500 feet off the ground. The noise management committee meeting was originally scheduled for October 10 when members were going to vote on whether to ask regional council to approve the plan and forward a request to Transport Canada to adopt the new flight path. However, Wood said it was decided to postpone that meeting until November 7 to give more time to consider the comments gathered from the public at the information session, and to make sure all regional councillors are informed about the study and the changes proposed. The September information session drew residents who are not only concerned about the proposal to change the flight path from southwest Kitchener to over Cambridge and Blair, but they are also very concerned with the way the information has so far been presented to the public. Many of the 160 people, mainly from Cambridge and Blair, who attended the session at the airport, were frustrated by the open house format used. “This is very badly organized. There are only three guys here to listen to us,” said Ann VanNorman from Blair. “People are standing in line waiting to talk with someone and you can’t get close enough to hear if your question has already been asked,” she said. “We need to know what the future plan for the airport is, before we make any changes to the flight plan. It’s an illconsidered plan,” she said, adding that it does not take into account the fact that the proposed path will fly over a large student population at Conestoga College that will continue to expand. She said she is also worried about what the changes may mean for wildlife along the Grand River and at the Rare Charitable Research Reserve, a 900-acre nature reserve on Blair Road in Cambridge. “We already have an increase in noise from the 401. We don’t need more noise,” VanNorman said. Another resident noted that

there were many people at the information session wandering around trying to find a place to sit and write their comments on sheets that were handed out. There were a few seats available, but no tables for writing were provided, and some people were sitting on the airport’s baggage return track while they filled out their comment cards. All modifications to airport flight paths must be approved by Transport Canada. The local airport does not have the authority to make flight path changes. The open house was intended to collect comments from residents that are being used by the noise management committee and regional council to consider whether the Region of Waterloo should ask Transport Canada to make the changes. Airport general manager Chris Wood said an average of six planes a day take off from runway 26. The takeoff direction varies with wind direction, but usually half the planes take off towards Guelph when the wind is not favourable for over-Kitchener takeoffs. The region received 101 noise complaints last year and many were from residents in Kitchener’s Hidden Valley area and Edgewater Estates (located along the Grand River across from the airport). Because of the complaints, the region’s noise management committee completed a study on noise levels in February 2013. The study looked at noise levels over 70 decibels. The study concluded that if the flight plan is changed to have planes pass over Cambridge and Blair before heading on their destination routes, 812 fewer properties would be affected by noise. The study, however, did not take into consideration a proposal for a 900-home development in the Limerick Road area that would be under the new flight path. Kitchener resident Paul Szever said he believes the new condensed flight path will greatly increase noise for the homes under that path and will add miles to some of the flights. “We’re supposed to be thinking about how to conserve energy and be efficient and green and this plan is not,“ he said. Wood said staff reviewed all the comments received at the information session and that the majority of complaints expressed concern that the new flight path will create more noise for them. “I know people don’t want to move the noise. We’ve heard what the public is thinking,” Wood said.


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 3

Opportunity Centre for adults with brain injuries moves to the Driftwood Plaza ...from page one

These days she rides an create over 6,000 pieces of e-bike to wherever she needs glass jewellery and Christmas to go, and works part time in ornaments, which are then sold Waterloo. in the local community to raise “This centre is a place where money for BIA programs. I can come to help other people. Stager also helps promote It gives me a sense of value,” the centre’s Lidz on Kidz, a she said. child educational program that “I think my son is proud promotes wearing helmets ...because good news is news too! of me and I am going to be a while biking and participating grandma soon.” in other sports. She is currently writing a “It’s a place that I can come book about her life. to be with people who went Mahoney’s story is just one through the same thing as me,” of many successes unfolding Stagerbusiness said. card rates. Ask about our low, annual with the help of the programs “We’re all in one location Call Helen atnow 519-741-5892. offered at the new centre. and everybody’s together. Each year the centre provides The move gave us more space NEXT ISSUE OF THE and COMMUNITY NEWS educational, recreational, allowed us to get someISof creative, lunch and leisure the2008. things on our wish list like a July 2, programs and activities for new kitchen and larger program about 300 people. rooms,” said Executive Brain injury survivor Dietlind Director Patti Lehman. Stager, who was injured in a car “The Brain Injury accident in 2000, volunteers Association of Waterloowith the centre’s glass program, Wellington has done a fantastic where clients and volunteers job of becoming a very strong

COMMUNITY NEWS KITCHENER

Your business card could be here!

presence in this community, “ said Ruth Wilcock, Executive Director of the Brain Injury Association of Ontario. “It would be great if every association in Ontario could run a program like this,” she said, adding that it’s survivor-driven programs are its strongest asset, and it is viewed as a role model across the province. “Survivors of brain injuries often lose their community, their jobs, their friends and sometimes their families. I think this is a place where they feel like productive members of the community again. They feel safe and they get support from each other. A lot of people find themselves here,” she said. *** For more information on the Opportunity Centre and its programs visit www.biaww. com or call 519-579-5300.

Providing Insurance and Financial Services AUTO • HOME • BUSINESS • FINANCIAL SERVICES 450 Westheights Dr. (near Fischer-Hallman & Ottawa) Angie Martens angie@angiemartens.com

519-579-0543

“LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOUR, STATE FARM IS THERE.”

Free landfill tours Saturday, October 26, 2013 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

Join us for a free, one-hour guided bus tour of the Waterloo Waste Management site. Enter and park at Gate #3, 1001 Erb’s Road, Waterloo. Reservations required. Call 519-883-5100 ext. 8449 or email SSteenson@regionofwaterloo.ca

Three great community papers Watch us sort your to serve you! recyclables!

East Kitchener South Kitchener Call Laura Call Carrie 519.578.8228 519.897.6889

Get up close to landfill equipment and collection trucks!

West Kitchener Call Helen 519.741.5892 Check out displays and speak to waste experts!

w ho ned ut e tur t! o d r s Fin ics aompo n c a org into

Donations of non-perishable food items in support of the Food Bank are welcome. www.regionofwaterloo.ca/waste TTY: 519-575-4608

Sierra Code, 5, of Kitchener enjoys a ride at the Fundraising Carnival that was held at the Sunrise Shopping Centre October 3 to 6. Procceeds from the Carnival go to the Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region. Photo by Helen Hall

Kitchener leaf collection program

City of Kitchener leaf collection drop sites open October 4. No matter where you live in the city, please, where possible: • Mulch or compost leaves on your property, or • Take leaves to one of the drop-off sites listed, or • Bag your leaves for collection under the Region of Waterloo’s yard waste program or deliver them directly to the regional landfill site. Drop-off sites 1. Schaeffer Park (Bloomingdale Road) 2. Breithaupt Park (Kinsmen Park - off Union Street) 3. Kitchener Auditorium (Ottawa Street North entrance) 4. Meinzinger Park Soccer Fields (Homer Watson Boulevard) 5. Lions Arena (Rittenhouse Road) 6. Southwest Optimist Sports Field (Pioneer Drive) 7. Cherry Park (Strange Street at Waverly Road) 8. Victoria Street South at Eastforest Trail (Eastforest Trail parking lot) 9. Hofstetter Park (40 Hofstetter Avenue) Use the online tool to find the leaf collection options for your specific address at www.kitchener.ca/CurbsideCollection, or by calling 519-741-2345.


Page 4 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

At the

Kitchener Citizen we’re green too!

After you read us, drop us in your Blue Bin.

Remember: Read & Recycle

I LOVE LIVE THEATRE TICKET GIVEAWAY! The final winners in our Drayton ticket giveaway are: Tammy O’Rourke and Joan and Derek De Ville Congratulations!

COMMUNITY, NEIGHBOURHOOD GROUPS ENCOURAGED TO APPLY

Deadline for environmental project grants extended to October 27 By CARRIE DEBRONE f you have a good idea for a project that will help the environment you may be able to get a grant from the City of Kitchener. The deadline for the city’s Community Environmental Improvement Grants (CEIG) has been extended to October 27, 2013. The city has $5,000 to give out to community groups that are working on, or have a new idea for, projects that will help promote stewardship and community involvement in caring for our environment. “It would be great to get more interest in the grant program from neighbourhood associations, community groups or schoolbased organizations, like an environmental club,” said Kitchener’s Senior Environmental Planner Barbara Steiner. “Any of these types of organizations might have, or know of a project that we can help them with,” Steiner said. “If they see something about their environment in their community that needs attention, and they’d like to improve it, they should apply for a grant.” The CEIG program was created to foster a sense of environmental stewardship throughout Kitchener. It helps organizations, associations or non-profit groups working towards building a cleaner, healthier more environmentally sustainable city. As expected, past CEIG projects have included park, woodland and stream clean ups and plantings to improve natural areas, but over the years it has funded many other original ideas. The Olde Berlin Towne Neighbourhood Association received $1,000 for its Boulevards in Bloom project, St. Mary’s Catholic Church received $1,500 for its garden and St. Teresa

I

Catholic School received $1,500 to help develop an outdoor classroom. C E I G ’ s have also helped to fund Seedy Saturday a project of the Kitchener Master Gardeners, an outdoor learning area for Our Place Family Resource and Early Years Centre, a recycling project at the Courtland Shelley Community Centre and the development of a website and portal project by Community Renewable Energy Waterloo (CREW). Steiner said the grants are intended to provide seed money for projects that will encourage people to adopt a stewardship role towards their environment and invest their time to maintain an active future role in the project. “It could be that a parent’s association might have a goal to discourage idling in a drop-off zone and needs some funding to help with the capital costs of putting a plan into action at the school. Or it could be that an organization is planning a unique community event to celebrate Earth Day and needs funds for that,” Steiner said. She added that, in past years, funds have also been used to encourage environmental stewardship around energy use with one grant being used to develop an information kit for homeowners that provided ideas about how to reduce home energy use. For details on the grant program and to get an application form go to the city’s website www.kitchener.ca and follow the link to grants. Applicants must submit a completed CEIG application form on or before Sunday, October 27, 2013 by email to environment@ kitchener.ca or mail to the City of Kitchener, Senior Environmental Planner, 6th Floor, 200 King St. W. PO Box 1118, Kitchener ON. N2G 4G7 or for more information call 519741-2200 x7293.

WHERE’S WALDO

Rainy weather didn’t dampen the spirits of the 9th Waterloo Scouts who helped build Little Libraries boxes at the Word on the Street Festival in Kitchener on September 21. They also had fun looking for Waldo. From left: Hunter Ibbotson, Maxx Vera, and Aislinn Panchaud with Waldo hiding behind them.


FINALKITCHENERBOUNDARIES

October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 5

NEW FEDERAL RIDINGS

The new federal electoral boundaries for Waterloo Region are bordered in green. The new Kitchener South - Hespeler Riding is shaded in green. Map courtesy of the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission.

Waterloo Region residents will vote together in new riding boundary report Helen Hall he Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission has submitted its final report, which adds a new fifth riding to Waterloo Region for the next federal election scheduled for 2015. The number of seats in the House of Commons allocated to Ontario has been increased from 106 to 121 based on a census conducted in 2011. The commission looks at the federal boundaries every 10 years. The new Kitchener South - Hespeler Riding is made up of the south end of Kitchener and the old Hespeler portion of Cambridge. It is bounded by FischerHallman Road in the west, New Dundee Road and the 401 highway in the south, Townline Road in the east, and a jagged line that is made up of Kossuth Road, Fountain St. N., Zeller Dr., Fairway Rd. N. and follows the Expressway until it meets up with Fischer-Hallman in the north. In addition to including South Kitchener and part of Cambridge, the new riding also includes a small portion of Kitchener in the east made up of the Chicopee neighbourhood and going south towards Freeport Hospital. This area was previously part of KitchenerCentre and is bounded by the Conestoga Parkway in the west, the Grand River in the south, Zeller Drive in the east, and Fairway Rd. N. in the north. The remaining four Waterloo Region ridings have been altered to help divide the population more evenly between ridings. The average riding size was set to be 106,000. Kitchener - Conestoga Riding: This riding previously included three townships and the south part of Kitchener. It loses Kitchener South to the new Kitchener South - Hespeler riding, but picks up residents in the Forest Heights and Victoria South part of West Kitchener. These residents living in an area bounded by the Conestoga Parkway, Fischer-Hallman Rd., University Ave. and Trussler Road used to be part of the Kitchener- Centre riding.

T

by

Kitchener - Centre Riding: This riding trims its population by giving part of its west Kitchener area to KitchenerConestoga and some of its east Kitchener boundary to Kitchener South - Hespeler. It picks up some voters from north of Victoria Street N. and bounded by the Conestoga Parkway on the east, that used to vote with Waterloo in the old Kitchener-Waterloo Riding. Waterloo Riding: This riding is the City of Waterloo and a small portion of Kitchener, which includes Bridgeport, north of the Canadian National Railway tracks and northeast of the Conestoga Parkway. Cambridge Riding: This riding includes part of Cambridge and North Dumfries Township. It loses Cambridge’s former Hespeler portion located north of the 401 highway to the new riding of Kitchener South - Hespeler. These changes will keep residents of the Region of Waterloo voting in five separate ridings all located within the region. The Kitchener South - Hespeler riding currently has no representative so it will have no incumbent in the next election. Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht was glad to see the final report keep Waterloo Region together. One of the previous ideas was to split up the region by abolishing the Kitchener-Conestoga riding, and having those residents vote federally in the neighbouring municipalities of Wellington and Perth. “Having five ridings is an excellent result for Waterloo Region,” he said. Now that his riding’s future is secure, Albrecht says he “fully intends” to run again in Kitchener-Conestoga. With the new boundaries, the size of his riding will be reduced to about 94,000 residents, below the proposed average size of 106,000. However, because it includes the west side of FischerHallman Road, which has several new suburban neighbourhoods under construction, he said its population will rise quickly to catch up with the other ridings.

13.09.20 – 14.01.05

SURFACE TENSION brings together work by artists, designers, engineers and scientists to explore the future of water. Through 35 installations, it plays on water’s physical properties, its role in politics and economics and discusses ways it’s harnessed, cleaned and distributed.

Funds are provided by the RBC Foundation

Funds are provided by the RBC Foundation

THEMUSEUM.ca

D OW N TOW N K I TC H E N E R


KM_CitizenAdvertorial_Sept13:Layout 1

9/4/13

10:08 AM

Page 1

Page 6 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

PARLIAMENTARY REPORT

MarketNEWS Fall is here! Celebrate its arrival this month with Pumpkinfest, learn to cook like Oma and learn how to use beer in your dishes! Visit our website for details and to register:

www.kitchenermarket.ca Oktoberfest: Cooking like Oma Saturday, Oct. 12 from 10 a.m.- 1 p.m. Bring your family to learn how to make pretzels and other traditional German food like Oma makes. Afterwards, see traditional German dancers and music and appearances from some of your favorite Oktoberfest mascots. FREE!

Pumpkinfest Saturday, Oct. 26, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Bring your family to the Kitchener Market to celebrate a glorious gourd – the pumpkin! While you’re here, enjoy crafts, cooking, music and a car show. Make a day of it by grabbing lunch with one of our vendors in the international food court on the upper level. FREE!

Cooking classes in the Marketplace It doesn’t matter if you know your way around the kitchen, can’t tell a saucepan from a frying pan, or just want a fun night out - we have a class for you! Cost: $39 includes a market bag and prepared food. To register: Visit www.kitchenermarket.ca/cookingclasses, call 519-741-2287 or email info@kitchenermarket.ca

Cooking with Beer Wednesday, Oct. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Did you know that beer can be used to enhance the flavors of a recipe? Similar to white or red wine, light or dark beer have different spices, so choosing the right beer to complement your dish is important! This class will teach you about beer pairings and add a whole new dimension to your recipe book.

Soups and Stews Wednesday, Oct. 23, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Autumn leaves are swirling down; the air is starting to feel crisp and frosty! Warm up to a bowl of homemade soup or stew using one of the fabulous recipes you'll learn in this class. Soups and stews can be made ahead of time and frozen for future meals. They are also a great way to incorporate fresh veggies into your diet! Get the MarketNEWS delivered every month to your inbox!

Sign up: kitchenermarket.ca/newsletter

by Stephen Woodworth MP for Kitchener-Centre

W

ith Thanksgiving just days away, here is some news about which we can be thankful but which is not well known. We often hear about negative aspects of Canada’s economic outlook which involve household debt, net worth, student debt and retirement savings. However I want to point out some hidden statistics. Although the ratio of household debt to disposable income did reach an all time high in the spring of 2013 of 165.6%, that is not the whole story. Debt numbers are higher because people are buying houses and the cost of the mortgages is included in the ratio, not the change in an individual’s overall net equity as the owner of a home. Although only the liabilities are reported, statistics about both assets and liabilities are available. For example, while Canadians have approximately $1.75 trillion dollars in liabilities it is rarely reported that households in Canada have roughly $9 trillion in assets. After subtracting these two figures and dividing by the number of Canadians, you will find that Canadians net worth is approximately $207,300 which (after being adjusted for inflation) has doubled in the last twenty years! Last month, I wrote about student debt, focusing on back to school issues. We frequently hear concerns that tuition rates and student debt rates are rising. We are told, for example, that Canada now has the fifth highest post secondary school tuition rates in the OECD. What we don’t hear is that between 2000 and 2010, the population aged 18-21 increased by 12% whereas post-secondary enrollment increased by 38%. This indicates that a greater percentage of Canadian youth are getting Season’s Greetings

educated and we should be thankful for that! Headlines warn that many baby boomers are not ready to retire, and their retirement savings are insufficient. However I am pleased to say that Canadians actually have $7.1 trillion in net worth retirement savings. We are preparing more and more for our retirement. The Government of Canada provides excellent incentives for youth to start thinking long term as well with tax free savings account initiatives and other measures. We need to have a keen eye when reading economic news and look for the hidden numbers. The level of wealth in Canada is high, the number of people living below the low income cut-off is declining, and incomes are recovering from the 2008-09 recession. The percentage of students getting a higher level of education is increasing. Data establishing these features of our economy is available from the same sources from which negative news emanates. We should, especially at Thanksgiving, always keep in mind those in need among us. We should remain concerned about economic challenges. Nonetheless, a balanced view reflecting the fact that we’re on the right track is important. Members of Parliament will be back in Ottawa after Thanksgiving to continue working on important economic measures. The Speech from the Throne delivered by our Governor General will no doubt review accomplishments to date and outline the work ahead. I hope to update you on that with another Parliamentary Report in November! My family and I wish you a Happy Thanksgiving, Kitchener Centre!

December 17, 2009

Wishing a Happy, Holidayyou Open House Healthy New Year 4:00pm to 6:00pm at

John’s Constituency Office 1770 King. St. E, Unit 6C (next door to Red Lobster on King)

D

PROVINCIAL ISSUES

by John Milloy, MPP for Kitchener-Centre

Drop-in to see Kitchener Centre MPP John Milloy Milloy and enjoy John a few holiday treats! MPP - Kitchener Centre

(519) 579-5460 espite progress, youth unemployment remains too high in this province. That is why our government is making a strong commitment to assist youth with several programs being introduced this year, including: the Youth Employment Fund; Impact - A Social Enterprise Strategy for Ontario; and Studio Y- Ontario’s Social Impact and Leadership Academy. Youth Employment Fund Ontario is helping young people in Waterloo Region get job skills and experience with a new Youth Employment Fund that helps employers offer four to six month job training placements for young people seeking work. The province will provide up to $7,800 to cover a range of supports and services for each eligible young worker under the fund. That includes up to $6,800 to help cover wages and training costs, and up to $1,000 to help young workers pay for job-related costs like tools and transportation to work. The fund was announced in the 2013 Budget as part of the new Ontario Youth Jobs Strategy. The strategy will help more young people find jobs or start their own businesses, and ensure that employers can find the skilled workers they need to grow their businesses. For more information, please visit Employment Ontario at: www.tcu.gov.on.ca/eng/employmentontario/ youthfund. Impact – A Social Enterprise Strategy for Ontario Our government has also launched a new plan that will help social enterprises start and grow their businesses while supporting the creation of 1,600 new jobs in the sector. Impact – A Social Enterprise Strategy for Ontario is the province’s plan to become the number one jurisdiction in North America for businesses that have a positive social, cultural, or environmental impact while generating revenue. This program will support social entrepreneurs and attract investors by focusing on four key areas: • Connecting, co-ordinating and communicating information to, and about, social entrepreneurs, including exploring new ways to help create ‘hybrid’ corporations that reinvest profits in a social purpose. • Building the social enterprise brand by increasing awareness of the sector using tools like an interactive web portal where social entrepreneurs could meet and connect with investors and access services. • Creating a vibrant social finance marketplace through various initiatives, including exploring the launch For more information call 519-579-5460 or email John at jmilloy.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org

of a new $4 million Social Enterprise Demonstration Fund to support early-stage social enterprises. • Delivering other innovative supports such as a pilot program to help social enterprises be part of procurements related to the 2015 Pan Am/Parapan Am Games. The strategy builds on previous action taken by our government to develop and grow the sector, including the creation of an Office for Social Enterprise that partners with the private, not-for-profit and public sectors to co-ordinate and expand the tools available to social entrepreneurs. Supporting businesses with positive social, cultural and environmental impacts is part of the government’s plan to create a strong business climate and invest in people. For more information please visit http://www.svx.ca/. To read the Strategy, please see the following link, http://www.ontario.ca/business-andeconomy/impact-social-enterprise-agenda-ontario Studio Y: Ontario’s Social Impact and Leadership Academy Ontario is helping promising young leaders gain the knowledge, skills, experience and support they need to make positive social changes in their communities and across the province. Last month, the Honourable Teresa Piruzza, Minister of Children and Youth Services, announced the province is supporting MaRS Discovery District in delivering a new innovative program; Studio Y: Ontario’s Social Impact and Leadership Academy. The nine-month program will include intensive training and mentoring for up to 25 youth, aged 18 to 29, to build and refine their leadership, social innovation and entrepreneurial skills. The curriculum will be focused on helping participants become social entrepreneurs, change agents or civic leaders — turning their bright ideas into new businesses or solutions to challenges facing their communities. Preparing Ontario’s youth to take on leadership roles that spur social and economic enhancements, supports the government’s efforts to invest in people and create a strong business climate; two of the three pillars of the government’s economic plan for jobs and growth. Applications open October 1, 2013 and can be found at http://studioy.marsdd.com/. The first group of young people will begin the program in January 2014. Helping young people find jobs is part of the Ontario government’s plan to build a fair and prosperous society, and help people in their everyday lives.


I TC H E N E R C I T I Z E N

y

a

October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 7

RANTS&raves

THE KITCHENER CITIZEN OPINION PAGE GUEST COLUMN

heading heading heading MakeHeading walking part of your life

Letter to the editor

O

n April 5, the Kitchener Public Library and our Region’s Dear Carrie Debrone, I wasPublic pleasedHealth to get your Kitchener launched Citizen (east edition) and found Department ‘Make Walking Partit quite informative and I thank you for it. of Your Life’. One week prior to its launch, politicians, Regional I just read your short article regarding the natural gas rates going down and Library employees were encouraged to participate in a confor residential customers. test to see who could walk the most onemeter week.average use You write that Kitchener Utilities have asteps 2,100incubic To count participants had to wear a pedometer. annually for steps, its residential customers. I still have an imperial Wouldn’t gas meter, whichknow showsit, thethe consumption in cubic have neverand beenthe ableRegion to read you CEO’s of bothfeet. the I Library matter, even100,000 the meter readersNow seemwe to have that meter as for thatwell walked theandmost with over steps. knowa problem with it as well. Why else would the city issue a bill in the amount their jobs won’t let them sit down. of $452? Autumn is bill an excellent time toFebruary, walk along our woodland trails, My January had been $222.16. $295.79, there I already sat tree-lined and studies up and took streets, notice, but thenheritage excused itneighbourhoods. by, the winter beingHealth especially harsh. recognize thatI received experiencing nature reduces stress. Walking However, when my March bill, I knew that something was very wrong. Icholesterol called the Utility Office pressure. and was asked to take a piece of paper lowers and blood It improves muscle tone I did not and a pen and read the meter myself. To this request I replied that and controls weight. know how to read the imperial meter and aside from that, it wasn't my job. If lady you Iare curious the number oftosteps walk in day, The talked to wasabout very nice and agreed sendyou somebody outa to do

our Kitchener libraries have atoPedometer waiting fordone. you Itto another reading and also promised call me backkit once this was was the very day weeks. that I received telling me that the new amount borrow fornext three Eachher kitcall contains a pedometer, a map owing mere difference of $251.90. I only wonder how with was GRTnow bus$200.10, routes,a walking and cycling trails, and a booklet often the meter had been misread in the past. with tips for a safe walk. My neighbours on either side have metric meters and I had previously Plan walk. motivated looking for different could get one Stay that I would be ableby to read. The answer to that asked if I your routes. Wear a pedometer. You will find, as I have, that wearing consisted of a flat NO. city had pre-authorized withdrawal privileges part for 2004/005 aThe pedometer to check your steps becomes of yourwhich daily they bungled up so badly that I revoked that privilege. I did ask that office apparel. to please sendknow me a paper trail for steps my records I never receivedyour nor Did you that 10,000 a daywhich is a way to reduce did I get an answer to my request and, of course, one can forget about an diabetes factor? Sounds a little bit like the old saying, ‘An apple apology. aI day, keeps away’. Healthy choices to think about. realize that itthe is doctor up to your discretion to publish or not to publish my Best wishesif you on your decideautumn to print itwalks. I wouldMake like towalking warn my part fellowof letter. However "Kitchenerites" your life! to be extra "vigilant" every time that Utility Bill arrives. Respectfully, Ingrid E. Merkel

Jean Haalboom Waterloo Regional Councillor

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

“Kitch-FIX or Camb-SCREW” Letter to the editor

T Just what makes Kitchener so good at Arts development?

hey’re doing it again, the Region of Waterloo that is. About a day ago I received a five page letter from the Region of Waterloo International Airport. As I read through the correspondence, it quickly became evident that something Asamiss. a relatively in Kitchener I've so been exploring the the was Now new I amarrival no aviation specialist deciphering photographic was arts aopportunities and been first impressions veryI information little taxing.here It has a long timeare since encouraging. It's just not just in the tech side of quality that the community studied vectors, graphs, decibel levels, charts and maps, but I should be judged. A thriving Arts community usually does well. This can did my best understand theyspectrum were saying. We standard (mostly not always be to measured in thewhat financial as the living my wife) even went further and researched the subject a little expectations of artists are remarkably low. We in don't wantWhat that two bedroom house within convenient driving more depth. follows, is my layman’s interpretation of or mall. Speaking as onefor of Cambridge. those underfunded distance the golf the issuetoand the course consequences it will have independent art (Region) producers i'll tell you I'vetolived in some very bad The airport is proposing move a designated conditions just to be close to my working environment. An example being 3when dimensional the Toronto sky called the “Kitch-Fix” living in mypoint variousinillegal warehouse studios many from years somewhere southwest of the 401 to a new point southeast of before they were condoized. reasons for artists to be from in an area. A slightly theThere 401.areInbasically laymantwolanguage that means Kitchener to compact arts community lowsky rents and the availability of galleries or Cambridge. The point with in the would now reside over the 401 venues showcase the art produced. I have noticed that there is a vibrant and thetoGrand River. theatre network here that none the less is going through hard times. The They state, “This will pull the choice noiseoftowards thethat east”…. music scene is really good with a solid local talent is well Cambridge. They will also allow planes to fly approximately publicized by a few local free publications. Radio generally follows the standard corprock but the 100ft University of than Waterloo has an outstanding 500ft above the ground, lower the current regulation community station. of 600ft above the ground. Thethe huge poollevel of university draw from for a of vocal audience In noise createdstudents by the to aircraft section their letter with some disposable cash helps in keeping the cities vibrant and they say “some aircraft noise can interfere with conversation”. enthusiastic. The number of professional artists is still small enough so that They also one stateanother. that “residential properties are the most sensitive they know are quickly seeing astounding growth in the digital imaging to We aircraft noise.” industry. Fortunately, who has been working in digital As I noted above as wea photographer did some more research. It seems the for years it me Valley integrate my own work into video, 3D, web, residents of helps Hidden Estates (built in 2003) in Kitchener, advertising, etc. So I think, personally, the opportunities in Kitchener are complained about An aircraft noise enough have a noise better than Toronto. example being the cabletoTV (Rogers) that study works completed. An article from the Record, Friday September 13 very hard to involve the regions schools and artisians in locally produced

programming. Let's not forget that Kitchener/Waterloo was voted the most intelligent LETTER TO THE city and speaking as aEDITOR newcomer it is very evident that the level of professionalism is visibly high here. People waste little time and the welcome i've received in presenting my own portfolio to various galleries and companies has been warm and enthusiastic. A very nice event held Mellow in townitchener-Conestoga is the quarterly partiesMPP at theMichael KW regional art gallery. Harris’ legislative bill people to who enjoy art meet each other with cool jazz and some ambient clarify the Labour Relations Act would have exempted dub from the djs. municipalities and school boards from being included in the defWith the projected growth of the regions artists in all mediums I have inition of construction employers. found there are many dynamic, specifically targeted plans, by the Bill 73 was not passedinand thus Kitchener-Waterloo taxpayerslarge will municipal government particular, to foster a (relatively) continue to investment pay for the in practice of uncompetitive tendering. community development towards artist integration. I was

K

states, “The proposal, years in the making and now under public review, follows noise complaints from the affluent Hidden Valley subdivision in south Kitchener. “A small number of homeowners were quite vocal,” Wood very impressed by the Arts office at City Hall and with how they provided said. going on on here. people in turn me Iwith information about ponder the effect ofwhat thiswas change Blair,Those the rare lands and have offeredHall. theirAs ownmost advice and contacts, so region again two for Langdon residents of this arethumbs aware,upBlair the level of support they give each other. and rare research reservedoing is host a large Yes,more thereimportantly are alreadythemany photographers thetonormal number of rare flora and fauna. Bald eagles that started to photographic needs of the region, but the opportunity to work come with here in image the nineties to winter live here yearhouses, round.software Osprey emerging companies like webnow designers, animation producers, basedabove video the firms, electronicSt. images for at broadcasters nest everylocally summer Fountain Bridge the Grand etc.is as the manufacturing base including has declined. live River.growing Countless numbers of waterfowl BlueThe Herons entertainment industries, local graphic from designers mostand especially thrive here. Thousands of people the and region the resttheof emerging gallery system bodes well for business opportunities, even in this the world come here to enjoy the tranquility and oneness with downturn. nature and ismarvel at the urban space inestimate Canada.of Kitchener projected to largest be growing by green a conservative Langdon Hall Hotel, voted best hotel in Canada, twice, is where 100,000 people over the next 20 years and plans call for a big investment inpeople conversions warehouse into studio style live work comeoftoexisting relax and enjoy buildings the serenity. space. base has down- Iturned leftWhen a lot HasTechnically the effectthe onmanufacturing all of that been studied? thinkand not. ofthe empty buildings. airport expands, and it will, how much more noise will If out of those numbers there are 10 percent artists in all media that Cambridge betheir subjected actually work at art all ofto? us are going to need some of this space to It seems to me this another case of though, the region dumping on build up our community. is Artists, being artists do not like to be Cambridge, akin to the Franklin Street roundabouts, the bio told how to do things. The local government is working hard to reach that level where theLRT, needswhich of thewe artistic community solids plantthey andcan dareintegrate I say the will pay for but seamlessly theirI development plans. residents can be as vocal in never seeinto here. hope Cambridge Many studies have shown time and again how efficient an Arts based stopping the “Kitch-fix/Camb-screw” as the small number of community can be. A planning group called The Prosperity Council homeowners Valley. for artists and art based businesses specifically calls in forHidden a huge investment

to encourage them to choose Kitchener as a place to work. This is the first Scottvaluable Wilson time I have found a directed approach to our niche, but very segment of society. If even fifty percent of the plans get doneCambridge it is still an attractive place to build a career. Our image production is now all pixels and with the recent announcement of a new 5 million dollar Federal grant to establish a massive digital media centre in the downtown core, it offers unexcelled opportunities to work with some of the leading edge image systems in the world. In fact there are plans to make Kitchener a regional communications and that leads into the possibility of thousands of new tendering is in hub place. usesThis for my photos. concern is very real in Waterloo Region. In December 2012, There is a very good internet hereshed and in if you would like moreon two regional workers buildingsystem a garden Wilmot Township info just go to the net and most community plans are available. nextis a Saturday applied to join the Carpenters’ Union. WaterlooThe Region three yearsthe willCarpenters’ establish this region of one inspired fighting certification bidofatthe the"Silicon labour Valley" board right now. examples of a thriving gateway of new ideas and I feel very fortunate to Waterloo Region is headed toward steep increased costs for municipal be able to establish myself here with so many other creative artists.

Fife voted along party lines rather than for residents

Catherine Fife, MPP for Kitchener–Waterloo voted along her NDP party lines and against the best interests of Kitchener-Waterloo residents and local businesses. The serious concern is that once a public sector employer becomes unionized the municipality and school board must contract out all construction projects to companies organized by a specific union –‘closed tendering’. Bill 73 was endorsed by local municipalities because of the well documented increased cost of projects in closed tendering cases. It is estimated that projects cost 40% more when closed tendering vs. open

construction projects. Closed tendering will shut out the ability for our local construction businesses to compete for publicly funded work, and handcuff municipalities from getting best possible price for taxpayers through an open and fair tendering process. Bill 73 is a bill that was in the best interests of Ontarians and Kitchener-Waterloo residents – US -- the taxpayers. Tracey Weiler Kitchener *** Tracey Weiler is the Ontario Progressive Conservative candidate for the riding ot Kitchener-Waterloo.

Kitchener Citizen ...YOUR SOURCE FOR COMMUNITY NEWS

(West Edition) 1187 Fischer-Hallman Rd. PO Box 48045 Williamsburg RO Kitchener, ON N2E 4K6 519-394-0335 or email

citizenwest@hotmail.com

Publisher/Editor Helen Redgwell Hall News Reporters Carrie Debrone Andrea Hall Contributing Columnists Karolyn Fournier Jennifer Leppek Scott Davey Berry Vrbanovic Yvonne Fernandes John Gazzola Kelly Galloway-Sealock Paul Singh Bil Ioannidis Zyg Janecki Frank Etherington Dan Glenn-Graham Carl Zehr Graphic Design Helen Redgwell Hall Photography/Graphics Suzy Hall Serving West Kitchener

Independently owned and operated since 2005. Member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association and Canadian Community Newspaper Association


Page 8 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

HOMECOMING GAME OCTOBER 10

Calling all Trojans! FHCI is turning 50 T his year is an important one for Forest Heights Collegiate. The school is turning 50 and to help celebrate, it is hosting a homecoming football and volleyball game in the afternoon of October 10. In the morning, a student and staff aerial photograph will be taken, followed by a barbecue and live music from noon to 1pm. The football team will be

announced at 12:50 with the game kick-off at 1pm. The football game will also feature a half-time show. The volleyball game begins at 3:30pm, while the Junior Football game is played. The main celebration will take place June 6 and 7, 2014 with an 50th anniversary reunion. For more information visit www.fhci50threunion.com and follow them on twitter at @ FHCI50thReunion.

BACK HOME IN WATERLOO

His Excellency David Johnston, Governor General of Canada, visits with Emily Adlam of New Zealand during his stop at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo on September 23 to preview the BrainSTEM: Your Future is Now Festival. Adlam is one of about 40 students in the Perimeter Scholars International 10-month intensive coursework Master’s level program designed to expose outstanding students to the full spectrum of theoretical physics.The BrainSTEM festival, held September 30 to October 6, invited the public to the Perimeter Intstitute to view hands-on scientific exhibits that included Mind control technology, solar paint, wireless electricity and a personal interactive robot. Photo by Carrie Debrone

Get This offer is unusual so we’ll keep it simple. We’d like you to experience Libro. Hard to do unless you bank here. So we’ll give $50 to any youth group or cause of your choice if you take that step. Join Libro. We’ll get the $50 to the organization you choose. Then we’ll dazzle you with fee-fairness and inspire you with Coaching. Sound fair? That’s what it means to be Libro. Visit the Libro branch nearest you today. Open an account. Get $50 to Give. Nice! Contact any Libro branch or visit libro.ca/share for details. KITCHENER

WATERLOO 519-744-1031

420 Erb St W

519-725-6060

1170 Fischer Hallman Rd

519-570-9955


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 9

Fairweather

mark©s work ouse wearh

Vie La e Ros n E

Nygard

peggy©s

trend s for men

jon new es york

ng lki a w a on d u clo

cleo

international clothiers

old navy

sears

ans

tm rei

Le Nails Salon

ricki©s

ix ben . & Co

SWEET Savings. wicked Selection. HAPPY HALLOWEEN FROM blac k phot ©s o grap hy

s per p o sh rug d rt ma

quiznos Sub

ttis n e d dr. r iffe pfe

trade secrets

bulk

barn

pita pit

first Cho hairc ice utte r

s

pizza nova

fut u sho re p

The Home Depot

The e sourc

Ardene

n

dia a n ca ire t

bell world

38 Stores... Millions of Reasons

payless shoe source

starbu cks coffee

era

et etc

p

bowring

Walmart

s Casey© bar & Grill

mark

hall

www. sunriseshoppingcentre.com 1400 Ottawa St. South at Fischer-Hallman Rd.


Page 10 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

EXHIBIT RUNS UNTIL JANUARY 5, 2014

Surface Tension looks at the uncertain future of water

by Helen Hall f you could, would you drink the water in Victoria Park Lake? The latest exhibit at THEMUSEUM called Surface Tension: The Future of Water gives you the opportunity to do so and to think about how you feel about water. “The water we drink ties us into our local ecosystem,” says Ireland’s Daithi O’Reilly, who is showing the exhibit which originated at the Science Gallery at Trinity College in Dublin. The exhibit was curated by Ralph Borland, Michael John Gorman, Bruce Misstear, and Jane Withers. Surface Tension brings together the work of 35 artists, designers, engineers and scientists who explore the future of water. Their installations look at water’s role in politics and economics, and discusses ways it’s gathered, cleaned and distributed, as well as how it is used and misused. O’Reilly said humans have a “fascination with water” and that, in addition to being used in traditional ways for things like drinking and manufacturing, it is also used for cultural and religious traditions and rituals. “We must respect our relationship with water,” he said. Some installations look at

I

Above left: An installation called Event Horizon captures a vortex in a bell jar and its whirlpool spirals in perpetual motion. At right, Daithi O’Reilly pours a glass of filtered water that originated in Victoria Park Lake. A Tim Horton’s cup can be seen floating in the water taken from the lake in the tank at the top of the photo. ways we could use less water, from new ways to clean our bodies without using water, to new ways of dispensing it in an udderlike container with the belief that if people had to work harder for their water,

they would use less. The exhibit also looks at the political aspect of fresh water - a resource that we have often considered as free and disposable, but in the future as its availability decreases, may

Happy Thanksgiving Kitchener Centre!

Stephen Woodworth, Your Voice in Ottawa Member of Parliament

For questions about the Government of Canada, I’m here to help! 300 Victoria Street North, Kitchener 519-741-2001 www.stephenwoodworth.ca

become highly valuable. It also shows the beauty of water through an installation called Event Horizon which captures a whirlpool in a jar and another called Bit.Fall which has twinkling water droplet words dropping from the ceiling to the floor. This exhibit looks at water

issues from around the world, but if you are interested in local water issues, you can attend a speaker series on October 27 called Water Dialogues: Local Water Issues. Speakers will give presentations on local water issues and then open the floor for discussion.

Region of Waterloo is striving to conserve drinking water Speaker: Steve Gombos, Manager, Water Efficiency, Region of Waterloo, Water Services Division The Region of Waterloo is one of the largest municipalities in Canada to rely so heavily on groundwater supplies for its drinking water. To prevent or delay the need to find new sources of water, the Region has delivered leading water efficiency and water conservation programs since 1974. Walking on Ice: Protecting our Winter Safety and Water Quality Speaker: Leanne Lobe, Supervisor, Source Water Protection Programs, Region of Waterloo, Water Services Division Have you ever been concerned about the amount of salt used in the winter – too much or too little? Have you ever considered where all that salt goes? Leanne Lobe will share simple, yet effective tools to improve your winter safety while using less salt and keeping our water clean! The Grand River Adventure: Tales from a river, source to mouth Speaker: Derek Lippert, Quiet Nature Ltd. For the past two years, Derek and his work colleague JP Bartle have paddled the entire Grand River in an effort to raise awareness of the river’s importance while raising funds for tree planting throughout the watershed. On these journeys, the two adventurers experience the river where it begins its life as a 15 ft wide stream, tumbles through rapids and gorges, works its way through the heart of our cities and towns, and cuts through forest and farmland, on route to Lake Erie. The Grand: Our Future GRCA representative Dave Schultz The talk will focus on the 21st century challenges to our water resources – population growth, intensive agriculture, and climate change – and outline what water managers from the GRCA, municipalities, the provincial government, federal government and other agencies are doing about it. Tickets are free with admission. Purchase a Water Dialogues Pass for access to each presentation without having to pay admission each time. For more information visit www.themuseum.ca.


National Newspaper Week National Newspaper Week is October 6-12,2013 2013 This marks the 73rd year of National NewspaperWeek Week, which observes National Newspaper 2013 the importance of newspapers to communities large and small.

II’s accession to the Throne as in supporting women and children, Queen of Canada, is in recognition Ariarani served the KW YWCA of those who, like Her Majesty, locally and internationally. She October 2013 lthemselves Kitchener to Citizen - West Edition Page 11 has also served on thelImmigration have 10, dedicated

1.

2.

1.

Now offering detailing services!

2.

HANSMA AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE INC.

PETE HANSMA (519) 748-5533 www.HansmaAutomotive.com 88 Shoemaker St., Unit 3 & 4, Kitchener, ON N2E 3G4

3. 4.

4.

7.

5.

6.

5.

6. 8.

7.

Socially Responsible Investing

3.

9.

8.

“We chose SRI because it aligns with our values and what we believe.”

9.

10.

11.

12.

10.

11.

12.

MSCU members Scott and Katharine Albrecht

13.

13. 14. 15. 14.

Looking for investments that match your values? Your conversation begins with MSCU, where faith and finances meet.

16.

15.

16.

Term Deposit Special

Special rate on 2 year term deposits.

17.

17.

Call or visit your local branch today!

18.

* Rates are subject to change without notice at any time.

2

.00%* 2 Year Term

18.

www.mscu.com | 519.576.7220

Unscramble the circled letters to nd out what brings these together. Unscramble the circled letters to nd out what brings these together. Down 1. friendly neighbors 2. upright entertainers Down 3. threeneighbors R’s 1. the friendly 4. secret knowledge 2. upright entertainers 5. or the 3. a, thean three R’s 9. play 4. competitive secret knowledge 11. 5. a,shopper’s an or thefriend 12. “champagne wishes and caviar dreams” 9. competitive play 14. pundit’s bread and butter 11. shopper’s friend 12. “champagne wishes and caviar dreams” 14. pundit’s bread and butter

Across 6. numbers all in a row 7. from oor to ceiling Across 8. aware 6. becomes numbers all in a row 10. library desk 7. from oor to ceiling 13. cinema offerings 8. becomes aware 15. statement 10. court’s library desk 16. 13. observer cinema offerings 17. daily occupation 15. court’s statement 18. and le formation 16. rank observer 17. daily occupation 18. rank and le formation

Doors Open Waterloo Region 2013 attracts over 13,000

T

he 11th annual Doors Open Waterloo Region, held September 21, attracted 13, 873 visitors, For those who love old buildings, are interested in architecture, or are just plain curious, Doors Open Waterloo Region celebrated local architecture past and present by opening 42 heritage and modern buildings for public tours. Many of the buildings had never been open to - or are rarely viewed by - the public. While Doors Open Waterloo Region is known for featuring heritage architecture, there is also always a selection of modern architecture. This year eleven of the 42 sites fit into the 2013 theme – Waterloo Region Modern. Built in the last 55 years, the modern sites included the Mike and Ophelia Lazaridis Quantum-Nano Centre, the Waterloo Region Courthouse, OpenText, the University of Waterloo Student Design Centre, the Waterloo Regional Police Service North Division,

the Conestoga Engineering and Information Technology Campus, North House, The Clay and Glass Museum, The Centre In The Square, Highland Baptist Church, and the Islamic Centre of Cambridge. The 31 other participating sites included many first-time participants and some popular sites from past events. Buildings from the 19th, 20th and 21st centuies were featured, and visitors got a chance to go behind-the-scenes. A part of a province-wide program, Doors Open Waterloo Region is a local event of Doors Open Ontario, an initiative of the Ontario Heritage Foundation to celebrate community heritage. Doors Open events take place in communities across Ontario. For information call 519-747-5139 or e-mail doorsopen@region.waterloo.on.ca, follow Doors Open on Twitter @DoorsOpenWR or join the Doors Open Waterloo Region Facebook page.

and a an ou K-W 1989and f result centre renam Child Co Co ran M auto comp chang memb Club Cana She i Assoc & En a rec Wate as we Wate of the of Zo Busin She i Symp Golf Jim Jim Erb an for 4 comm as a 1988, the m candi muni been Cone where Turke of Fr the bo Wate KidsA Coun Presid Coun found Huma Glass the W Chee


Page 12 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

presents

Musical Kaleidoscope T he Lions Hall 40 South Street West, Elmira, Ontario

Saturday, November 2 8:00 pm

nd

,

2013

$20 per person | For Tickets Contact Sheila 519-664-2874 This is a licensed event. Raffle table prizes to be won!

Staff of Ziggy’s Cycle and Sport with the Independent Bicycle of the Year award are, from left: Nicholas Abbott, Zoltan Pop, Marta Generoux, Margaret Pachnik (owner) and Michael White.

Ziggy’s Cycle and Sport wins national award for the Independent Bicycle Retailer of the Year Helen Hall argaret Pachnik says 2013 has turned out to be a “lucky year” for Ziggy’s Cycle and Sport. Pachnik owns the business on King Street West in downtown Kitchener that recently won the 2013 Independent Bicycle Retailer of the Year award from the Bicycle Trade Association of Canada (BTAC) at its annual ExpoCycle trade show in Montreal. “We were so happy,” Pachnik said. “We never expected it.” The Independent Bicycle Retailer of the Year award recognizes bicycle retailers that have shown commitment and innovation in encouraging cycling in their community. “All of our employees are thrilled and energized,” Pachnik said. She said the store has a great staff that works as a team and they all have “a passion for cycling and promoting a healthy lifestyle.” “We have a great cycling community here,” she said of Kitchener. “And the most satisfying aspect of our job is connecting with the community.” There are five full-time staff at Ziggy’s and five to six parttime employees. Ziggy’s works with the community on the Bike2Work Challenge, along with many local fundraising rides such

M

Peter Doiron as

Tim McGraw

Mark Thomas as

Neil Diamond

Amberley Beatty as

Patsy Cline & Gretchen Wilson

Proceeds to The Chord Spinners Chorus, and their favourite Charity The National Service Dogs.

by

as the Tour de Hans, Canadian Cancer Society Great Ride ‘n’ Stride, and the Ride to Conquer Cancer. “Independent bicycle retailers in Canada make significant contributions to their com-munities in the way of cycling advocacy, rider safety, sponsoring local athletes, and their support of worthy causes,” said Bill Yetman, Executive Director of BTAC. “Ziggy’s is a prime example of a retailer doing great work in their community and we’re happy to recognize their work with this award.” The BTAC Primes (awards) are named after a traditional class of cycling prize given for accomplishment within a stage or lap of a race. They are divided into four distinct categories: Independent Bicycle Retailer of the Year, Outstanding work by a Local Cycling Association, Achievement by a Municipal/ Regional Government, and Contribution by a Political Leader. Ziggy’s was nominated for the award by the City of Kitchener, which organizes a Bike2Work Challenge that Ziggy’s has sponsored for the past two years. The Bike2Work Challenge provides Kitchener residents with an opportunity to try commuting to work by bicycle. In 2013, Ziggy’s donated 16 bicycles, valued at approximately $1000 each, to the contestants in the challenge. For the month of June they were required to commute to work on the bicycle, recording the mileage and contributing to a blog about the experience. Ziggy’s donated the bikes as well and provided training to the participants about how to care for the bike and make repairs, like fixing a flat tire. To read more about this year’s Bike2Work participants visit the website http:// bike2work2013.blogspot.ca.

Next edition November 7, 2013

For News Tips & Advertising call 519-394-0335


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen -West Edition l Page 13

Annabelle or Smooth – Hydrangea arborescens

OUT IN THE GARDEN

Pruning Hydrangea

by Karolyn Fournier s the cooler temperatures arrive and the leaves start to change colours, home owners start thinking about cleaning up the yard and preparing the garden for winter. Don’t be too anxious, in my opinion it’s still a wee bit early for pruning and chopping back perennials and shrubs. The November edition of the Citizen will provide you with a guideline of what you should and can do in your garden before the snow flies. One of the most asked questions this time of year is when to prune hydrangea. The answer is “it depends”. There are six main types of hydrangea shrubs in our gardens and it is imperative you know which type you have before you take a pair of pruners to its branches. If you haven’t kept the plant tag to identify the species, or specific type of hydrangea, here are some generalizations to help you identify which type you have. The danger of pruning at the wrong time of year may mean you are cutting off buds that have already formed during a specific time of growth. Annabelle or Smooth – Hydrangea arborescens: Large globes of densely packed flowers, typically white, but in the case of Invincibelle® Spirit, pink. These flower on new wood (current season’s growth), usually in late summer. These may be pruned in very late fall (after blooming) or early spring. However, if you are happy with the size of the shrub, pruning is not necessary unless there are dead or diseased branches. Panicle or Pee-Gee – Hydrangea paniculata: Large, cone shaped clusters of flowers that may start out lime-green and change colour as

A

Coming in November... Fresh Winter Greens Ready-made Urns Custom Urns Wreaths Fundraising Programs always available!

the blooms age. These also bloom on growth created in the current season so prune, if desired or necessary in late fall or early spring, as with H. arborescens. Limelight and Pinky Winky™ are some other brand names for this variety you may recognize. Oak leaf – Hydrangea quercifollia: Identified by lobed leaves that turn red with age and white flowers that bloom in the summer on old wood. If you prune these in spring or late fall, you are removing the buds and it will not bloom that year. These should not be pruned. Flower buds on old growth may be damaged by sudden freezes in spring or by animals chewing on the stems. Climbing – Hydrangea petiolaris: Like the oak leaf, it blooms on old wood. If pruned, it will not flower that year. Big Leaf, Mophead, Lacecap or Florist’s – Hydrangea macrophylla: This hydrangea can bloom in colours ranging from blue to purple depending on the pH (acidity or alkalinity) of the soil. This is another hydrangea that requires the spring, fall & winter to produce flowers in summer. Pruning will remove flower buds. Mountain – Hydrangea serrata: Lacy flowers with limited flower colour change. Blooms develop on old wood. Avoid pruning. Pruning is required if the shrub has grown too large, has spent flowers or has damaged or diseased limbs. Prune for its health versus its blooms for that year. If you are pruning, the general rule of thumb is never to remove more than one third of the plant. Happy Gardening! *** Karolyn Fournier is the Retail Manager at Colour Paradise Greenhouses in Mannheim.

In October...

• Drop by and pick up fresh herbs for your Thanksgiving dinner • Watch for us talking about herbs on “At Home with Chef D” on Rogers 20

In November...

• Christmas Open House November 15-16 • House of Friendship Wreath Auction starts November 16 • Auction wraps up with a Fashion Show November 23 from 1-3pm with Nygard from Sunrise Shopping Centre www.colourparadise.com info@colourparadise.com

HABITAT HOME 100

Looking over the plans for the 100th home (in the background) that is being built by the Waterloo Region chapter of Habitat for Humanity are from left: Seth Jutzi, Chair of Habitat for Humanity, Karen Redman HFH Chief Operating Officer, Vaughn Bender Board Vice-Chair and Horace Coelho board member. The 30-unit town home project, currently under construction at 242 Kehl Street in Kitchener is the largest development the local Habitat for Humanity chapter has ever constructed and is expected to take about seven years to complete. Habitat for Humanity gives lowincome families an opportunity to own a home. Photo by Carrie Debrone

wilmot veterinary clinic on trussler road

Dr. Robert Lofsky BSc DVM 1465 Trussler Road Kitchener ON N2R 1S7

519.696.3102

wvc@rogers.com www.wilmotveterinaryclinic.com Mon-Fri: 8am-6pm Sat: 8am-12pm Sun: Closed

1209 Bleams Road, Mannheim 519.745.0200 We’re closer than you think 3 minutes west of Sunrise Centre on Ottawa Street South in Kitchener Hours: Mon. to Sat. 9am-5pm Closed Every Sunday


Page 14 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

National Newspaper Week 2013

HEALTH &

1.

c c

2.

o

c

4.

m

o

m

m

u

i

n

c a

5.

i

l

7.

s

a

t

o

10.

f

u

d

t

i

c

c

e

a

t

u

r

e

n

o

i

r

s

p

14.

d

15.

o

p

i

n

i

o

11.

c

12.

u

l

u

a

t

9.

s p

i

o

i

i

r

u

f

o

t

p

e

n

s

o

s

n

t

n 16.

e

y

i

e

w

s

s

i

t

n

e

s

s

l

t

17.

b

u

s

i

n

e

i c

k

o

l

18.

e

a

i e

o

u 8.

l

i

I

e

s

i

s

St. Mary’s announces a pilot project to explore remote monitoring for pacemaker patients in Waterloo Wellington

3.

y

t

y

s

13.

r

6.

s o

l

u

m

n

s

Unscramble the circled letters to nd out what brings these together.

y o u r

n e w s p a p e r

©2007 Medicine Shoppe Canada Inc., a Katz Group Company. All rights reserved

Down 1. friendly neighbors 2. upright entertainers 3. the three R’s 4. secret knowledge 5. a, an or the 9. competitive play 11. shopper’s friend 12. “champagne wishes and caviar dreams” 14. pundit’s bread and butter

Lifestyle

Across 6. numbers all in a row 7. from oor to ceiling 8. becomes aware 10. library desk 13. cinema offerings 15. court’s statement 16. observer 17. daily occupation 18. rank and le formation

n collaboration with the Cardiac Care Network of Ontario and the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Inte-gration Network, St. Mary’s General Hospital has announced plans for a pilot project to explore the feasibility of large scale remote monitoring for pacemaker patients. If successful, St. Mary’s will be the first hospital in Ontario to broadly offer pacemaker patients remote monitoring as an option. “St. Mary’s is proud of its cardiac excellence and we are always looking for new and innovative technologies that can improve patient care,” says Don Shilton, President at St. Mary’s. “After extensive research and discussions with industry and government partners, we recently determined that remote monitoring technology has evolved in Canada to the point where it can now be a safe, viable and highly beneficial option for many pacemaker patients in our

Your Medicine Shoppe® pharmacist understands. As your Medicine Shoppe pharmacist, I do more than just fill your prescriptions. I help you make sense of the bigger health picture. I take the time to get to know you, understand your health needs, and get actively involved in improving your well-being. Remember, when it matters most, it’s The Medicine Shoppe.

Bryan Hastie, B.Sc. Pharm.

Pharmacist/Owner

296 Highland Road East Kitchener, ON

571-7050 FREE Prescription Delivery Available Hours: M-F 9 a.m-6 p.m. | Saturday 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

WANTED 7 HOMES THAT NEED ROOFING

7 homes in your area will be given the opportunity of having an INTERLOCK metal roofing system installed on their home at a reasonable cost. This lifetime product is capturing the interest of homeowners across the country who want to know this will be the last time they will have to re-roof their home. Our product is environmentally friendly and comes with a transferable Lifetime Limited Warranty with an excellent choice of colours to complement your home and is going to be introduced to your local market. Your home can be a show place in your neighbourhood and we will make it worth your while if we can use your home.

1-866-601-7366 • Toll-Free 24 hours 7 Days a week www.ontarioroof.com

community.” “If this pilot is successful, our pacemaker patients will be the first in Ontario to benefit from this newly-available technology. We look forward to initiating the pilot early in 2014 so we can assess its potential for wide scale utilization across the Waterloo Wellington LHIN,” continued Mr. Shilton. It is anticipated that the pilot project will allow many patients to visit a setting closer to home where the remote monitoring equipment will be located. Initially, only patients with Medtronic pacemakers will be eligible, but the goal is to extend this service to patients with pacemakers from other device manufacturers as the project progresses and the technology continues to evolve. In this pilot project, the patient will use a one touch universal Medtronic Carelink Express® monitor at the remote site to read their Medtronic pacemaker. Performance and diagnostic data from their pacemaker will be transmitted via the Medtronic CareLink® network to clinicians at St. Mary’s. If potential concerns are identified, the patient will

be contacted for a follow up appointment at St. Mary’s. While the long term goal is to offer this technology in several locations across the Waterloo Wellington LHIN, the first installation of the pilot project will be for patients in the Guelph area with the intention of engaging eligible patients whose pacemaker care was recently transferred to St. Mary’s. Evaluation criteria will measure and monitor the success of the first pilot site, and this data will help to formulate the feasibility of a broader roll out of CareLink Express, including more patients and remote monitoring systems from other pacemaker companies. This initiative has the potential to offer many patient benefits, including fewer trips to hospital for pacemaker checkups, reduced time required for device followup, and increased patient satisfaction. There are also potential benefits to the health care system, such as increased efficiency in the St. Mary’s pacemaker clinic and stronger support for community partners/providers.

Province offers online driver’s licence renewal

O

ntario is now allowing drivers to renew their licences online ­— the first province in Canada to do so. Ontario drivers need to renew their licences every five years. Now, eligible drivers who renew online at ServiceOntario. ca/DriversLicence will be able to use their existing licence photos for an additional fiveyear renewal cycle, meaning they will only need to renew in person every ten years. When drivers renew their licences online, they can also get licence plate stickers, driver abstracts and other driver and vehicle products in the same transaction. Offering more online services is part of the Ontario government’s plan to help people in their everyday lives and make it easier for them to access important government services, when and where they need them. “With the launch of the new online driver’s licence renewal service, Ontario becomes the

first province in Canada to provide drivers with the option to renew their licence online. We are committed to making it easier and more convenient for the people of Ontario to access important government services,” said John Milloy, Minister of Government Services. QUICK FACTS • The new online driver’s licence renewal service is added to the more than 40 services already offered online. These include renewing licence plate stickers, changing addresses and applying for birth, death or marriage certificates. • ServiceOntario processed more than 1.6 million driver’s licence renewal transactions last year. • Drivers can now use Interac® Online, in addition to major credit cards, to pay online. • ServiceOntario meets its online service guarantee for more than 99 per cent of transactions.


Saturday, Oct. 26, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 15

Manage Stress Naturally as our grandparents did, and for many people that creates a fascination with By Carrie Debrone ingredients, slow food, local Includes samples of a variety forgotten treats ver wanted to taste pemmican, pur- real,ofbasic ple fingerling potatoes or varieties food, and many modern food movements andthat a wonderful lunch.that are trying to recapture something of apples our ancestors local would have that feels lost,” he said. cherished? Advance registration required. The symposium will open with Fiona Here’s your chance. The Waterloo Lucas speaking Region will hostplus a Forgotten $50Museum per person HST includes lunch. about familiar and forgotten foods of the 1960s and 70s Foods Symposium on Saturday, Oct. 26 when in Canada garlic was socially from 9am to 4pm. There is growing public interest in unacceptable, margarine was touted as learning how to grow, cook and preserve modern, the food processor was a recent foods as our ancestors did. Knowledge invention and the jellied salad was king. Today’s food choices are still about those skills was once widespread, because, even only a few generations influenced by the way people shopped, cooked, entertained and planned kitchens ago, everyone was farming. Today, because of lifestyle and 40 years ago. Participants will then have the chance technological changes, fewer and fewer people know about food production, to attend workshops on a variety of topics including: bread making, forgotten First preparation and preservation. The Forgotten Food Symposium is Nations natural remedies, a heritage apple tasting, canning, a behind the scenes aiming to change that. “Food is a very good device for tour of the museum’s collection, food bringing people into a conversation about preservation by drying, salting pickling who we are as a people. It cuts across and fermenting, lost drink recipes from all boundaries. Everyone can relate to the turn of the century and seven ways of food,” said Bob Wildfong, Horticultural looking at a cookbook. The symposium will close with speaker Interpreter at the Waterloo Region Museum and organizer of the symposium. Carolyn Blackstock, who decided to use “It’s really important that we step back the 1906 Berlin Cook Book every day in and understand our food system and how 2012, and to keep a record of the attempt it works. It is so fundamental to living in an online blog. She succeeded in and we can’t become complacent about bringing a forgotten cook book to life, will share some of her discoveries in food or take it for granted,” Connect withWildfong us. and this presentation. said. The symposium The symposium10will explore foods Huron Rd., Kitchener, Ontario costs $50. To and heritage plants that were common register call 519-748-1914 or visit 519-748-1914 519-575-4608 www.waterlooregionmuseum.com to in gardens andTel: homes in the past, and TTY: features workshops, guest speakers and download the Forgotten Food Symposium a lunch that will feature forgotten foods. registration form. Waterloo Region Museum volunteers Wildfong said that in recent years, as people have become further separated and members of the Region of Waterloo from the sources of their food, there has Museums Membership Program receive been a resurgence of interest in traditional a 10% discount. The Waterloo Region Museum is located at 10 Huron Rd. in food and local culinary traditions. “We just don’t cook the same way Kitchener.

E

www.waterlooregionmuseum.com

Building For over 40 years, KW Habilitation has been inspiring abilities and enriching the lives of children and adults with developmental disabilities.

NOW WE’RE BUILDING ON THAT SUCCESS!

Please help us by supporting our Building AchievAbility Campaign.

Your contribution will help us inspire abilities and enrich lives. To learn more, please call 519-744-6307 or visit us on-line at:

www.kwhab.ca

By Karen Jensen, ND

Our ability to adapt to stress depends upon optimal function of the adrenal glands. When excess or chronic stress overloads our adrenal glands - symptoms and disease can occur. Some of the common earlier symptoms of adrenal stress include: fatigue, insomnia, anxiety, depression, low back pain, asthma, allergies, blood sugar problems, hormonal imbalances, irritability, headaches, sugar cravings, gastrointestinal symptoms and inflammatory conditions.

The ‘roots’ of the original AdrenaSense Formula Throughout my life I had good health and boundless energy and then suddenly in my early 30’s I hit the wall with fatigue… I had three children under the age of 3, my marriage broke up, and I went back to work thinking I could ‘do it all’. My body did not agree… nothing helped the crippling fatigue until I saw a naturopathic doctor who introduced me to my adrenal glands. Forty years later I still take adrenal support during times of added stress. When I started naturopathic practice in the 1980’s it was my own experience with adrenal fatigue that allowed me to recognize it in my patients and over the years I saw the need for an effective adrenal supplement to help people with the stressors and demands of daily living. There is much more awareness about adrenal fatigue today and also other adrenal fatigue formulas on the market. AdrenaSense® is the original solution I formulated for patients and others who have found it very effective.

The Original AdrenaSense Formula: The herbs in the AdrenaSense formula are called adaptogens that have been proven to support stress reactions and normalize adrenal function. These include Rhodiola, Suma, Schizandra Berries, Siberian Ginseng and Ashwagandha, which in combination, enhance mental and physical performance; balance the nervous system helping with anxiety and insomnia; support the immune, cardiovascular and hormonal systems; counteract fatigue, anxiety and depression; provide vital energy and act as a ‘general tonic’ to support the effects of stress and fatigue.

2

$

OFFAdrenaSense

®

ANY SIZE

Only Available at Health Food Stores and Select Natural Pharmacies

MANUFACTURER COUPON - TO THE RETAILER: For redemption, mail to: Preferred Nutrition, 153 Perth Street, Acton, ON L7J 1C9 Expiry: November 30, 2013 Code: 05-137

PNO.CA

CUSTOMER SIGNATURE REQUIRED FOR VALIDATION

homes from the past.

COUPON

Participate in workshops and listen to guest

Forgotten Foods Symposium speakers while exploring forgotten foodsoffers and heritage to plants that were common gardenssystem and chance understand ourinfood

Improve Energy, Sleep Better, Reduce Cravings


Page 16 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

Local SPORTS

The Heritage Greens Lawn Bowling Club held it’s final tournament on Sunday, Septemer 29. The Fall Bowl was sponsored by Richard Bruton of TD Wealth Management Group. From left: Bruton, who also played in the tournament, presented the winning trophy to the team of Jonathan Blake (Lead), Connie Steinman (Skip), and Kathy Robertson (Vice).

Heritage Greens Lawn Bowling Club took 3rd prize in the Georgina Bellamy Women’s Open Triples Tournament on September 17. Carolyn Cooke, right, was Skip, Ellen Edwards, middle, was Vice and Donna Bauman was Lead.

-18°C

-18°C

-18°C

-18°C

-18°C

-18°C

Winners of My Computer Guy Dave Tournament Sunday, September 15 are, from left: David Milne (Sponsor), Sandra Scand (Lead), Colin Thomson (Skip), Bev Hitchman (Vice).


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 17

CANADA’S TOP CURLING PRIZE

Canadian champion Brad Jacobs bringing Brier trophy to the Oktoberfest parade

C

anadian Men’s Curling Champion Brad Jacobs of Sault Ste. Marie will celebrate Thanksgiving in Kitchener-Waterloo this year. “We’re thrilled to have Brad Jacobs participate in our annual Thanksgiving Oktoberfest Parade,” said Cynthia Roth Chair of the 2013 Capital One Road to the Roar Organizing Committee. “Brad is the top men’s curler in the Province, and one of the best in Canada, and we expect him to be one of the favourites to win the Capital One Road to the Roar when it is held in Kitchener next month”. Jacobs and his team from Northern Ontario, which includes Third Ryan Fry, Second E.J. Harnden and Lead Ryan Harnden, together with Coach Tom Coulterman won the Tim Hortons Brier last spring in their sixth trip to the national championship. The team followed up their success by finishing second at the Ford World Curling Championships in Victoria B.C. the following month. In the parade, Jacobs will be joined by his wife Shawna - whom he married this past summer. Jacobs will also have with him the Brier Tankard,

The Brier Tankard

Photo courtesy of the Canadian Curling Association.

considered to be one of the most famous trophies in Canadian sport. “Brad will be part of an elite field of curlers in Kitchener that will battle one another for the final two men’s and women’s spots in the Roar of the Rings that will decide who represents Canada in the sport of Curling at the Olympic Games next February in Russia. To have the journey to Olympic Gold start here in Kitchener for possibly two of our champions

is wonderful,” said Roth. Brad is 28 years old. He has been curling since he was 10. He is an Account Manager with Royal Bank, and his team will be one of 12 men’s teams and 12 women’s teams competing in the Capital One Road to the Roar. Among the teams competing are former Wilfrid Laurier University Alumni John Morris (formerly the Third for Alberta’s Kevin Martin) and Laura Crocker. Morris is presently curling out of Kelowna, B.C. while Crocker is curling in Edmonton, Alberta. Also taking part in the pre-olympic curling trials is Guelph’s Bob Rumfeldt, Jake Higgs of Harriston, former Olympic Gold medallist Brad Gushue of St. John’s, Newfoundland, Cheryl Bernard and Shannon Kleibrink from Calgary, Alberta and Kelly Scott from Kelowna, B.C. Visit www.curling. ca/2013roadtotheroar-en/ to see all of the competing teams as well as the Draw schedule. To purchase tickets, visit www. theaud.ca. The Capital One Road to the Roar will be held at the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex November 5 through 10.

ymcacambridgekw.ca

makes taking the bus easy! EasyGO’s online trip planner makes it easy to get to my yoga class!

Class presentation? No problem I called EasyGO and found out I had enough time to finish it before I left for the bus stop.

EasyGO’s Text messaging let’s me make it to the movies. If only my buddies were as predictable.

Online www.grt.ca Text 57555 Call 519-585-7555 visit www.grt.ca today!


Page 18 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

notes from city hall far in our lanes term. You cycling andprobably clearly haven’t defined heard or read much about 2013 parking. The aim was totheachieve budget because,impeding to be frank,the flow this without “KITCHENER DELIVERS of traffic. The work took place RESPONSIBLE BUDGET” isn’t exactly in tandem with road resurfacing headline news. which included reducing the than twotoyears I was elected poorly utilizedmore four-lanes two, ago on a platform of efficiency but including new turning and lanes fiscal responsibility; borne of the to ensure an unrestricted flow of realization of strained taxpayers traffic. Now that the workand has a stagnating economy.   completed, I find it a dramatic With that in mind, In backaddition in May I to improvement. suggested we conduct a being safer and bicycle-friendly, representative residents Lorraine nowsurvey feelsofmore liketoa

bring in a budget at 1.39 per cent — including whether you are the lowest increase of the tri-cities, eligible for curbside collection, and among the (519) lowest in Ontario. or please call 741-2345 in reaching this ,figure My pride visit www.kitchener.ca keyword stems from“leaf the fact that it was Also search: collection”. accomplished withoutdrop-off being note that leaf sites, regressive. We made a $500,000 located in neighbourhoods across Office: 519-741-2784 Office: 519-741-2300 payment debt,open dedicated Finding beauty in nature, and also the city,to are seven days a Residence: 519-498-9056 mayor@kitchener.ca $800,000 to major parks hours (including week during daylight until finding beauty in the garbage that scott.davey@kitchener.ca Kiwanis $1.65 millionThe to nine mars nature link the two exhibits Blog: www.scottdavey.info the endPark), of November. amily Day is only a few days trails, and $320,000 to replace city hall art galleries for the s Kitchener’s finance chair, Lorraine Ave. Road Diet leaf drop-off locations include: at the away, so if you are still trees affected by the emerald ash of October. I’d like to detail in Lorraine Ave.my pride recently Schaeffer Park on Bloomingdale month looking for something fun borer.  In short, we’re stronger staff and council for bringing Rotunda Tammy Ratcliff underwent what’s knownwhat as Ia Road andand the toKitchener to do on Feb.Gallery: 18, I suggest checking fiscally still managed make believe be thetobest budget thus uses intaglio (a printing process “road to diet” improve safety Auditorium on Ottawa Street, out Mayor Zehr’s Movie Morning, in Kitchener a little bit better. n in whichof the image isSclerosis engraved or and aesthetics, while also adding side-street or crescent versus the about options for leaf disposal, north entrance. support the Multiple etched into a metal plate or cylinder Society of Canada. Doors open at 8 community is. Each zone has a TRAFFIC ON FAIRWAY ROAD John Paul II school, our staff will a.m. so that lies below non-printing anditmovies beginthe between different leaf collection date and Back a few months ago, be relocating a crossing guard 8:45 area), and mixed andmonotype 9:15 a.m.,prints at Empire rules about how leaves can be Kitchener Council supported my from Fairway and Lackner and Theatre media works in herPark October Drive.exhibit, on Gateway collected. To find out about options motion calling on the Region of placing a second one at Lackner the paper garden, to to explore There are great movies choosethe strength and beauty of the natural in your area, call our Corporate Waterloo to investigate speed and Pebblecreek to create safer from this year, including The Lorax; world, and also Drift; draw attention Contact Centre at (519) 741-2345 issues on Fairway Road. Recently, crossing conditions there for school Ice Age: Continental to the the3: Europe’s imperfections or visit www.kitchener.ca, keyword we heard back from the region, and children. Second, I will be working Madagascar Most and Office: 519-741-2243 impermanence of all living search “leaf collection”. Leaves can quite frankly the response was not with Mayor Zehr and the other Wanted; Transformers: Darkthings. Side Residence: 519-896-7300 Moon and The Hunger “The ‘perfect’ asymmetry in also be left at drop-off sites around satisfactory from a neighbourhood Kitchener regional councillors to of the berryv@kitchener.ca nature, the odd shaped spaces the city including: Hofstetter Park safety point of view. As a result, we see how we can get the region to Games. @berryonline branches at 40 Hofstetter Avenue and the will be doing two things to try and more proactively address some of between The morning is sureorto the offerawkward LEAF COLLECTION curl of onefor petal on a flower where Kitchener Memorial Auditorium at address the concerns I continue these regional road concerns in a something everyone! Thereiswill Kitchener is divided into different the North entrance. The sites are to hear from residents about this more effective way. Please stay be Looney draws, greatthe door myLucky curiosity takes root,” artist leaf collection zones depending on open during daylight hours until the regional road. and process visits from says offace herpainting work. “The and tuned for future updates on this prizes, how heavily forested a particular end of November. Onkle Hansare and as Missimportant Oktoberfest. materials to my First, in consultation with Pope neighbourhood issue. For more on this event,and visitit is work as details the subject matter, use of patronswithout of the cutting Boathouse. our community are worth much isless During have the of water the Federal same period, and accomplished any I in Although thisadvantage the increase in taxes www.mayorsmoviemorning.com. my love of printmaking and working had hoped that arrangements could than this amount.level, I was grant. rates have increased 199 per sewer integral services. at a reasonable Although is still paper) with fine March washi Break (Japanese have been made to add additional Recently tenders were received I firmly believe when a project is weeks away, it’s time to start cent and 293 perthat cent respectively. extremely disappointed in the The most contentious issue was that informs how I work.” washrooms this central location for this constituents project withwill the lowest 41% greater than expected itservices is time to thinking about what your children be facing increase Users of our recreational reducing fouratfirefighters in the fire Ratcliff studied printmaking at without infringing on attrition. the Boathouse tender a price services: of $565,000; will rethink thebe complete make will be doing with their newfound throughhaving other essential again facing aproject furtherand three department through This BealArt in London, Ontario. She patrons. this ofwas not $165,000 41%rates greater whatever changes are fornecessary freedom. Will water and or sewer are than had per cent increase in fees resulted inApparently, annual savings theywith be visiting with and lives in Guelph her family possible. been budgeted. and four other activities so as to such live within our budget increasing by 4.75I per cent. I had Office: 519-741-2790 as swimming and and their $480,000. I supported this, grandparents, spending the works full time in her studio amongst At this same a new ways matching councillors against accepting ultimatelyHydro within ouraremeans. put forward voted a limiting increase of requesting stafftime investigate to skating. rates also Being week at home with family, or visitingin Residence: 519-744-0807 the diverse artistic community Federal grantessential becameservice available. tender. The but mayor and four other increasing unable to take of the grant friends? three per cent, received support provide this in a As the and advantage many will face john.gazzola@kitchener.ca the Trafalgar Building. Her work amanner result, that $400,000 became available members of council voted in favour monies is similar to not being able to from only three councillors. Our we can afford now and increases over the next four years Another greatextensively option is March has shown in group the first in 10 years, to I for thisfuture. project; from the of moving withfinancial a $565,000 due taketoadvantage fabulous “sale Lastoryear, city time council decided utilities are forward in a strong in the No ($200,000 action will be taken the changeofinaproperty Break Camp at the Breithaupt and solo shows, most recently at voted in favour of the tax government $200,000 project. motionwithstand was lost giving on the assessment price” if we values. have insufficient funds add new washrooms at Victoria Park. Federal position The and could until thorough studies and are carried The tax Centre, running from 9 a.m.-4:30 Art Renann Isaacs Contemporary budget, resultedbecause in an the municipality). In reality, it tie vote and accordingly the tender available. We have all encountered This waswhich necessary the from our consumers a slight reprieve. In out, which clearly result in no increase was reasonable, but we fell p.m. daily with additional in Guelph, AWOL Gallerysupervised in Toronto increase of at 1.39 cent; slightly $400,000 taxpayers not10 accepted. time considerably this problem short on numerous occasions washrooms the per Boathouse location amounted the last years, theBecause inflationofrate in other essential comprise totothe safety ofofour citizens was Children in JK to hours available.and for Printopolis with Open Studio lower than thekept annual in monies washroom. Many homes constraints, it isbylikely that not services in maintaining our to individual homes. needed to be for increase the exclusive has increased about 20we perwill cent. provided our citizens. n and riskfor toaour properties. grade six will spend the week for Art Toronto. Her work is included the inflation rate. This was playing games both indoors and in numerous private, public and making new friends, and whenthe delegations tothis matters included Mayor Zehr, to thesalary publiclevels is outdoors, reduction, the overall budget for themessage interactive speak website, is what which unsustainable causedportrayed corporate collections. going for a daily swim. For more at council. Staff brings forward this motion. wethe are not willing toand, hear,if they and municipal level department will still go up in 2013. that at citizens told us they could manage. supported Berlin Tower ARTSPACE: For the and to register, visit a wide variety cuts of reports andto TheI understand City how of theKitchener value what have to say. andetails citiesyou could experience No significant were made public may don’tcontinue, month of October, artist-in-residence keyword search position. issues beforesuch council for review. procedural by-lawcuts; continues to I unstable want tofinancial encourage youCities as www.kitchener.ca, services as community centres, perceive these I respect the Susan Coolen continues to update “camp.” need to send a clear message to the snowplowing, grasshelps cutting; Hearing from theand public us allowwork theour 5 minute timedo.frame fora citizens to speak at the Council her collection of items of litter from firefighters It takes that these are not On April 12, I will host the annual however, one reduction special people do these I province to understand a significant broader view on delegations. I feelto this is a jobs veryand and Committee of methods the Whole the local urban environment State of the City Address. This as part sustainable and taxpayers don’t know that the community fire that council made affected our how council decisions impact our short time to address a particular meetings and let us know what you breakfast of the fallevent exhibit of The provides an LITTERhave limitless funds to pay these appreciates this essential service. Office: 519-741-2779 department. Their budget was residents. issue, especially when one is are increases concernedthrough about!their In council’s ARTI Project. Drop by toinsights see the opportunity for me to share taxes. The reality of theafire department Residence: 519-895-1569 reduced $480,000 to account ongoing percolating process of this This is whybyI was so pleased that forpassionate about subject and process of decision making, I surrounding the 2013 budget, the budget is that it has gone up 31.3 we see efforts to yvonne.fernandes@kitchener.ca the retirement of four firefighters; thematicand residency project through regional council’s motion to reduce possibly nervous or uncomfortable hope Everywhere you understand that it is of progress of citywide planning Downtown Incentive Plans per cent over the past six years due reduce spending, we must lead by new video, installations and book two fire prevention officers the delegation speaking time have from speaking in public. importance and value to hear from projects, upcoming initiatives to increases in salary, and the at the city. Please contact works. already retired. This was When we impose what I feel you example he final budget was ratified in affecting our community, and many 5 minutes wasreduction defeated. on city matters, whether as a Transparency and accountability 10 to presented by senior staff as a viable opening of an additional fire station.  me with your questions or January, setting Kitchener’s However, Theissues exhibit includes other affecting theoverviews citizens of I was disappointed that are unfair time constraints on delegation or by contacting your is vitally important to helping Salaries are often decided through concerns.n option to limit the potential increase tax rate at 1.39 per cent. Through various LITTER-ARTI sub-projects, and businesses of Kitchener, and 7 members of regional council, our arbitration. delegations, I worry that have the elected municipal council directly. council make decisions, These decisions to the fire budget. Even after the public input, researchespecially surveys and our entire region. including ‘The Snowball Effect’, which has had public and community addition, you will be pleased the garages; Kitchener consider pilot program youryour input will be create artistic events. I amwith proud To register activity forrequested the 2013To do this, I haveaorganized threeto This charitable event is open to all involvement during thewith firstnethalf of members of the public, determine the effectiveness of a soon. new space and its changes once it to say that Ward 10 has registered 2014 Festival of Neighbourhoods, such neighbourhood meetings in the the residency, and various art events proceeds from ticket sales donated on reduced speed limit of 40 km/h opens this spring. Improvements will KW Art Gallery the most events of this kind with it must take place between October past, providing an opportunity for to the Kitchener and Waterloo where Coolen presented information elementary frontages in the thenCity beginofonKitchener’s the originalFestival building.of 1, Looking the 2013 and Septembercreative 30, 2014. to school be heard, get answers for something for residents Foundation. For morelitter about her project and exhibited 2013/2014 year.plan. Some Community For more information on programs Neighbourhoods program since I Register soon, astoearly bird a prize and develop school an action you or your family do? Take trip information on this, and past State art installations. A staff provided report willincome the and services the KPL locations, draws began my termatofallcouncil in 2010. January, MayKW and solutions thesetomeetings at the to seeare the held greatinexhibits of the City addresses, visit Visit her LITTER-ARTI installation community and infrastructure check out their and to the August. I would like wonderful to invite you have included the use of the city’s Art Gallery and find out about their Office: 519-741-2786 keyword search at the regional public landfill tour day services April Webe www.kitchener.ca, interactive website free Festival of www.kpl.org. Neighbourhoods cool Being part of there a neighbourhood free speedcommittee monitoringon unit that8.can art programs for kids, Residence: 519-576-3501 “state of the city.” I hope to see you on Saturday, Oct. 26 from 9:30 a.m.– need to develop a culture that says celebration in City Hall’s Rotunda on family means that there are times used up to 7 days, police involvement teens and adults at www.kwag.ca. The new underground parking at dan.glenn-graham@kitchener.ca there! pedestrians first,enforcement, especially little Sunday, 20 from 1-3pmand for when issues concern arise. help including speed by-law 2:30 p.m. at the Waterloo Waste Let the innerofartist out to playTo and the mainOctober branch library is open ones! plus provision of city contacts Management site (enter and park at fun andwill a be chance to win the with these I feel theartcity’s Many can bring community food, check out times, the wonderful that role is in patrol, he things main branch ofaKitchener construction completed Gate #3, 1001 Erb St. W., Waterloo). $10,000 neighbourhood improvement is to facilitate in providing information, specific to resident needs. together and strengthen ties Keep in touch with your great ideas your very own backyard at Centre In Public Library on Queen Street sometime this spring on the other Call to reserve a spot on the site grant. Remember, one neighbourhood education, and answers, as well I would be glad to help your area between neighbours. This includes or concerns at dan.glennThe Square! parking garage to the east of the is open during construction, and if tour: 519-883-5100 x8449 or email mustpublic be present working withschool you tozones find creative out with either a celebration graham@kitchener.ca or or to hold opportunities to the startprogression community library.representative And yes, a great space as 40 km/hour you have not seen of event n common concerns. solutions where possible. a meeting to share 519-741-2786. ssteenson@regionofwaterloo.ca. gardens, hold street parties or tois win! planned above these parking the new 25,000-square-foot Lastly, I am moving that the City of

A

F

T

T

determine of previous affordability boulevard-feel. I hope services.  Staff implemented the the local residents are enjoying survey with expediency and the the change. results came back as suspected. It Loose leaf collection is best summarized as maintenance As the leaves begin to turn, I’ve of services with tax increases no already had some inquiries about greater than inflation. leaf collection. It’s important to At thethat timethe of the survey, note city has inflation different was projected 2-2.5 per cent; rules aboutto beleaf collection little did we know it would drop depending on how your particular sharply in the latter half of the year street has been zoned (the zoning settling at 1.4 per cent.  is determined by how densely Still, with your significant forested areawork is). from To find staff council, we managed to out and more detailed information

Paper Garden explores fascination with natural world

F


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 19

notes from city hall

been a great to shine a spotlight visit with yourway family, you may want to check out the that Hurongirls Natural on challenges fromArea all (HNA)the located at 801 TrilliumtoDr.face. Not over globe continue only isbullying it Kitchener’s largest violence park, it From and family home to some significant tois also educational barriers and child wetlands and species. marriage, many youngWith women are kilometres of trails boardwalks, bravely standing up and to injustice. I find Office: 519-741-2791 therestories is truly inspirational something forand I am their kelly.galloway-sealock@kitchener.ca everyone. happy to support initiatives that bring Twitter: @gallowaykelly The park also offers lots of cause. awareness to this important educational experiences, including This year’s theme for International and walk an upcoming presentation Day of the Girl Child is: Innovating Dear Ward 5 Residents, hope you have been enjoying entitled All About Bats, happening for Girl’s Education. It’s a well-known Have you heard about the United the summer so far. If you are Aug. 24 from 8-10 p.m. You must Nations’ Day of the looking forInternational an exciting destination to fact that investing in girls’ education in advanceeffective to participate. an extremely tool to Girl Child? Since 2011, the day has isregister

combat If batspoverty. aren’t your thing, you may beLast interested an event year, Iinwas proudcalled to host a Ganödagwёhda:’ dosgёh walk in recognition of International gёhö:de’ village close byyear the I am Day of the–Girl Child. This stream,awhich is a chance to learn hosting screening at City Hall of about richRising. archaeological the filmthe Girl Girl Rising is a heritagedocumentary of the area. This a drop-in moving that ischronicles 21 from 1-4 p.m. event on Sept. the lives of nine extraordinary girls Pleasenine visit different www.kitchener.ca, from countries. The “HNA”narration for more from keyword film alsosearch features information and towinners register.like Meryl Academy Award Every and year ICate look forward to the Streep Blanchett. More Williamsburgabout Community Festival. information the film can be This year the event will be taking found at www.girlrising.com. place Sunday, from 11-4 If youonwant to joinSept. me in8recognizing

International Day ofCommons. the Girl Child, p.m. at Max Becker While the details arepublic still being please attend a free, screening finalized, expect of at 9 am, 2you pm can or 6:30 pm lots on October great games, is food, activities 17. Everyone welcome andand we will entertainment high for the wholeteachers family. accommodate school Everyone is invited andclasses. I hope toNote see who want to bring their you there! there is a PG 13 rating for this film. The film to willleave be screened council I want you with ainfinal thought onon firethe safety. If you have a chambers second floor of city propane BBQ, is please remember hall. Seating limited, so please that the have a shelf life. RSVP to canisters Amy Carroll at amy.carroll@ Propane cylinders must be kitchener.ca or 519-741-2300 ext. inspected and re-certified 7768 by October 14. I look or forward to replaced 10 years. Enjoy the seeing youevery there!

Borer (EAB)Park. infestation in features the City McLennan Some key oflikeKitchener. Staff have completed the large splash pad, dog park an assessment of our andinventory the walking trail are very wellash trees to determine whichof trees attended. The number peoplecould be saved with an injection using these amenities, plustreatment some and required has removal. verywhich hot weather, madeRemoval it ofevident these that identified trees will haveand a more shaded areas significant impact in our ward, which is seating are needed in key areas the reason feel itAs necessary around theI park. this is stilltoahave further withnot those of you newercommunication park, trees have reached who are directly affected. To facilitate maturity to provide sufficient shade, this have organized a resident input more trees at this time andI planting and informational would not solve themeeting issue with our operational staff. immediately for the same reasons. The WARD PUBLICwith INFORMASo, I have been6 working our

TION will investigating take place on parks SESSION staff, who are October 16 from 7:00– 8:30pm in some options. Room 1 ofinconvenience Country Hills that Community Another I’m Centre, located at 100the Rittenhouse Rd. sure has hampered enjoyment Aofshort presentation by staff McLennan Park has beenwill thebegin atclosure 7:15pm to main talk about boulevard of the bathroom tree removal, funding and some facility. This has been due totimelines, followed by astructural question issues and answer sanitary and that period with longer staff. Ifthan you anticipated are unable to to are taking attend this meeting, the information address. As a temporary measure, presented will be posted onbeen the city’s portable washrooms have website www.kitchener.ca (search made available. Understandably this “urban forest”). I look forward is not the desired alternative. I askto seeing this meeting hear your you foryou youratpatience untiltothe questions andrepairs concerns. appropriate can be made.

Kitchener This year, in myBloom wife and I took great I had a cruising great time yearoftouring pleasure thethis streets Ward worthy residential and Ward 66 infor order to nominate business for the deservingproperties propertiestofornominate Kitchener Bloom.awards I’m to proud Kitchener in in Bloom be to announce that 12. WardMany 6 hadofthe held on Sept. youhighest are number of nominations. Mythesincere time proud homeowners, taking thanks and your appreciation to I those to beautify properties. wantedof you who have displayed yourofpride to make certain that those you of ownership through dedication, who go above andthe beyond wouldlove be and tender care you give efforts to maintaining acknowledged for your in and beautifying beautifying youryour frontproperties. yards. I amYour efforts then toimpact the able community’s very happy say I was to send level of civic help to create in more thanpride 200and nominations for a more welcoming Ward residents in Ward 6. n6.

eliminate the council. roadside grass before city The cutting motion budget to asincrease a cost-saving sought staff measure. and citizen The region contracts out the identification of areas of service underto theland city that but when used couldthe be money naturalized. disappeared, thehas city had choice Naturalization two nobenefits but to stop maintaining roadside for the city. First, it is a greener grass. approach to land management. Wisely, after receiving a lotwatering of Grass requires intensive pushback and other and the from city Kitchener is working hard the region reinstated tomunicipalities, conserve and protect water the moneywhere but unfortunately, a resources possible. Second, maintenance backlog hadrequire been the naturalized areas do not This combined created. same level of backlog, maintenance from city with an unusually rainysaving. spring and staff, resulting in cost

perfect storm forwhich weeds.was carried, The motion, is Recently, aligned Iwith bothcitythe met with staffofficial to principles thecouldcity’s Park see how thisofissue be Master Plan states addressed. It is which important to note“the City of Kitchener is committed to that grass maintenance is protecting environment completed the on anatural three-week cycle by through greening andperforms naturalization routes. The trim crew basic trim maintenance on cul-de-sacs, initiatives and policies” and the city’s park frontages and around Efficient and Effective Government playgroundscontains and park the furniture. document strategic cut thevalue main through areas Larger mowers direction to “maximize of the parks. Staff have also cost effective service delivery”. informed me that maintenance Cost saving andthe going green are cycles will tighten up as we return to two things that you have told me

solution wouldIf be to allow areAnother important to you. you have some areas be naturalized. other ideas toabout ways thatCitywe staffstreamline would workservices in consultation with can or improve residents our qualitytooflocate life inappropriate Kitchener, I am areas that might be beneficial always open to hearing them.toYour return to a natural state, feedback is valuable to like mevalley and I lands and meadows. encourage you to stay in touch. Do I am inaccount? the process of addition, youIn have a twitter Make drafting a motion before sure to follow metoatbring @bilioannidis council that would seekon to increase for the latest updates our ward the amount of maintenance and city. I can also be reached by performed city land. I certainly email at: on bil.ioannidis@kitchener. sympathize withat: residents who are ca or by phone (519) 741-2783. proud oftoour community and Irightly look forward hearing from you!

the downtown core, allowing cyclists by Michael Harris, MPP. Bill 73: to occupy an entire lane, similar to a Fair and Open Tendering Act motorist. Kitchener also has many pertains to lanes. labour relations for marked bike certain public sector employers In my recent travels to Chicago, in the construction industry. I Vancouver and Ottawa, I observed supported this resolution as the one-way and two-way bike lanes on City of Kitchener handcuffed downtown streets. is Some of these by the current legislation which does bike lanes are marked with elephant not permit all eligible non-union feet (extra-wide crosswalks, showing masonry that bikes contractors are permittedtotobid ridefor a City of Kitchener tendersection project. as across using the green Unfortunately, Michael Harris’ their travel lane) and are separated Bill was planter defeated. I noted while by either boxes, collapsible plastic bollards raisedincurbs to listening to the or debate the public

separate the bike riders from the gallery Conservative Michael Harris motorists. I also noticed sharrows on made strong arguments supporting the curb lanes of four lane streets in the municipalities’ Chicago, which allowinterests. motorists Howto ever, NDP MPP Catherine Fife pass any cyclists in the passing lane spoke against the bill and I found if they are not travelling at the speed her limit.position weak. Also, Liberal MPP John I have also Milloy checkeddid outnot bikeattend lanes the debate but only appeared at on trails and dedicated bike lanes to the vote. It is unfortunate and determine if there are any gates disappointing thata public these two before approaching members representing our region roadway. Having biked in Stanley were not the interested ininsupporting Park and waterfront Kitchener Council’s Vancouver and Toronto,resolution I have yet as to discover part of Billany 73.gates at road crossings.

In fact, Stanley Park has extensive Unfortunately, with the defeat of one-way bike trails and only one gate the bill, I will not be able to pass on to separate bicyclists from to you, the taxpayer, any beach. potential pedestrians using the local savings. For this to have happened, Well-marked directions, bike speed Bill 73 would need to have been limits and separated pedestrian or supported when it came before bike paths are well designed as the provincial legislature. It is noted on numerous park billboards. important that all contractors have The Vancouver parks department the to bid taxpayer-funded alsoright provides anon extensive Bike infrastructure A transVancouver routeprojects. map and guide. parent, openstrides and fair While wecompetitive, have made great tender getsinthe highest with ourprocess cycling that strategy quality work at isthe bestroom possible Kitchener, there clearly to n a benefit to the taxpayers. grow. is price

Lately, in the stickyappeals to Scott Davey —hot, rejected summertime, I have been tender. humming reconsider a construction that ditty whileplans at By Ghostbusters dumping washroom handling about David andlegitimate Jubilee, beefs their opposition bass-thumping music, high may have also helped weeds, torpedo geese droppings dying trees.barthe future of TheandBoathouse restaurant. priority for prospective — amid complaint And that’sAwhy Boathouse is topositive have calls — it’s a operators relief to receive separate in order commentswashrooms from peoplebuilt delighted toabout eliminate a situation a city-backed program towhere customers toiletsto with the reintroduce share rental boats Victoria public. Park. Opposition also means Kitchener As councillor, I have never risks kissing goodbye to $200,000 experienced such a refreshing flow offered by the federal government

of complimentary responses toward the $565,000 cost about of thea city project. It’sThat beenprice great to washrooms. tagseecan the way residents have embraced be measured against two other the efforts bybuilt Canoeing Grand to washrooms severaltheyears ago return boats to the downtown park. in other Kitchener parks that, by today’s prices, would between That company is alsocost donating $1 $555,000 and $586,000. from every boat rental to a parkNow, taxpayers maintenance fund. are paying for theEverywhere time and Iexpense go, peopleinvolved tell me in having staff scramble to cope with they like seeing boats back on the alake near-impossible create after a 20-year task hiatus.—Many of washrooms withcome heritage from standards residents the comments for under $400,000. who remember spending enjoyable My ongoing support for theonproject summer weekends boating the has partly to do with the fact that

lake during people past decades. numerous attended public meetings where theyresident said they I recently met one in want a washrooms located at this site. And neighbourhood grocery store who, while I share concern costs, as a young man, used toabout rent boats Ifrom support theinneed to construct the city the park. He loved a quality in what is aand beautiful seeing building the program return heritage park where $10.35 commented that, years ago, itmillion cost was upgrade the lake that, and $3 tospent rent atoboat. He’s amazed Boathouse exterior. decades later, it’s still possible to Despite $5 peropposition, half hour for I rent a boat forthe will eachcontinue person.n to push for park washrooms while seeking ways to safeguard that federal grant.

I

Office: 519-741-2793 Cell: 226-748-3109 Email: paul.singh@kitchener.ca Twitter: @paulsinghward6 Dear Residents, he beautiful weather has Emerald Ash Borer-Public Meeting brought to light some Work resident has beenconcerns ongoing to counter regarding the effects major of the Emerald our newest city park — Ash

T

Office: 519-741-2783 Email: bil.ioannidis@kitchener.ca Twitter: @bilioannidis

T

he summer of 2013 has

Dear been Neighbours, terrible for weeds in I am Kitchener. excited toIt tell youwhen about began aRegion motion that I recently brought of Waterloo decided to

Office: 519-741-2796 Residence: 519-57 Email: zyg.janecki@kitchener.ca

I

amSeptember pleased the19, cityI,recently On along with installed sharrows a pilot Councillor Yvonne asFernandes project along King Street from attended the second reading of Madison Avenue to Francis Street in Private Member’s Bill 73, tabled

Office: 519-741-2798 Email: frank.etherington@kitchener. ca

G

ot awashrooms complaint...who Public for you Victoria Your complaintPark gonna are incall?limbo after four buster councillor, of course. councillors — John Gazzola, Zyg Janecki, Yvonne Fernandes and

Ontario’s pesticide ban, created the

the drier weather of July and August.

rest of your summer! n

want to keep it looking its best.n

Office: 519-741-2300 Email: mayor@kitchener.ca

W

hat does When you thinkyour of economic neighbourhood to development and city mean building, you?investment This is the may not foreign direct question is being askedtoofmind, be the firstthat thing that comes residents as part of the however, it is critical to20th our local anniversary of Kitchener’s Festival economy. Foreign direct investment of Neighbourhoods. refers to a direct investment into production or a business bya an Typically, residents would host individual company located communityor event and register their in another country, buying a event to be enteredeither into a random draw for ain$10,000 capital company the target country or by improvement grant to be in expanding operations of used an existing their neighbourhood. business in that country. I recently returned from20th a joint marks the Since this year foreign direct investment trade anniversary of Kitchener’s Festival of mission to Germany and Neighbourhoods, we thought we the Netherlands, organized by Canada’s would add even more excitement to Technology Triangle (CTT). this already outstanding event Those and on the the mission created Mayor’sincluded Challenge.Mayor It’s Halloran, Mayor simple; all you haveCraig, to do iseconomic tell me what your neighbourhood to development staff from means the three you. Maybe youas want to share story– cities, as well staff from aCTT about thewe memories have of together formed you Team Waterloo growing upOur in your neighbourhood, Region. objective was to the impact thattargeted one special pursue new, leads in the life, or the neighbour in your food and made advanced manufacturing history ofconduct your entire neighbourhood. sector; follow-up visits to There is no right wrong answer; companies that orhad taken part in just share whatmissions; your community earlier trade and meet meansnumerous to YOU! city officials and with You can tell me about senior Canadian tradeyour officers to neighbourhood any host way that you gain insight intoin the country’s choose. Write a story orand essay of 500 economic situation potential words or less; draw, paint or create a business opportunities. picture on an 8.5x11 page; the I feel strongly inchabout create an audio recording five importance of these tradeofmissions, minutesfirsthand or less, orthe filmmany a video of seeing benefits fiveKitchener minutes or less. to and our entire Region. And, although missions are your entry to Sarah Please submitthese FitzPatrick,partially executive assistant the centered around thetotech mayor, via email, sector, they also have strong ties sarah.fitzpatrick@kitchener.ca or by to manufacturing. As an example, mail, 200our Kingprevious St. W., Kitchener, ON following trade mission N2GGermany 4G7. Submissions to at leastmust twobe local received nohave later seen than 3expansions p.m. on in companies Sept.manufacturing 30. their facilities. In keeping withquestion this growth But now the big – whatand development of the do you win? Since this manufacturing is the Mayor’s sector, I participated the Mayors’ Challenge after all, theinwinner and Dialogue on Manufacturing, his/her neighbours will have the in opportunity to take me on a walking September, organized by the can tour of your neighbourhood. Waterloo, Wellington, You Dufferin show me your favouriteBoard. spots, chat Workplace Training They about that topics are of interestsector to noted thethat manufacturing you or share your vision of how you needs to have an even greater see your neighbourhood the other way of connecting with ineach future. our virtual Manufacturing beyond Innovation Network. If you have questionsToorthat needextent, several organizations will contact be working more information, please Janice Ouellette at 519-741-2200 together to consider a body similar x7227 or to Communitech that can advocate Janice.ouellette@kitchener.ca. for the manufacturing industry. an important timeallfor IThis look is forward to reviewing of the manufacturing that will, the entries and sector; will see one one lucky no doubt, seen many changes in winner this fall! the years ahead. I look forward to continuing to support and grow this sector.


Page 20 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

Arts & ENTERTAINMENT Frederick Art Walk offers lots of variety

up ! g m ar son W th wi

By Carrie Debrone im Simpson and Aura Hertzog of Kitchener, two of the very few people in Ontario who make chocolate from scratch, will be offering their silky product at the 13th annual Frederick Art Walk on Saturday, November 9 from 10am to 5pm. You can meet the couple at their home at 24 Pequegnat Ave. in Kitchener during the Frederick Art Walk when participants can enjoy the beauty of a fall day and pleasure of exquisite artworks, in a setting of grand maple trees and century-old homes. This is the second year the chocolate makers have participated in the Frederick Art Walk. “It’s a busy day and good exposure for our businesses,” said Simpson, who opened the Ambrosia Pastry Co. one year ago after selling their previous business The Golden Hearth Bakery at the corner of King and Cedar Streets across from the Kitchener Market. The Ambrosia Pastry Co. opened in a small 350-square-foot commercial kitchen in Waterloo with the intent to produce pastries for sale with a sideline offering of chocolate products. But Simpson, a pastry chef who also teaches pastry making at George Brown College in Toronto, said the chocolate products they produce have became so popular they are now the main focus of the business. Using different kinds of cocoa beans from all over the world, they husk, roast and process them to create many different chocolate products. Currently Ambrosia Pastry Co. sells its chocolate to restaurants, catering companies, cafes and specialty food shops locally and across Canada. “It’s great to have a product that has a long shelf life compared to pastries. We can offer our own unique chocolate recipes. It’s always fun to make and the possibilities are never ending,” Simpson said. The business also offers pop-up pastry sales to customers who can purchase products such as chocolate bars, goat cheese tarts and cookies on line at ambrosiapastry.com This year, the 2 km Frederick Art Walk tour

T

2013/2014

CONCERT SERIES

October 27th to April 6th

WWW.ELORAFESTIVAL.COM KW Musical Productions presents

Canada’s favourite family musical! Starring Heather Brezden as Anne

Chocolate maker Tim Simpson stands in front of a bowl of raw cocoa beans and his completed slab of freshly made Mexican chocolate. He and his wife, Aura Hertzog of Kitchener, are two of the very few people in the province producing chocolate from scratch, taking it from bean to bar. and art sale through the Central Frederick Neighbourhood of Kitchener that spans north and south of Frederick Street between Lancaster and Edna, will offer the work of 55 artists who will open their homes in the downtown neighbourhood to visitors. Offerings will include fabric art, paintings, chocolate, photography, pottery, wood art, stained glass art, sewing crafts, tile work, jewellery, and more to suit all tastes and budgets. Children from the neighbourhood also get together and create one-of-a-kind arts and crafts to sell, giving the profits to a charity of their choice. Last year, they raised over $200 for Kidsability. You can find a description of the artists and more information about the event online at www. frederickartwalk.org. Brochures can be picked up from different locations around the area or at 230 Frederick Street.

Grand River Festival shows regional films

E

Nov 14 to 16, 2013

Centre In The Square, Kitchener Adapted by Donald Harron Music By Norman Campbell From the novel by L. M. Montgomery Lyrics By Donald Harron and Norman Campbell Additional Lyrics by Mavor Moore & Elaine Campbell

Lucy Maud Montgomery’s classic story about a feisty red-headed orphan named Anne Shirley comes alive on stage in this bright and fun-�illed family musical. Tickets $40+

Groups of 20 or more save 10%

1.800.265.8977 ● kwmp.ca centreinthesquare.com

ntering its seventh year, the 2013 Grand River Film Festival (GRFF) kicks off October 22 at Empire Theatres, 135 Gateway Park Drive, Kitchener at 7:30 with Bill Cunningham, NY, a 2010 profile of the noted and extraordinarily cheerful veteran New York City fashion photographer. Also opening at the same time and place is the Street Style Exhibition curated by Cambridge’s newest cultural organization the Fashion History Museum and students from Conestoga College’s Visual Merchandising Program. To celebrate this event, GRFF is hosting a Street Style photo contest. Fashionistas are invited to submit a photo of their favourite Street Style in Waterloo Region to win tickets to the opening night festivities. This year’s film festival will premiere six regional films. “We are so excited to bring fantastic new films to our community, some of which are hot off the heels of TIFF!” There is a great mix of both Canadian and international films, documentaries and narratives,” said Executive Director Tamara Louks. Festival highlights include Canadian director Jason DaSilva’s ‘When I Walk’ a personal, ambitious and genuine view of a life that takes nothing for granted.

Winner of the Best Canadian Feature Documentary at 2013 Hot Docs, DaSilva turns the camera on himself and openly shares his struggle with multiple sclerosis, a disease that has no cure. From the UK, the 2013 film Good Vibrations will please music fans and radicals alike. Based on the real life story of Terri Hooley, the man who opened a record store in 1970’s Belfast and became the unlikely leader of a motley group of kids and punks who join him on a mission to create a new community. As in previous years, GRFF will present the SHORT Shorts Screening & Awards Night and networking party on Wednesday, October 23, 2013, 7pm at the Princess Twin Cinemas in uptown Waterloo. Nine filmmakers from Waterloo Region and across Canada will compete for bragging rights and top prizes, including the Audience Choice Award. New for 2013, GRFF is launching its educational outreach program Cin-E-merge. Combining cinema, education and emerging film artists, Cin-E-merge aims to create opportunities for students to network with and learn from local film industry professionals. For more information about the GRFF and the event schedule, visit www.grff.ca. Phone: 519-2210172, Email: media@grff.ca or Join us on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/GRANDRIVERFILM


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 21

Raegan Little – Untitled #3 - Photograph, 2013 24 1/2 by 33 ½” - Printed on cold pressed 100% cotton watercolour paper

Above: Bill Schwarz - Coalie 2013 38” x 44” - Oil on linen Right: Amy Ferrari - Blossoming CreativiTree, 2013 - 36 inches tall X 30 inches wide X 2 inches deep - Acrylic on Canvas

BOX 13 Art Show & Sale - November 15 to 17 in Kitchener Cathy Farwell n November 2009, seven members of the Artist Critique Group exhibited their artwork in the loading dock hallway of the old Boehmer Box factory in Kitchener. The show name “BOX” was chosen to reference that place of origin and the many artistic connotations of the word ‘box’ - the paint box, camera, computer, toolbox, thinking outside of the box and more. A huge success, this art show and sale evolved to become a regional event in 2010 and has continued to grow each year since. Last year BOX displayed the juried work of 24 local artists, and was enjoyed by over 1650 visitors. The BOX event is very different from most traditional art shows. Audience enjoyment and arts education is an important part in the planning for this event. The BOX show takes a unique approach to the business of helping and promoting local artists and is a springboard, resource and support system for both emerging and established artists. BOX helps to connect artists from across the Region, and to raise the level of excellence of art produced and appreciated in our part of the province. BOX is designed and run by artists for artists, is not for profit and depends on the generosity of many sponsors, donors, and community partners. Awarded “Best New Event or Festival” at the Arts Awards Waterloo 2012, BOX 13 is growing again. In September a panel of art experts selected 33 artists from Kitchener, Cambridge, Waterloo, Elmira, and New Hamburg to display about 260 original paintings, drawings, photographs, mixed media works and sculptures at the

I

by

show, which will take place in a large industrial building at 41A Ardelt Place in Kitchener, behind Double R Steel. The Venue BOX moves each year to a different historic building in this region, offering visitors a chance to visit interesting buildings rarely open to the public. The history of the building is researched and becomes the basis for the much-loved BOX History Talk. The venue at 41A Ardelt Place was originally home to Ardelt Industries of Canada, a subsidiary of the giant Fried Krupp industrial empire in Germany. Built in 1955 by Rudolph Ardelt, the company produced heavy steel machinery, including cranes, bridges, hoists and mining equipment. Among its larger contracts, Ardelt did work for the St. Lawrence Seaway, Trans-Canada Highway and Blind River Uranium mines. History Talk Advanced manufacturing and the skills associated with it will be the topic for the BOX 13 History Talk on November 16 from 11:30am to 12:45pm. Hosted by radio and television personality Mike Farwell, panelists from education and industry will look at developments in our region. The adjacent Double R Steel, an example of an industry successfully adapting to change, will offer free public tours following this Talk. Art Talk The BOX 13 Art Talk happens on Sunday, November 17, from 11:30am to 12:45pm. Beyond BOX, hosted by Suzanne Luke, Curator of the Robert Langen Gallery, will focus on sharing insight into various avenues for artists interested in venturing outside of our community to pursue other arts related opportunities. Topics covered will include

artist participation in larger or cross border art fairs, acquiring gallery representation, and the advantages of joining artistrun centers or collectives. Representatives from Toronto, Guelph, London and beyond will participate on this panel. BOX Talk guests can preorder a $5 gourmet BOX lunch to be delivered to the venue to enjoy during the Talks. Guests are invited to stay on to enjoy the art afterwards and chat with the BOX artists. BOX Talks are free and open to the public. Doors open for both BOX Talks at 11:00 am. 2013 Charitable Partner Each year BOX partners with a different charitable organization and a percentage of sales from the event will be donated by the participating artists to the charity partner. The Independent Living Centre of Waterloo Region (ILCWR) is the BOX 13 Charity Partner. This organization provides programs and services for people with disabilities to help them live full, fulfilling and independent lives in the community. Through advocacy, education and handson support, ILCWR removes barriers and strives to make Waterloo Region a leader in accessibility. * * * BOX 13 is open to the public on November 16 and 17 from 1 to 4pm. BOX has free admission and parking, and is accessible by arrangement. The participating artists are present for the entire event, eager to explain and talk about their work with visitors of all ages. Visit www.boxartshow.ca for more event information and to pre-order a $5 Gourmet BOX lunch in October to be delivered to the venue for your enjoyment during the BOX 13 Talks. For more show information contact Cathy Farwell, BOX

Art General Organizer, boxinfo@bell.net 519-5043277. Twitter: @BOXArtshow FB: www.facebook.com/ BoxArtShowSale *** Cathy Farwell is a mixed

media artist and Founder/ General Organizer of the BOX Art Show & Sale. Farwell’s copper artwork is presently on display at Homer Watson House & Gallery through November 17.

SAT NOV 39

201

10 - 5

Join us on a walking tour through Kitchener’s Central Frederick Neighbourhood. Over 60 local Artisans invite you to this one day event to view and purchase original works.

frederickartwalk.org


Page 22 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013

WHAT WE’RE READING A monthly column featuring great reads as suggested and reviewed by librarians from the Kitchener Public Library. Follow along each month and discover your next great read! y life held great promise, I was sure of it, M but finding my way there was another matter altogether. This historical tale begins

THIS MONTH’S READING: The Virgin Cure by Ami McKay

REVIEWED BY:

Chris Schnarr, Manager, Grand River Stanley Park Community Library

in the rat-infested misery of lower Manhattan in 1871. Moth, a streetwise twelve year old girl, living in poverty, is sold by her gypsy mother to live as Mrs. Wentworth’s servant. Jealous of her young beauty, the cruel Mrs. Wentworth abuses Moth. Desperate, Moth finds her way to the Bowery, another place filled with threat and grief. Still hoping for a better life, Moth joins other young girls at Miss Everett’s high-end brothel, an establishment specializing in virgins. Moth feels the brothel is a place that offers her prospects and a chance at a life she’s never known. She finds friendship here and meets Dr. Sadie, a progressive female physician. Dr. Sadie counsels Moth about protecting her virtue and urges her to consider another path in life. Still, Moth is determined to be in charge

of her fate. Given the harsh experiences of her young life so far, Moth understands that her independent spirit will face risk and consequence, at times dire. Our strong heroine exemplifies what it takes to survive even when one’s choices are meager from the beginning. The novel affirms that our destiny is the one we make for ourselves. Through the voice of Moth, McKay reveals what life was like for thousands of children living on the streets of New York more than 140 years ago. Included in the book are lush details, period advertisement and fascinating pieces of history, all which make the different settings quite tangible for the reader. We can sense the desperation of the poor as well as the opulence of the upper class. The Virgin Cure is the second novel written by Ami McKay, the acclaimed Canadian writer of The Birth House. Copies are available at Kitchener Public Library in traditional book and audiobook format.

For more great reading ideas, visit www.kpl.org and click on the “Books and More” tab Want to share your own review of your favourite read? The library’s online catalogue enables library card holders to write a review for any item in the collection. Simply click on the “Add Review” tab for your selected book, and write away!


October 10, 2013 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l Page 23

COMMUNITY CALENDAR...COMMUNITY CALENDAR...COMMUNITY CALENDAR...COMMUNITY CALENDAR ELORA FESTIVAL SINGERS FALL AND WINTER CONCERTS – on Oct. 27 the Elora Festival Singers will be joined by organist Michael Bloss, an international performer and music educator, to reflect on the autumnal harvest with nine glorious choral works. The aptly titled Nine Lessons and Carols for Harvest is a program of stirring song accompanied by thoughtful text. Taking the form of poetic readings, the lessons derived from the works of T.S Elliot, Keats and Thomas Traherne mingle with scriptural extracts expertly voiced by Canon Robert Hulse. Program highlights include pieces by Dvorak, Elgar, Mendelsohn and Finnish composer, Jussi Chydenius. Tickets can be purchased by calling 519-8460331 or visiting The Elora Festival & Singers online at www.elorafestival. com K-W FIELD NATURALISTS CLUB – Hear Bryan Gilvesy, rancher extraordinaire, explain Alternative Land Use Services – a new concept for conservation on private land at the Kitchener Waterloo Field Naturalists Club on Mon. Oct. 28 at 7:30pm at the Wing 404/Rotary Centre, Dutton Drive, Waterloo. FREDERICK ART WALK – Saturday Nov. 9, 2013 10am –

5pm. The Frederick Art Walk is a 2 km walking tour through one of Kitchener’s oldest neighbourhoods. Participants can enjoy the beauty of a fall day and pleasure of exquisite artworks, in a setting of grand maple trees and century-old homes. The Art Walk features an amazing array of works including fabric art, paintings, chocolate, photography, pottery, stained glass art, sewing crafts, tile work, and jewellery. We also have rewards for “Art Walkers” via our Passport Program. The tour begins in the vicinity of Frederick and Chestnut Streets. Visit www.frederickwalk.org for more information on the homes and artists. KW CENTRAL ART WALK - 2013 Studio Tour and sale on Sat. Oct. 19 from 10am to 5pm and Sunday Oct. 20 from 12noon to 5pm. Yearly studio tour and sale in the beautiful Kitchener neighbourhoods bounded by Belmont Ave., Victoria, Weber, and Union streets. Come visit, and get a chance to see artists in their own studios, displaying fine art, jewellery, paintings, food, photography, pottery, glass, collage and fibre arts. For more information visit www.centralartwalk. ca ST. LUKE’S BAZAAR - Sat Nov 2, 2013 from 8am – 1:00 pm, 317

Franklin St N, Kitchener. Come and see our fabulous selection of Craft Items, Nearly New Table, Knitting Table, Raffle Table, Bake Table, Preserves, Jams, Christmas Cookies & Cake, Candy, Chicken & Beef Meat Pies. Lunch Room. Everyone invited – Bring your friends! CHRISTMAS TEA & MARKETPLACE, Saturday November 9th, 2013 10:00am to 3:00pm - Foundation Christian School in Winterbourne presents its 8th annual Winterbourne Wonderland Christmas Tea & Marketplace. Enjoy a country Christmas in our Tea room with home-made soups, scones, cookies and baked goods, and visit our famous basket room. 35+ vendors. Free Admission. Door prizes! 28 Katherine St. S. Winterbourne (519) 664-0110. Visit foundationchristianschool.ca . Email: admin@foundationchristianschool.ca OUT OF THE COLD VOLUNTEERS NEEDED - a training session will be held Oct. 25 at 7pm at First United Church, 16, William Street W., Waterloo, for anyone interested in volunteering on Fridays only with the Out of the Cold Program. Volunteers are needed for meal preparation and serving, overnight supervision, morning clean up and social time.

Network DRIVERS WANTED

Westcan Located throughout Western Canada is: Recruiting Experienced TRUCK DRIVERS to drive on a Seasonal, Rotational or Full-Time Basis for our busy Fall and Winter seasons

www.westcanbulk.ca Under the Join Our Team Link CALL 1.888.WBT.HIRE (1.888.928.4473) WESTCAN will be hosting a series of Open Houses in Ontario from October 17-19. CONFIRMED ARE: October 17, 2013: - London Husky, Hwy 401 Exit 195 & Hwy 74, 10am-2pm - Brantford Esso Truck Stop, 11 Sinclair Blvd, 6-9pm October 18, 2013: - Kitchener Petro-Pass, 120 Conestoga College BV, 10am-2pm. October 19, 2013: - Pickering Flying J, Hwy 401 Exit 399 (Brock Road), 10am-2pm More details to follow regarding additional locations L A I D L A W C A R R I E R S VA N DIVISION requires experienced AZ licensed drivers to run the U.S. Premium mileage rate. Home weekly. New equipment. Also hiring Owner Operators. 1-800-2638267

HOMER WATSON HOUSE & GALLERY’S FALL EXHIBITION – on now until Nov. 17, 2013, at 1754 Old Mill Road, Kitchener, featuring the original and highly gifted artists Nicole Waddick with the exhibition titled Strata based on the rolling grasslands of Southeastern Saskatchewan; Cathy Farwell’s body of work titled Relative Distance inspired by her recent trip to New Zealand; and Kathryn Bemrose courtesy of De Luca Fine Art Gallery, exhibition titled “The Above Series” includes a series of large scale oil paintings that were inspired by the artist having observed car tracks in the snow viewed from her second floor window. Admission $5. Members of the public are invited to attend an Artist Talk Event on Saturday, October 19, 2013 from 1-3pm. For more information call 519-748-4377. SO YOU THINK YOU CAN SING G&S! Waterloo Regional Gilbert & Sullivan Society is hosting a music competition for nonprofessional soloists on Saturday, October 26, 2013 Two Categories: Youth (age 1518) & Adult (19 & over) Cash prizes for each group: (1st $500, 2nd $300, 3rd $200) For more information and to register by September 30, 2013 Email: gswaterloo@gmail.com or call 519-650-4246

ADVERTISE ACROSS ONTARIO OR ACROSS THE COUNTRY! For more information contact your local newspaper.

ADVERTISING LOOKING FOR NEW BUSINESS and added revenue? Promote your company in Community Newspapers across Ontario right here in these Network Classified Ads or in business card-sized ads in hundreds of wellread newspapers. Let us show you how. Ask about our referral program. Ontario Community Newspapers Association. Contact Carol at 905639-5718 or Toll-Free 1-800-387-7982 ext. 229. www.networkclassified.org

HEALTH

FOR SALE

ANNOUNCEMENTS

#1 HIGH SPEED INTERNET $32.95/Month

Do you know a young star who is making a difference? Nominate them for the 2013 Junior Citizen Award. Nomination forms at www.ocna.org/juniorcitizen, from this newspaper, or call 905-639-8720 ext 221.

Absolutely no ports are blocked Unlimited Downloading Up to 11Mbps Download & 800Kbps Upload ORDER TODAY AT: www.acanac.ca or CALL TOLL-FREE: 1-866-281-3538

Travel to and from the location of employment provided APPLY ONLINE AT:

Those who can offer their time for even one night a month are welcome. For more information, e-mail friday@ kwootc.ca HANDICRAFT SALE - Saturday November 16th, 9am-2pm, Fairview Mennonite Home, 515 Langs Drive, Cambridge. Lots of Crafts, Decorations, Gift items, Stocking stuffers, Wearables, Wreaths, Woodworking, Baby Quilts and much more! Featuring: Santa’s Sweet Shop, Fresh Baking, Tea Room, Lunch, Preserves and a Used Book Sale. www.fairviewmh.com (519) 653-5719. No Admission Charge, Everyone is Welcome! OKTOBERFISH - Sunday October 27, 2013 - Waterloo Inn, 475 King Street West Waterloo. Doors open at 8am, auction starts at 10am sharp. Huge 38 class show. Returning this year...SALTWATER FRAG SWAP. This event is for fresh and saltwater enthusiasts of all skill levels. Don’t miss the area’s largest auction and fish show held only once a year. A great place to see different fish in the show, purchase supplies and fish at a discount from the auction, and ask questions from “a-fish-ionados”! Hosted by the area’s aquarium club, Kitchener-Waterloo Aquarium Society (KWAS).

1 in 5 Canadians will experience a mental health issue in their lifetime Mental Health Helpline 1-866-531-2600 www.MentalHealthHelpline.ca Also find us at: Mental Health Helpline on Facebook or @ConnexOntario on Twitter

SAWMILLS from only $4,897 - MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-566-6899 Ext:400OT.

SERVICES

AUTOS FOR SALE 100% AUTO FINANCING APPROVAL - We can get you approved for an automobile no matter what your circumstances are. Drive a little and save a lot. Over 300 vehicles to choose from. Apply online www.canadianautogroup.ca. CANADIAN AUTO GROUP INC., 250 Springbank Dr., London, ON, TollFree 1-888-474-8815 / 519-472-8815.

STEEL BUILDINGS STEEL BUILDING - THE GREAT SUPER SALE! 20X20 $4,070. 25X26 $4,879. 30X32 $6,695. 32X40 $8,374. 35X38 $9,540. 40X50 $12,900. One end wall included. Pioneer Steel 1-800-668-5422. www.pioneersteel.ca STEEL BUILDINGS/METAL BUILDINGS 60% OFF! 20x28, 30x40, 40x62, 45x90, 50x120, 60x150, 80x100 sell for balance owed! Call 1-800-457-2206 www.crownsteelbuildings.ca

Have you become addicted to prescription medication? Drug & Alcohol Helpline 1-800-565-8603 www.DrugAndAlcoholHelpline.ca Also find us at: Drug and Alcohol Helpline on Facebook or @ConnexOntario on Twitter

EMPLOYMENT OPPS. JOURNEYMAN AUTOMOTIVE Serv i c e Te c h n i c i a n ( s ) i n H a n n a Alberta. Hanna Chrysler Ltd. offers competitive wages from $30/hour, negotiable depending on experience. Bright, modern shop. Full-time permanent with benefits. Friendly town just 2 hours from major urban centres. More info at: hannachrysler.ca Fax 403-854-2845; Email: chrysler@telusplanet.net.

AUTOMOTIVE GUARANTEED APPROVAL DRIVE AWAY TODAY! We lend money to everyone. Fast approvals, best interest rates. Over 500 vehicles sale priced for immediate delivery OAC. 1-877-796-0514. www.yourapprovedonline.com.

FINANCIAL SERVICES

MORTGAGES

AS SEEN ON TV... NEED A MORTGAGE Home Equity Loan, Better Rate? Bad Credit, Self-Employed, Bankrupt? Been Turned Down? Facing Foreclosure Power of Sale? CALL US NOW TOLL-FREE: 1-877-733-4424 (Live Operator 24/7) And Speak To A Licensed Mortgage Agent MMAmortgages.com specializes in: Residential, Commercial, Rural Agriculture, Farms, & Land Mortgages For More Information Visit:

Want to talk to someone about gambling problems? Ontario Problem Gambling Helpline 1-888-230-3505 www.ProblemGamblingHelpline.ca Also find us at: Ontario Problem Gambling Helpline on Facebook or @ConnexOntario on Twitter

PERSONALS ARE YOU TIRED of investing in relationships that never seem to go anywhere? MISTY RIVER INTRODUCTIONS has people interested in finding partners for life. Ontario’s traditional matchmaker. CALL (519)6584204, www.mistyriverintros.com. DATING SERVICE. Long-term/shortterm relationships, free to try! 1-877297-9883. Talk with single ladies. Call #7878 or 1-888-534-6984. Talk now! 1-866-311-9640 or #5015. Meet local single ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+) TRUE PSYCHICS! For Answers call now 24/7 Toll Free 1-877-3423036; Mobile #4486; http://www.true psychics.ca.

Connect with Ontarians – extend your business reach! www.networkclassified.org

www.MMAmortgages.com (Lic#12126) $$$ 1st, 2nd, 3rd MORTGAGES Debt Consolidation, Refinancing, R e n o v a t i o n s , Ta x A r r e a r s , n o CMHC fees. $50K you pay $208.33/ month (OAC). No income, bad credit, power of sale stopped!! BETTER OPTION MORTGAGES, CALL TODAY Toll-Free 1-800-282-1169, www.mortgageontario.com (LIC# 10969). 1 s t & 2 n d M O RT G A G E S f r o m 2.55% VRM, 3.69% 5 YR. FIXED. A l l C r e d i t Ty p e s C o n s i d e r e d . Let us help you SAVE thousands on the right mortgage! Purchasing, Refinancing, Debt Consolidation, Home Renovations...CALL 1-800-225-1777, www.homeguardfunding.ca (LIC #10409).

COMING EVENTS Grow Marijuana Commercially. Canadian Commercial Production Licensing Convention October 26th & 27th. Toronto Airport, Marriot Hotel. www.greenlineacademy.com. Tickets 1-855-860-8611 or 250-870-1882.


Page 24 l Kitchener Citizen - West Edition l October 10, 2013


Kitchener Citizen - West Edition - October 2013