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[002] MIST

FOTOGRAFÍA: © JAVIPEC


THOUGHTS

MIST

The perseverance and patience of Alex Txikon as the days go by, whilst the fickle weather decides the best moment to attack the summit. Moments when you have to turn back and when frustration appears to have overcome hope. But it just seems that way; his will power goes much farther. On 26th December 2009, under a gray and cloudy sky, Diego, creator of the Dolomites Skyrace, lost his life in an accident in his beloved Dolomites. Many feared this mythical race would disappear. But this coming 22nd July, eight years after this tragedy, the twentieth edition will be held. This is, without a doubt, thanks to all those who wish to honor his memory. In April last year, British athlete Jasmin Paris set the female record at the Bob Graham Round. Two months later she ran the Ramsay Round in the shortest time ever, not only for a woman, but also for a man. Breaking barriers. Without limits. Only one person in history has ever managed to run a vertical kilometer in less than 30 minutes. His name is Urban Zemmer. He did it aged 44. Words just can´t do it justice. Javipec is a climbing photographer. Some of the very best climbers in the world have passed through his lens. Sasha DiGiulian, Patxi Usobiaga, Edu Marin, Adam Ondra, Chris Sharma... Their images evoke something special. Certainly down to the passion that surrounds his work. In a few weeks, the 35th edition of Leadville Trail 100 Run will be celebrated, a legend created through decades of effort and enthusiasm. The best trail runners in the world have competed in this race. Everyone wants to be there. But very few succeed. Alex Txikon’s willpower, honor at Dolomites Skyrace, the absence of limits in Jasmin Paris´ mind, the strength and resolve of Urban Zemmer, the passion of Javipec´s work and the eagerness at Leadville Trail 100 Run. These are the values and qualities that inspire this second issue of The Ridge. Onwards and upwards!

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CONTENTS

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THE SCENE DOLOMITES SKYRACE. SKYRACE & VK.

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CHALENGES ÁLEX TXIKON. INSTINCT AND HARD WORK.

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SUMMIT TALKS JASMIN PARIS. IN LOVE WITH MOUNTAINS.

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THE CAMERA IRIS JAVIPEC. VERTICAL PHOTOGRAPHY.

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THE SCENE LEADVILLE TRAIL100RUN. A LAND OF HOPE.

102 PORTRAITS URBAN ZEMMER. THE LEGEND.

116 EXPERIMENTAL BARKING IN THE SNOW.

124

WILDERNESS AREAS PATAGONIAN ICE. THE END OF THE WORLD.


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S K Y R A C E

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V E R T I C A L

K I L O M E T E R

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For Diego, Always with us.

Thanks to the inner strength and breathtaking environment where it takes place, the Dolomites Skyrace plays a key role in Skyrunning´s international circuit, attracting runners from all over the world who come to Canazei each year to take part in this incredible race. The International Federation of Skyrunning considers it one of the most prestigious on the Skyrunning World Series calendar thanks to its popularity and natural attraction. In fact, its setting, recognized as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, makes it even more fascinating and unique. Diego´s brainchild is still alive and strong, growing every day in reputation and prestige in his honor and memory. After that tragic 26th December, the promise made by his friends, from the bottom of their hearts and with their faces awash with tears, has been fulfilled”.

Extracted from www.dolomiteskyrace.com

Thanks Diego.

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PHOTO: © BONCIUTOMA

“On December 26th 2009, under a cold and cloudy sky that covered the highest peaks of the Dolomites in Val di Fassa, a tragic event took Diego and three other men from the Alpine Rescue Team away forever. In the desperation of those first moments, there were many who thought that those major sporting events he had created would also perish with him. Without its charismatic guide, the Dolomites Skyrace was in danger of disappearing from the international sports scene. In the end this did not happen. Almost six years have gone by since Diego left us and the Dolomites Skyrace is still going strong, still a bright light among mountain sports events held during the summer.


THE SCENE

Text: KissTheMountain

Dolomites Skyrace. A living legend. A sporting event that has become mythical to match other huge events in different sports such as the climb up Alpe d’Huez in the Tour de France, the Ironman Hawaii, the Five Nations Rugby tournament, Le Mans 24 Hours or the Wimbledon final. Kilian Jornet, Ionut Zinca, Marco di Gasperi, Luis Alberto Hernando, Fabio Meraldi, Rob Jebb, Miguel Caballero, Mitja Kosovelj, Tadei Pivk, Michele Tavernaro, Tòfol Castanyer, Agusti Roc, Faustino Bordiga, Bruno Brunnod and many other names from yesteryear and today, have all stepped onto the podium at least once in the 18 editions held to date. Elisa Desco, Emily Forsberg, Mireia Miró, Maite Maiora, Megan Zimmel, Laura Orgué, Silvia Serafini, Morena Paieri, Corinne Favre, Antonela Confortola, Silvana Iori, Nuria Dominguez, Oihana Kortazar, Kassie Ennan... all

know what it means to leave the starting line in the small town of Canazei at 1,465 meters above sea level, and begin climbing relentlessly to gain a height difference of 1,750m before reaching the summit of the race located at Piz Boè 3,152 meters above sea level. Nothing more, nothing less. The difficulty of this 22 kilometer race is only comparable to its beauty. From Piazza Marconi in the center of Canazei, both runners taking their first starting line in this race and the experienced elite can´t take their eyes away from the intimidating walls filled with rock crevices and stone needles they must go up only to then launch themselves into a frenzied descent back to the place from where they skeptically observed their shoes and little material they´ll have for such a challenge. Earth, stones, snow ... mix together in a high altitude landscape full of risks and threats to take on and as fast as our legs will carry us if we want to reach the extremely demanding cut off time.

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PHOTO: © FOTOIOSU

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THE SCENE

COURSE PROFILE

Pian Schiavaneis

Rifugio Boè

Rifugio Capanna Piz Fassa

Passo Pordoi

Rifugio Forcella Pordoi

DOLOMITES SKYRACE

Canazei

Canazei

+ 22 KM.

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CANAZEI

CANAZEI

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3.152 m.

1.750 m.

MAX

4 + FINISH LIN E

8h 30m .


PHOTO: © BONCIUTOMA

DOLOMITES VERTICAL KILOMETER

+ 2.530 m.

PARTENZA

SPIZ

2.465 m.

934 m.

FINISH LINE

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THE SCENE

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THE SCENE

COURSE ANALYSIS

SECTION 1 Canazei (1.450 m.) – Passo Pordoi (2.239 m.) Km. 6. Distance: 6 kilometers. From Marconi Square in Canazei this race starts slightly uphill through the town´s streets for about half a kilometer, before continuing on to a rocky path that takes you onto the grassy ski slopes at km/2. From here to Passo di Pordoi we find long straights with a 20% gradient connected by steep curves that push it up to 30%.

SECTION 2 Passo Pordoi – Rifugio Forcella Pordoi (2.829 m.) Km. 8. Distance: 2 kilometers. The most sculptured, well known and toughest part of the race begins, where you gain 600 vertical meters in just two kilometers, made up of steps and earthy sections at first, steep colossal rocks in the middle, and finally the highly photographed “zig zags”, the hallmark of the race, perfectly carved out of the vast prairie that leads up to Forcella. In such a remarkable place like this it´s worth taking in the majestic view of Val di Fassa and the Marmolada.

SECTION 3 Rifugio Forcella Pordoi – Rifugio Capanna Piz Fassa (3.152 m.) Km. 10. Distance: 2 kilometers. But the hard work is not over here. After a welcome flat that looks like the moon, we see the rocky pyramid of Piz Boe (3,152 meters), the rooftop of the race. Its conquest is not without emotion. Although well equipped with metal cords, the ascent is a complicated technical climb (grade III at its most dangerous part).

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SECTION 4 Rifugio Capanna Piz Fassa – Rifugio Boè (2.871 m.) Km. 11,5. Distance: 1,5 kilometers. Another warm reception from the tifosi, and a wide variety of provisions at the top (km/10) to help you undertake the entertaining final descent of loose rocks and ingenious solutions in the form of stairs to overcome impossible paths that lead down to the Boè refuge, still very close to 3,000m.

SECTION 5 Rifugio Boè – Ristorante Pian Schiavaneis (1.850 m.) Km. 16,5 Distance: 5 kilometers. After a brief slightly upward respite, an almost vertical drop begins up to km/16 where there is hardly any path. The red and white poles and the orange flags placed by the organization, guide us to Pian de Schiavaneis.

Distance: 5,5 kilometers. Now only a wooded area and a large, comfortable stony track, compared to the dizzying descent we just traversed, separate us from the long awaited goal at Canazei. The finishing line leads onto a stage at the end of a ramp as if they were holding a rally, with a lively speaker and a devoted crowd that give you goose bumps.

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PHOTO: © CLAUDIOVENTRELLA

SECTION 6 Ristoriante Pian Schiavaneis – Canazei (1.450 m.) Km. 22.


PHOTO: © FOTOIOSU

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THE SCENE

INSIDE THE RACE

Text: Gontxal K.N.

Every enthusiast of mountain races must have seen, either through photo or video, the daunting and unique “Zig zags” leading to Forcella Pordoi, that incredible milestone nestled in the Transalpine Dolomites that in recent years has brought us fierce duels between Kilian Jornet and Marco di Gasperi in 2013, resulting in a sprint in favor of the former; or the not so well known but no less epic battle between Luis Alberto Hernando and current Team Manager of La Sportiva Spain, Miguel Caballero, under heavy snowfall in the month of July in 2011. Yes, this is the Dolomites Skyrace, deservedly marked in the Skyrunner World Series and with the sponsorship of legendary Italian brand La Sportiva, capable of converting a high mountain race into a magnificent spectacle as demonstrated from the previous days, with the presentation of the elite athletes on a catwalk with a light and sound show, which caused a furor both among visitors and more earthy runners. Or the gift of Helios running shoes given to each participant, very suitable for the race, and of which the writer can vouch for good feelings of comfort and safety after using them. As for the race itself, it must be stressed that a commitment to optimal fitness is required, officially accredited by a medical certificate, and indirectly through demanding cut off times in the race: 1 hour and 50 minutes at Forcella di Pordoi and 4 hours and 15 minutes at the finishing line if you want to appear in the final classifications. At 8:30, from Marconi Square in Canazei, the race starts slightly uphill through the town´s streets for about half a kilometer, before continuing on to a rocky path that takes you onto the grassy ski slopes at km/2. From here, to the previously mentioned Passo di Pordoi (2,240 meters above sea level) at km/6, we find long straights with a 20% gradient connected by steep curves that push it up to 30%. In this strategic point the most sculptured, well known

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and toughest part of the race begins, where you gain 600 vertical meters in just two kilometers, made up of steps and earthy sections at first, steep colossal rocks in the middle, and finally the highly photographed “zig zags”, the hallmark of the race, perfectly carved out of the vast prairie that leads up to Forcella. Interestingly, the latter part of the climb is perhaps the kindest thanks to its firmer and flatter ground, and above all for the cheering crowd gathered there. In such a remarkable place like this it´s worth slowing down to take on liquids and take in the majestic view of Val di Fassa and the peaks of the Marmolada. But the hard work is not over here. After a welcome flat that looks like the moon, we see the rocky pyramid of Piz Boe (3,152 meters). Its conquest is not without emotion. Although well equipped with metal cords, the ascent is a complicated technical climb (grade III at its most dangerous part). Another warm reception from the tifosi, and a wide variety of provisions at the top (km/10) to help you undertake the entertaining final descent of loose rocks and ingenious solutions in the form of stairs to overcome impossible paths that lead down to the Boè refuge. After a slightly brief upward respite, an almost vertical drop begins up to km/16 where there is hardly any path. The red and white poles and the orange flags placed by the organization guide us to Pian de Schiavaneis. Now only a wooded area and a large, comfortable stony track, compared to the dizzying descent we just traversed, separate us from the long awaited goal at Canazei. The finishing line leads onto a stage at the end of a ramp as if they were holding a rally, with a lively speaker and a devoted crowd that give you goose bumps. An entertaining post-race time to refuel liquids and solids before moving on more leisurely to a warm meal in the green grassland of Canazei adding the finishing touches to a pioneering race that every lover of this type of alpine romp should enjoy at least once in their lifetime.


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PHOTO: © FOTOIOSU


THE SCENE

PHOTO: © FOTOIOSU

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THE SCENE

PODIUM

2016 - 19TH EDITION MEN:​ 1. TADEI PIVK 2. STIAN OVERGAARD 3. MARTIN ANTHAMATTEN WOMEN: 1. LAURA ORGUÈ 2. ELISA DESCO 3. CELIA CHIRON​ 2015 - 18TH EDITION MEN:​ 1. TADEI PIVK 2. IONUT ZINCA 3. PASCAL EGLI WOMEN: 1. MEGAN KIMMEL 2. LAURA ORGUÈ 3. ELISA DESCO​ 2014 - 17TH EDITION MEN: 1. KILIAN JORNET 2. IONUT ZINCA 3. TADEI PIVK WOMEN: 1. LAURA ORGUÈ 2. EMELIE FORSBERG 3. MAITE MAIORA ​ 2013 - 16TH EDITION MEN:​ 1. KILIAN JORNET 2. MARCO DE GASPERI 3. TADEI PIVK WOMEN: 1. EMELIE FORSBERG 2. SILVIA SERAFINI 3. NURIA DOMÍNGUEZ

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2012 - 15TH EDITION MEN: 1. KILIAN JORNET 2. IONUT ZINCA 3. MITJA KOSOVELJ WOMEN: 1. EMELIE FORSBERG 2. KASIE ENMAN 3. MIREIA MIRÒ ​ 2011 - 14TH EDITION MEN:​ 1. LUIS ALBERTO HERNANDO 2. MIGUEL CABALLERO 3. MICHELE TAVERNARO WOMEN: 1. MIREIA MIRÒ 2. OIHANA KORTAZAR 3. BRANDY ERHOLTZ​ 2010 - 13TH EDITION MEN:​ 1. PAOLO LARGER 2. MICHELE TAVERNARO 3. FULVIO DAPIT WOMEN: 1. LAETITIA ROUX 2. ANGELA MUDGE 3. STEPHANIE JIMENEZA 2009 - 12TH EDITION MEN: 1. RAÚL Gª CASTÁN 2. DENNIS BRUNNOD 3. GIOVANNI TACCHINI WOMEN: 1. ANTONELA CONFORTOLA 2. MÓNICA ARDID UBED 3. NADIA SCOLA


2004 - 7TH EDITION

MEN: 1. KILIAN JORNET 2. TÒFOL CASTANYER 3. TADEI PIVK​

MEN: 1. FULVIO DAPIT 2. BRUNO BRUNNOD 3. MICHELE TAVERNARO

WOMEN: 1. ANTONELA CONFORTOLA 2. STEPHANIE JIMENEZ 3. PIERANGELA BARONCHELLI

WOMEN: 1. ANNA SERRA 2. EMANUELA BRIZIO 3. RUTH PICKVANCE

2007 - 10TH EDITION

2003 - 6TH EDITION

MEN: 1. MITJA KOSOVELJ 2. TÒFOL CASTANYER 3. AGUSTÌ ROC

MEN: 1. SAUL PADUA 2. PAOLO LARGER 3. MARTIN PLANKER

WOMEN: 1. ANGELA MUDGE 2. STEPHANIE JIMENEZ 3. PAOLA ROMANIN

WOMEN: 1. GIOVANNA CERUTTI 2. CRISTINA PALUSELLI 3. MARIAGIULIA CANELLO

2006 - 9TH EDITION

2002 - 5TH EDITION

MEN: 1. AGUSTÌ ROC 2. JEBB ROB 3. MATTEO PILLER

MEN: 1. LUCIO FREGONA 2. PAOLO LARGER 3. ETTORE GIRARDI​

WOMEN: 1. ANGELA MUDGE 2. CORINNE FAVRE 3. PAOLA ROMANIN

WOMEN: 1. SILVANA IORI 2. MARIAGIULIA CANELLO 3. RIZZI MICHELA

2005 - 8TH EDITION

2001 - 4TH EDITION

MEN: 1. MICHELE TAVERNARO 2. SIMON BOOTH 3. ROB JEBB

MEN: 1. PAOLO LARGER 2. LUIGINO BORTOLUZZI 3. ANDREA MARTINELLI

WOMEN: 1. CORINNE FAVRE 2. EMANUELA BRIZIO 3. ANNA SERRA SALAME

WOMEN: 1. MICHELA BENZONI 2. ANNAMARIA GARELLI 3. ARMANDA MARUZZI

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2008 - 11TH EDITION

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PHOTO: © ÁLEX TXIKON’S ARCHIVE

ÁLEX TXIKON

INSTINCT AND HARD WORK


CHALLENGES

“We really wanted to climb Nanga Parbat. For ourselves, not for other people. We went there for three months, not for twenty days like the rest of the expeditions we met at base camp. It can´t be that way. You have to give it everything you´ve got. ”.

“First I leave. Then, Ali and Tamara. Simone is the last. The air that enters my lungs is as if it were made up of pins. I am setting my pace while doing the math to check my mind is working well. At 8,000 meters this is important. I count 25 steps up. If I don´t reach that number, and I count 16 for example, my head works out how many have been missed. Nine. It seems simple, but up there it´s not that easy. At 25 I add another 9. I have to do 34. What´s most difficult for me is the number 7. And 13. So the minutes go by whilst I ensure everything is working correctly in my mind”. Alex works hard. Always. He’s never had anything easy. As the youngest of 13 siblings he had to fight for himself at home. He is used to fighting. In the first winter ascent to Nanga Parbat he also had to do it. In his own words, one of the keys was the work he put in over 26 days with Ali Sapdara, so that at the right moment everything would culminate in success. WORK.

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Por KissTheMountain

His first memories of the mountain were not particularly positive. At the age of three he would go walking in Mount Gorbea with one of his brothers. But he suffered much more than he enjoyed it. It was not until he turned fifteen that he fell in love with the mountains. At that age he took his first ascents up the Alps. He started to forge his character and his learnings of the mountains. In 2002 he went up Broad Peak. In 2004 Makalu; for Alex, the most aesthetic 8,000 meters peak of all, and it stole a piece of his heart, because that spring he climbed with the late Ricardo Valencia and Iñaki Ochoa de Olza. It was on expeditions such as these where he began to develop that special instinct and learnt how to read nature´s clues. For Alex it is crucial to stop and study the direction of the wind, or the brightness of the stars and the moon. More than once it´s saved his life. INSTINCT.


PHOTO: © PIPI CARDELL

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CHALLENGES

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PHOTO: © ÁLEX TXIKON’S ARCHIVE

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In 2008 he joined Edurne Pasaban´s challenge to become the first woman to climb the 14 eight-thousanders. He has fond memories. Especially of teamwork. “One glance was enough to know what Edurne wanted, and therefore what he had to do.” But he also discovered aspects he doesn´t like: egos, competition, lack of humility and honesty. In Shisha Pangma he decides he doesn´t want to live others´ adventures, but rather his own. Ignoring the advice of those close to him, he discards going up Everest with his Al filo de lo imposible [tv program] companions, thereby turning down a great sum of money. “Everything has a beginning and an end. I wanted to discover how to reach a base camp in winter, how to survive above 7,000m in that season. That year

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in 2011 we did it in Gasherbrum I, reaching 7,100 meters“. HONESTY. Instinct would save his life the following year, in 2012, again in Gasherbrum I. Of the six companions who stayed the night at base camp, he was the only one who decided not to climb. Three of them did not return. “They did what you shouldn´t do, and you have to talk about it so that it doesn´t happen again. Ego and doing things to please others, not for oneself. They couldn´t wait for the perfect day, March 9. It had to be the day beforehand. I tried to reason with my companions, but they ignored me. It was intuition and the information nature shed itself. I had to climb 2,000 meters to help a teammate. I saw the rest of the expedition at 7,000 meters and I knew they were going to die. My heart


CHELLENGES

EL NANGA PARBAT (8,126 METERS.)

PHOTO: © PIPI CARDELL

pounded out of my chest. I shouted at them on the walkie talkie that it wasn´t going to work. I saw how they died with my very own eyes just 700 meters above me. The real high point is for everyone to return safe and sound to base camp. It’s not up there”. EXPERIENCE. “It´s very common for me to only sleep two nights at base camp. The first day we arrive; and the last night before returning home. I grab my bedroll and head up, without going back down for many days. I keep grafting and fend for myself. That’s what’s nice. Working and climbing. I end up with my hands all torn up and I´m unable to close them for days. I feel like a village boy with this keen eagerness but without great ambitions. If I had them, I would not be here to tell the tale”. PERSEVERANCE.

“It’s brutal. Together with Kanchenjunga, it´s the mountain with the greatest relief on the planet. You have to climb a grade of 4,000 meters, much more than Everest. Its summit is 7,000 meters above the Indus River, located just 25 kilometers away. It´s very unpredictable, with three peaks. You never know where the wind is going to blow. It can take your life very easily. There are no warnings of weather changes. One minute you´re at -25°C, and then the next at -50, with winds of 140 km/h giving a wind chill of -75°C. You´re a dead man if you don´t do things properly. Patience is key”. CLAIRVOYANCE. Álex Txikon arrives in Islamabad on December 24, 2015. He knows perfectly well what he is about to do. The killer mountain awaits him or the naked mountain as he prefers to call it. Soon he approaches a boxed in valley that in summer can reach 50ºC, whilst in winter is very cold. Tremendously cold. “This is what I wanted. To do a simulation in winter. During this trek the team comes together. Lots of time is spent with the porters. We made the mistake of dancing with them, and they got used to it. Every night we would do it until 2:30am, and at 4:00am they were waking us up, because the cold wouldn’t let them sleep under just a few blankets or inside their sleeping bags unsuitable for those temperatures. It becomes very hard. We carry 30 kilograms in our backpack. More than them. But we don´t

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CHALLENGES

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PHOTO: © ÁLEX TXIKON’S ARCHIVE

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CHALLENGES

lose sight of the fact that this is leisure for us. It is what it is. These are extreme days, but we enjoy them. What you want to do is reach base camp, “the fairytale meadow”. In summer it´s full of flowers and its beauty charms you, but in winter, for me, it´s even more beautiful. We arrived three days later, on 31st December. There were four expeditions, including Simone Moro and Tamara Lunger. This makes an uncomfortable base camp so it´s not difficult to keep going up. I always do things like this so there´s no temptation to use even the slightest excuse not to climb”. Passion. From 1st January I try to read nature. All the information about the environment, where the sun´s rays strike, the footprints of animals. Those first sensations, those first feelings, are key to me. An old sherpa told me years ago that when you cross a glacier, if you follow a fox’s footprints, you will never fall into a crevasse. That year we found them. We followed them and, after a really beautiful route, we crossed the glacier to reach Camp I“. Emotion.

SUCCESS OR FAILURE What is success and what is failure? Alex defines it as something very subjective and personal. He sets three clear goals in their expeditions. From a vital point of view, to enjoy it, have fun and climb with friends; as an athlete, to reach the summit that is not at 8,126 meters above sea level, but rather in the warmth of base camp after reaching the top; lastly, going and returning with friends. This does not always happen. His controversies with Daniele Nardi confirm this. Álex Txikon talks about the key points that, together with Ali, Simone, and of course Tamara, resulted in the first winter climb up Nanga Parbat on 26th February 2016, between the hours of 15:00 and 16:00:

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“There is a powerful tool, the Internet. I spent hours studying the best route. I noticed that in previous attempts people had tried to go via easier routes to reach high zones, between 7,500 and 7,800 meters, which would then require four days to reach the summit. But this is misleading. If you really understand winter climbs, you´ll know that it´s not possible to spend that many days above 7,000 meters under those conditions. I realized that we would have to use the Kinshofer route from 1962. A very difficult route, perhaps more than the typical one taken to K2. It means you have to fix many meters of rope and climb up very sharp vertical walls that are completely frozen. That was our choice”. STUDY.

2

“I have climbed 12 of the 8,000 meter mountains. Some of them twice. In 2011, at Gasherbrum I, I made many mistakes. I learned to almost lose my fingers. In 2012, on the same mountain, I learned to almost lose my toes. In 2013, I learned, among other things, how to organize myself and get dressed. In every expedition you learn. Last year’s attempt was key. It’s taken two years of planning and strategy”. KNOWLEDGE.

3

”Before going to Pakistan on 3rd December, we went to Argentina. Instead of going to Aconcagua and paying more than a thousand dollars just for the license, we went further north to a valley where five of America’s highest mountains are. Wild ones. We were surrounded by pumas, llamas and other really beautiful species. It was a key decision. It helped me achieve a certain level of acclimatization and get those stressful days out of the way before the start of the Nanga expedition”. ACCLIMATIZATION.

4

“From mistakes, opportunities are born. Last year, on summit day, we took twelve long hours from base camp to Camp I. This year, only an hour and twenty minutes. It’s not all muscle. You have to use your head and put all your energy and passion into it. With humility, hon-


PHOTO: © PIPI CARDELL

esty, perseverance and consistency. This is achieved little by little. Between Ali and I, we equip the route. Daniele left earlier. It´s a very hard job of 26 uninterrupted days to leave everything prepared to attack the summit. We did it without laziness. It´s not easy getting out of the sleeping bag every morning at -25º C. We always went running from one side to another, without wasting any time. Everything is rushed apart from breakfast. I like to get together face to face with my companions and talk about our fears and concerns. Concentration. Gaining meters through peace of mind. Many trips to Camp I. There, we always left the tent set up even if it tore apart. From here we start to equip the couloir with old climbing rope that my friends had left me. You have to fend for yourself. When it turns more vertical, we use higher quality ropes. Everything is frozen. The effort is tremendous even though the rope is fixed. From 5,000 to 6,100 meters, where Camp II is, it´s extremely vertical. We hadn´t even reached Camp II, and the other expeditions were already thinking about at-

tacking the summit. And Ali and I calmly go about our own business, carefully, step by step, and without any stress. It´s a very constant job, very psychological. You have to know how to measure physical exhaustion.” PLANNING AND WORK.

5

”For three and a half weeks we were waiting for an opportunity to attack the summit. Last year was the same, but during those days of waiting we got it wrong. We spent a whole month at base camp, but without moving position. We “declimatized”, thinking it was better to stay there as the body gets less tired at only 4,000 meters. Not this year. We didn´t stop moving. Leaving footprints, removing snow, going to Camp I to keep equipping it, or even cleaning the mountain to leave it as we had found it, and occasionally taking garbage down to the nearest town. You have to work. I learned that from last year. From a negative, you have to turn it into a positive”. EFFORT.

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ATTACKING THE SUMMIT Tamara, Ali, Simone and I. This is the final team. Four people in harmony. I’ve known Simone since 2003. From the first day at base camp I suggested we all got together. Simone and Tamara joined when all the work was done, after trying to do it on their own and realizing they would not reach the summit. I was getting calls from home, from journalists and other people telling me that Simone would eclipse me, because she has much more media interest than me. I didn´t get it. We must build, not destroy. It´s important to share things, to be honest and humble. The work was already done, but every little bit counts. At least, I think so”. VALUES. We had a window of six hours and climbed to Camp II. The goal was Camp III, but we didn´t make it. At least Simone and Tamara slept at high altitudes. It had snowed a lot, but the work Ali and I had done beforehand, equipping 2,845 meters of fixed rope, paid off. That night was frightening. When it happened, we went outside and the sight was apocalyptic, as if in a war. We went back down to base camp, to comfort, to life...“. FEARS.

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“Like last year we are in the last camp. It´s difficult to get an idea of the dimension of the topmost trapezoid. It’s giant. We left on 22nd February. A team of 4 but without a leader. Yes, I do take a bit more of the responsibility for having equipped everything with Ali, but I like the fact that decisions are taken among everyone. It looked as if it was going to be a good day, but really there is no timeframe to reach the summit. If today I´d been warned about what was coming, we wouldn´t have gone up. We rushed and spent two bad nights (22nd and 23rd January) at Camp II, where a tent hardly fits. The wind is brutal, over 200 km/h. We have to sleep at -45ºC on just two bedrolls. We’re going to be freezing cold. On the third day, 24th, at eleven in the morning we headed up at 04:00 in the morning. On the 25th we reached Camp IV. You’re tingling because you realize you might just have a chance. Here you have to cross crevasses and cracks with some humungous distances. We´re not carrying rope because it finishes at 6,900 meters. We go up with


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PHOTO: MARC EWERT (CC BY 2.0)

piolets and little else. If you stop to think about what you really need to take in those conditions, you wouldn´t go up. We´re not crazy, just psychologically prepared. I know why I do it, how and the distance I want to go. I do it for myself and just for me, because I honestly enjoy it. We leave Camp IV at 06:00 in the morning instead of at 03:00 as we did the year before. There are 600 meters of height gain and one and a half kilometers of distance left. First I leave. Then, Ali and Tamara. Simone is the last. The air that enters my lungs is as if it were made up of pins. I am setting my pace while doing the math to check my mind is working well. At 8,000 meters this is important. I count 25 steps up. If I don´t reach that number, and I count 16 for example, my head works out how many have been missed. Nine. It seems simple, but up there it´s not that easy. At 25 I add another 9. I have to do 34. What´s most difficult for me is the number 7. And 13. So the minutes go by whilst I ensure everything is working correctly in my mind. We cross the basin trekking very risky areas. We arrive at a pass at 7,650 meters with

a wind chill of -65º C. Ali separates from us, preferring to climb on the other side. With every step I take, I think about how I’m going to get back down. I try to be as relaxed as possible. Here I see a chocolate bar wrapper and a urine stain in a highly vertical zone. At first I think I’m getting sick, but I´m not, it’s just a sign. There´s also an old ice axe abandoned. I’m getting close. The last 250 meters give me the impression of being on another planet. The conditions are very tough. I haven´t seen Ali for the past hour. I see Simone and Tamara right behind me”. CONCENTRATION. “Ali and I were kneeling at the summit because it was very windy. I was very scared. I just wanted to get down”. SUCCESS. “Don´t make a sound, silence / so they don´t hear us, so they don´t hear us. / I have a mercury glove / and another of silk, and another of silk. / The statues fell / when the great door opened“.

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PHOTO: © ÁLEX TXIKON’S ARCHIVE

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IN LOVE WITH M O U N TA I N S


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PHOTO: COURTESY OF JASMIN PARIS


Text: KissTheMountain

K: When I think about Jasmin Paris, an image about you coming over Tromso Skyrace’s ridge arises in my mind. We published this picture in The Ridge’s first issue. It´s really inspiring. What do you remember of this race and especially about its famous ridge? Did you feel something like fear or is there no time to think? What would you highlight about that race? Is it one of the most technical you’ve done? Have you thought about coming back next year? Please tell us about your emotions in Tromso Skyrace. J: I really enjoyed the Tromso Skyrace. The mountains, terrain and weather all felt surprisingly similar to Scotland, so it was like running an exciting new race in familiar conditions. The route was a mixture of technical ridge running and steep descents through boul-

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ders and snow, interspersed with beautiful valleys of bilberry bushes and low forest. It was quite cold on the day of the race, which suited me, because I never enjoy racing in the heat. The mist rolling in and out limited our views in the morning, but did add to the atmosphere on the Hamperokken Ridge, which the race is famous for. I don’t remember feeling frightened at all, probably because I was enjoying myself too much – I really enjoy scrambling and moving fast over rocky terrain. There wasn’t any moment when I felt out of my depth, or dangerously exposed on the ridge itself. My greatest concern was probably on the descent from the ridge, which was quite steep. I worried that someone above me might slip, or knock a rock down, either of which I had no control of. I think that the Tromso Skyrace and

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the Glencoe Skyline are probably equal in terms of technical running, and I definitely plan to run them both again. I’m also looking forward to running Tropheo Kima – I missed out on that last year because it was the same weekend as the UTMB. My husband Konrad raced it though, and when he got home he said to me ‘You have to do that race, you would love it!’ K: 2016 was definitively a very good year for you. You completed the Bob Graham Round in a time of 15:24 (taking two and a half hours off the women’s record). You ran the Ramsay Round with an overall fastest known time for this route. You took third place in the Buff Epic Trail which was the Skyrunning World Championship in Ultra category. In August, you finished in a remarkable sixth position in UTMB. You set a new wom-


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PHOTO: © JAMES MACKEDDIE | INOV-8.COM

en’s record for the Paddy Buckley Round. Finally, and I am sure that I´ve not mentioned all your races and projects, you were crowned champion in the Extreme Series of the Skyrunner World Series with victories in Tromso Skyrace and in Glen Cloe Skyline. It´s really amazing, Jasmin. Congratulations! What about your plans for 2017? Which races and projects have you thought about taking part in? Will you definitely choose those long distance ones? J: Yes, I definitely prefer longer races and challenges. On longer races one has time to enjoy the views, to absorb the landscape, and to make friends with other runners. Longer races are more of a journey through the mountains, and less intensely competitive. Regarding the next few years, there are so many things I would like to do! I don’t have an exact plan, and I don’t intend to divulge everything here. I am known for keeping my secrets to myself (I prefer to run for the fun of it, and without media pressure and publicity, which is why I kept each of my three rounds – the Bob Graham, the Ramsay, the Paddy Buckley – a secret until I had completed them), and so people will probably find out about my most exciting projects after they have happened, rather than before. That said, some races I hope to do in the near future include: Tropheo Kima, Petite Trotte à Léon (with my husband Konrad Rawlik, and our good friend Jim Mann) and Els 2900. I also want to try and get a British vest (either for the Ultra Trail, or World Long Mountain Running Championships), and to set records for the classic long distance Lake District fell races,

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including my favourite, the Wasdale Horseshoe. In terms of Long Distance Challenges, the 24 hour records in Scotland and the Lake District are both tempting, as are challenges further afield – Nolan’s 14 for example. K: Jasmin, last year your time to complete the Bob Graham Round was 15 hours and 24 minutes. This is one of the fastest five times ever recorded. More than two and a half hours faster than Nicky Spink’s previous record and only around one hour and 30 minutes off the fastest ever Bob Graham Round. Could you explain to our readers why the differences between men and women are becoming smaller and smaller in ultra distance races? J: I am no expert, but I guess that there are several reasons why the differences between men and women become smaller and smaller in ultra distance races. Short races require fast sprint style running, and simply because of p h y s i o l o g y, men are always going to be stronger at that. In contrast, women seem better suited to endurance events requiring stamina. It may not only be a physical thing though. I remember the pre-race briefing for the Dragon’s Back (a fiveday race across the mountains of Wales), which I ran in 2015. At the time, Shane Ohly (the race director) told us that based on previous editions of the race, the chance

of a competitor finishing the race was significantly higher if they were female as opposed to male. Interestingly, there were also far fewer females entered for the race compared with males. Perhaps that was because the men were more likely to have the bravado and confident attitude (thinking ‘it can’t be that hard’) needed to enter the race, and in contrast, ladies only committed to doing so if they

start this late. What can you tell us about this situation? Do you think it could be a handicap or that the opposite is true, it can lengthen your sports career? What were your beginnings with running like? From the beginning did you start with fell running or with the more conventional road running? Do you remember your first mountain race? Which was it? What are your memories of it? J: I don’t really think that starting late as a runner will be a disadvantage for me. Probably over short distances, it is better to be younger, but for longer endurance races I think the best performances tend to come in the 30’s and early 40’s – you only need to look at the top placed runners in the UTMB in 2016 to see that. Besides, as I keep pointing out, I am really only interested in enjoying the mountains. If I cease to be competitive, I will

“Yes, I definitely prefer longer races and challenges. On longer races one has time to enjoy the views, to absorb the landscape, and to make friends with other runners. Longer races are more of a journey through the mountains, and less intensely competitive”.

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felt thoroughly prepared. In a way, women did their own selection beforehand, whereas men left it to the race itself. K: You were born in 1983 and started running in 2008. You were 25 years old. I think it´s not so common for an elite runner to

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continue to run and enjoy it regardless. And when I can no longer run, I hope I will still be able to walk, and enjoy the mountains that way instead. I started running as a fell runner, I was never really a road runner. After I finished university I was working as a small animal vet in a practice close to my parents’ home in the Peak District (this, like the Lake District, is a focal point for fell runners in the UK). One of my colleagues recognised that I was interested in sport and the mountains, and suggested I go along to a local fell race, called Wormstones (roughly 4 miles and 400m ascent). I ran in ordinary trainers, so I didn’t have much grip, and I fell over several times on the descent, but I remember that I enjoyed it immensely. After that, I joined a local club (Glossopdale Harriers) and started training with them twice a week. I would go out with the faster group (usually all men), because I enjoyed the longer runs, which took us further into the hills. I wasn’t very fast to begin with, but I gradually improved. I spent the following year (2009-2010) in Min-


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nesota, USA, doing an Internship (I didn’t have much opportunity to run there sadly). It wasn’t until I moved back to UK, to Edinburgh, that I took up fell-running more seriously. K: “I love being outside and I love being in wild places and among mountains. It’s who I am, I guess. The mountains put everything into perspective. Not only do they look beautiful but all the things that worry you…it makes it seem insignificant”. I read this sentence in an Interview you did with www.athleticsweekly.com. I really like it. Mountains have given you so much… Jasmin, are you in love with the mountains? Could you tell us about some of your best

memories in the mountains before you started running and after it? I know it might be difficult, but I would really love it if you could convey how you feel about the mountains. J: Yes, the mountains have given me some of the happiest moments of my life. The best day of my life so far was probably in 2014, when my husband (Konrad) and I traversed the Cuillin Ridge (on Skye, Scotland) in one long summer’s day. We started the walk in at 3am, reached the ridge at 6am bathed in glorious morning light, and then spent the day running, scrambling and climbing, with fantastic views of mountains and sea stretching out in all directions, and nobody else around. Similarly, many of the hiking trips I have been on with my brother (Romania, Slovenia, Slovakia, Patagonia, Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Scot-

happier. K: I have heard you saying that your background is in hillwalking. Before you started running you used to spend a lot of time in the hills and mountains. Did you feel that you already had special skills to move into them? In your case, do you think it is something innate or that you have acquired with practice? How do you work on fast technical descents? Do you train these aspects? J: My parents took us to the hills and mountains from a very early age, in fact some of the earliest photos I have of myself in the hills are from a trip when my parents hiked across the Andes with me on their back, at the age of 12 months. So I don’t really remember ‘moving

“Perhaps that was because the men were more likely to have the bravado and confident attitude (thinking ‘it can’t be that hard’) needed to enter the race, and in contrast, ladies only committed to doing so if they felt thoroughly prepared. In a way, women did their own selection beforehand, whereas men left it to the race itself”. land, Norway and so on...) have been very special. I always come back from the mountains feeling like my perspective on life has been re-adjusted, and I am always

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into’ the mountains, I was just there from the beginning. I do think that those early trips, and the freedom we had as children to play, explore, climb and swim outdoors, all probably helped me develop skills (later honed as a teenager and in my twenties on long hiking trips with my brother Vaclav in big mountains across the world) which help me now as a fell and mountain runner, to move quickly and with minimal effort over difficult terrain. I don’t ever train specifically for technical descents, but given that I enjoy them so much, I often seek them out when I go for a run anyway. K:Talking about training, Jasmin… Could you tell us in detail how a training week is when you are preparing for a long distance race? I mean three or four weeks before running the Buff Epic Trail or Salomon Glen Coe, for instance. How many hours do you spend training? Do you also do cycling or swimming? Do you work out at the gym? J: I’m afraid I might disappoint you with this answer. I don’t really have any structured training plan from week to week. In general, last year, I ran in the hills for 6090 minutes each day during the week, and around 3-4 hours both days on weekends. I also did some

cross training, through open water swimming, cycling to work, and (over the winter) also the gym. Approximately once a week I would try to do a hill-rep session, and occasionally I would run a fast 5-mile

“I am really only interested in enjoying the mountains. If I cease to be competitive, I will continue to run and enjoy it regardless. And when I can no longer run, I hope I will still be able to walk, and enjoy the mountains that way instead”.

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loop around the reservoir outside our cottage (my husband and I would set off in opposite directions and the place we met would indicate how well/badly each of us was doing), which was the nearest thing I ever did to a speed session. K: When did you start your relationship with Inov-8? What is it like? How is your relationship with other members of the Inov-8 Team? Could you tell us what your

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favorite shoes are? Do you always use the same ones? I have X-Talon 190 from three or four years ago. I really like this model. I only use them for vertical kilometers. J: I think it was 2015. My relationship with Inov-8 is very relaxed. They support my running with kit and shoes, which is brilliant, and in return I am pleased to be an ambassador for them. The fact that I always chose to run in Inov-8 shoes is because I like them most, rather than because I am obliged to. For rough fell races/running in the UK, I have always run in inov8 MUDCLAW 300. For day to day running with bits of trail and road, I like the new Inov-8 ROCLITE 305s. K: Jasmin, thank you for letting us get to know you a little more. I would like to end this talk with a double question. How do you imagine this sport in 15 years? And you? Will you keep competing and trying to break the records that still remain to be achieved? We wish you the best of luck for this new season. J: I hope that the sport will retain its open, all-inclusive and welcoming nature, and that people will continue to enjoy the mountains cleanly, and in friendship. If I am lucky enough to remain fit and uninjured, I hope to be setting myself new challenges for many years to come, pushing my boundaries and learning more about myself in the mountains I love so much.

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PHOTO: © JAVIPEC | CLIMBER: SASHA DIGIULIAN


THE CAMERA IRIS

Text & photography: Javipec.

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PHOTO: © JAVIPEC | CLIMBER: JOE KINDER | ROUTE: CHILAM BALAM (R1 8C+) | SPAIN

Climbing photography has no strict rules. As with many other specialties of this artistic discipline, you don´t always achieve what you are looking for, whilst at other times you do without even looking for it. But you have to be there. Sometimes you calculate the precise moment, the light, the most convenient location to turn what you have imagined in your mind into reality, yet it does not work. This is photography. In the case of sport climbing, as a rule of thumb, and especially in taking pictures of an elite climber, it is the photographer who has to adapt to the circumstances. The chance of the photography scenario being chosen by the person behind the camera is practically void. It will not be how you chose, nor at the time when the light is most appropriate. The photograph comes into the frame during the climber´s plan, and just at the moment in which temperature and humidity conditions are perfect for the protagonist. In a high percentage of occasions, it will be in the shade and at a time when the light is growing dim. And that’s

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FOTOGRAFÍA: © SWEET SHOT PHOTOS

PHOTO: © JAVIPEC | CLIMBER: ADAM ONDRA | ROUTE: VICIOUS CIRCLE (9A+/B) | SLOVENIA


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PHOTO: © JAVIPEC | CLIMBER: CARLOS LOGROÑO “CITRO” | ROUTE: MECONI (8A+) | SPAIN

THE CAMERA IRIS

FOTOGRAFÍA: LUIS ORDÓÑEZ

when the photographer has to do the very best he can. He will “go all out” and there will be no second attempts. Anticipation is crucial so as not to miss what may be a unique opportunity. Although it´s not always so negative. Sometimes “luck” can occur as a climber in unable to overcome a path and has to try again and again. This gives you the option to change frames, angles or even the lens. The threat that a climber will leave the track at that moment is also lurking, and that is the end of any opportunity. To lighten the burden, both in terms of closeness and when hanging on a wall, I like to work with a single camera body and several lenses, whose focal lengths depend on the possibilities I have seen from the ground. For me it is important to have everything under control in advance: the lenses prepared and the exact moment in which I will be able to change my lens without losing a good opportunity. There are no rules that fully ensure something will work. At least I do not know them. Each path is different and each climber has their own style that is decisive. Some are more static and others more dynamic; some climb closer to the wall and others less so ... The final result is also affected by your empathy with the climber. It is always better to create a relaxed atmosphere within the pressured environment they are already under by taking themselves to their limit. In spite of everything, and always trying to do my very best, many times after having climbed a static rope to the location I believed ideal, and having

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I also like to photograph bouldering. This type of climbing allows for greater creativity. When undertaken on smaller rocks and without rope, you can look for different locations and angles. Freedom of movement is much greater. In addition it is possible to resort to other elements such as external flashes. All this is much easier than hanging on a rope, and also provides the possibility that the climber repeats or attempts to repeat a certain movement. There is something common in climbing a route and in taking a picture: you are never completely satisfied. In photography there is always something to improve, you always want something more. At least we get to work in an unbeatable office such as the rocks, surrounded by a fantastic environment for doing what we most enjoy, climbing. And that is very important. Many thanks to the brands and people who make all this a little easier: Patxi Usobiaga, ABK Company, Moonfeet Spain, Tenaya Climbing and Climbskin. As well as everyone who has trusted in my work at some point.

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PHOTO: Š JAVIPEC | CLIMBER: UNKNOWN | ROUTE: TRANSWORLD DEPRAVITY | USA

been hanging on for hours, the result was less than I hoped for. It is not unusual for a paradoxical situation to occur: that being prepared to photograph a climber on a certain route, the best photograph is of a climber on another path nearby. Other times, on the contrary, studying the walls, the light, the different locations ..., you get that photo without having to hang from a rope, just from the floor. Observing the environment and the possibilities it offers can yield more than satisfactory results.


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PHOTO: © JAVIPEC | CLIMBER: CARLOS RUANO | AWESOME (7C) | SPAIN MOUNTAIN CULTURE MAGAZINE

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PHOTO: © ARCHIVE KTHEM

IT IS NOT THE MOUNTAIN WE CONQUER BUT OURSELVES. EDMUND HILLARY

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theridge@kissthemountain.com

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PHOTO: © MATT TRAPPE

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35 YEARS

LEADVILLE TRAIL 100 RUN A

L A N D

O F

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A NEW OPPORTUNITY

Leadville was burned into Henry’s mind as a new opportunity. A new hope to provide for his family. He knew it would be hard work and how difficult it would be to stay away from his wife and children, but he had no choice. The gold rush had also captivated others who left their homes and began moving to Lake City. After several weeks, Henry reached his destination. He did not carry luggage, just a small bag where he kept some bread and water. He watched as the timber to build cabins was cut and collected, and he set to work. He was surprised by the friendly atmosphere there, and even how they helped each other. Days passed, but the clear image of his family was still in his mind. He collected the soil and went to the river to kneel and sieve it, in hope of finding the desired gold stone. Months passed by

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Text: J.J. Alcaide

without finding any. Until one day, luck was on his side and a nugget shone in his hands. Excitement glowed on his face, bright in his eyes. That night he dreamed he would come home and that his family would never be poor again. However, fate would not make it so easy. In the following months, new waves of workers came, which coincided with the rise of the silver market. The cabins were multiplying and the atmosphere was no


PHOTO: Š MATT TRAPPE

longer the same. Every day there was more work to be done and fewer benefits to gain. The massive looting of the lands gave way for the last of the sand of the times of glory to run out, welcoming decay. Anxiety and greed took control of the human mind. Desperation drowned in liters of alcohol, and envy rummaged pockets under the accomplice of the night. Faces were tired and broken, the looks were sad and dull. Henry watched as his dream slipped through his fingers and he could not bear the thought of failing his family. One night he came up with the idea of stealing from his companions, of even ending their lives if necessary. At that moment, a part of him died. He no longer recognized himself, he did not know who he was anymore, he was on the verge of madness. Fate wanted to send a sign and suddenly a shot rang out. As he emerged from his cabin, Henry discovered the lifeless body of one of his companions and rushed

to his aid, but it was too late. Tears covered his face as he shouted words that no one could understand. This event made him rethink his stay in Leadville. His head kept spinning, and though he did not want to admit it, he knew he was no better than the others. His mind had also played tricks on him because he had wanted to take on more than he could. All this devoured him from inside and he could not forgive it. He had trouble remembering the image of his family and wondered if it was time to return. There was enough gold in his pockets to keep on going, though without the opulence. He was not entirely sure, but the desire to hug them pushed him back home. The reunion made his eyes fill with tears again, but this time with happiness. Henry will never forget all that Leadville taught him.

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LT100. THE RACE ACROSS THE SKY Leadville is a magical place. For 34 years, this rugged mountain town has welcomed racers with a monumental challenge. Every year brings a fresh crop of anxious and energetic athletes just waiting to test themselves in Colorado’s high country. As you place one foot in front of the other and witness our breathtaking views, the scale of your challenge will begin to sink in. There will be highs and lows and water crossings thrown in for good fun. And as the hours tick by, the sun will rise, then fall...and, for some, rise again. The further you get on this beautiful course, the more you will depend on your incredible crew of family and friends to get you back home. Our goal is to give you every opportunity to succeed. We have made some changes and are hopeful that you feel the benefits. Please be courteous to your fellow athletes and show respect to the course. You have spent countless hours preparing for this day and are definitely ready to toe the line. Leadville’s magic has been here for over 100 years and soon it will be in you! Thanks for running with us.

Josh Colley, Race Director.

www.leadvilleraceseries.com/leadvilletrail100run

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I I M AG I N E

DAYDREAM

...35th anniversary of the legendary Race Across The Sky, sheltered in its alpine forests and glacial lakes

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...a myth created through decades of effort, dedication and passion.

...thousands of dreamers crossing their fingers to take the place of those brave 45 who accepted the ch ...the incessant vibration of the earth as hundreds of runners pass by. ...the black night lit with the lights of hundreds of headlamps. ...the excitement, the pain and the doubts for a hundred miles. ...a race for the sky to more than 3,000 meters of altitude. ...the collapsing of the lungs coming to Hope Pass. ...the legs punished by the string and effort then comforted by river crossing. ...the eyes fixed on the stopwatch and the dispute over the gold or silver buckle. ...the despair of those who see a dream escape them. ...Skip Hamilton at the starting line, when I had barely been born, staring at the road with a calm mind. ...Teri Gerber making her way into a male-dominated sport, surpassing herself and setting a new era by

...Ann Trason and her competitive spirit accelerating the pace to leave behind her rivals and set the wom

...Victoriano Churro and Juan Herrera, far from the Copper Canyon, flying in their sandals for sacks of Pin ...Steve Peterson with the dedication and effort that led him to four consecutive victories. ...Matt Carpenter punishing his legs, breathing hard and pushing his body to an undefeated record.

...Anton Krupicka at 23, running without a shirt, focused on winning, with two victories and three of the best twe

...Rob Krar lost in the dark confines of his mind unable to find a way out, fighting against depression and ...Emma Roca facing a new challenge, out of the flames, with the certainty of achieving her goal.

...myself, in the future, with my feet at the starting line. Scared. I live in hope. Fighting for the gold


s.

PHOTO: © RICKEY GATES

hallenge for the first time.

crossing the finish line victoriously.

men’s record.

nole.

elve times in history.

d overcoming.

d buckle.

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ACHIEVEMENTS

2016

2007

M. IAN SHARMAN W. CLARE GALLAGHER

M. ANTON KRUPICKA W. TAMMY STONE

2015

2006

M. IAN SHARMAN W. ELIZABETH HOWARD

M. ANTON KRUPICKA W. DIANA FINKEL

2014 ​ M. ROB KRAR W. EMMA ROCA

2005 ​ M. MATT CARPENTER W. NIKKI KIMBALL

2013

2004

M. IAN SHARMAN W. ASHLEY ARNOLD

M. PAUL DEWITT W. ANTHEA SCHMID

2012

2003

M. THOMAS LORBLANCHET W. TINA LEWIS

M. PAUL DEWITT W. VALERIE CALDWELL

2011

2002

M. RYAN SANDES W. LYNETTE CLEMONS

M. CHAD RICKLEFS W. ANTHEA SCHMID

2010

2001

M. DUNCAN CALLAHAN W. ELIZABETH HOWARD

M. STEVE PETERSON W. JANET RUNYAN

2009

2000

1º. TIMMY PARR 1ª. LYNETTE CLEMONS

M. CHAD RICKLEFS W. AMANDA MCINTOSH

2008

1999

1º. DUNCAN CALLAHAN 1ª. HELEN COSPOLICH

M. STEVE PETERSON W. AMANDA MCINTOSH

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1998

1989

M. STEVE PETERSON W. ANN TRASON

M. SEAN CROM W. KATHY D’ONOFRIO

1997

1988

M. STEVE PETERSON W. JULIE ARTER

M. RICK SPADY W. ANN TRASON

1996 ​ M. STEVE PETERSON W. MARTHA SWATT-ROBISON

1987 ​ M. SKIP HAMILTON W. RANDI YOUNG

1995

1986

M. KIRK APT W. LINDA LEE

M. SKIP HAMILTON W. MAUREEN GARTY

1994

1985

M. JUAN HERRERA W. ANN TRASON

M. JIM HOWARD W. MARGE ADELMAN

1993

1984

M. VICTORIANO CHURRO W. CHRISTINE GIBBONS

M. SKIP HAMILTON W. TERI GERBER

1992

1983

M. RICK SPADY W. THERESA DAUS-WEBER

M. SKIP HAMILTON W. -

M. STEVE MAHIEU W. ALICE THURAU 1990 M. JIM O’BRIEN W. ANN TRASON

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1991

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COURSE PROFILE

START

FINISH

LEADVILLE TRAIL 100 RUN | August 19 | Leadville, Colorado. |

MAX

100 MILES

6TH STREET & HARRISON AV.

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15,600 FT

15,600 FT

11 AIDS STAT.

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PHOTO: JEREMY RHOADES. CC BY 2.0

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LA SPORTIVA MOUNTAIN RUNNING TEAM

RECORD DEL MONDO DI KV

URBAN ZEMMER

PHOTO: © FABIO MENINO

FISIOLOGÍA Y NUTRICIÓN

THE LEGEND

LA LEGGENDA


PORTRAITS

Text: Fabio Menino

WHEN IT WAS COMMONPLACE TO SAY THE FIRST RUNNERS WENT UP IN A LITTLE MORE THAN HALF AN HOUR. QUANDO ERAVAMO SOLITI DIRE CHE I PRIMI SALIVANO IN POCO PIÙ DI MEZZ’ORA

For mountain lovers, whether they be runners, climbers or hikers, the vertical climb always represents something closely related to passion. Particularly in the mountains, linear distance is not that important. Very often it is not even taken into account, as what really matters is the distance to climb.

Per tutti gli appassionati di montagna, corridori, alpinisti o escursionisti che siano, il dislivello positivo rappresenta da sempre qualcosa di strettamente collegato alla loro passione. Proprio in montagna, il più delle volte la distanza lineare non ha addirittura un significato importante, spesso non la si considera e non la si conosce proprio, quello che più conta è quanto realmente si salga in altezza.

As a young man, I once asked how far I had left to reach the top. The answer was given to me in vertical meters. It is now, based on experience over the years, that a hundred, a thousand, or more meters gives me a more precise meaning, depending on my state of mind, level of fitness and my enthusiasm.

Da giovane, quando chiedevo quanto ci volesse ancora per arrivare in vetta, mi veniva data una risposta in termini di metri di dislivello mancanti. Ecco allora che, in base all’esperienza acquisita sul campo, quei 100, 1.000 o più metri di dislivello positivo assumevano un significato preciso in base al mio stato d’animo, d’allenamento o d’entusiasmo.

And given that, for some strange reason, we tend to refer to round numbers, where for example a 4,000 meter mountain is always more significant than a 3,900m one, the exact figure of 1,000 meters of vertical height is key, something highly representative and used as a base.

E visto che per qualche strano motivo i nostri riferimenti sono quasi sempre i numeri tondi, dove, per esempio, una montagna alta 4.000 metri sembra avere più importanza di una di 3.900 metri, i 1.000 metri di dislivello positivo rappresentano da sempre un punto fermo, un qualcosa su cui basare i ragionamenti.

Who in the mountains doesn´t usually make a mental connection between the distance and the time taken to run up it? In broad lines, when someone informed me of the remaining vertical climb to reach the top, I would use it to work out an estimated time to complete it. In my head, always based on past experience, I had my own time reference for an ascent. In general, the reference I used was how long it took to climb 1,000 meters vertically. This reference always took into account the technical difficulty and other factors that, on the other hand, would

Chi più o chi meno, inoltre, è anche solito accostare l’unità metrica al relativo tempo di percorrenza, ovvero, al tempo di ascesa verticale. A grandi linee, quando mi veniva riportato il dislivello mancante alla vetta, anch’io cercavo di associare quella distanza verticale al presunto tempo di percorrenza. Nella mia testa, infatti, sempre in base alle esperienze passate, avevo il mio personale parametro di tempo di ascesa. Solitamente, il mio riferimento era proprio il tempo che ero solito impiegare per percorrere 1.000 metri di dislivello positivo. Lo stesso, poi, in base alle difficoltà tecniche, lo proporzionavo agli effettivi me-

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often provide a mental exercise to help divert my attention from the fatigue I was suffering at that time.

tri mancanti, un esercizio mentale che, oltretutto, mi aiutava spesso a distogliere l’attenzione dalla fatica del momento.

Until yesterday morning, on the odd occasions I remembered to take note of the time spent on a route or in a race, my thoughts inevitably turned to make a comparison between the times taken by the top specialists in vertical ascents. Until yesterday morning, with a certain inferiority complex, I compared my performance with the scarce half an hour that the best in the world took to climb 1,000 meters vertically. Until yesterday morning, and for the last time, I compared my performance with the time taken to cover 2,000 meters by those same top athletes.

Fino a ieri mattina, le rarissime volte in cui ho mi sono ricordato di prendere nota del tempo impiegato durante una gita o una corsa, il mio pensiero ricadeva poi inevitabilmente sul raffronto con gli specialisti delle corse in salita. Fino a ieri mattina, in modo sbrigativo, accostavo la mia performance a quella quasi mezz’ora che i migliori atleti al mondo impiegavano per salire 1.000 metri di dislivello positivo. Fino a ieri mattina, infine, accostavo anche la mia stessa performance ai quasi 2.000 metri di dislivello positivo in un ora quale velocità di ascesa verticale degli stessi atleti di prima.

Yesterday morning, however, something changed. In Switzerland, the 14th edition of the Fully Vertical Kilometer took place, a special race in which there are only 1,000 meters of vertical climb in just 1.6 linear kilometers. This makes it one of the fastest races on the international scene. To this characteristic it is necessary to empasize the fact

Da ieri mattina, invece, qualcosa è cambiato. In Svizzera, si è svolta la 14° edizione del Vertical Kilometer di Fully, una gara particolare che, con i suoi 1,6 km di sviluppo lineare per 1.000 metri di dislivello positivo esatti, rappresenta una delle prove più ripide nel panorama internazionale. Questa caratteristica, forse unita al fatto che si svolge a una quota relati-

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29:42

that it takes place at a relatively low altitude, and that its entire route is accompanied by the old railway track. All this makes it the fastest race of this type in the world. In fact, in this race in 2012 the first records, both male and female, were set: 30’26’’ for the Italian Urban Zemmer and 36’48’’ for the French Christel Dewalle.

vamente bassa e che il suo percorso è interamente accompagnato da una vecchia rotaia i cui traversini aiutano la spinta, la rende anche la prova più veloce al mondo. Ed è proprio lungo questo percorso che nel 2012 sono stati fissati i primati mondiali al maschile e al femminile; 30’26’’ per l’italiano Urban Zemmer e 36’48’’ per la francese Christel Dewalle.

Yesterday morning, Fully’s Vertical Kilometer seemed destined to rewrite a great day for the stopwatch. In men, the Italian Nicola Golinelli crossed the line in a fantastic time of 30’25”, which was a new world record. Marco Moletto also got below 31’, setting his own personal record. In addition, for the females, Dewalle set her own record of 34’44’’. In short, once again Fully offered something “inaccessible” to the most “human” of those passionate about the mountains and the vertical climb.

Leri mattina, quella di Fully, sembrava essere destinata a diventare un’altra grande giornata di importanti prestazioni cronometriche. Tra gli uomini, l’italiano Nicola Golinelli si avvicinava alla mezz’ora di percorrenza con un fantastico 30’25’’ che rappresentava il nuovo record del mondo, Marco Moletto scendeva sotto i 31’ stabilendo il suo primato personale e, addirittura, la stessa Dewalle stravolgeva il record femminile in 34’44’’. In poche parole, ancora una volta, Fully stava proponendo qualcosa d’inavvicinabile per qualsiasi normale appassionato di montagna e di dislivello.

But then, as in previous editions, the race was preparing to receive Urban Zemmer, and the word “inaccessible” became something very real indeed. His perfect core, comprised of head, arms and legs, not only shook the old rails of Fully, but even wrote a new page in the history of the specialty of Skyrunning and of mountain climbing. His final time of 29’42’’ suddenly changed many mountain enthusiasts´ way of thinking. As of yesterday morning, the fastest time that even the most experienced athletes have achieved a 1,000 meter vertical climb, of little more than half an hour, has fallen short and become obsolete.

Poi, però, come nelle ultime edizioni, ha preso il via alla prova anche Urban Zemmer e l’inavvicinabile ha assunto una dimensione ancora più complessa. Le sue spinte fatte di testa, braccia e gambe, non solo hanno fatto tremare per l’ennesima volta le vecchie rotaie di Fully ma, addirittura, hanno scritto una nuova pagina nella storia di questa specialità dello skyrunning e del salire per le montagne. Il suo tempo finale di 29’42’’, di fatto, ha immediatamente cambiato il modo di pensare di molti appassionati di montagna, me compreso per primo. Da ieri mattina, infatti, dire che i primi atleti al mondo salgono in poco più di mezz’ora 1.000 metri di dislivello positivo, è qualcosa che è diventato di colpo riduttivo.

But to tell the truth, you cannot really say that the top specialists in the world do it in less than half an hour, because really there is only one athlete who has done it. To be precise, we need only refer to one name and surname: Urban Zemmer, the only one capable of completing a 1,000 meter vertical climb in less than half an hour, or if you prefer, the only one capable of exceeding a speed for 2000 meters of within the hour.

A dirla tutta, non si potrà neanche dire che i primi atleti al mondo salgono in poco meno di mezz’ora perché, di fatto, solo un atleta c’è riuscito. Bisognerà avere l’accortezza di essere più precisi, di fare riferimento a un solo nome e a un solo cognome. Al termine di una gita, lodando o commiserando la propria performance, bisognerà pensare che Urban Zemmer sale 1.000 metri di dislivello positivo in meno di mezz’ora o, se si preferisce, con una velocità superiore ai 2.000 metri di dislivello positivo all’ora.

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FOTOGRAFÍA: FABIO MENINO

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And in this context, there is no point trying to compare Urban Zemmer´s time of 29’44’’ in absolute terms at an altitude of less than 1,500 meters, to Kilian Jornet´s record of 32’43’’ achieved in a vertical climb at 2,000 meters above sea-level, or to that of Marco de Gasperi of 34’51” at over 3,000m altitude. As often in this context, little consideration is given to the type of terrain or technical difficulty.

E in questo contesto, poco importa cercare di ragionare se in termini assoluti hanno più valore i 29’44’’ di Zemmer in un Vertical che arriva solo a 1.500 metri di quota rispetto ai 32’43’’ fatti registrare da Kilian Jornet in un vertical con arrivo sopra i 2.000 metri o ai 34’51’’ fatti registrare da Marco De Gasperi in uno con arrivo a circa 3.000 metri. Sempre in questo contesto, poco importa inoltrarsi su considerazioni inerenti alla tipologia del terreno o alle difficoltà tecniche.

However, it doesn´t matter. The new temporary reference point will be that made by Urban Zemmer. Maybe some from outside the sport are wondering who Urban Zemmer is? The answer, obviously, varies depending on how well you are known or the successes achieved in your sports career. Some may say he is just a farmer, a shy mountain man not inclined to complacency, or others an enormously gifted athlete, not only physically but also mentally.

Poco importa perché, a livello mentale, il nuovo riferimento sarà solo quello di Urban Zemmer. Può essere che qualcuno non particolarmente esperto di questioni sportive a quel punto domandi chi sia Urban Zemmer. Le risposte, ovviamente, potranno essere molteplici in base a quanto o meno lo si conosca, in base a quanto o meno si sia seguita la sua carriera. Qualcuno racconterà anche che è un contadino, un uomo di montagna schivo e non incline alle autocelebrazioni, che è un atleta non solo dotato fisicamente ma anche molto determinato mentalmente.

My answer, however, is already made up in my mind. Urban Zemmer is a man who, as rarely occurs in sport, has been fortunate enough to dedicate himself to the ideal activity that matches the physical and mental qualities Mother Nature has blessed him with. The perfect activity that, in fact, turns an athlete into a champion, a man into a legend.

La mia risposta, invece, è già scolpita nella mia mente; Urban Zemmer è un uomo che, come raramente capita nello sport, ha avuto la fortuna di dedicarsi all’attività perfetta per le qualità fisiche e mentali che madre natura gli ha donato. L’attività perfetta che, di fatto, trasforma l’atleta in un campione, l’uomo in una leggenda.

At this point, and on a final note, I would like to add that the new vertical kilometer record has been established by Urban Zemmer at 44 years of age. But all things considered this is an unimportant detail given that champions and legends do not have an age, just like their achievements and successes escape any type of temporary reference.

A quel punto, giusto come chiosa finale, aggiungerò anche che quel nuovo riferimento sul verticale, Urban Zemmer l’ha stabilito a 44 anni. Ma questo, a ben vedere, sarà un dettaglio perché i campioni e le leggende non hanno età, loro stessi e le loro imprese escono da qualsiasi riferimento di tipo temporale.

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PORTRAITS

THE THREE FACES OF TALENT LE TRE FACCE DEL TALENTO

I don´t think I’ll ever forget that hot summer afternoon. Not only was it a pleasant moment on the mountain, but, and more importantly, a great lesson.

Quel caldo pomeriggio estivo, penso che non lo scorderò mai. Non solo ha rappresentato un piacevole momento trascorso tra i monti ma, cosa ancora più importante, mi ha insegnato molto.

In the distance, I watch Astrid as she leans over the ridge to look for Urban’s silhouette. Not even half an hour has gone by since he left Santa Carterina Valfurva, and in a few minutes he should appear over the last dip that leads to the finish line.

In lontananza osservo Astrid mentre si sporge dalla cresta in cerca della sagoma di Urban. E’ ormai trascorsa quasi mezz’ora da quando è partito da Santa Caterina Valfurva e, quindi, tra qualche minuto dovrebbe sbucare dal ripido canalino finale che conduce all’arrivo.

But today is not race day, rather the afternoon beforehand. Urban, following his tradition, wants to scout the route. Astrid tells me he is like that, professional and meticulous in his way of life.

Ma oggi non è il giorno della gara, è solo la vigilia. Urban, come suo consueto, ha voluto provare il percorso. Astrid dice che lui è fatto così, che l’essere professionale e meticoloso è una sua prerogativa di vita.

I do not see any other athlete in the distance on the slope of this mountain. Urban is the only one. As I wait, I try to think of Astrid’s words looking for keys that will help me to understand her partner’s talent.

Non vedo altri atleti lungo il pendio della montagna, Urban è l’unico che ha optato per questa scelta.Nell’attesa, ripenso alle parole di Astrid cercando di trovare una giusta chiave di lettura che mi consenta di avvicinarmi alla comprensione del talento del suo compagno.

At the age of 45, and taking into account his spectacular sports career, Urban should have already abandoned high-level competition. And yet, not only does he keep on running, but when it comes to doing it vertically, he does it faster than any other athlete.

A 45 anni compiuti, a maggior ragione con lo strepitoso palmares sportivo, in base alle consuetudini della vita normale, Urban avrebbe già dovuto smettere di cimentarsi nelle competizioni di alto livello. E invece, non solo continua a correre ma, quando si tratta di farlo in salita, lo fa ancora più velocemente di qualsiasi altro atleta.

I think that talent, in the very sense of the term, is one of those characteristics intrinsic to defining a champion. For Urban Zemmer, however, it is not enough. It is necessary to go deeper into the meaning of the term and analyze other possible facets.

Penso che il talento, nella sua accezione del termine, sia una delle prerogative fondamentali per circoscrivere la definizione di campione. Per Urban Zemmer, però, questo non basta, è necessario entrare in profondità del significato del termine e contemplarne tutte le sfaccettature possibili.

Typically, talent is identified as having an athletic body and extraordinarily distinct physical abilities. But this is just one of the faces of talent

Solitamente, il talento è identificato nella predisposizione ad esternare un gesto atletico redditizio e nelle doti fisiche proprie dell’atleta. Ma questa è solo una delle tante facce

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and, while important, not enough to explain how a 45 year-old man is able to compete on equal terms with others much younger than him.

del talento e, sebbene importante, da sola non è sufficiente a spiegare come un uomo di 45 anni possa competere con atleti di valore assoluto molto più giovani di lui.

In the case of Urban, it is also necessary to talk about talent as the ability to program, persevere and find the right motivation in any situation.

Per Urban, direi che è necessario parlare anche di talento inteso come la capacità di programmarsi e preservarsi e di trovare la giusta motivazione in qualsiasi situazione.

Among all high-level athletes, Urban is the only one who has always competed in the vertical kilometer event. In fact, he is the only specialist in this discipline. He never fell into the temptation to seek futile popularity in more well-known races like Skyraces. And this, I consider a talent in itself, especially with the frenetic pace of our society, which considers doing more and more a status vivendi. To believe in something and to put all your effort into it, without sideline distractions, seems to me to be something truly admirable and with a clear vision of the future.

Di tutti gli atleti di alto livello, Urban è l’unico che si è sempre e solo cimentato nel Vertical Kilometer. Di fatto, è l’unico specialista della disciplina. Specie in passato, non è mai caduto nella futile ricerca di popolarità cimentandosi in discipline più popolari come le SkyRace. E questo, io lo considero un talento perché, specie nella frenesia della nostra società dove la ricerca spasmodica del fare sempre di più può essere ormai considerato come uno status vivendi, credere in qualcosa e concentrare tutte le proprie forze su questo, senza distrazioni inutili, mi sembra qualcosa di addirittura lungimirante.

In order to understand talent as a motivation, however, there is no need for words, it is enough just to observe what is happening on this hot afternoon on the mountains of Santa Caterina Valfurva.

Per il talento legato alla motivazione, invece, servono poche parole e mi basta osservare quanto stia accadendo in questo caldo pomeriggio estivo sulle montagne di Santa Caterina Valfurva.

That is why I feel I learned a lot from Urban today, because his athletic side is something that goes beyond sport and should be taken as a reference in daily life, especially for all normal people like me.

Ecco perché sento che oggi ho imparato molto da Urban, perché il suo essere di atleta è qualcosa che va oltre il solo aspetto sportivo e che merita di essere preso come riferimento nella vita di tutti i giorni, in particolare da tutte le persone normali come me.

I see him coming with his beloved dog. He stops for a few minutes to contemplate in silence the mountain that surrounds him. Never before, until this very moment, am I convinced that tomorrow he will give absolutely everything to conquer his umpteenth victory.

Finalmente lo vedo arrivare con il suo amato cane. Raggiunge la cima e si ferma per qualche minuto a contemplare in silenzio le montagne circostanti. Mai come in questo momento, cullo in me la certezza che domani darà tutto se stesso per conquistare la sua ennesima vittoria in carriera.

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PHOTO : © FABIO MENINO

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EXPERIMENTAL

Photo & text: Xabier Mata.

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BARKING IN THE SNOW

A deep solitude in the immense whiteness. Absence of shadows. Light hazy under the mist. There are no fears. We are together.

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BARKING IN THE SNOW

Your heartbeats are mine. Your pain is my pain. We are one. Let us delve into the stillness of the moment.

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BARKING IN THE SNOW

The cold is our ally. Looking towards the distance. Let’s live this dream. Let’s not escape it.

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BARKING IN THE SNOW

Let us run to breach the silence. To feel the wind. To leave our mark on this fleeting stage.

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“This was the world of my childhood dreams: a space without limits and lands without owner.” Andreas Madsen.

I like to imagine the wind traveling across the Pacific Ocean in its quest for solid ground. I close my eyes and try to join it on cold winter nights. It really is chilling to think of the sea violently shaken up as it blows by and of the creatures that inhabit it. Imagine the moment when you see the Andes range and, reaching an even faster pace, seek direct confrontation with its mountains. These winds, which clean the atmosphere to enhance colors and silhouettes, and endow it with a luminosity for which human eyes are sometimes not prepared for, travel through Patagonia leaving behind great precipitations in the form of water and snow. Nature is giving us the formation of spectacular glacial tongues that culminate in magnificent fjords towards Chile, and towards Argentina in lakes that seem to be taken out of a dream. In any case, it goes without saying, of extraordinary beauty. We are between the parallels of latitude 48°20’ and 51°30’ south. The South Patagonian Ice Field as it is called in Chile or the Patagonian Ice Continent in Argentina. The largest of this hemisphere after the Antarctic, and home of the Perito Moreno, Upsala, Spegazzini glaciers... in Argentina; and of Pio XI, Grey, Balmaceda and many others in Chile. And of course mountains whose

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Text: KissTheMountain


PHOTO: THE RIDGE’S ARCHIVE

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FOTOGRAFÍA: MANUEL MATA OLIVER. ARCHIVO P.N. DE AIGÜESTORTES I ESTANY DE SANT MAURICI


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PERITO MORENO. PHOTO: THE RIDGE’S ARCHIVE

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FOTOGRAFÍA: © paralelo 70 | ALWAYS EXPLORING.


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names evoke times of the past, present and future: Fitz Roy, Cerro Torre, Torres del Paine, Monte Steffen, Cerro O’Higgins, Lautaro Volcano, Cerro Daudet ... Some 15,000 square kilometers, 360 kilometers from north to south and between 40 and 60 from east to west, on the Chilean Argentine border, extending from Jorge Montt glacier in the north to Torres del Paine in the south. I like to imagine Andreas Madsen, a young Danish emigrant who came to these lands to carry out exploratory and measurement work, making the decision to settle with his wife at the feet of Fitz Roy, and helping all those who tried to conquer what he understood as one of the greatest creations of his god. I like to imagine Lionel Terray and Guido Magnone reaching the summit of this mythical mist-shrouded mountain after weeks of continuous snowfall, frightening storms and brutal winds that threw them to the ground and ripped up their tents. Poincenot’s recent death, who also accompanied them on that expedition, was surely on their minds.

FITZ ROY. PHOTO: COLM LINEHAN (CC BY 2.0)

I like to imagine that I am next to Perito Moreno, alone, on one of those sunrises that can only be felt in these lands. I dwell on it. I hear it. I feel it. Beauty frozen. A cathedral of ice cracks, tossing icebergs into the sea which then suddenly emerge to create waves that break the most wonderful of silences. Immensity. Blue. I cannot stop thinking that what my eyes are able to see rising above sea level, is only an eighth of the grandeur of this glacier. How much beauty must be hidden under the waters!

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PERITO MORENO. PHOTO: © LETICIA S. BALSALOBRE

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I like to imagine I´m contemplating Maestri and Egger´s ascent of Cerro Torre. I see the fall of the latter and the despair of the former. He continues on an impossible ascent. I am the only witness of the truth that I keep to myself. I am not the one to unveil this universal mystery. I am not the one to justify or deny claims by Bonatti or Messner. I like to imagine myself in a comfortable hotel room in El Chalten, where the fire warms a room through whose windows the cold can

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be seen. The wind violently shakes everything in its path. It is near dusk and rain hits the glass furiously. In the background, the intimidating mountains are reflected in the eyes of climbers from the other side of the world. Everyone is silent. Respect and fear. Hope and dread. I like to imagine myself navigating one of the lakes that make this part of the world even more beautiful, if that were possible. Lake Argentino. A great amount of clothing pro-


BETWEEN CHILE AND ARGENTINA. PHOTO: MCKAY SAVAGE (CC BY 2.0)

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CERRO TORRE. PHOTO: ALEX PROIMOS (CC BY 2.0)

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PHOTO: RAV AS51 (CC BY 2.0)

tects me from a temperature that gives the impression it cannot get any lower. I’m on the deck. What a sight. Icebergs that seem sculpted by the most inspired of artists indicate that I am approaching a new glacier. There it is. Its intimidating wall of no less than eighty meters awaits me. I close my eyes and let myself be carried to the top of the glacier. From there I look at the ship I came in on. On the deck I spot someone observing me through binoculars. It is me, myself.

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ON THE COVER Sasha DiGiulian. FOTOGRAFÍA Photo: Javipec DE PORTADA: Photography. UTMB. Fotógrafía: Issue Fede [002]. Arcos Mist. (Paralelo July 2017 70). PUBLISHER www.kissthemountain.com Número #08. theridge@kissthemountain.com Horizonte. Septiembre 2016 Granada. Spain EDITOR EDITA IN CHIEF kissthemountain J. M. Ávila juanmi@kissthemountain.com C/ Albaricoque, 18 18198 Huétor Vega – Granada ART info@kissthemountain.com DIRECTION & DESIGN LAYOUT Kiko Cardona kiko@kissthemountain.com REDACCIÓN Juanmi Ávila juanmi@kissthemountain.com TRANSLATION Liz Barrass Leticia ARTE S. Balsalobre Kiko Cardona kiko@kissthemountain.com ADVERTS & MARKETING theridge@kissthemountain.com MAQUETACIÓN (+34) 670013576 Y DISEÑO Kissthemountain CONTRIBUTORS PUBLICIDAD Gontxal K.N. publicidad@kissthemountain.com J. J. Alcaide (+34) Fabio 670013576 Menino Pipi Cardell COLABORADORES Javipec Guillermo Xabier Olcina Mata Maite Maiora Aritz PHOTOGRAPHERS Urdampilleta Pipi Cardell Fabio Menino Fede Arcos (Paralelo 70) Pipi Cardell Matt Trappe Jeremy Rhoades Rickey Gates FOTOGRAFÍA Bonciutoma - Dreamstime James Mackeddie Paralelo 70 David Phan Javipec Carlos Llerandi Colm Linehan Xabier Mata Iosu Juaristi Leticia S. Balsalobre Bonciutoma - Dreamstime Rubén Fueyo Mckay Savage Kilian Jornet Kilian Jornet Alex Proimos Iosu Juaristi Luis Ordóñez Rav As51 Mikel Besga Pipi Cardell Jordi García Localpres Fernando Guevara . Pyrene Media .

Prohibida Copyright la reproducción, 2017 Kissthemountain. ediciónNo o transmisión liability is accepted total o forparcial the accuracy por cualquier of the information medio ycontaien ned herein, cualquier nor aresoporte any guarantees sin la autorización given by the magazine. escrita de Copyright kissthemountain. worldwide of original mateKissthemountain rial is held by Kissthemountain no comparteand necesariamente permission must las be obtained opiniones for de anysus use,colaboradores. transmission, storage or reproduction. Opinions expressed in this magazine are not necessarily shared by the publisher. Kissthemountain assumes no responsibility for the loss or damage of unsolicited material. 140 THE RIDGE

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PHOTO: © ARCHIVE KTHEM

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PHOTO: © ARCHIVE KTHEM

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The Ridge [002]. Mist  

Mountain culture magazine.

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