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YOND THE BEYOND LOGOTHE LOGO

EXPERIENCING SF DYES EXPERIENCING SF DYES

KIRUTHIKA M

KIRUTHIKA M

PG COMMUNICATION DESIGN

PG COMMUNICATION DESIGN

BATCH OF 2012

BATCH OF 2012

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN

GUIDE

GUIDE

MS.KUMKUM NADIG

MS.KUMKUM NADIG

KENA DESIGN, BANGALORE

KENA DESIGN, BANGALORE


BEYOND THE LOGO Experiencing SF Dyes

diploma project document january to june 2015 kiruthika m pg communication design batch of 2012 dj academy of design guide ms. kumkum nadig kena design, bangalore


diploma project document title Beyond the Logo: Experiencing SF Dyes

duration January to June 2015

declaration This thesis, submitted to the DJ Academy of Design in partial fulfillment of the postgraduate level diploma in Communication Design, is the result of original work done by me at Kena Design in Bangalore. Wherever contributions of others are involved, every effort has been made to indicate it clearly.

design Kiruthika M kiruthika.m.design@gmail.com

typography Display text - Verlag Body text, Captions, Headers, Footers – Whitney

printed at Print Xpress Richmond Road, Bangalore - 560025 080 4050 4100


D J ACADEMY OF DESIGN

APPROVAL The following document is duly examined and approved by the designated jury as credible work on the chosen subject, carried out and presented in a manner and at a level that is appropriate for acceptance as diploma project qualification of this Insitute. This approval however does not necessarily endorse any statements, comments or conclusions drawn in by the author in the document. This is a partial fulfillment for the award of the Undergraduate / Postgraduate level Diploma in Industrial (or) Communication Design. This Project / Thesis study of 26 weeks duration in the curriculum has been completed in 24 weeks.

Title of the Project:

BEYOND THE LOGO: Experiencing SF Dyes

Student’s Name & Signature:

Guide’s Name & Signature:

Kiruthika M, PG Communication Design

Kumkum Nadig, Design Principal, Kena Design

Internal Jury

External Jury

Name & Signature

Name & Signature

Place: Coimbatore

Dean / Jury Chairman

Date:

Name & Signature

Coimbatore – Pollachi Highway, Othakkalmandapam (P.O.), Coimbatore – 641 032. India Phone : 0422 – 3094300, 3094444, Fax : 0422 – 3094310, Website : www.djad.in, E-mail : office@djad.in


ACKNOW LED G EM ENTS

THANK YOU all my love and gratitude to my parents, without whose efforts, I could not have studied design. Their belief in me and what I do is my anchor. My heartfelt thanks to my sister, Madhangi, for being a steady source of comfort and support when I most needed it. I thank DJAD for giving me a platform to learn, experience and enjoy the world of design. The progress that I have made over the last few years, both professionally and personally, would not have been possible without the institute’s animated and encouraging environment. My heartfelt thanks to my faculty, for always devoting time and energy to answer my questions; for giving me direction. Special thanks to Mr. Balaram and Mr. Menon for being constant sources of inspiration. I also thank Ms. Kanaka Ananth for motivating me on so many occasions and for always understanding.

My sincere gratitude to Kena Design for taking me in as a project intern and for giving me such a friendly, open atmosphere to work and learn in. I thank my guide, Ms. Kumkum Nadig, Design Principal, Kena Design, for her steadfast advice and counsel and for always pushing me to achieve my best in all stages of the project. This project would not have been possible without the abiding cheerfulness, cooperation and efforts of the studio head, Ms. Prachi Prabhu, who sat with me everyday, going over the concepts, fine-tuning and presentation to shape the final output. Much thanks to my Kena colleague and friend from DJAD, Amrita K Prasen, for her invaluable input. To my friends at DJAD - Shruthi, Pavithra, Shruti, Shweta, Vishnupriya, Divya, Swathi and Shreya, thank you for making these past few years a completely new, exciting experience. I will take them with me for years to come.

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CONTENTS introduction About the project

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DJ Academy of Design

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Kena Design

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SF Dyes

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Project Brief

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research Corporate branding & Brand experience

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Textile dyes & Auxiliaries

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Symbolic reference points

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Website

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strategy

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Collation, discussion & deliverables

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Proposed Schedule

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Actual Timeline

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BEYOND THE LOGO

KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


concept development

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execution Visual Language

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Primary Identity System

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Brand Package

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Calendar 2016

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Website

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Print advertisements

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conclusion

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bibliography

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KIRUTHIKA M, M 2015 2015 DJ ACADEMY DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN OF DESIGN

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BEYOND THE LOGO

KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


INTRODUCTION ABOUT

THE

P ROJ ECT

START HERE this document is a detailed report of my diploma project as a student at the DJ Academy of Design. It was for a 6-month period at Kena Design in Bangalore. In brief, my project was the crafting of a brand experience. It involved the conceptualization and creation of a whole new brand language and consequently a whole new brand experience for my client, SF Dyes. It started with taking the company and converting it into a brand.

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I researched on brand design processes to understand the parameters and the terminology. Throughout my project, I identified, understood and gave form to SF Dyes’ character, its ideals and goals. What resulted is a unified, holistic message and identity system that manifests throughout SF Dyes’ communications – its print material; online presence; offices, etc.

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DJ Academy of Design, Main Campus

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BEYOND THE LOGO

KIRUTHIKA M

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DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


INTRODUCTION DJ

ACAD EMY

OF

D ESI G N

the dj academy of design belongs to the illustrious GKD Charity Trust, set up in 1983 by the industrialist par excellence, (Late) Cavalier Dr. G.K.Devarajulu. Situated at a picturesque locality just outside Coimbatore, it offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses in three main streams of design – Communication Design, Industrial Design and Interaction Design. The academy is known for its unique pedagogy. An effective combination of permanent and visiting faculty provide the students with several avenues of information and learning. Senior Faculty members include experienced design professional who have taught at the National Institute of Design (NID), Ahmedabad. Visiting Faculty members consist of successful, practicing Design professionals. Hence the students acquire both a strong foundation in the principles and ideologies that drive good design and are also exposed to industry standards and practices. I started at DJAD in the year 2012 when I was accepted for the postgraduate diploma program in Communication Design. These last three years here have been an enlightening, enjoyable experience. I have learnt design from the ground up, opened myself to varied schools of thought and developed my own sense of process and aesthetics. I believe my time here will significantly shape my thought process and my work ethic in the future.

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Kena Design, Workspace

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INTRODUCTION KENA

DE SI G N

QUESTIONS ANSWERED kena design is a Communication Design studio in Bangalore, Karnataka. Headed by Ms. Kumkum Nadig, it specializes in Publication Design, Branding and Identity. “Kena means to Question (in Sanskrit). Any design process at Kena starts with questions, yours and ours. Answers to the questions help us analyze and define your needs and set the context for our inquiry and design work. We provide strong design solutions and enable change... Branding & Identity design to bring perceptive change, and, Publication and Environmental Graphic design to bring about mindset change.”(quote from Kena’s website)

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I started my project at Kena on the first week of January, 2015. A warm, creative environment that aids the progress of all of their projects fuels the studio. My diploma project hugely benefitted from the talks and discussions that I had with my colleagues. My guide and Kena’s Design Principle, Ms. Kumkum Nadig and the Studio Head Ms. Prachi Prabhu in particular supported me in the directions I took for the project. Their advice and feedback braced me as I explored various routes and ideas that resulted in a strong, cohesive body of work.

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THE

CLIENT:

SF

DYES

YOUR PEOPLE FOR COLOURS the sf group of companies is a family business run on professional lines that continues to nurture the ethical legacy of its founder, Lala Fatehchand Sachdev. Started in the year 1954, they celebrated 60 years of their progress in the year 2014. SF Dyes and SF Dyes Pvt. Ltd., part of the SF Group, are India’s leading manufacturers and suppliers of textile dyes and auxiliaries. SF Dyes prides itself in its Indian origin and tradition. It finds its identity in the colour that it adds to our everyday lives. The company’s tagline, your people for colours,

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reflects the passion and pride that it takes in its products and services. The company pioneered the manufacturing of eco-friendly sulphur dyes in 1988 and is today, one of India’s leading providers of textile dyes and auxiliaries to denim manufacturers. SF Dyes’ products and processes revolve around the concept of ‘Fibre to Fashion.’ They are one of Kena’s oldest clients. The studio, which is responsible for SF Dyes’ identity and communication, decided to craft a completely new brand experience for SF Dyes exemplifying their love for colours.

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INTRODUCTION PROJ ECT

B RI EF

ONE, BIG, HAPPY beyond the logo is in its essence a Branding and Identity project. Primarily, it aimed to create a visual system that, when applied to SF Dyes’ communications, would create graphic messages that speak for the brand. The client, SF Dyes, is a textile dye manufacturer with their share of traditional Indian roots. They wished for this system to be inspired by Indian traditional aesthetics; motifs and color symbolism. To give form to these intangible specifications and to shape the direction of my efforts, I listed down certain distinct objectives that the visual system would need to satisfy in order to be successful.

1 - to create and establish a new brand tone The visual system should serve to generate and communicate a new tone for SF Dyes as a brand. It should highlight the warm, human characteristics of the brand. Primarily, it must, –– Go beyond the industrial and corporate facets of the brand and bring to light other qualities. Their drive, their passion, their enjoyment in their service and their acknowledgment of their roots. ––Give the SF Dyes’ communicative touchpoints an invigorating global look, on par with their international clients and partners.

2 - develop a versatile design language The visual system must be distinctive and versatile. It should form an overarching theme that inspires other design solutions.

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––It should have an originality and character that still complements SF Dyes’ existing identity. ––The language must include a collection of graphic elements that are flexible enough to accommodate other applications without losing their spirit. This project offered a unique, interesting scenario in a lot of ways. Most branding projects involve the development of an identity from scratch i.e, the creation of a new brandmark, or they require the rebranding of an existing identity. However, here the client SF Dyes, was a well established, well reputed company with an effective, identifiable brandmark that required no change. It was the company’s corporate communications and message that needed a sense of clarity and cohesion, a revitalization. SF Dyes’ ideals, their products and their Brandmark were sound reference points for the creation of the final visual system. The challenge lay in creating a graphic language that flowed seamlessly with the original identity so that together they would create one, big, holistic picture. At the start, I drafted a project proposal. I broke down the project into distinct phases and requirements. In brief, the project went through the following stages. ––Research ––Strategy Development ––Initial Ideation ––Concept Development and Execution ––Adaption and Application

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1-6: The six images above show Pentagram’s work for the Massechusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab. The logo is simple, geometric and versatile. The most interesting thing to note here is the way the identity lends itself to a fun, intriguing visual language that still seems to embody the spirit of the Lab, where art and science meet.

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7-9: The branding of Integrated Research by Interbrand is yet another illustration of the geometric logo and its brand extensions. The combination of geometric shapes and stark, contrasting colours makes for a cheery choice. The use of cheeky copy also helps define the brand, going well with the playful impressions the visuals give.

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RE S E ARC H CORPORATE

B RA ND I N G

&

BRA N D

E X PE R I E N C E

STATE OF BEING the research stage began with the examination of the

1 - there is no definite formula

processes and ideas involved in branding a corporate company and crafting their brand experience. I needed to understand the prerequisites, the objectives and the design practices that defined this field. My research was conducted mainly through books and the internet. I also received regular input from my guide and my colleagues at Kena. Regarding sources, Designing Brand Identity by Alina Wheeler was my main source of textual information. It proved to be a treasure trove of useful, orienting facts that pointed me towards various other avenues of information. Through the internet, I explored the work of prominent multidisciplinary design firms like Pentagram, Lippincott, Wolff Olins, Landor, Interbrand, etc. The case studies of their projects proved extremely useful in helping me prioritize my process. Most importantly, they helped me understand what would work and what wouldn’t. I paid particular attention to how the logo or the graphic variedly manifested in different applications. Some of the most impactful case studies include the Identities for MIT Media Lab (Pentagram), Saint-Didier-au-Mont-d’Or (Graphéine), Southwest Airlines (Lippincott), Housing. com (Moving Brands), Givaudan (Interbrand), Maldova Holiday (Tourism Agency of Maldova & USAID CEED II Project) and Integrated Research (Interbrand). The Design review websites Brand New (by Underconstruction) and BP&O (by Richard Baird) were also constant points of reference throughout the project. With these resources, I was able to gain certain pertinent insights that directed my process from square one.

What must be understood foremost is that branding is not an exact science. It doesn’t have an exact equation or method of working. While it has certain parameters that it works within, it is not completely formulaic. The simplest way to take forward a branding process is to think of the brand as a state of being. And consider all that goes along with it - emotions, impressions, abstract concepts and perceptions, etc. As brand designers, it is easy to get lost in the details of brand communications - a piece of copy or a particular message. But it is important to constantly remember that we are building a bigger picture. We must tailor-make a different formula for each project that applies most effectively to that particular company.

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2 - the four questions

A good starting point for any branding project are these four questions again provided by Ms. Alina Wheeler. A branding brief is often filled with a lot of facts, requirements, touch points and deliverables. But these questions help narrow the focus down to the relevant insights that will matter the most. Ms. Wheeler states that to develop and communicate a brand you must find the answers to these questions - Who are you? Who needs to know about you? How will they come to know? Why should they care? An analysis of these four questions by the company and the brand managers will yield the foundation. Who you are (Your identity = Your core message), Who needs to know (Your audience = Your consumers), How will they know (Your media = The Deliverables), Why should they care (Brand USP). Above all else these four factors will reveal the bigger picture, the building blocks for your brand.

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3 - brand personification In today’s age of experience selling, brands don’t wish to market themselves through concrete products. They want to market themselves through interpretative associations that target the consumer’s emotions. They want their brand’s image to invoke feelings, positive connotations and promises of a better quality of life. This is hard to visualize for a brand because the company behind it would be very solid, driven by physical, tangible products. Companies don’t have feelings and emotions. People do. So to brand a company that way, you must try to understand the brand like you would understand a person. The Brand too has a Physique and a Psyche. The Physique are its tangible products, its services and and its employees. The Psyche is the intangible product and service experience, the values and drives of its people.

4 - find your message, find your voice.

Who are you? This is the first question in Ms. Wheeler’s 4 questions. While the most important one, it might also be the one that’s most difficult to answer. Oftentimes, a

brand has so many things to say about itself that, without proper direction, it inevitably ends up saying all of them through different touch points. This piecemeal approach leaves the audience confused and the brand makes very little real impact in their minds. The key to answering this question is realizing which facet of the brand must be at the forefront. A company can be defined by many voices and ideals, but to be effective, its brand must be defined by one voice and an all-embracing ideal. Wellestablished brands like Coca-Cola, Volkwagen, Vodafone, etc, have made enough of an impact on their audience’s minds to conduct different brand campaigns that push different messages forward for a time period. However, in the beginning, it is vital to begin with one, essential brand voice. For this, the Brand’s strategy must utilize the company’s vision and ideals. It must examine where the company is coming from an where it wants to go. It must find a voice within the company’s aspirations and its unique personality. It is this that finds physical form through different styles and imagery.

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10-13: The branding for Southwest Airlines by Lippincott is another good example of how a simple logoform can create a language both emotional and memorable. The logo’s sweeping lines and bold colours find justified application in the aircraft livery and the signboards. The fluid forms imply light and motion while the chunky use of primary colours convey a lightheartedness and confidence.

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14-17: With Maldova Tourism, I found a different approach where the logo was not simple and flexible but rather made up of multiple elements that form a style, not just a logoform. Here its not that the logo informs the language, but that the logo itself takes different forms to create a language.

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18-21: The identity for the city of Saint-Didier-au-Mont-d’Or by GraphÊine makes use of something as simple as a hyphen to create a brand. The context sensitivity of the logo (as explained above) makes it so much more memorable and appealing. It also makes for a very happy, celebratory visual style.

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T EXT ILE

DYES

&

AUXI LI A RI ES

MATERIAL MATTERS i continued my research by learning about the products and services that SF Dyes offered. The brand experience would convey SF Dyes’ love for colours and their motivated service. Intangible as these attributes are, I still needed to understand the tangible products that fueled these ideals. These products included several kinds of textile dyes and auxiliaries. Given below are brief definitions that lay the foundation for my learning about SF Dyes’ products.

1 - textile dyes and dyeing

A dye is a colored substance that has an affinity to the substrate to which it is being applied. The dye is generally applied in an aqueous solution, and requires a mordant to improve the fastness of the dye on the fiber. Dyeing is the process of adding color to textile products like fibers, yarns, and fabrics. Dyeing is normally done in a special solution containing dyes and particular chemical material. After dyeing, dye molecules have an uncut chemical bond with fiber molecules. The temperature and time controlling are two key factors in dyeing. There are mainly two classes of dye, natural and man-made.

2 - man-made/synthetic dyes

The first human-made organic aniline dye, Mauveine, was discovered by William Henry Perkin in 1856, the result of a failed attempt at the total synthesis of quinine.

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Other aniline dyes followed, such as fuchsine, safranine, and induline. Many thousands of synthetic dyes have since been prepared. Synthetic dyes quickly replaced the traditional natural dyes. They cost less, they offered a vast range of new colors, and they imparted better properties to the dyed materials. Dyes are now classified according to the process used for their application to the fibers. Following are a list of the dyes offered by SF Dyes. They specialize in sulphur dyes and offer a range of dyes and finishes, especially for denim. ––Ecosol: Pre-reduced sulphur liquid dyes ––Ecovat: Modified liquid vat dyes ––Solsul: Solubilised sulphur dyes ––Ecofad: For better wash look ––Ecofast: Comprehensive range of powders. ––Ecotone: Duo-tone dyes ––Tancol: Leather dyes ––Ecomint: Pigment emulsions

3 - auxiliaries

Auxiliaries, as the name suggests, are not dyes but are used additionally on the fabric to prapare it, to obtain special finishes, to attain a certain look or feel, etc. SF Dyes have just released their own range of auxiliaries trademarked as Safeaux Performance Chemicals.

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RE S E ARC H SYM BOLI C

REF ERENCE

P OI N TS

ANALOGIZE once i had oriented myself to the corporate branding process and my client’s capabilities, I focussed all of my energies in discovering different symbolic routes from Indian society and culture. The bulk of my research was done here. Since ‘Indian roots’ and ‘Textile Dyes’ were the two watchwords at this stage, I investigated symbolic themes/scenarios which I thought would serve to inform my concepts and my visual content for the graphic language. I was also investigating these themes to create content for a 2016 calendar for SF Dyes. To that end,

this stage involved a lot of gathering photographic and pictorial data. After a mindmap cum research session I narrowed down on seven particular reference points, ––Indian traditional handlooms ––Indian traditional handicrafts ––The art of fabric storytelling ––The process of natural dye-making ––The lives of Indian artisans ––The concept of the Navarasa ––Visual cues from ancient calligraphy

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T HEME

NO.

1

indian traditional handlooms India has a long and varied history in weaving cloth manually. Just like our languages, we have weaving styles, fabrics and textile iconography that is unique to each region. Each kind of handloom fabric represents that regions’s skill, material availability, culture, stories, etc. In this theme, I found a graphically rich reservoir of icons, symbols, colours and grid systems. Through a summing up of this theme’s research I realized that, comprehensively, there are four major directions that the visuals take in Indian handlooms.

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––Geometric: Defined by complex interplay of chunky geometric shapes in bold, solid colours. ––Floral: Defined by delicate and intricate creations of symbols of nature like flowers, wines, leafy trees, etc. ––Motifs: Defined by the repetitive application of a particular motif which results in a pattern. The motif might be religious, nature-oriented, geometric or generic. ––Narratives: Not defined by a particular visual style. But there are several indigenous visual styles that are characterized by the way they narrate stories, folktales, religious and royal accounts. 23

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22: Bandhej fabric from Rajasthan is defined by bold colours which stand out against the state’s desert landscape. The symbols have a loose, angular style created from handmade geometric shapes. 23: Chikan fabric from Uttar Pradesh gives an intricate, ethereal feel through detail-rich, floral embroidery on a delicate, off-white background. The fabric, being sheer, supports that region’s hot climate. 24,25: Batik is more a style of dyeing than weaving. It is prevalent in several regions of India and also Indonesia. The Batik dyeing technique produces organic forms and wide, flowing lines that are eye-catching and exotic. This technique has been taken up by the fashion industry and greatly contemporarized. 26,27: The Kantha style of embroidery popular in West Bengal is characterized by friendly motifs and bright colours that look like they are out a children’s storybook. These fabrics make for beautiful, everyday wear and are also applied on several accessories. They signify a love of life, colour and a simple happiness. 28: Patola fabric from Gujarat is unique in its complex geometry and interlocking of simple shapes to form complex patterns. These patterns can also be found in Gujarat’s architecture, in its step well’s embellishments, windows, etc. 29: Pochampally fabric from Andhra Pradhesh is a perfect example of South India’s preference for more earthy colours in fabric. With distinctly elongated diamonds and olive, rust and mustard tones, these fabrics represent grandeur, wealth and prosperity.

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T HEME

NO.

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indian traditional handicrafts Just like the handloom industry, the Indian handicraft industry is also defined by region-specific, culturespecific and community-specific histories. The handicraft industry offers a cache of different material applications,

textures, physical properties and uses. It also has certain icons, visual styles, production techniques, etc. While this theme was not directly connected to textile dyeing, I still believed that it would help me understand the history and legacy of Indian manufacture better.

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30: Marble inlays from Agra have been synonymous for Indian handicrafts for a long time. They are found all over the Taj Mahal’s facade and have come to stand for the superiority of Indian craftmanship and attention to detail. 31: Blue Pottery from Jaipur, with its combination of white and yellow with a vivid, solid blue is not widely known for its part in the Indian pottery scene. However, these exquisite objects are also very much Indian. 32,33: Dokra from Central India makes use of the Lost wax method of metal casting to produce idols, objects, animal forms and other depictions of everyday life. Dokra articles exhibit a unique, idenitifiable look through thin, tightly woven lines of metal. This is another craft form that India is known for. Dokra artisans work diligently to keep this craftform alive. Dokra is experiencing a revival through increased awareness throughout the country 34: Khatamband wood carving from Northwest India is a craftform that again explores a lot of geometric forms and tessellations. These carvings can most often be found in windows and in ceilings giving the whole building an artistic, atmospheric effect. 35: Just like marble inlays, Agra’s wood carvings are also defined by extremely detail-rich floral embossing with a lot of additional rendering. These objects and craftforms are the best standing examples of how the traditional Indian lifestyle was a work of art in itself.

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36: Papier-mache articles have gained popularity all over India with artisans working and selling throughout the country. The delicate objects are covered by distinct illustrations lined with golden paint. They form floral, natural patterns that have an undertone of an Oriental stylistic language. 37: Paper stencils from Sanjhi take a lot of forms, anywhere from a bookmark to a mural. But whatever size they may be in, these stencils are exhaustively worked on by patient, earnest artisans who devote their lives to learning how to create these intensive artworks by the simple act of cutting paper. 38, 39: Basket weaving is one of the best representative examples of how handicrafts began from the ingenuity of rural people who needed to make their own objects for practical use. Sarkanda basketry as shown above, takes this a step further. Even a simple basket or a stool is embellished with sheaths of different coloured bamboo and interwoven painstakingly to create stark, angular forms that make even an everyday object interesting.

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40: Phad paintings follow the ‘Chitrakatha’ concept of visual storytelling. They show complex concepts and incidents through simple art and stylized narratives. 41: Gond paintings are simple in content with an appealing detail in execution. They are defined by deep browns, blues and greens. 42: Pichwai paintings are religious in nature, mostly depicting the life of Lord Krishna. They are created with an elegant, impressionistic style that goes well with the content presented. 43: Kalamkari is an extremely popular Indian painting style that has found application in fabrics, furniture, lifestyle accessories, etc. Like Phad, Kalamkari is also sometimes filled with complex content shown with a distinctive style. 44: Warli is one of most well-known Indian tribal artforms. It is celebratory in nature, Warli paintings show the simple joys and rituals that make up everyday life for the rural artists of the Warli village.

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N O.

3 45

the art of fabric storytelling While researching the previous two themes, I came to understand that there were a few folk tales and stories that revolved around weaving, dyeing and weavers. This was an extremely interesting avenue to explore. Fabrics are often used as mediums of storytelling. I examined this phenomena in reverse. By discovering stories that had been told of fabrics, weaving and weavers.

1 - draupadi’s unending saree Mahabharata

This is the iconic scene from the Mahabharata where Dharma loses Draupadi to Duryodhan in a bout of gambling. Duryodhan, in an attempt to dishonor Draupadi and the Pandavas, proceeds to disrobe her. Draupadi cries out to Krishna to come to her aid. Lord Krishna does so, providing Draupadi with a seemingle unending saree that keeps magically appearing as Duryodhan continues to frustratedly pull.

2 - the girl who taught the world to weave Mishmi folktale from Northeast India

This is a story of the time when humans first walked the earth. And in those days they did not wear clothes, for they did not know how to weave cloth. One day, the God Matai decided to teach the art of weaving to one person. The god taught a girl called Hambrumai. And what were the designs the girl wove? She sat by the riverside and saw the ripples and circles made by water. She wove the ripple pattern on cloth. She spent days in the forest looking up at trees and the designs made by their branches. She saw patches of the sky between branches and wove in all those designs on cloth. She saw nature’s patterns very clearly, be it in trees, water, flowers, or leaves. When she wore the cloth she wove, it was as if she was clothed in nature. She was beautiful. And many young men wanted to marry her. One day, Hairum, the Porcupine, came to her cave to steal her cloth. As he tried to get inside the cave, he pushed a rock. The rock fell by the riverside, and crushed Hambrumai. It also broke the loom on which she used to weave cloth. Parts of the loom fell into the river. They were carried by the water in its journey from the hills to the plains. Wherever people found a part of the loom, they learnt to weave. The Mishmis believe that the designs Hambrumai made, became butterflies. To this day the patterns on butterflies’ wings carry the designs the girl made. And people remember Hambrumai to this day as the girl who taught the world to weave.

45: Painting depicting the scene where Krishna blesses Draupadi with an endless saree.

Among the Apa Tani people of the Ziro plateau, the story of cloth begins from a time in the remote past when

there was nothing except cloud and water until fire was born. Following this the first man on earth, Abo Tani emerged out of the soil. In an account by Hage Pilya in his book Ranth Pigeh, Abo Tani was not born in the present form and passed through many epochs until he reached the present form. He was capable of fighting with gods and goddesses as he had Koga-Miiri, a third eye at the back of the head. He also had two spikes, one at each end of the heels. In this way he captured almost all the fertile land, rivers, the useful trees and plants and chased away all the spirits to the mountains and desert regions of the earth. Abo Tani even captured the daytime and left the night for the spirits until the gods, fed-up with the unending fights over land captured Abo Tani. His third eye and the spikes on his heels were eliminated and he was cursed to remain on earth with his dual nature of both good and demonic works. A delegation of Village Elders called the Bulyang summoned a meeting to discuss the terrible fate that had befallen man and an appropriate cloth to signify the importance of the meeting was required. It was at this time that pulyeh - cloth, first came to man. It was made by an industrious lady named Ami Tamang Binyii. Binyii was the first woman to identify the seeds of cotton. She wove a white cloth but it was rejected and thrown away. A bird,

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3 - the story of the jilang shawl

Apa Tani folktale from the Ziro Plateau, Arunachal Pradesh

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the white eagle picked up the cloth and draped himself with it so he remained white forever. Binyii roamed in the forest wondering what type of cloth would please the elders. One day she found a yellow dye from a tree and an idea struck here. She possessed the red dye of a creeper and mixing this with the new colour she wove a design that received the approval of the gathering and is today identified as the Jilang shawl motif of the Apa Tani. The Jilang is meant only for the most revered shaman and is worn during religious ceremonies when deities are invoked to visit the homes of the descendants of Abo Tani. A white shawl, like the one the eagle picked up is given to men during marriage celebrations.

4 - the two headed weaver Panchatantra

Once upon a time, there was a weaver by the name Mantharaka. One day when he was weaving cloth, the wooden frames of his loom broke. He took an axe and went to the forest to bring wood in order to make new frames. He went round the forest but didn’t find the adequate wood for the frames. From the forest, he drifted towards the seashore where he saw a huge tree. He thought that if he could cut wood from the tree, he would have enough wood for all frames and would stay throughout his life. As the weaver raised his axe to cut the tree, a spirit living on that tree said, “Oh weaver, this tree is my home and it must be spared in any event, because it protects my body from the cool breeze which comes from the sea”. Mantharaka said, “Sir, if I don’t cut the tree and take its wood home, then my family will starve and die. So, please go somewhere else as I have to cut this tree.” The spirit answered, “If you do not cut the tree, I will give you a boon of your choice”. The weaver said,” Sir, in that case, I will go home and ask my wife and friends. When I return, you must give me what I ask for.” The spirit agreed to it and the weaver returned home with joy. While coming back to the city, he met his friend, the barber and said, ”Friend, a spirit has given me a boon of my choice and gave me time to consult friends and my wife. Tell me what I should demand from him.” The barber replied, “My dear friend, demand a kingdom where you could be the king and I would be your Prime Minister. You would be having a palace, where we can enjoy the pleasures of this world. Like this, both of us can enjoy life here and hereafter.” Mantharaka said, “True. But let me ask my wife too.” The barber said, ”A wise man should never ask women for advice. He can give a woman food, clothing, jewelry and above all the duties of marriage, but should never ask for their advice. As women think only of their own benefit and they have low wits.” The weaver replied, “Even though this is true, still I would consult my wife, as she is my better half.”

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After this, the weaver quickly went to his home and narrated the whole story of the spirit and his boon to his wife. He also told her that his friend, the barber had advised him to ask for a kingdom. His wife said, “Oh my lord, what does the barber understand? No wise man would consult children or barbers or servants or beggars. A king’s life is full of hardships. He is always worried about friendships, animosities, wars, servants, defense alliances and duplicity. He never gets a minute’s rest because anyone who rules hardly gets anytime. The same container that is used for comfort can also be used to pour out bad luck. Never envy the life of a king.” The weaver said, “You are right. But you haven’t told me what boon I should choose”. She answered, ”Every day you are able to weave a single piece of cloth which is barely enough to meet our daily needs. You should ask for another pair of arms and another head so that you can work on two pieces of cloth at once, one in front of you, and one behind you. The first piece will help us meet our daily needs. The second one will help us meet special needs. Thus, we can sail through our lives comfortably and happily.” After listening to his wife, he said, ”You are a faithful wife and you have spoken well. I will do what you have suggested.” The weaver happily went to the spirit and said, “Sir, you have kindly given me a choice. I request you to give me two more hands and an extra head.” He had hardly spoken before he was two-headed and four-armed. Rejoiced, he began his homeward journey. People on the way saw him and considered him a kind of demon. They hammered him with stones and sticks. The poor weaver died at the spot. The moral of the story is that he should have listened to his own counsel first and not strove to please others without considering the consequences.

5 - the secret of weaving invisible fabric Tenali Raman Short Story

A beautiful woman entered the royal court of Sri Krishna Deva Rayalu one day, when he was busy with his courtiers. Her pleasing manners, attractive attire and conversation made her the center of attention in the gathering. After a few words with the King and his prime staff, the woman took out a delicate and sheer saree from a small box. The box that had held the saree was barely large enough to hold a pair of ear-tops. Holding out the saree for the royal court attendants to see, she addressed the King, “Oh King of Kings! A group of divine weavers are working for me. They can make many more these delicate, beautiful sarees. In fact, they are capable of weaving celestial fabric that is not even visible to the naked eye! With Your Majesty’s blessings and support and with proper allocation of funds these weavers can work miracles and exhibit these fabrics to you.” Satisfied with the exhibition and her words, the king allotted the

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required funds and asked her to get it all done by the end of a year. He was looking forward to viewing their excellent handiwork. And so the beautiful woman and her weavers enjoyed the benefits of being the kings’ royal guests for one year. A year lapsed and they still did not exhibit any work to the king. The anxious king then sent a few of his employees to the royal guesthouse to check on the weavers’ status. The woman invited the royal employees to the guesthouse and took them to where the weavers were working. The employees were shocked to see that there were no looms, no spools and no fabric in the room. Not even a single string of fabric was evident. The weavers were however, busily pretending to draw threads and weave. When the employees asked the woman about the celestial fabric she replied with a lovely smile, “Gentlemen! The celestial fabric is visible only to those who are pure along with the purity of their parents. Of course I know that you can see and appreciate the superior quality and craftsmanship of the fabric!” The royal employees were embarrassed to admit that they could not see the fabric. They feared being branded as sinners. So they pretended to compliment and appreciate the invisible fabric. They stood by the roles they had played in the guesthouse in front of King Rayalu too. The king was pleased with their report and after a few days, ordered for the fabrics to be exhibited before him. A big crowd gathered in court the day the celestial fabric was to be displayed. Before the exhibition, the weavers gave an introductory speech where they explained how the fabric was made of divine materials and so; only those pure of soul along with the purity of their parents could see it. No one in the crowd admitted to not seeing the fabric and as one they all applauded the weavers’ work and expertise. Just then the king entered the room with Tenali Raman. The weavers gave the king the same introductory speech. The king, unable to see the fabric, turned to Tenali Raman and said with chagrin, “I’m afraid I can’t see the fabric! Does that mean I have sinned or is this the sin of my parents?” Tenali Raman replied, “Nothing comes to be visible in thin air, My Lord!” Rayalu grew suspicious, “What do you mean?” he asked. Tenali Raman in a low tone audible only to the King said, “King of Kings! These weavers are cheating our eyes and brains with their deceptive speech.” The king urged Raman to make public the cheating of the weavers. Raman turned towards the gorgeous woman and in an astoundingly inquisitive tone told her, “What a beauty! How rich are these textiles, Lady. The King of Kings Rayalu is anxious to view your stepped up decorum, if you wear those celestial material.” The lady immediately understood that Tenali Raman had deciphered the secret of invisible weaving. She was caught. She had no escape.

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She could neither disregard the King’s order nor stand nude in the crowded court in the guise of wearing something, which was actually nothing. She thought that the only way out would be to fall on the King’s feet pleading mercy. Immediately she did so begging for pardon. This was how Tenali Raman was once again instrumental in protecting his King. Since then, nudity is referred to as wearing divine clothes.

6 - indian weavers Sarojini Naidu

WEAVERS, weaving at break of day, Why do you weave a garment so gay? . . . Blue as the wing of a halcyon wild, We weave the robes of a new-born child. Weavers, weaving at fall of night, Why do you weave a garment so bright? . . . Like the plumes of a peacock, purple and green, We weave the marriage-veils of a queen. Weavers, weaving solemn and still, What do you weave in the moonlight chill? . . . White as a feather and white as a cloud, We weave a dead man’s funeral shroud.

7 - the blue jackal Panchatantra

One evening when it was dark, a hungry jackal went in search of food in a large village close to his jungle home. The local dogs didn’t like jackals and chased him away. The jackal ran as fast as he could, and not looking where he was going fell into a bucket of indigo dye outside the home of the cloth dyer. The dogs ran further and the jackal climbed out of the bucket, wet but unharmed. The jackal continued into the jungle and saw the lion, King of the Jungle. The Lion asked him who he was and the jackal seeing that he had now turned blue declared himself as Chandru - protector of all the animals in the jungle. Chandru told the lion that he would only continue to protect the jungle if all the animals would agree to give him food and shelter. Soon Chandru was sought for advice from animals from other jungles and animals sat at his feet and brought him the best of food. But as happens every year in India, the Monsoon came, and slowly but surely, the blue dye had run off Chandru’s coat and he was just a mangy jackal again. The animals realised this and chased the jackal far into the jungle, where he was never seen again.

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the process of natural dye-making I investigated the historical processes and techniques that were used to extract dyes from plants and insects. There were three primary dyes that were used in ancient

India. They are Indigo (Blue), Madder (Red) and Turmeric (Yellow). I looked to see if the process by which the colour was extracted from these natural sources could serve as content for my graphic language.

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46-48: Indigo dyes are extracted from the woad or the indigo plant. The leaves of the plant are used to extract the compound Indigotin which is responsible for the deep blue colour of the dye. 49,50: Red dye in India is manufactured naturally from the Madder plant. The dark, red roots of a 3-5 year old madder plant is cut, dried and powdered. The main compound in madder dye that gives it colour is called Alizarin. 51: Turmeric has been the source of natural yellow dye in India for a long time. The colour is extracted from the dried roots of the turmeric plant. It is a good food dye but makes for a poor fabric dye.

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the lives of indian artisans Any of the themes discussed previously would not be possible without the considerable work and contributions of Indian artisans. They are the lifeblood of homespun

Indian aesthetics. Generations of an artisan’s family devote their lives to keeping a craft alive, making history everyday. So in this theme, I studied the skills, the unique lifestyles and actions of different kinds of artisans.

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52,53: Fabric dyers are exposed to a lot of harmful, abrading chemicals during the process of dyeing. Their work hardens them to withstand the high temperatures of the dye vat inside which they soak the fabric to be coloured. 54,55: Different weavers work all over India using different techniques. Weaving is predominantly a family profession. Weavers often apprentice within their own families and learn the trade from a very young age. However, the profit to be found in handwoven garments is less for the weavers themselves as the sale of these garments go through several channels. This has instigated a lot of the newer generations to leave this profession, making certain styles of handloom weaving extremely rare.

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56: Just like weaving, handicraft artists and artisans are also facing a dip in their numbers because fewer and fewer individuals choose to take up this profession for their livelihood. 57: Stone-carvers are some of the most physically tested artisans in India. Their craftform requires both extensive, physical labour and intensive, intricate sculpture work. The presence and growth of temples assure that these artisans have a steady stream of business. Therefore, these artisans continue to thrive and progress. 58, 59: Basket weavers usually live and work in communities, often selling and creating their ware at the same place. Government initiatives and workshops increase awareness about this craftform and assure that these artisans receive aid and materials.

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the concept of the navarasa

Each rasa has its own colour, they are as follows,

The Navarasas and The Rasa Theory are definitive ideals behind which Indian aesthetics are founded. They set Indian art and interpretations apart from other Western aesthetics. The Navarasas also give importance to colour. Colour plays an important role in the stimulation of an emotion or state of being. I explored this theme in particular because it represented how colour was linked to emotion. This theme exemplified how colour could influence our daily lives and psychological states. I hoped to tap into this theory for visual content.

––Shringar (Love) - Green ––Hasya (Laughter) - White ––Karunya (Compassion) - Dove grey ––Adbhutham (Wonder) - Yellow ––Bibhatsya (Disgust) - Blue ––Veera (Courage) - Wheatish brown ––Raudram (Anger) - Red ––Bhayanaka (Horror) - Black ––Shantham (Peace) - White

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60: Bharatnatyam is a danceform where the Navarasas are prominently used. Here, a Bharatnatyam dancer demonstrates the Navarasas in the order given in the list above.

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visual cues from ancient calligraphy My final theme involved looking at different calligraphy styles and treatments for inspiration. Through research, I discovered several visual cues. Calligraphy artists, particularly from India and the Middle East have made

lettering an artform and have created different visual content with the same style of brushstrokes. I found this very interesting as I was also attempting to do something similar - create different visual content that conformed to the same system of graphic style.

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61-66: These are a few of the images that I collected in the process of trying to understand how calligraphy has become an artform with certain guidelines, application angles, brush widths, etc. that help define different lettering styles.

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NEW PLACES NEW FACES sf dyes conducts most of their business communications

I reviewed the websites of corporate firms, museums and educational institutes to understand the current trends in place, both stylistically and content-wise, for the building of a business website. A comprehensive list of current trends are as follows, responsiveness: The first parameter to consider in today’s web design is a site’s responsiveness. It is not so much a trend now as it is a staple requirement. Users are turning more and more to their smartphones as portals of online information. Google estimates that almost 8 out of 10 websites today are responsive. So when looking at websites I checked to see how they shrank to fit different sizes and how their navigation changed. There are several

well designed websites today that demonstrate that with a clean, crisp grid and clear, straightforward typography it is possible to create a seamless, responsive website. minimalism, no clutter: Visually, today’s websites opt for a minimalistic look and feel with a colour palette filled with primaries along with stark black and white. There are no excessive gradients and special effects. In essence, the visuality of the website is designed to not distract the user from the content but rather to subliminally lead the user to it. Typographically, designers are experimenting with bold, large headers and much smaller type sizes for body text. This gives websites a distinct, typographic richness which is useful when it comes to creating responsive websites. clear, engaging copy: In terms of copy, the heading phrases and explanatory paragraphs are characterized by clear, concise language that gets to the point quickly. Today’s users, with their extensive online presence have a short attention span. Companies therefore have to optimise the time that users spend on their website. So, without resorting to exhaustive, data filled copy, most websites hit their users with short, impactful phrases that oftentimes emotionally engages them. long pages: Long pages are another trend that have become popular with the rise of the responsive website. The frame of a phone to view information has created a slew of challenges for web designers in terms of website navigation. Long pages are a very effective answer to that. Instead of switching between tabs or clicking too many links, the user can view the pertinent content by scrolling through one long page. collapsible content: Collapsible content is another really effective solution in today’s website. Like long pages, they serve to make the work of navigation easier.

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and transactions face-to-face. A majority of their publicity is done through word-of-mouth. But the company understood the importance of making an impression through their online presence also. So the website became a very important touchpoint in their brief. Through discussion and analysis, I found that visitors to the SF Dyes website would mainly be potential clients, existing clients and employees. They would all most probably learn about the website from the company’s corporate giveaways. Most of them would approach the website with some level of knowledge about SF Dyes’ work and products. The website would serve to inform them in detail about SF Dyes’ product portfolio and office locations . It would provide them with the required, contextual contact information. My research for the website included looking at existing corporate websites. This was to understand current website navigation and design trends, the business objectives that websites have to satisfy and website grid usage.

1 - trends

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Perceptively, the user’s connection with the website is disturbed everytime they have to move to a new page within the website. Although the whole website has the same visual language, every new page still causes a mild stumble in the user’s flow and experience. Collapsible content is a kind of information viewing and navigation trend where pockets of information are available, hidden inside the same page. Typically, with this trend, the place in the website which has more information is followed by a ‘+’ or a ‘more’ link. On clicking that link, the page opens up to reveal the information that was hitherto unseen. On clicking a ‘x’ or a ‘close’ link, the information ‘collapses’ back revealing the original page.

2 - website objectives

I looked at what kind of roles websites played in the brand building of other companies, especially other dye manufacturers. Each company’s website helps project its company in different ways. Although most of their objectives are the same, companies prioritize differently when it comes to what their website communicates. Some put their customer service and their loyal commitment on the forefront, others are purely experiential and market their products more than anything else, while some others offer options for prospective employees at the forefront. I also studied the needs of my client SF Dyes here and arrived at a few important objectives that the brand’s website must satisfy, the website must be flexible: A company’s branding, marketing and PR objectives keep changing with different market scenarios. The website should be flexible enough to bring different kinds of information to the forefront without involving a major redesign. Most companies manage this by designing their website over a simple, fluid grid system. This flexibility in the website is also necessary for quick addition and update of new streams of information. Companies constantly keep presenting updates about new partnerships, a new product they’ve released, a new office opening in a city, job opportunities, etc. The website should be changeable enough to accomodate this rotation of information.

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the website should always inform: The landing page is key here. To inform its viewers about the company is the primary objective of every website. The levels to which it may inform them might differ. Some companies have viewers visiting their website without any idea of what they do or offer. In that case, the website becomes a trusted source, a window into the products and services of that company. At this point the website plays a make-orbreak role, so establishing credibility becomes key. Which is why, I believe, most corporates fill their landing pages with their best work. They present information, tabloid style, about all the work happening in the different sectors of the company. Instead of it just being an introductory chapter, the landing page of the website becomes something of a launchpad for the company, showing the company in its best light.

a clever website provides context-sensitive information: While the landing page grabs the

interest of the viewers, it is the rest of the content in the website that retains the their attention. Websites induce their users to different kinds of action. It might be as simple as impacting the user enough that he/she wants to acquire the services of the company or it might be as decisive as making a purchase through the website (Eg: E-commerce sites). Whatever the case, the website must provide the necessary links and buttons where it is needed. The user’s decision-making process is filled with variables so the website must provide everything it can to help the user make the desired decision. This includes providing the action buttons in spots where the user will most likely take action, further motivating him to do so.

3 - grid usage

Well designed websites today, are based on a solid grid system that makes it easier for both the designers and the developers. Most websites that I referred used the 960 grid system. In terms of layout, the tile layout presented an interesting option. I looked up several websites with effective, interesting layouts with particular attention to tile layouts and how they were applied.

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67,68: The Bloomberg Businessweek’s website is one of the most well-designed media websites. As visible above, it falls obviously within a grid. The designers have used an unusual combination of colours like a dark, formal blue with a bright, candy pink that somehow works. The bold typography takes after the masthead and helps counter the sheer variety of visual content.

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69,70: Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects’ simply designed website puts their work at the forefront in the form of majestic, screen-spanning images. The website informs its viewers at the first look that it represents a firm that does extremely high-end, impactful work. It also points to the kind of people that these architects do work for, the kind of people who would visit and appreciate a website like this.

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71, 72: The website for the Choiseul Institute in France uses the grid a little playfully. Solic expanses of happy colours stand out against a formal, grey background and monotone photographs. The typography is lukewarm, however there is a slight off-kilter quality to the arrangement of the coloured tiles which gives an interesting continuity to the visual language throughout the website.

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73, 74: You would expect an art museum’s website to be extremely heavy and tightly packed with graphic content. However the Harvard Art Museum’s website completely surprises with deliberately spaced out panels and a mix and match of categories in the landing page. Sub-links show expanded artwork images with visual cues pointing to the next image. Overall, the website seems to actually replicate a trip through the museum digitally. It is a good example of how to build an experience through the medium of the web.

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76

75: The online portfolio of designer David Arias makes use of the tile layout in its most perfect form. This kind of arrangment works best for image heavy exhibitions of work. Arias has used monotone throughout and uses colour to accent links in the landing page. 76: Wired magazine’s website is another example of a well executed media website. But unlike Bloomberg, Wired plays down the visual appeal of its typography and vector elements and lets the intriguing images take the spotlight.

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CO LLAT ION,

DI SC U SSI ON

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DELI VE R A B L E S

PLAN OF ACTION this stage started with a collation of the requirements from the brief, the information collected from research and insights from extensive discussions with my guide and the studio head. An overall review of all of this yielded a list of prioritized deliverables. These included,

1 - visual language

Conceptualizing and finalizing the overarching visual content and graphic style was the first priority. All the information from my research would take form here. The output of this stage would serve to inform all of the rest of the deliverables. An awareness of the brand’s touchpoints gave me an in-depth understanding of how the graphic style would function. The language would be applicable across different platforms - print, online and physical spaces. It would contain a combination of smaller visual elements all tied together. The language could branch out to signify different functions/actions within the same brand. Importantly, bright, vivid colours would be judiciously applied, explored and used within the language. They would communicate SF Dyes’ service value and product quality more than anything else.

2 - logo refinement and logotype

The SF Dyes logo is a well thought-out concept. However, it is a singular entity and doesn’t work as a system. Therefore, the logo would be fine-tuned and checked to see if it worked in all sizes. A new logotype would be explored and finalized. This would consequently lead to the lockup of the full brand signature. The color palette would also be finalized and applied throughout.

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3 - business cards and stationery As already mentioned, SF Dyes do most of their marketing and selling face-to-face. And so, their business stationery becomes their single most importanttouchpoint with the customer. They give away a lot of business cards in the course of a working day. They needed two kinds of business cards - one for the company’s partners and one for employees. These cards would have a low production cost as SF Dyes printed and used a large number of cards. The accompanying stationery would be simple, practical, corporate and functional.

4 - website

The SF Dyes website is another influencing touchpoint. The requirements of a website have grown from a simple informant to a complete experience provider. The SF Dyes website would also, therefore, give its viewers a look at the world of SF Dyes. The website would be both emotive and functional. Along with informing them of SF Dyes products, it would link the brand to the customer’s quality of life. And like all other websites out there today, it would also be responsive.

5 - calendar

SF Dyes give out calendars to their clients and associates every year. These calendars are always detailrich and inspired by traditional Indian mythology, ideology and artforms. For 2016’s calendar, varied themes would be explored. Along with Indian symbolism and aesthetics, attention would be given to colour interplay, weaving styles, contemporary visual techniques, etc.

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STRATEGY

6 - folders, notebooks, print advertisements

be defined by their distinct logotypes that are consistent throughout. These would appear on the advertisements with the SF logo and so, all these advertisements would become part of a single, unified campaign.

Folders and notebooks are a part of SF Dyes’ print communication along with the business stationery. But while the stationery needed to be corporate and practical, there was a wider opportunity to play around graphically with the surface of the folders and notebooks. The folders often contain shade cards for dyes and is often mailed to SF Dyes’ clients. So the cover of the folder would also communicate that sense of vibrance, variety and colour that the shade cards represent. The print advertisements, for separate dyes and auxiliaries, could be completely removed from the brand’s corporate graphic style. The product ranges itself would

SF Dyes needed a format for e-greetings to update their clients digitally about company developments, news, announcements, etc. Just like the print advertisements these e-greetings could move away from just employing the visual language. This solid list of touchpoints helped me breakdown my project into smaller deadlines. With this, I formulated a project schedule to follow.

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7 - emailers and e-greetings

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PROPOS ED

SCHEDU LE

project duration: 20 weeks (12/01/2015 – 30/05/2015) project stages

january 1

2

3

february 4

5

6

march 7

8

9

10 11

april

may

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

stage 1: foundation research & strategy

concept development

execution & refinement

stage 2: website research & wireframing

content & graphics

artwork refinement

stage 3: collaterals folders, notebooks & print ads

calendar 2016

emailers & e-greetings

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2015

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STRATEGY ACT UAL

TI M ELI N E

project duration: 24 weeks (12/01/2015 – 30/06/2015) january

project stages

1

2

february

march

april

may

june

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

stage 1: foundation research & strategy

concept development

execution & refinement

stage 2: website research & wireframing

content & graphics

stage 3: collaterals folders, notebooks & print ads

calendar 2016

emailers & e-greetings

EXPERIENCING SF DYES

KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN

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INITIAL

IDEATI ON

SYSTEMIZE i began ideation for the visual language at this stage. During research and strategy development, sparks of a few directions and concepts had already started forming in my mind. Some of these directions could also be applied as themes for the SF Dyes calendar. I examined each of them in detail to see if they would go the distance. Because I was conceptualizing for a visual language, I couldn’t stop with a few sketches. I had to apply different content to the concepts to see if they each had the graphic flexibility to accommodate different scenarios.

This stage was an exploration of content as much as the style. Therefore, for each concept, I created a collection of sample vectors. I explored different styles and different kinds of messages to put forth. It was important that these concepts work well and thrive on colours. So, to make things simpler, I created a basic, bright colour palette to apply to these vectors. As I continued exploring, new ideas formed with the examination of every other idea. At the end I narrowed down on six different directions to be presented initially.

trial colour palette Existing Brand Colour

Existing Brand Colour

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


CONC E PT CONCEPT

N O.

DE VE LOPME NT

1

a grid inspired by indian handlooms One of the very first ideas I had was to base the visual system upon a grid. A grid would create a unified foundation and is also one of the best, time-tested platforms that takes in a variety of content and still makes them all conform to a singular style. Type design and websites use grids to create holistic style families. And so, for this concept, I created a grid inspired by the geometric constructions found in

Indian handlooms, especially Patola and Pochampally. What I refined finally was a simple combination of squares, circles and rhombi . This grid showed potential for both straight, sharp lines and also elaborately curved, flowing forms. Content-wise, I illustrated stylized versions of colourful objects from everyday Indian life upon the grid. I believed these objects could be used to metaphorically represent different brand qualities later.

The grid. Circles and Rhombi form alternate rows over a network of smaller squares.

Initial attempt at exploring the style. A doodle of trial visuals over the grid.

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2015

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Sample vectors in outline and filled colour versions. Everyday objects like streamers, wall hangings, kites, paper pinwheels, etc. interconnect with each other to create an interesting composition.

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KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


CONC E PT CONCEPT

N O.

DE VE LOPME NT

2

superimposing vectors on fabric swatches For my second concept, I attempted a pairing of vector illustrations with photographed fabric. I explored this concept more for application in calendars or office spaces

than as a corporate visual language. Here I tried to create a simple landscape composed of vector elements inspired from textile motifs. It was set against a dark fabric background. The result was fun, modern and quirky.

The individual vector elements, inspired by motifs from Ikkat, Batik, Pochampally and Kantha fabric respectively.

Outlined against a dark blue, denim background are stylized clouds, plains, mountains and woods made of these replicated motifs.

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CO NCEPT

N O.

3

a grid inspired by the weaving technique The third concept reaches down to the essential core of textile manufacture and dyeing. It is inspired by the fundamental interlocking of warp and weft threads while weaving fabric. The texture of woven fabric is a grid in itself and in this concept, I created a simplified, vector

version of that texture. I combined several separate motifs and explored a mural-like composition through this grid. These motifs were abstract renditions of attributes like progress, teamwork, relationship building, etc. This concept proved to be one of the most flexible options in the collection of concepts I worked on.

The primary diagonal grid on which I built the style. It resembles a zoomed in version of a piece of fabric.

Digital exploration to test out the possibilities of the grid.

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KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


CONC E PT

DE VE LOPME NT

Final visual of stacked graphics that signify different qualities. Together they create a pattern that can branch out through different iterations to form a visual system.

Employees, Teamwork

Growth, Progress

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Spreading out, Crossing shores

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2015

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Fire, Drive, Passion

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CO NCEPT

N O.

4

dynamic fibres The basic element in fabrics is fibre; thread. These threads, in the most basic level, are the lifeblood of SF Dyes and their clients. For this concept, I explored the thread as a visual medium of representation. By creating dynamic pathways and tight coils for colourful streaks of fibre lines,

I was able to create a style that looked bracing, energetic, progressive and happy. Here again, for the content I tried to represent the intangible, empowering attributes of the brand. I also tried to create process-oriented icons through this style. For instance, icons for shade cards, colour mixings and product offerings.

Liquid dyes and colour mixing

Shade cards

People, Workforce, Helpdesk

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Committed employees, Eco-friendly practices, Innovative techniques

Product offering - Pigments and powders

60 Year anniversary

Information / News

BEYOND THE LOGO

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Downloads

2015

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CONC E PT CONCEPT

N O.

DE VE LOPME NT

5

motif stencils This concept explores the message that SF Dyes is a window to a colourful world. Here, I created a set of basic icons stylized from textile motifs. These icons denoted specific facets of the company like their innovation, their

organizational structure, their new ventures etc. Then I experimented with the replication of these and used them to create stencils which I laid over colourful swaths of fabric. What resulted is a contemporary and interpretative language that would be a wholly new outlook for SF Dyes.

The icon set I created for the stencils. They have a stylized, modified look and take their form from existing, popular textile icons.

IDEAS / INNOVATION / NEW BEGINNINGS

The image above and the four images that follow employ each of these icons to create different visual arrangements. These composed stencils along with their colour and the fabric at the background are used to represent certain actions and functions within the company. These are highlighted in small text boxes that are incorporated into the artwork itself. Initially, when I started exploring this concept, I thought that this would apply best in the form of web banners and as environmental graphics for SF Dyes offices and signage.

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ORGANIZATION / STRUCTURE / FOUNDATION

PEOPLE / NETWORKS / COLLABORATION

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CONC E PT

DE VE LOPME NT

PRODUCT OFFERING / DYES / SERVICES

PROGRESS / NEW VENTURES / DIRECTIONS

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CO NCEPT

N O.

6

a constructivist mural The last concept I designed purely for application in physical environments or as a calendar theme. SF Dyes have always preferred artwork that is explicitly Indian in design and inspiration. I wanted to explore a different

approach. I was inspired by the minimal, constructivist posters of El Lissitzky. His sense of aesthetics were completely removed from the earthy, decorative Indian sense of aesthetics. I thought it would be interesting to attempt to bring together both of these styles.

Initial doodle where I tried to figure out what kind of content to put in, how they would interact, etc. The idea was to incorporate design elements and the machinery involved in the physical process of weaving and dyeing togther in a long swathe of cloth.

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


CONC E PT

DE VE LOPME NT

Fabrics, looms, threads , motifs and different perspectives are superimposed with each other to create a dynamic, 2d/3D effect.

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V IS UAL

LAN G UAG E

INTO THE GRID after thorough discussion and review, it was decided that the first concept, of the grid inspired from handlooms, would be taken forward. The way the concept contemporarized a traditional style made it very appealing and showed a lot of promise. This grid offered a lot of opportunities. It was made up of simple, highly identifiable shapes. Therefore it would be easy to create elements that have strong links to each other graphically. Although the shapes are basic, the grid has enough of their numbers to create a dense network of lines upon which various iterations for new forms could be explored. As for the content that would fuel the language, creating very specific objects seemed to make the communication needlessly complex and tricky. To lend it more fluidity and abstraction, arbitrary forms would be created and combined to create large compositions. Each individual element would signify nothing, but the

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composition as a whole would express the brand’s vigour, zeal and a wholesome cheer. These compositions could be applied on stationery, surfaces, as panels on websites,etc. Another interesting insight is that this concept is also intrinsically linked to the SF Dyes brandmark itself. The brandmark prominently features quadrants in its arrangement (the brandmark and its construction are discussed in detail in Pg: 62, 63). One of the most basic shapes that I had created and replicated throughout the grid had been a quadrant. In that sense, this grid and graphic concept worked very effectively for SF Dyes’ identity. The following few pages show iterative compositions that I created as part of developing this language. To make the language simpler and more connected to the brandmark, some of the compositions are made of just quadrants. These compositions were particularly for application in the company’s corporate stationery.

KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION PR IM ARY

I DENTI TY

SYSTEM

REVITALIZE the brandmark for SF Dyes is a stylized S that has been designed to enclose an F in the negative space. SF Dyes had recently switched to a 3D version of the brandmark. After debating the issue, it was decided that, in the interest of refreshing the full brand, the older, flat brandmark would be revived. The 3D version only lent itself to limited applications. The flat version is much more effective and flexible. The concept behind it was sound. The mark could stand the test of time and was highly identifiable. Only the execution of the brandmark’s vector required some review and refinement.

Although very effective, it stood alone and did not have system in place to support it. So, at this stage, I developed a primary identity system with guidelines. I took the brandmark through different phases and the entire structure began to emerge. These phases include, ¬¬Refinement of existing brandmark ¬¬Alternate enclosed brandmark ¬¬Colour palette ¬¬Logotype ¬¬Full brand signature ¬¬Corporate type family

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PHAS E

1

refinement of existing brandmark In this phase, the brandmark vector was redrawn and finetuned. Its geometric construction was revisited and the required changes were made. When checking to see if the brandmark worked even in very small sizes, it was found

that after a particular point, when the mark was about 2 cms high, the crosshairs which enclosed the ‘F’ had become too narrow to be seen. This problem was solved by separately creating a smaller version of the logo with the crosshairs widened.

SF DYES The flat and 3D versions of the logo that were in use at the start of the project

The existing brandmark’s vector. The blue circles enclose the sections that needed to be fine tuned.

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION

The refined brandmark along with its geometric construction. The junctions are where the shapes were edited to make sure they formed perfect squares. The geometric construction also helped me understand the balance of the symbol and how the different shapes interacted with each other.

The large version of the brandmark (100%) compared to a couple of smaller versions (25%). The small brandmark in the center is an exact scaling down of the original while the brandmark on the extreme right is a version where the crosshairs have been widened. The difference is palpable.

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PHAS E

2

alternate enclosed brandmark To strengthen the existing form and to help it stand out against a variety of backgrounds, it was decided that the brandmark would be enclosed by a basic shape. This would allow the it to work by itself as a mnemonic without the company’s name to accompany it. I sketched out a few ideas and vectorized the most promising ones. They were

all considered and the simple circular form was decided as the final pick. It went really well with the original brandmark. It was neutral and didn’t add confusing new meanings to the brandmark. It allowed for equal areas for white and the brand colours, creating a pleasing visual balance. It also had the look of a seal when applied in the brand’s collaterals.

A few initial doodles exploring the form of the brandmark and seeing what kind of an enclosing form can be added around it.

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Tentative brand colours that were proposed. This trial palette was used to check the enclosing forms’ reactions to colours.

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION

A few of the promising forms that were explored along with colour possibilities. The second and fourth row of options made me realize that a circular form worked better than sharp forms. That is how the final, basic circle was chosen.

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finalized form

The form that was chosen at the end. This version of the brandmark enclosed in a circle would now serve as a stand-alone mnemonic for SF Dyes’ communications. It lends a foundation for the brandmark and gives it more presence and stability.

x = 4 units

5x

7x

8x

4x

Geometric construction of the circle and brandmark. It explains where the brandmark should be placed within the circle for it to achieve optimum visual balance.

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KIRUTHIKA M

2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION PHAS E

3

colour palette SF Dyes’ brand colours, blue and green, had been in use for a long time and therefore could not be changed. However the shades of blue and green that were being used could be reviewed and other options could be explored. A light, teal blue was being used for SF Dyes (the manufacturing division) and a dark, earthy green was being used to represent SF Dyes Pvt Ltd (the supply division). These two shades seemed to be taken from two different

palettes and didn’t sit well together. Consequently, the first change to be made, while exploring new shades, was to make sure the tonality of the blue and green matched. So when I experimented with different combinations, I did so by constantly trying out blue and green pairs. I presented options from different colour palettes. The final colour pair that was chosen looked bright, active and struck a perfect balance between showing the company’s strength and age and their futuristic outlook.

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Initial colour palette that was in use at the start of the project. It is obvious that the blue and green do not work well together. The green has a deep, murky shade that pulls a lot of weight and undermines the strength of the blue.

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These were the main three blue and green pairs that were offered as options to the clients. Each of these options are from different palettes and convey different moods. However, the colours within the pairs themselves correspond to each other’s tonality.

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finalized colour palette

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BEYOND THE LOGO

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E XEC UTION PHAS E

4

logotype The existing logotype for SF Dyes, a full uppercase arrangement, was typeset in Futura’s Bold Oblique style. The diagonal plane created by the oblique letterforms warred with the perpendicular plane of the brandmark. So, a change in logotype was also considered. I presented assorted options, each of which seemed to react to the brandmark differently. The form of the ‘S’ in the logotype was given particular attention as this had to match the brandmark’s ‘S’. The typefaces were also judged on the

basis of how well they worked with the tagline’s typeface. The tagline - your people for colours - was typeset in Trebuchet MS. It worked well and required no change. A lot of typeface options were scraped because of the mismatch that their ‘S’s created. After extensive and careful deliberation, Neue Haas Grotesk was selected as the final typeface that the logotype would be typeset in. The form of ‘S’ in Neue Haas Grotesk is a full-fledged curve and it interacted well with the ‘S’ in the brandmark. The bold weight in the typeface’s display version was used.

your people for colours The image to the left is the brandmark with the original logotype. During review, it was decided that the proportion between the logotype and the brandmark would be altered. The logotype would become much larger, visibly extending out from below the brandmark. The image above is the tagline. It normally appears below the logotype in the brand signature.

SF DYES

SF DYES

SF DYES

SF DYES

Akzidenz-Grotesk (Medium)

Amplitude (Bold)

Officina Sans (Bold)

SF DYES

SF DYES

SF DYES

Univers (Bold)

Trade Gothic (Bold)

Scala Sans (Bold)

SF DYES

SF DYES

SF DYES

Flama (Bold)

DIN (Black)

Gotham Narrow (Black)

The first set of logotypes that were offered to the client. The options here contain an assortment of different typefaces.

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SF DYES

SF DYES

SF DYES

SF DYES

Swiss 721 (Bold)

Helvetica Neue (Bold)

Lato (Black)

Campton (Bold)

SF DYES Neue Haas Grotesk (Bold)

Galano Grotesque (Bold)

After review and feedback from the client, the second set of logotypes were given. This next set of typefaces were picked with particular attention to their ‘S’s. It was out of these that Neue Haas Grotesk Display Bold was chosen as the final typeface for the SF Dyes logotype.

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION

finalized logotype

SF DYES

abcdefghijklm nopqrstuvwxyz ABCDEFGHIJKL MNOPQRSTU VWXYZ 0123456789 Neue Haas Grotesk (Display Bold) from Linotype.

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PHAS E

5

full brand signature

signature. I worked with the measurements of basic elements taken from the existing brandmark to inform the proportions of the brand signature.

Once the brandmark and logotype had been finalized, it was time to make the final lockup of the full brand

SF DYES

your people for colours 4x 3.5x x

y

SF DYES 0.5y

0.5y

your people for colours Full brand signature featuring the brandmark’s first version with the logotype and tagline. Relative proportions shown.

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION

SF DYES

your people for colours 4x 3.75x x

y

SF DYES 0.5y

0.5y

your people for colours Full brand signature featuring the brandmark’s second version with the logotype and tagline. Relative proportions shown.

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PHAS E

6

corporate type family As the last step, the brand needed a corporate type family. One that had enough styles that could meet all of SF Dyes stationery and print communication needs.

This type family would also need to go well with Neue Haas Grotesk from the logotype. It needed to be versatile, practical, decisive and modern. Gotham Narrow was the type family that was chosen.

Thin

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Thin Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Extra Light

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Light

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Light Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Book

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Book Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Medium

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Medium Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Bold

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Bold Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Black

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Black Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Ultra

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Ultra Italic

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg Hh Ii Jj Kk Ll Mm Nn Oo Pp Qq Rr Ss Tt Uu Vv Ww Xx Yy Zz 0123456789

Gotham Narrow (full type family) from Hoefler and Frere-Jones.

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2015

DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION BRAND

PAC KAG E

THE FULL GAMUT once the identity was in place, the stationery naturally followed. As noted before, the business card was the cornerstone for the company’s corporate communication. So considerable variations were tried out until the final layout was made to perfection. Once the elements inside the business cards were in place, the letterhead and envelope could be created easily. They would follow the visual cues that had already been set in the business cards. After the three basic components came the invoices. SF Dyes are manufacturers of their own dyes and suppliers for a few international dye manufacturers. Their business transactions require them to have very specific invoice types. So, before the design could begin, I consolidated all of their available invoices. From here, the types were

narrowed down to four - Basic invoice, Tax invoice, Debit note and Credit Note. For the final layout, I worked on systemizing and streamlining the content within the invoices. They were all typeset in the company’s corporate typeface, Gotham Narrow’s light and medium weights. At this stage, I was also able to design the folder covers and notebooks. They offered more area for exploration. They could be light, colourful and energetic. So, here I adapted the abstract composition that I had created of the visual language. I worked further on it, expanding and adding color to it until I got the desired results. All of these together yielded the fundamental branding package. The next few pages show all the artwork made at this stage through mockups and full-page layouts.

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BUS INESS

CA RDS

the first set Size: 8.5 X 5.5 cms

NAME

NAME

info@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

info@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

Designation

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

Designation

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 C 91 00000 00000

YOGI SACHDEV

YOGI SACHDEV

yogi@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

yogi@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

Director

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 C 91 00000 00000

Director

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 C 91 98450 08333

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 C 91 98450 08333

SF DYES Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

SF DYES Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

MUMBAI ALLEPPEY

MUMBAI ALLEPPEY

BANGALORE ERODE

NEW DELHI

BANGALORE ERODE

NEW DELHI

visuals have been scaled down by 85% to fit the page. These were the first set of cards that were considered. The composed graphics were becoming too colourful and too complex to render well in such a small size. So a toned down version was considered.

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DJ ACADEMY OF DESIGN


E XEC UTION

NAME LAST NAME

NAME LAST NAME

info@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

info@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

Designation

Designation

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 00 00000000 F 91 00 00000000 C 91 00000 00000

your people for colours

T 91 00 00000000 F 91 00 00000000 C 91 00000 00000

your people for colours

YOGI SACHDEV

YOGI SACHDEV

yogi@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

yogi@sfdyes.com www.sfdyes.com

Director

Director

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

SF DYES 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 40061000 F 91 80 2558 0424 C 91 98450 08333

your people for colours

T 91 80 40061000 F 91 80 2558 0424 C 91 98450 08333

your people for colours

SF DYES HEAD OFFICE Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

SF DYES HEAD OFFICE Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

MUMBAI

MUMBAI

BANGALORE

NEW DELHI

ALLEPPEY

ERODE

BANGALORE

NEW DELHI

ALLEPPEY

ERODE

visuals have been scaled down by 85% to fit the page. Above are the first set of options that were shown to the client. The visual language was adapted to include only quadrants and the brand colours. This was done to create a much more formal, sober look for the business cards.

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the second set Size: 8.5 X 5.5 cms

NAME LAST NAME

NAME LAST NAME

91 00000 00000 info@sfdyes.com

91 00000 00000 info@sfdyes.com

Designation

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 56001 India

Designation

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

your people for colours

NAME LAST NAME

NAME LAST NAME

91 00000 00000 info@sfdyes.com

91 00000 00000 info@sfdyes.com

Designation

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

Designation

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

visuals have been scaled down by 85% to fit the page. By this stage, with the second set of cards, a firm direction had been established. Small dashes were placed at the top and bottom of the textual content to create a subtle, enclosing window. These dashes would become the visual continuity cues that would continue into the rest of the business stationery.

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YOGI SACHDEV

YOGI SACHDEV

91 98450 08333 yogi@sfdyes.com

91 98450 08333 yogi@sfdyes.com

Director

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

Director

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

your people for colours

your people for colours

YOGI SACHDEV

YOGI SACHDEV

91 98450 08333 yogi@sfdyes.com

91 98450 08333 yogi@sfdyes.com

Director

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 40061000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

Director

T 91 80 4006 1000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

SF DYES Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001 India

T 91 80 40061000 F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

SF DYES Pvt Ltd Head Office Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

SF DYES Pvt Ltd Head Office Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

MUMBAI | BANGALORE | NEW DELHI | ALLEPPEY | ERODE

MUMBAI | BANGALORE | NEW DELHI | ALLEPPEY | ERODE

SF DYES Pvt Ltd Head Office Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

SF DYES Pvt Ltd Head Office Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001 India Tel 91 224351 8888

MUMBAI | BANGALORE | NEW DELHI | ALLEPPEY | ERODE

MUMBAI | BANGALORE | NEW DELHI | ALLEPPEY | ERODE

For the back of the card, outline and filled colour versions were explored. An embossed finish was also considered. A sample of the blue version is shown above. The emboss would add to the subtlety and sophistication. However, it was not the most suitable option for the client as they would be printing a lot of these cards and embossing would be needlessly expensive.

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the third and final set Size: 8.5 X 5.5 cms

Name Lastname Designation 91 00000 00000 info@sfdyes.com

SF Dyes 1012 Barton Center, 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001, India T 91 80 4006 1000 | F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com your people for colours

since 1954

Yogi Sachdev Director 91 98450 08333 yogi@sfdyes.com

SF Dyes 1012 Barton Center, 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001, India T 91 80 4006 1000 | F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com your people for colours

since 1954

SF Dyes Head Office Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001, India T 91 22 4351 8888

MUMBAI

BANGALORE

AHMEDABAD

SURAT

NEW DELHI ERODE

exact scale shown. Further fine-tuning from the second set resulted in the third and final set of cards. The text was re-arranged and the brandmark’s size was reduced. This was to done to open up the area around the brandmark and to give it more breathing space. After much deliberation, the composition at the back was removed as it was taking too much away from the formality of the card.

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Name Lastname Designation 91 00000 00000 info@sfdyes.com

SF Dyes Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center, 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001, India T 91 80 4006 1000 | F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com your people for colours

since 1954

Yogi Sachdev Director 91 98450 08333 yogi@sfdyes.com

SF Dyes Pvt Ltd 1012 Barton Center, 84 MG Road Bangalore 560001, India T 91 80 4006 1000 | F 91 80 2558 0424 www.sfdyes.com your people for colours

since 1954

SF Dyes Pvt Ltd Head Office Hague Building, 9 Sprott Road, Ballard Estate, Mumbai 400001, India T 91 22 4351 8888

MUMBAI

BANGALORE

AHMEDABAD

SURAT

NEW DELHI ERODE

The dashes enclosing the text were made thinner. The entire card was typeset in Gotham Narrow’s light and medium weights. The tagline was also brought to the front to give it more prominence. The list of cities where SF Dyes’ offices are located was pushed down to make proper use of the space in the back of the card. It also made for better visual hierarchy.

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BUS INESS

STATI ON ERY-SF

DYES

Card: 8.5 X 5.5 cms Letter: A4(21 X 29.7 cms) Envelope: Policy Envelope 11 (26.5 X 11.43 cms)

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STATI ON ERY-SF

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BAS IC

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CR EDIT

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FO LDER- FRON T

Large Folder: 9 X 12.25” + 0.5” spine. Small Folder: 6.5 X 9” + 0.5” spine.

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NOT EBO OK

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BR AND

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BR AND

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CALENDAR

201 6

TIME TO DRAW the next stage in the execution process was the calendar. There was still some information that the client had to provide regarding the website. So, using this time, I visualized and worked out possible themes that could be applied for the 2016 calendar. The conceptualization and execution of this stage took place for one and a half months. It began with me researching and listing out tentative themes for the calendar. Each theme had to have enough content and variety to be applied across 12 months. The research that I had done on Indian culture helped inform these themes too. Possible themes that I

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was considering included Weave styles, Hastamudras in Bharatnatyam, Indian boardgames, Indian jewellery, Suryanamaskar stages, Colonial Indian Architecture and Indian danceforms. Out of these, the first three themes were taken forward. For each theme, I separately worked out colour palettes, visual styles, and layouts. I had to give the client an idea about how each theme would progress over 12 months. The client would also need to see enough visuals to understand their respective graphic styles. Therefore, for each theme, I created layouts for the first three months.

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N O.

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fabric weaving styles This theme focusses on the different ways in which fabric is woven. The physical properties of a fabric are influenced mainly by two factors - the material that the threads are made of and the way in which the warp and weft threads are woven together. I looked for weaving styles that were visibly different and created unique, distinct patterns. The final list of weaves that I included are - Plain weave, Sateen weave, Twill weave, Basket weave, Jacquard weave, Rib weave, Dobby weave, Leno weave, Oxford weave, Cut/ Uncut piles, Double knit and Weft knit.

For this theme’s visual language, I took inspiration from a concept that I had created before (Pg no. 52, 53). That particular diagonal grid was perfectly suited for the graphic needs of this particular theme. Using that grid I created vectorized warp and weft threads in bright colours. An interplay of these contrasting colours and different opacity levels helped create a contemporary, modernistic design that was far removed from SF Dyes previous calendar themes. The datepad for this theme was effectively included into the visual itself.

The grid from my previous visual language explorations. It again served as the foundation for this theme’s visual style.

Initial visual explorations. I worked with different opacity levels, blending modes, colours and graphic interplay to get a deeper understanding of the movement of the weave and the grid on which it was placed.

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JANUARY

JANUARY S

T W

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31 3

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F

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1

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S M T W 31 3

4

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JANUARY

31 3

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31 3

8

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17 18 19 20 21 22 23

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2

JANUARY

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

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1

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

24 25 26 27 28 29 30

F

S

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

T

7

F

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

S M T W

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24 25 26 27 28 29 30

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JANUARY S M T W

T

31 3

4

5

6

7

F

S

1

2

8

9

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24 25 26 27 28 29 30

10

17 18 19 20 21 22 23

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M

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

T 1 W 25 1 1 2 26 1 T 3 27 1 F 4 28 1 1 S 5 29 1 2 S 6 3 30 M 17 4 31 T 18 5 W 19 6 T 20 7 F 21 8 S 22 9 23

E XEC UTION

These are a few sample layouts. Once the weave structure was in place, it was exciting to try and incorporate the datepad and the month. This style also gave me a lot of room to endlessly explore shape combinations and layouting. I tried adding other elements to see if they enhanced the mood of the weave. Experimenting with the size of the weave also gave interesting results.

S

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final style and layout Size: 12 X 19 cms

JAN S

M

T

W

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31

F

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www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

Since 1954

This was the final layout and design that was chosen. The datepad is incorporated into the weave itself and is typeset in DIN. The month of January features the ‘plain weave’. Although the weave structure changes with each month, the weave of the datepad remains the same. It naturallly continues down each weave.

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FEB S

M

T

W

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F

S

1

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25

26

27

28

29 www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

Since 1954

The month of February featuring the ‘Sateen weave’.

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MAR S

M

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F

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1

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www.sfdyes.com

your people for colours

Since 1954

The month of March featuring the ‘Twill weave’.

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T HEME

NO.

2

hastamudras in bharatnatyam The hastamudras in Bharatnatyam are gestures that the dancers make solely with their hands to convey certain emotions, incidents, objects and animals. They are made both with a single hand and with two hands. For this theme, I chose mudras that prominently represented animals or plants. They are - Mayura (Peacock), Shukatunda (Parrot’s beak), Katakamukha (Crab), Sarpashirsha (Snake’s hood), Mrigashirsha (Deer’s head), Simhamukha (Lion’s head), Hamsasya (Swan’s head), Hamsapaksha (Swan’s wing), Tamrachuda (Cock), Vyagraha (Tiger), Bhramara (Bee) and Alapadma (Flowering Lotus).

What is interesting to note about these hastamudras is that each gesture seems to contain some of the inherent qualities of the animal that it represents. I tried to show how this could be. Inspiration struck in the form of MC Escher’s tessellations. I developed tessellating visuals for each mudra where the form of the Mudra interlocks with the form of the original animal until the similarities are very visible. The resulting graphics were filled with deep, vivid Indian colours and had a flowing, friendly illustrative style. I created both horizontal and vertical calendar layouts. For this theme, I was able to create the final visuals for six different mudras.

The image above and the following few images show my first sketches where I tried to figure out the fluidity of the gestures and how the animal and the hand would fit together and flow from each other. I used isometric and hexagonal grids, for a few, in order to see how they would tessellate.

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final style and layout Size: 12 X 19 cms (Vertical), 19 X 12 cms (Horizontal)

The Mayura mudra which represents the peacock is made by joining the ring finger to the thumb with the other fingers pointing straight up and outwards.

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The Bhramara mudra which represents the bee is made by joining the middle finger to the thumb with the index finger tucked inbetween and the last two fingers pointing up and outwards.

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The Mrigashirsha mudra which represents the head of a deer is made by pointing the thumb and the little finger outward and upward while the other three fingers point straight out.

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The Alapadma mudra represents a blossoming lotus. This version of the mudra uses both hands and can be made by spreading them out together and joining them all along one side.

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The Katakamukha mudra represents the crab and can be made by joining the index finger to the thumb while the other three fingers point up and outward in an elegant semicircle. Here, I’ve assigned the Katakamukha mudra to the month of July because the sunsign for July is Cancer (The Crab). It makes for an interesting connection.

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The Simhamukha mudra which represents the head of a lion can be made by joining the index finger and the middle finger to the thumb while the other two fingers point up and outward. Here, just like in the previous case, I’ve assigned the mudra to the month of August because the sunsign for August is Leo (The Lion).

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T HEME

NO.

3

indian boardgames The third theme draws inspiration from a corner of Indian tradition that a lot of people do not know about - Indian boardgames. For this theme I collected information on traditional indoor games that had originated in India. Some of these games are still in practice today. A few of them have actually been the inspiration for a few popular western board games (Chess, Ludo) This theme is an informative and interesting take on how the games we grew up playing have enormous historic and cultural value. The list of games are - Chaduranga (Chess), Parama

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Padam/Vaikuntapaali (Snakes and Ladders), Carrom, Pachisi (Ludo), Ashte Kashte, Chaupar, Pallanguzhi, Aadu Puli Attam, Puli Meka (Lambs and Tigers), Dahdi, Kalaney Belaney, Krida Patram and Ganjapa/Ganjifa cards. The visuals for this theme are illustrations of the elements of the game - players, dice, objects on the board, etc. I made these illustrations in such a way as to bring these characters and elements to life, giving each of them a personality. The artworks give the small game elements a life-like size and quality. This was done so the viewer could feel like they’d just entered the world of the game.

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Initial sketch and vector explorations of the illustration style. The sketch shows the four armies in Chaturanga - the foot soldiers, the cavalry, the chariot and the elephant armies. All of them are shown together waiting as a unit. behind them stands the capable minister (mantri) and far behind him, protected by all of them, stands the king. Their positions in the artwork are reminiscent of the pieces’ positions in the game board.

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Finalized artwork. It was decided that each illustration would feature black, grey and a light yellow as permanent colours as well as two other colours that are unique to each of them. The illustration above takes green and red as its distinctive colours. For the embellishments on the figures, I was inspired by the decorative flourishes that are added to Indian handmade toys. I tried to recreate the same, visually tight, craftsy, handmade look that those toys have.

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Rough sketch of the illustration for Paramapadam. I especially tried to emphasize the feeling of menace that the snakes convey. Players of the game come upon the snakes at unopportune moments and get the feeling that the snakes are everywhere in the game board. I wanted to give the same impression in the illustration also. So a bulk of the artwork’s area are occupied by the snakes that ominously approach the player’s pawn. A flick of another snake’s tail also seems to indicate that there is no escape. There are three ladders to balance the presence of the snakes and they give a fleeting show of hope. The illstration also shows the traditional long bars used as dice by Indians. These dice would decide the player’s fate. These kind of constant pitfalls and opportunities is what this game is defined by.

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The final illustration here features a mustard yellow and a cerulean blue as its unique colours.

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Initial sketch made for Ganjapa cards. These are exclusive Indian cards made mostly by Kalamkari craftsmen to supplement their fabric trade. The real rules and methods of playing Ganjapa card games are now lost. But the cards themselves still exist. They are filled with illustrations of kings, soldiers, demi-gods,animals and fantastical creatures. They are available in sets of increasing numbers from 8, 12, 16 and so on. Each set has 12 cards and is defined by its own colour. In the artwork I made, I tried to show the variety of content represented in the cards. So I created a collection of different piles of cards scattered around a blanket. The card at the top of each pile does not lie flat. Instead, the person / animal from that card has taken life-like dimensions and seems ready to engage in the game.

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The chosen illustration has an olive green and purple as its unique colours.

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W EBS ITE

DIGITAL WINDOW the design process for the website began with a detailed analysis of SF Dyes’ requirements. I had already completed my primary research on web design. I now needed a strong strategy based on which I could create concepts. At this inspective stage, I looked at the possible user flow scenarios that the SF Dyes’ website would experience. Also, from the input given by the client and the studio, I was able to craft a detailed information architecture. These two activities helped me tune into what the website would need to represent. My initial concepts relied heavily on content. I conceptualized a very corporate, information-driven website. However, after detailed discussion with my superiors in the studio, I came to understand that this might not be the best strategy for SF Dyes’ web presence. SF Dyes is an

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industrial firm and a corporate company. However, they needed their website to not be an obvious representation of that. Essentially, the website would be an extension of the experience that SF Dyes promises their employees. It would be a digital window that gives its viewers an idea of what it would feel like to be SF Dyes’ customers and partners. It was my job to visually and textually create that experience online. After the feedback session, I detailed out a more emotive strategy and concept that appealed to SF Dyes’ needs more. This chapter details out the stages that I went through in the web design process from user flow and information architecture maps to wireframes and mockups of the three main concepts. All the wireframes and banners were created over a 960 grid with 24 columns.

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FLOW

SCEN A RI OS

scenario no. 1 The user is an existing client. Sees the website link on the business card (or) Has an SF Dyes employee recommend that they view it.

Arrives at website and gains knowledge about newest product offerings and new offices opened.

Continues perusal to get contact information related to the acquisition of a specific product or service.

scenario no. 2 The user is a potential client. Sees the website link on the business card (or) Hears about SF Dyes from an associate.

Arrives at the website and looks mainly at product offerings and office locations.

Continues perusal to learn about the closest point-ofcontact with SF Dyes’ employees or offices.

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INFORMAT I ON

A RCHI TECTU RE

A review of other dye manufacturing websites, of SF Dyes’ previous website and an in-depth discussion with the studio head helped me narrow down the list of information that would be displayed in the website. The resulting information architecture was simple and

level – 1

straightforward with three levels of pages. Out of these the Level 1 page, which is essentially the landing page was the most important. I began my concepts by working out the dynamics of the landing page and then using that to inform the rest of my pages.

level – 2

level – 3

Product Range

Safeaux

Search Button

Products

Ecosol About

Ecovat

The Company

Ecofad

History

Ecotone

People

Ecomint

Client Testimonials

Solsul

Company News

Careers

Current Openings Contact Info Application Form

Contact

Branch Office Addresses Google Map Links Email Ids Contact Nos. Query Form

Partners Introduction Social Media Contact Info

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E XEC UTION CONCEPT

N O.

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context-sensitive patterned background The very first concept that I presented was based on the idea of using patterns as a visual element. I was trying to incorporate the brand’s visual language into the website this way. I divided the website into 3 distinct avenues of information - product information, company information and contact information. Then I assigned three different patterns to each of these three kinds of information. Each pattern would appear in the back or as a header or

around the respective information column. This was a way of letting the users know what is where and orienting them to the whole website. For this concept I was greatly influenced by newspaper websites. Wireframes for key pages within this concept are given below. However, after wireframing, I realized that this sort of strategy and layout works only if there is a lot of content and a variety of it. Which is why it works for newspapers. Otherwise it becomes needlessly complex and confusing.

wireframes The next few pages show and explain the wireframes under this concepts. A few parametric facts regarding the wireframes are given below.

3 patterns inspired by the sf dyes visual identity Shown here as dotted patterns for representation.

Company Info, People, Company News, etc.

Contact Info

Products

level 1 - landing page SF Dyes Logo Level – 1 Links (Buttons) Search (Laser Focus Button)

MAIN MENU (Permanent Header)

Introductory Information Showcased Product (Image Slideshow)

New Arrivals (Link + Image + Write-up) Client Testimonials (Write-up) Company News (Image + Write-up)

Basic Contact Info + Social Media Links (Permanent Footer)

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level 2 - about the company

Textured Heading/Title Bars

Company Images (Image Slideshow + Write-up)

Detailed Company Information (Write-up)

Company Timeline (Interactive Infographic)

level 2 - about the company (continued)

Textured Heading/Title Bars

Company Partners’ Information (Image + Write-up)

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level 2 - contact

Textured Heading/Title Bars Respective Contact Information Corresponding Google Map Location (Link + Image)

Other Cities (Links)

level 2 - product ranges

Product Range List (Link + Image + Write-up)

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level 3 - product #1

Breadcrumb Trial Textured Heading/Title Bars Product Images (Image Slideshow + Write-up)

Material #1 (Image + Write-up)

level 3 - product #1 (continued)

Textured Heading/Title Bars

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E XEC UTION CONCEPT

N O.

2

vertical and horizontal navigation combined For my second concept, I proposed a way of combining vertical and horizontal kinds of navigation within a page. This was to increase the seamlessness of the experience for the viewer and also to reduce the total no. of pages. I took inspiration from the newest navigation trends that I had researched, such as collapsible content and

long pages. The wireframes that are shown in the next few pages elucidate this concept clearly. Regarding functionality however, this concept faced the same limitation that the previous concept did. I did not have enough content to fuel the website which would make a concept like this one feasible and necessary.

level 1 - landing page

Social Media Links Products (Laser Focus Button) SF Dyes Logo Introductory Information Screen spanning Image + Pattern background (inspired by the SF Dyes Visual Identity)

Horizontal Navigation An image slideshow that the user can go through by using the ‘Right’ and ‘Left’ arrow buttons. The corresponding write-up for each image appears on the side. The slideshow encompasses multiple information categories - New Products, Company News/Events, Client Testimonials

level 1 - landing page (continued)

When the user scrolls down, the menu bar appears with links to other information categories - About, Contact, etc. The Menu Bar now becomes a Permanent Header.

Basic Contact Info (Permanent Footer)

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level 2 - about

Company Images (Image Slideshow + Captions)

Detailed Company Information (Write-up)

level 2 - about (continued)

Company Partners’ Information (Image + Write-up)

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level 2 - contact

Respective Contact Information Corresponding Google Map Location (Link + Image)

level 2 - product ranges

‘Read more’ (Button) Product Range List (Image + Write-up)

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CO NCEPT

N O.

3

emotive banners An analysis of my first two concepts with my guide and the studio head made me realize that an information-rich, content-heavy website was not the way to go. In an effort to gain new direction, I made a comprehensive list of all the impressions and messages that SF Dyes could give through its web presence. Out of these, three main points of communication stood out - (1) SF Dyes’ Indian origins, (2) Their love for colours and (3) Their efforts to capture the ‘joy of life’ through colours. I combined all three of these characteristics and one clear message came into being - ‘Celebrating colours’. The SF Dyes website would, through its visuals and copy show the viewers how SF Dyes is a company that finds pride and purpose in ‘adding colour to everyday Indian life.’ This became the guiding strategy behind my third concept. The concept itself was based on the premise of using

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an emotive slideshow of banners in the landing page. So, the first look that the viewer has of the website will comprise of colourful, warm, friendly banners that each communicates different information about the company. In accordance to the information architecture, there would be five banners for the five main landing page links - Product offerings, About the company, Partnerships, Careers and Contact information. Each banner would also contain a button within its layout corresponding to these aforementioned links. Regarding the visual style and content of the banner, I researched and picked out scenarios and articles from everyday life. They were selected particularly so they would serve as metaphorical representations of the information the web links would give. All of my varied explorations and attempts are detailed as follows. This concept is still in the development stage and the final layout has not yet been chosen.

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E XEC UTION

Initial sketches illustrating possible banner content. I drew parallels from everyday occurences like a flower store, clothes hanging out to dry, a woman washing clothes, a building lined street and a cotton candy seller to try and visually represent the main five site links.

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Celebrating colours the Indian way.

Vector exploration of the concept. I tried to integrate the visual language into the landscape itself. However, the overall visuals were becoming too rustic and rural to suit the website. So instead of using scenarios, in my next set of explorations, I tried to create colourful Indian objects out of the visual language’s elements themselves. This proved to be a more effective solution.

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Celebrate colours the Indian way. ABOUT SF DYES

Banner with a link to information about the company. I used kites to emphasize the company’s energy, drive and progress.

Share our vision. Work with us. BECOME A PARTNER

Banner targeting potential industry partners. Here, I showed linked figurines to signify teamwork and collaboration.

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Join our family. Show us your colours. CURRENT JOB OPENINGS

Banner for prospective employees. Entrance gates used to show encouragement and promise.

Open your doors to colour. Talk to us. OFFICE LOCATIONS

Banner informing viewers on office locations. Birds in flight to show reaching out, expanding, spreading.

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E XEC UTION PR INT

ADV ERTI SEM EN TS

ADVERTIZE along with the execution of the website, I was also designing magazine advertisements for SF Dyes’ specific product ranges. These ads generally feature the fabric

material that the dye is meant for along with technical specifications. The final layouts for a few of these ads are shown in the next few pages through mockups.

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The ad for Safeaux Performace Chemicals talks about the kind of enhanced quality and finish that the product range can give the fabric.

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Ecosol is a denim dye that is particularly suited for continuous rope dyeing of denim threads. The ad emphasizes this fact by showing swathes of denim fabric in different shades dynamically moving over the layout.

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This a corporate ad that talks about SF Dyes as a whole. It features a simple, sophisticated layout where the new brandmark is prominently featured. The range of products are listed out in the form of a colour spectrum that spans the brandmark.

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CONC LUS ION

IN RETROSPECT This entire project has been a completely engaging, intensive experience. Looking back at these past six months, I can see that I have learned and understood a lot about how a brand is created in the existing market. My ambitions as a student working on a branding project have always been limited to sample printouts and mockups made on Photoshop. Now however, having my ideas and work find a place in the real world is extremely satisfactory. It shows me the amount of responsibility I have, as a designer, to create and put good work out there. It has taught me that every stage, every minute

assessment and detail matters. Because each of these processes have some role to play in the end result. I end this document with an important realization that has came in the course of this project. The efforts of the past few months, the work I have done, the aid and support I have received from my colleagues, peers and friends have given me the confidence and the motivation to further create solid, transformative, professional and good work. As this project draws to a close, I take with me the warm, inspiring feeling that I am finally ready to go out into the world and give it all I’ve got.

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S EL ECT

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Beyond the Logo: Experiencing SF Dyes (Graduation Project)  

Detailed documentation of the design process followed for my 6-month long graduation project at Kena Design, Bangalore. The project encompas...

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