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japan / australia

Cowra Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre The Cowra Japanese Garden and Cultural Centre has become a powerful symbol of reconciliation and friendship between the people of Cowra and Japan, a relationship that originated during WWII with a Prisoner of War camp on the outskirts of Cowra and the largest ever POW Breakout that occurred in 1944.

P : 02 6341 2233 www.cowragarden.com.au

As a result of the Breakout, 231 Japanese perished along with 4 Australian Servicemen, and the Australian and Japanese War Cemeteries were established. In 1960, the Government of Japan brought all Japanese war casualties from around Australia to be interred at the Japanese War Cemetery in Cowra, the only Japanese War Cemetery outside of Japan in the world. Together with the Australian and Japanese War Cemeteries, the POW Camp site and the Australian World Peace Bell, the Cowra Japanese Garden plays an integral part in the wonderful Cowra – Japan reconciliation story. The Ken Nakajima designed 12.5 acre Kaiyushiki (strolling) Garden was opened in two stages, stage 1 in 1979 and the second stage in 1986. The Garden is a representation of the Japanese landscape; the striking hill represents Mount Fuji, manicured hedges cascade across the garden like rolling hills, streams flow like rivers and the ponds glisten like inland lakes and the sea.

Cowra Japanese Garden & Cultural Centre

An exhibition room showcases the work of local and regional artists providing exhibitors with a full month to display and sell their works, while the Cultural Centre houses an extensive and unique collection of Japanese movable cultural heritage artefacts. Other features in the Garden include a Bonsho Bell, a traditional tatami room in the EDO cottage, an authentic open-air tea house, and a bonsai house. There is also a gift shop and cafĂŠ on site, and golf buggies are available for hire. Open every day of the year except Christmas Day, the Garden is beautiful all year round. It is a place of peace and serenity with many quiet spots in the Garden to be able to sit, relax and take in the views. Children enjoy feeding the fish and the ducks, and dogs are welcome in the Garden (must be on a leash). Entry fees apply as the Garden is a not-for-profit organisation that relies on admissions and gift shop sales to fund its day-to-day operations.  n

OPEN 7 DAYS 8:30 -5pm 12.5 Acres of Peace & Serenity ADMISSION FEES APPLY Dog Friendly

Profile for The Last Post Magazine

The Last Post Magazine Anzac Day 2019  

In 2019 TLP editor Greg T Ross visited Japan under the Japan-Australia Grassroots Exchange Programme. To commemorate the visit and the prog...

The Last Post Magazine Anzac Day 2019  

In 2019 TLP editor Greg T Ross visited Japan under the Japan-Australia Grassroots Exchange Programme. To commemorate the visit and the prog...

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