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You don’t know what you have until it’s gone, is an expression that I have unfortunately held true for myself, however, it has helped me truly embrace who I have in my life as well as reminded me to honor and remember those who have passed. This is why I believe in Grandmothers, because they are the ones who guide me to realize just how blessed I am. From flowers growing on a farm, to pink lipstick kisses, to marble cookies in remembrance, all these represent how I think of my Grandmothers. Row after row the tall sunflowers rise high to sunlight as the golden petals dance in that light summer breeze. Growing up we spent some time in the summer at my Grandma’s house in Syracuse, New York. These times spent with Grandma Schader reminded me to slow down and be grateful for the simplicity of life. These times are spent walking outside near the farm, shucking corn every night, and tagging along with her to sell produce at the farmers market. Whether it’s making a beautiful flower bouquet or baking warm chocolate chip cookies, Grandma Schader does not cease to remind just how blessed I am to learn the value of simplicity from her. On the other hand the one person who taught me the art of being crazy is my Grandma Susan. I meet Grandma Susan eight years ago, when my mom decided to find her birth mother and there has never been a dull day since. From the time Grandma Susan arrives with those pink lipstick kisses to the time she leaves there is constant sound of laughter throughout the whole house. Whether it’s my little sister and her singing at the top of their lungs or her and I giggling about stories of her sneaking out as a teenage, there’s always excitement when Grandma Susan’s around. All these fun


times help me realize just how lucky I am that eight years ago not only did I meet another Grandmother, but a lifelong friend. Unlike Grandma Schader and Grandma Susan, Grammy Repich was a women I did not get the chance to spend much time with. Unfortunately I don’t remember Grammy because she passed away when I was four, however, I do have stories, jewelry, and marble cookies to remember her by. The picturebooks of my father’s childhood are piled high not only with photographs, but memories of Grammy as well. When these pictures are passed around at family gatherings everyone tells of special memories they shared with Grammy. Along with pictures, I have a delicate, pearl necklace of Grammy’s set aside in a rose pink box. It’s crazy how a simple necklace can hold such meaning, but it is a reminder that a piece of Grammy is with me. Another reminder of Grammy is the smell of chocolate marble cookies baking in the oven. These cookies made by my Grammy were my father’s favorite so now my mother took up the task of baking them. As the scent of the warm, baked cookies fills the kitchen, the thought of Grammy fills our hearts. My family and I will always be looking for ways to remember Grammy and I will continue honor Grammy’s last name as my middle name. Losing my Grammy was a hard time for my family, however because I am so lucky to grow up with two other Grandmothers I am able to truly understand both parts of the saying, you don’t know what you have until it’s gone. I am able to understand the sadness of what comes with losing a loved one, but this helps me realize how important it is to be thankful for those around you. I understand the significance of how family time is most important time, and express your love while you can.

Copy of this I believe  

This I believe essay A personal narrative

Copy of this I believe  

This I believe essay A personal narrative

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