Page 1

The Citizen $1.50

Kipling

incl. GST

The Community Newspaper Since 1936

VOLUME 82 • NO. 49

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14TH, 2018

KIPLING, SASKATCHEWAN

INSIDE: DRILLING REPORT 3 | EDITORIAL 4 | BELIEVE IN THE GOLD 5 | CLASSIFIEDS 10 | SERVICE DIRECTORY 11 PAGE 2 Wawota Wildcats win volleyball tournament

PAGE 3 STARS & Kipling Health Foundation

PAGE 6 Kingswood Golf Ladies Tourney

Kipling Trade Day a success! The barricades were up shortly after 9am on the business strip of Main Street in Kipling on Saturday, Sept. 8th for the 2018 Kipling Trade Day. The hustle and bustle of vendors, businesses, restaurants and local garage sale participants as they filed into their designated places along the one block stretch was just the start of a successful September Saturday for downtown Kipling. With 61 registered vendors and participants, this year’s Trade Show more than doubled the previous Trade Day in early fall of 2016. The Kipling Entrepreneurial Group and Plainsview Credit Union, invited vendors and participants to showcase their unique products on tabletops along the sidewalks of businesses and along the yellow line center of the street during the 6-hour, full day event. Savoury smells of BBQ burgers and smoked meat filled the air on the west

end of the street by vendors and amazing local cooks alike, along with the sweet treats of mini donuts, snow cones and cotton candy for the sweet-toothed children. Visitors were treated to complimentary Filipino finger food from the staff at Three Sisters Foods including two desserts (kutsinta and sapin-sapin) and delicious spring rolls (Lumpia). The Paperclip Cottage took part in the Red Paperclip event and didn’t let anyone down with their Kiplingfamous baking, chili cheese dogs, grilled burgers, steak and meat pies, to name a few! Legal-aged visitors kept their thirsts quenched with the various taste testing and sampling at Best Cellars. Tabitha’s Closet handed out tray-loads of birthday cake to visitors and vendors to celebrate their 1-year business birthday. Visitors stocked up on the freshly homemade jams, baking goodies, fudge and pickled foods as they made their way throughout the food vendors.

Nick Kimery entertained the attending crowd with a variation of music alongside the Credit Union Plinko and mini golf games where kids could choose from a variety of prizes and treats. Within an ear’s reach, children bounced their hearts out on the bouncy castle while the older kids filled the seating area of the mobile Curbside Games bus to play a variety of free video games. Cooper the Co-Op mascot showed up to celebrate the beautiful, but gusty, Saturday weather with the attending children, taking plenty of selfies with the children as he worked his way down the Main Street strip throughout the day. Firefighter Quentin Wilson entertained children with the sounds and lights of the Kipling firetruck and Constable Mike Parker handed out tattoos and stickers for the curious children as they inspected the inside of the police cruiser. Street shoppers treated themselves as they made

Photo By: Laura Kish

Many shoppers came out to see what the over 60 vendors had to offer.

Photo By: Darcie Khounnoraj

Kids were excited to visit with Hometown Co-op’s mascot “Cooper the Bear”. their way from the talented individuals who showcased their most beautiful knits, crocheted and sewed clothing, household fabrics and fashion accessories. Beautiful displays of precious metal, beaded and stone jewelry were spread throughout both sides of the street, each bringing a unique fashion to light. Eye-catching wood art creations, metal art and engravings were displayed by creative vendors, some of tactical use and others with inspirational quotes and popular designs. Artists displayed their breathtaking art on canvas, rocks and animal skulls, as well as creative art made with stones, sea shells and chainmaille. Representatives from

Arbonne, Tupperware, Vox Socks, Norwex, smudge and linen sprays and JBT nutrition programs made themselves available to reach out and promote their products as well as educate people on alternative lifestyles in health, cleaning and everyday needs. Representatives from the Kipling Arts Council, the Kipling Library, Remax, Kipling Lions Club, Sun Life, Diva Dance Club and Kipling Band Parents attended the full day event to bring awareness to the various programs available in the community throughout the year and upcoming season. Garage sale items filled the tables along the Main Street stretch, offering great

deals on new and used clothing, toys, household items, video games and collectables. Participating stores including Timeless Trends, Hometown Co-Op Grocery and Agro, Balfour Drugs, Tabitha’s Closet, Kipling Home Hardware, Pharmasave, The Kiputer Store, Cruickshank’s Garage and Best Cellars visited with patrons and gave amazing in-store savings to the shoppers throughout the day. Despite a little bit of rainfall and gusty winds, the afternoon was taken over with sunshine and warm weather. Vendors and visitors alike were happy with the opportunity to visit, shop and eat to their hearts content.

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KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, Friday,September December 15, 14, 2018 2017

Wildcats win volleyball tournament by Laura Kish Kipling School’s Senior Boys Magyar Volleyball team hosted a tournament on Friday and Saturday with six teams entered including the host team Kipling Magyars, Montmartre Eagles, Wawota Wildcats, Cowessess Cougars, Bert Fox Bison and Vibank Vipers. Kipling Magyars (coached by Mel Gesell, Darrell Beattie and Ashley Hengen) includes team members: #2 Carter Beattie, #3 Logan McCarthy, #5 Bryson Andres, #6 Kaiden Lyons, #7 Burke Lyons, #8 Kurtis Doud, #10 Shawn Puffalt, #11 Michael Stanley, #12 Hayden ScottMcCarthy and #13 Dawson DeDecker. Spectators were wowed by the excellent volleyball action throughout the two day tournament. Standings at the end of the round robin: 1st Kipling Magyars, 2nd Bert Fox Bison, 3rd Montmartre Eagles and 4th Wawota Wildcats. The bronze medal match came down to Kipling vs Montmartre with Kipling winning 2517 and 25-16. Gold medal final was a match between Bert Fox Bison and Wawota Wildcats with very close games. Wawota Wildcats

took the gold medal with scores of 21-25, 25-17 and 17-15. “I believe our tournament this past weekend was a huge success. It has been a few years since the Senior Boys team has held a home tournament, so it was nice for the boys to kick off the season playing at home and playing extremely well nonetheless!” comments Mel Gesell, one of the coaches of the Kipling Magyars. “The Kipling Senior Boys team is going to have a very exciting season, if this first tournament is any indication. The boys played and performed like they have been practicing for months already, and we only have three practices under our belt!” adds Gesell. “Kipling placed first in the Round Robin, and our loss in the semi final was the Magyars only loss of the tournament,” says Gesell. “It was really surprising to see volleyball of this calibre from so many teams this early in the season. Not only were the other teams full of skill, but they were also full of respect; for their opponents as well as our officials. We will be coming across many of these teams in our next tournaments to

Photo by Laura Kish

Volleyball Champions - Wawota Wildcats: Back row (l to r) Devin Stewart (Coach), Billy Easton, Trevor Stewart, Lucas Porter, Nathan Bye, Mykel Biermann, Riley Riddell (Coach). Front row (l to r) Jesse Schill, Theoren West, Jose Villeta, Thomas Husband, Ross Brimner. come - next weekend being the University of Regina Cougars Classic!” comments Gesell. “Huge thanks go out to everyone who helped out to make this tournament a success, and a very important thank you goes

out to Susan Hengen who officiated our tournament and did an amazing job of it!” says Gesell. “I thought the quality of volleyball was very high for the first tournament

of the year,” comments Riley Riddell, coach of the Wawota Wildcats. “It was great to get back into the swing of things, as the boys have been really looking forward to this season. It

18092SS3 18092PS0 18093PS0

was nice to get everyone into the games and watch our younger guys improve. We have a lot of work to do as the round robin indicated, but we can take a lot of positives from our semi-final game against Kipling and final game against Bert Fox.”

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Friday, September 2 KIPLING 14, 2018 CITIZEN

KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, December 15, 2017 3

STARS & Kipling Health Foundation

By Darcie Khounnoraj For almost eighteen years, community members and members of the Kipling Health Foundation (Kipling and area health district) have put efforts into raising funds for the much-needed health care expenses in various facilities in the community. For many of the Kipling and area residents, having the opportunity to seek professional health care so close to home is not only beneďŹ cial to them but also gives peace of mind to their loved ones while they are receiving special care. The Kipling Health Foundation has supported (and fundraised for) the growing community over the years and has been inuential in bringing a modern hospital facility to the area, forming new job opportunities and services in Kipling. Their fundraising

eorts could not have been made possible without the financial help of the community businesses, sponsors and of course, the citizens of Kipling and area. In 2016, the STARS and Kipling Health Foundation was sold out far before the event took place, giving the evening gala an awesome opportunity to raise funds for the Kipling Health Foundation and STARS services through ticket sales and auction donations. Keeping up with the successes of past events, the Kipling Health Foundation is anticipating a large crowd for the 2018 STARS & Kipling Health Foundation event on Saturday, October 20th. “This year, STARS and the Kipling Health Foundation split the proceeds evenly. STARS is only funded 50% by the government and the

rest is through donations,� Joe Karwandy, representative of the Kipling Health Foundation explained. “The health foundation bought a new ambulance this year so they need funds to build up for the next one.� Bringing the community and area together for the benefits of local health care is more than a fundraiser for the Health Foundation, rather, it is an opportunity to educate the public about their health care facilities, their health care professionals and the members that make the local health care so accessible to the area. Over the course of the evening, attendees will enjoy a delicious supper catered by volunteers of the previous Swimming Pool Committee and volunteers from the Kipling & District Lions Club before a live product and service auction

with auctioneer Gord Kish. “We currently have very few items donated for the auction and we are looking for a lot more,â€? Karwandy addressed the auction which will be in conjunction with the supper event. “So far, we have a Shirley Rumble painting of the Mellor barn, a cedar park bench, a western saddle and a handmade quilt (which have been donated by generous locals).â€? STARS & Kipling Health Foundation events help to ďŹ nancially support the needs of the health care facilities as well as ďŹ nancially support various operations of the STARS Air Ambulance and newly purchased ambulance for the critically ill and injured. Any and all donations help in big ways and many more are needed to make this event as successful as previous STARS & Kipling Health Foundation

cent compared to last year, and 2,672 Indigenous students are registered, up 11.3 per cent. “More international students want to study in Canada, and as one of the top 15 research intensive universities in the country, people from around the world are choosing to study here at the University of Saskatchewan,� said Pickrell. “Our diverse student body is one of our greatest strengths and contributes to the fact that we are well positioned to contribute to the global needs of our society.� U of S international students are from 107 countries around the world, and China, Nigeria and India are the top three countries where students are coming from this term, ac-

cording to Pickrell. Pickrell attributes the large increase of Indigenous students enrolled at the U of S to a number of factors such as student recruitment strategies, comprehensive student supports, an active and engaged Indigenous student body, and the fact that overall the young Indigenous population of Saskatoon and Saskatchewan is on the rise. “The province is growing and young Indigenous people make up a lot of that new growth,� said Pickrell. “These enrolment numbers show me there is a young Indigenous demographic that is ready and eager to pursue their postsecondary studies at the U of S.�

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events. Advance supper tickets will be on sale on Monday, October 1st for $25.00 and $30.00 at the door on Saturday, October 20th if the event is not sold out. Mark this date on your calendar, be sure to purchase your ticket and be part of another successful health care event

in our community! To support this evening fundraiser, drop o your donation at Kipling’s OK Ag & Auto/ Bumper-to-Bumper location. For more information on how you can contribute, contact Joe Karwandy at (306) 7367437 or Len Leggett at (306) 736-3180.

OILFIELD DIRECTORY

Enrolment on the rise at U of S SASKATOON – As of the ďŹ rst day of classes on Wednesday, Sept. 5, fall term undergraduate and graduate enrolment at the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) is at 21,318, up three per cent compared to the ďŹ rst day of classes last year. “Our U of S family continues to grow, and I welcome our students to another school year of innovation, curiosity and creativity,â€? said Alison Pickrell, assistant vice-provost of strategic enrolment management. “This enrolment growth is something we have planned for, and I’m very happy with our progress.â€? Pickrell expects student numbers to continue to grow throughout the year and anticipates the total academic year enrolment (which includes fall, winter, spring and summer terms) to exceed 25,000 students when announced in June 2019. The U of S has a strategic growth agenda with a plan to increase the overall academic year enrolment to 28,000 by 2025, according to Pickrell. She is part of a team tasked with identifying strategic enrolment growth opportunities and has begun to implement some of those strategies. “A number of our colleges have strategically increased seats, including the College of Kinesiology, the College of Engineering and the Edwards School of Business,â€? said Pickrell. “We have also made strides in oering programming outside of Canada—we have recently partnered with Beijing Normal University to oer our master’s in water security.â€? Both international and Indigenous student enrolment increased dramatically as of the ďŹ rst day of classes. 2,368 international students are registered in classes, up 5.9 per

Archive photo

The auction to be held in Kipling on October 20th is to benefit both STARS and Kipling Health Foundation.

The drilling report

Drilling Licenses 108390 107921

2 new licenses issued to Monday, September 10 Triland Energy Hz 2-32-6-4 Whitecape Resources Hz 1-28-5-13

Rig Report 97990 107601 105116 97928 93011 97922 88285 105718 104686 92790 11B104 104117 105860 106847 107340 105839 106997 107338 11B104 14K341 105399 105559 107958

Trinidad Drilling Panther Drilling Precision Drilling Alliance Drilling Alliance Drilling Alliance Drilling Trinidad Drilling Stampede Drilling Trinidad Drilling Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Iron Hand Drilling Betts Drilling Stampede Drilling Horizon Drilling Alliance Drilling Horizon Drilling Horizon Drilling Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Horizon Drilling Horizon Drilling Horizon Drilling

Torc Oil & Gas Vermilion Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Crescent Point Energy Astra Oil Corp Crescent Point Energy Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Silver Bay Resources Vermilion Energy Crescent Point Energy Midale Petroleums Vermilion Energy Crescent Point Energy Vermilion Energy Vermilion Energy Ridgeback Resources Ridgeback Resources Crescent Point Energy

3-25-5-6 9-26-6-30 4-24-7-10 13-9-1-12 13-9-1-12 13-9-1-12 16-27-1-16 2-10-5-6 1-16-1-14 1-18-2-13 15-22-6-34 07-19-2-1 12-15-6-32 16-15-1-2 13-8-1-12 6-23-4-4 14-30-2-14 15-12-1-13 15-22-6-34 4-26-6-34 5-28-9-6 13-34-10-6 1-29-1-12

BOOK YOUR SPACE ON THE DRILLING REPORT

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KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, September 29, 14, 2018 2017

Pause for Reflection by Ken Rolheiser

www.kenrolheiser.com

After God gets our attention then what The foreman looks down from ten stories up and tries to holler to a worker. He can’t get the fellow’s attention. He drops a twenty-dollar bill. The worker picks it up, pockets it and does not look up. He drops a hundred-dollar bill. Same result. Finally he drops a stone, which strikes the worker and causes him to look up. When God tries to get our attention, he may send blessings. We don’t look up. We often take the credit for our good fortune and forget God. When crosses come our way, we turn to God. We take and take and take. God gives and gives and forgives. (Example from homily by Father Franklin Emereuwa)

When Jesus walked among us, when he went through the towns and villages, all who touched him were healed (Mark 6:56). People followed and brought out the sick on matts. And he healed them all. Jesus still loves us. He loves the sick and the suffering. But guess what? He is ignored by many who have forgotten him or just not heard of him. They are not flocking into the streets to follow Jesus. That’s where you and I come in. We all have a hunger for God things. At one point in his life Charles Coulson; Methodist lay preacher, religious author, mathematician, chemist and physicist; prayed to find God. He did.

Coulson went on to explain that God’s actions were evident in nature’s processes rather than apart from them. Coulson coined the expression God of the gaps in opposition to many who used God’s presence only in the things science cannot explain. Again, this is where you and I come in. We can be in touch with God. Jesus still loves us and has not changed. Often we are afraid of getting near to God. “The truth is,” Jean Vanier says, “if we get closer to him he’s going to give us a hug.” Through Faith we can touch others. In a good Saskatchewan metaphor we hear that the harvest is ready, but the labourers are

few. Ask the Lord to nourish and energize the workers. Jesus left the Bread of Life with us. Jesus, the Word of God, is still with us. His love flows into us all, and, if we do our part, from us to all. We are the Body of Christ on earth. If any are to touch the Body of Christ and be cured, we are that Body. In the words of Mother Teresa: “Who is Jesus to me? Jesus is the Word made Flesh. Jesus is the Bread of Life…Jesus is the Word— to be spoken. Jesus is the Truth—to be told. Jesus is the Way—to be walked. Jesus is the Light—to be lit. Jesus is the Life—to be lived. Jesus is the Love—to be loved.”

Kipling Rec Report Submitted by Susan Hengen, Recreation Programmer Tim Hortons Smile Cookie Campaign runs from September 11-17. Tim Hortons in Kipling has once again chosen Kipling KidSport Committee as their designated charity! This means that the whole $1.00 you spend on a Tim Hortons cookie between September 11-17 goes to the Kipling KidSport Committee to fund sport opportunities for children and youth in the community. Recently, the Saskatchewan Nonprofit Organizations released the results of their 2018 Research Study and the roles and impact that volunteers play in our non-profit organizations. While it was noted that volunteers in Saskatchewan spend at least 14 million hours each year volunteering, it was also noted that 41% of organizations reported an increase in members and/or patrons while only indicating a 1719% increase in volunteers. It was also noted that 90% of organizations reported that 90% of their volunteers were 55+ years old. One obvious conclusion can be drawn: if we continue to increase the number of people who benefit from the services provided by our nonprofit organizations (sport, arts & culture, recreation, social services, health, religion), we will need to more fully utilize our younger and newcomer populations in volunteer roles. Consider encouraging your children to participate in a variety of sport activities this year. When kids specialize early in one sport they miss out on important movement skills and many get injured, burnout, or quit. That’s why top athletes and sports experts are saying the same thing: let kids play as many sports as possible. Check out www.playmoresports.activeforlife.com to view a great video featuring prominent Canadian elite athletes who grew up playing multiple sports, as well as essential links for educating parents and coaches on the multi-sport advantage. September 22-30 is National Coaches Week! National Coaches Week celebrates the tremendous positive impact coaches have on athletes and

communities across Canada. This week is an opportunity to recognize coaches for the integral role they play by simply saying #ThanksCoach. Kipling’s Disc Golf Course remains playable throughout the fall. The course begins on the edge of the Kipling Museum, and moves east toward the 605 grid, including the Town of Kipling Orchard. Check out Moose Mountain Disc League on Facebook for a map of the course. Older Adult Fitness Sessions are back on at the Kipling Friendship Club! Come out on Tuesday mornings at 10:30 a.m. for 50 minutes of light cardio and strength, balance and flexibility training. There is no charge to participate, and the benefits are great. One of the biggest benefits of regular exercise in older adults is fall prevention. Regular exercise assists in preventing falls by strengthening muscles and bones; adding mobility to joints and muscles; improving balance, coordination and agility; and strengthening the heart and lungs and improving circulation. The result is a person who is able to do their day to day activities with less fatigue, discomfort and strain. Kipling KidSport Committee has Naaman Roosevelt posters for sale for $5.00 each. Naaman is KidSport Saskatchewan’s Ambassador and Spokesperson, and contributes to the charity through Roosevelt’s Receptions. For your own poster, stop in at the Rec Office (#6 – 207 6th Ave – Kipling Professional Building). 100% of funds raised through the sale of the posters benefits sporting opportunities for children and youth in the community. Even though summer has come to an end, the Kipling Campground has sites available and will remain open until October 15. If you are looking for a space, please give the Rec Office a call (306) 736-8440. Also, please be reminded that the firewood in the RV Park is only for patrons camping in the campground. Use of the dumpster in the Kipling Campground is also limited to patrons.

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The Citizen Kipling

207 - 6th Avenue, Kipling, SK P.O. Box 329 S0G 2S0

The Kipling Citizen acknowledges the financial support of the Government of Canada.

Our lives must be given to the greater purpose of Christ’s redemptive work in the world. In our families, the domestic church, we must be evangelizing, passing on the message to

our children and our community. It is very simple: “I am a little pencil in the hand of a writing God who is sending a love letter to the world.” Mother Teresa

Saskatchewan celebrates International Literacy Day Deputy Premier and Education Minister Gordon Wyant proclaimed September 8 as International Literacy Day. “We know that literacy is the foundation of learning and success in schools,” Wyant said. “Libraries and literacy organizations across our province are doing a terrific job promoting literacy by providing access to programing and materials to all Saskatchewan readers.” The Government of Saskatchewan is committed to improving literacy of children and learners of all ages by providing $1.5 million in continued funding to support Saskatchewan’s literacy programs. These include eight family literacy hubs across the province, the Saskatchewan Community Literacy Fund and 20 summer literacy camps across the province serving more than 1,200 students. The Government of Saskatchewan partners with the Saskatchewan Literacy Network to support the

family literacy hubs and the Saskatchewan Community Literacy fund recipients. “We use literacy skills in our everyday lives – for communicating, reading medicine bottles, banking, and much more – and these skills support success in work, school, and home life,” Saskatchewan Literacy Network Executive Director Phaedra Hitchings said. “Literacy is important for the well-being of everyone in Saskatchewan, building resilient communities where everyone can contribute their strengths. The Saskatchewan Literacy Network is pleased to join the Government of Saskatchewan, our province, and the world in celebrating International Literacy Day.” International Literacy Day has been proclaimed by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) for more than 50 years to promote the importance of improved literacy as the foundation for all learning.

RCMP Broadview – Hold and Secure at Broadview Broadview RCMP were advised that the Broadview School (kindergarten to grade 12) was being placed in a ‘hold and secure’ as a precaution after a student had advised of a social media post threatening harm to other students. Police were able to determine that the post being referenced was regarding BHS School in Brunswick, Georgia. Police have met with school officials and confirmed that no threat was made by or to any student at Broadview School. The hold and secure has since been lifted, and parents have been advised.

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Friday, September 2 KIPLING 14, 2018 CITIZEN

KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, December 15, 2017 5

Believe in the Gold is a symbol for kids with cancer By Theresa Nett Team alumni Dan Rashovich, former linebacker for 16 seasons with the Saskatchewan Roughriders, is now backing up a foundation dedicated to researching and improving treatments for childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cancer. At a lunch and learn presentation at Crescent Point Energy Corp., he was joined by fellow alumni offensive tackle Andrew Greene to acknowledge the company as the foremost financial donor. The Believe in the Gold Foundation was started six years ago in Calgary by Shonalie Biafore, and has now spread to Saskatchewan. Her daughter Jacey, was diagnosed in 2010 with a very rare cancer called Erwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sarcoma, similar to the cancer Terry Fox had. Jacey passed away in 2012 but left behind the catch phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;Believeâ&#x20AC;?. Her mother started a foundation funding research into new treatments for children, and offer financial support to local families with children who had been diagnosed with cancer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was approached by a friend who started asking me questions, if I knew anything about gold, how itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the symbol for kids with cancer, and he asked if I knew only 4 per cent of funding for cancer research go towards research for kids with the disease,â&#x20AC;? said Rashovich. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What do you want me to do, I asked, and my friend said chair this event weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having. I thought I can do better than that, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get the whole Roughrider alumni on it. They jumped on it.â&#x20AC;? With last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Believe in the Gold Walk or Run Rashovich ďŹ rst as chair, the event raised about $70,000,

Photo submitted

Crescent Point Energy employees listen intently at the Believe in the Gold presentation held Aug. 23. with Crescent Point donating $30,000 of that total. The funds are split between local families at 45 per cent, research at 45 per cent, and the final 10 per cent towards raising awareness. The research funds go directly to support the work of Dr. Doug Mahoney at the University of Calgary for immunotherapy as a cancer treatment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the midst of revolutionizing cancer therapy,â&#x20AC;? said Mahoney. In the last decade immunotherapy has become the â&#x20AC;&#x153;fourth pillarâ&#x20AC;? in cancer treatments. Biafore had wanted to fund new treatments and that brought her to Mahoney. The oncology team at the Alberta Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital that had treated her daughter reached out to him on her behalf. After a discussion of his research, particularly with viral immunotherapy along with a recommendation from the Alberta Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital also funding this research, she decided to allocate 45 per cent of the money raised towards the research of the new treatment as well as a donation to the Cummings School of Medicine, the medical department of the University of Calgary where Mahoney

has his lab. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s based around the idea that viruses are essentially to us like little programmable robots. In a nutshell, the viruses are engineered to infect the cancer cells and start to kill them. It is also engineered to help the patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s immune system learn what cancer is, what it looks like, and helps seek out and destroy it. It basically like a two-part system,â&#x20AC;? said Mahoney. Immunotherapy was approved in 2011 by the FDA and has shown very promising results in treating melanoma (skin cancer) and lung cancer. The causes of childhood cancer to this day remain unknown. Alterations in adult DNA that are caused by smoking for example might be easier to track, but in children there are no known causes. Mahoneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research is based on ďŹ nding a treatment speciďŹ cally for children with cancer. While the funds go directly to support Mahoneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s research, Biafore also mentioned that any request for funding other types of research would go directly to him. With 45 per cent of the money raised supporting families in the province, this was one of the important

The Carlyle Observer has an immediate opening for a dedicated and enthusiastic full-time Journalist. Our one-person newsroom is responsible for delivering solid news coverage and compelling photos for communities in Southeast Saskatchewan and working to break important stories that matter to our readers. The ideal candidate will be a self-starter, a person whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not afraid to go the extra mile to capture and tell human-focused stories. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for someone who can: Â&#x2021;JHQHUDWHVWRU\LGHDV Â&#x2021;ZULWHXSWRVWRULHVDZHHN VSRUWVQHZVRSLQLRQDQGIHDWXUHV

Â&#x2021;WDNHFRPSHOOLQJH\HFDWFKLQJSKRWRV Â&#x2021;NHHSRXUFRPPXQLW\XSGDWHGE\SRVWLQJWRWKHZHEVLWHVRFLDOPHGLD Â&#x2021;EHDWHDPSOD\HUZKRLVĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOHWRFKDQJLQJZRUNQHHGV 4XDOLÂżFDWLRQV Â&#x2021;DGULYHUÂśVOLFHQVHDQGZRUNLQJYHKLFOH Â&#x2021;SURÂżFLHQF\LQ(QJOLVKDQG&3VW\OH Â&#x2021;DGKHUHQFHWRMRXUQDOLVWLFHWKLFV Â&#x2021;DELOLW\WRZULWHDFFXUDWHDQGIDLUVWRULHVWRGHDGOLQH Â&#x2021;FRPSXWHUVNLOOVLQD0DFHQYLURQPHQW Â&#x2021;DSRVWVHFRQGDU\TXDOLÂżFDWLRQLQMRXUQDOLVPRUDUHODWHGÂżHOGZRXOGEHDQDVVHW Â&#x2021;EDVLFNQRZOHGJHRI3KRWRVKRSDQG,Q'HVLJQZRXOGEHDQDVVHW Â&#x2021;SRVVHVVH[FHOOHQWFRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV 'HDGOLQHIRUDSSOLFDWLRQVLV6HSWHPEHU We thank all applicants for their interest. Successful candidates will be contacted to set XSDQLQWHUYLHZ,IWKLVMREVHHPVULJKWIRU\RXSOHDVHHPDLO\RXUUHVXPHZULWLQJDQG photography samples and references to: Rick Major 3XEOLVKHU&DUO\OH2EVHUYHU (PDLOUPDMRU#ZH\EXUQUHYLHZFRP

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Saskatchewan Roughrider team alumni Dan Rashovich and Andrew Greene were at Crescent Point Energy Corp. on Aug. 23 for a lunch and learn presentation for The Believe in the Gold Foundation. parts that brought Crescent Point aboard as a supporter, according to Taralyn French who is in charge of health and wellness for the company. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We helped 17 families last year. Crescent Point has done a lot for our community and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s so nice to see that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aďŹ&#x20AC;ecting our local families. It makes you proud to work here thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for sure.â&#x20AC;? French was also the organizer for the August 22 lunch and learn. Mahoney added that parents often have to take a leave of absence or even quit their jobs where treatment for kids with cancer is involved. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parents sometimes have to move from a rural area to a city for a long period of time (for treatment for their kids). As great as our health care system is, not all of the expenses are covered all the time.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s where Believe in Gold can play a big part for families when they are seeking out treatment options. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are obviously some consequences to radiation and chemotherapy and surgeries that are not so nice. So if there were a better way of treating people, they

would certainly choose it,â&#x20AC;? said Mahoney. This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Believe in the Gold Foundation will be hosting a walk and run in Wascana on Saturday, September 22, and Rashovich encourages everyone to come out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of like

a mini Disneyland. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the best way to describe it. They will be throwing around footballs with Roughrider alumni in their jerseys. There will be therapy dogs, Rider tattoos for the kids, face painting and golden balloons.â&#x20AC;?

P/T Reporter / Photographer

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KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, Friday,September December 15, 14, 2018 2017

Kingswood holds ladies golf tourney by Laura Kish Kingswood Golf Club held their annual ladies golf tournament on Saturday, Sept. 8 with 54 golfers entered. There was a threat of rain throughout the day but Mother Nature held off until after the golfing was finished. New this year was a chance at winning $10,000, sponsored by Western Financial Group, if one of the ladies was lucky enough to sink a hole in one on hole #9. Unfortunately throughout the day very few balls actually landed and stayed on the green so no lucky winner of the $10,000 this year. There were many other prizes won throughout the day including: Longest Putt which went to Karen Dunn being 39’ 6” from the hole on #7. She won a

$50.00 gift certicate from L.B. Plumbing & Heating and a putter from T.D. Bank. Longest Drive went to Rowena Clements winning a blanket sponsored by Spotfree Carwash. Tammy Joorisity won the Closest to the Line being 8” away and winning a bracelet, donated by Bumper-to-Bumper. Winning a necklace donated by Heaton Ready Mix was Lorna McCarthy being 14’ 11” on the Closest to the Pin on hole #3. A random pick out of the hat was the lucky golf group of four, namely, Lori Toth, Kim Rolufs, Deb Hubbard and Shelly Krecsy winning a gift bag donated by Rolufs Esso. Following cocktail hour and supper many other prizes were won and all had a great day.

Photo by Laura Kish

Longest Drive went to Rowena Clements. Prize presented by Marsha Rolufs.

Photo by Laura Kish

Lucky golf group of four, namely, Lori Toth, Kim Rolufs, Deb Hubbard and Shelly Krecsy.

Photo by Laura Kish

Closest to the Line went to Tammy Joorisity. Prize presented by Doreen Szilagyi.

Photo by Laura Kish

Closest to the Pin went to Lorna McCarthy. Prize presented by Shelby Heaton.

Photo by Laura Kish

Longest Putt went to Karen Dunn. Prize presented by Marsha Rolufs.

Line 3 Replacement Program

Keeping You Safe. Enbridge is preparing for the replacement of a segment of the Line 3 pipeline in your area. This upgrade will help us maintain our stringent safety standards. Rest assured that throughout the process, our number one priority is to ensure the safety of communities and our employees and contractors. We thank you for your patience and cooperation.

For Your Safety Use extra caution when driving near any pipeline construction. Watch for: • heavy equipment • caution signs

• flaggers • slow traffic

For your safety and the safety of others, please do not enter our work areas.

For more information, visit enbridge.com/line3construction


Friday, September 2 KIPLING 14, 2018 CITIZEN

KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, December 15, 2017 7

Fall is a great time to look for clubroot and other diseases

By: Lyndon Hicks, PAg Crops Extension Specialist, Yorkton Regional Services Branch The best way to manage field crop diseases is through an integrated approach of cultural control strategies (such as crop rotation), host plant resistance and fungicide application when required. To develop an optimal integrated disease management plan, you need knowledge of the disease risk and field history. You can evaluate disease risk during the growing season by monitoring environmental conditions and scouting throughout the growing season to look for initial symptoms of the disease or signs of the pathogen. For crops such as canola it can actually be easier to gain knowledge of the field’s history through end-of-season disease scouting. Many plant diseases are strongly influenced by crop rotation. Short rotations between susceptible crops increase pathogen levels within the field, as well as the potential for yield and quality loss due to disease. When you monitor the disease history of the field, you can use crop rotation and other disease management strategies to manage pathogen levels and reduce the occurrence of disease epidemics and substantial yield loss. In addition, you

Galls (swollen root tissue) resulting from a clubroot infection. Galls can be large or small depending on the severity of the infection. may also find early signs of fungicide-resistant pathogen populations or a breakdown in host plant resistance. The decision to apply a fungicide for disease control is often difficult. Scouting for disease levels at the end of the season can be a very good way to evaluate your fungicide application decisions; the results can also guide your decisions in subsequent years. This is particularly true if a fungicide-free checkstrip has been left in a field. Leaving a check-strip makes it possible to compare the fungicide-treated area to a non-treated area and can be a good indication of whether or not the fungicide application was successful in reducing yield losses. When scouting, it is important to look at more than one location within a field. A good rule of thumb is to scout in a “W” pattern

and look at multiple plants from a minimum of five sites in fields less than 100 acres and a minimum of 10 sites in fields greater than 100 acres. Pull multiple plants from each site and examine the entire plant for symptoms of the disease, including the roots. Clubroot Fall is a great time to scout for clubroot in your canola fields. When scouting for clubroot, it is important to examine areas where the disease is most likely to occur. These areas include the field entrance, low spots and suspicious patches with above-ground symptoms such as yellowing, wilting and premature ripening. These above-ground symptoms indicate that something is wrong. To determine if clubroot is the cause, it is important to uproot plants and examine the roots for clubroot galls. It is important to also examine the roots of healthy plants at the field entrance, since the roots of the plant can be infected even though there are no aboveground symptoms. When you uproot plants, examine the roots for swollen tissue (clubroot galls). When plants are still actively growing the clubroot galls will appear white and fleshy. At this point in the growing season, the galls will likely be de-

composing and appear rotten and spongy. In some cases, the root tissue may be completely decomposed, leaving no intact tissue. When this occurs, dig around the area looking for spongy root tissue or pull other plants in the area to look for intact galls. If you find clubroot in the field it is important that you determine the distribution of the disease in the area so that you can develop an informed clubroot management plan for the field. Clubroot is a soil-borne disease that is best managed when detected early. Taking a proactive approach combines both disease prevention and management, keeping pathogen levels low and minimizing yield losses. Proactive management strategies such as extended crop rotations, selection of clubroot resistant varieties and preventing the movement of clubroot infected of potentially infected soil can be used to prevent the introduction of the pathogen and keep spore levels low. The key to clubroot management is keeping the pathogen levels low to allow canola production in a clubroot-infested field with minimum impact on yield. The earlier that clubroot is detected, the easier it will be to manage. As a result, clubroot management can begin before symptoms are seen in

a field and can even occur before the pathogen is present in a field by focusing efforts on preventing the introduction of clubroot-infested soil. Clubroot best management practices include: Grow clubroot-resistant canola varieties in regions where clubroot has been identified. Extend your crop rotation. Aim for a three-year break between susceptible crops, even when clubroot-resistant varieties are used. A minimum of a three year rotation (two-year break between susceptible crops including clubroot resistant varieties) should be followed. Longer crop rotations are encouraged for fields with high disease severity and high pathogen levels (resting spore concentrations). In addition to scouting for visible symptoms, the presence of the clubroot pathogen in the field can be confirmed through a DNA-based test on soil collected from the field. This method of testing for the clubroot pathogen is advantageous, as it allows for the detection of the pathogen at levels lower than those required to cause disease symptoms in the field. Restrict the movement of potentially contaminated soil to non-contaminated areas. This can include: - Practicing zero-till to

reduce soil erosion. This will help prevent movement of contaminated soil via wind and soil erosion, but will also help to reduce the movement of the pathogen to new areas in a field if it is already present at low levels in an isolated patch within the field. - Creating a separate exit as far as possible from the entrance to reduce the movement of the pathogen inoculum out of an infected field. - Reduce the risk of spread of clubroot. The level of sanitation used should match the level of risk associated with field management. Sanitizing should include the removal of crop and soil debris when moving from field to field. The more soil that is moved with equipment, the higher the risk of introducing clubroot to a field. Washing with a pressure washer, using hot water or steam, and misting with a disinfectant such as two per cent sodium hypochlorite solution is also a good measure to take. Sodium hypochlorite is the active ingredient in bleach and is the most effective disinfectant. Virkon® has been found to be only moderately effective in reducing the viability of the clubroot pathogen. - Restrict the entry of vehicles unless they have been properly sanitized.

How many jobs will the Line 3 program create?

The Line 3 Replacement = 24,494 jobs. The Line 3 Replacement Program is expected to generate almost 25,000 direct, indirect and induced jobs in Canada. The project is creating significant employment opportunities for local and Indigenous individuals and businesses. Here in Saskatchewan, approximately 9,175 jobs will be created over the project lifespan.

> Here are some ways Saskatchewan communities will benefit from the Line 3 Replacement: Stimulating local economies With pipeline construction workers in town, local businesses like hotels, restaurants, campgrounds, stores, movie theaters and recreational businesses will all benefit. Local business boost During construction, Enbridge sources local businesses like hardware stores, supply stores and parts dealers for goods and services to support their operations. Almost $200 million in revenue Over the life of the project, Enbridge will pay an estimated $183.9 million in taxes to the Province of Saskatchewan. These tax revenues are typically used to fund schools, roads, community projects and other services that sustain our quality of life.

Proud to be part of Prairie communities for over 68 years. To learn more about our Line 3 Replacement Program, visit enbridge.com/line3canada, call 1-888-967-3899, or email projects@enbridge.com


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KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, Friday,September December 15, 14, 2018 2017

KIPLING TRADE DAY

Photo by Darcie Khounnoraj

Photo by Darcie Khounnoraj

Photo by Darcie Khounnoraj

Photo by Darcie Khounnoraj

Photo by Darcie Khounnoraj

Photo by Laura Kish

Photo by Laura Kish

Photo by Laura Kish

Thank you to everyone for taking part in the Kipling Trade Day! WE HOPE TO SEE YOU ALL BACK AGAIN NEXT YEAR!

PHOTO PAGE SPONSORED BY:

For a full range of financial products and services with advice you can trust, visit us at one of our ten convenient branch locations, or on the web at:

www.plainsview.com

E-mail: info1@plainsview.cu.sk.ca Phone: (306) 736-2549


Friday, September 2 KIPLING 14, 2018 CITIZEN

KIPLING CITIZEN

Crop report for the period August 28 to September 3, 2018 Despite a cool and damp week in much of the province, producers took advantage of breaks in the weather to make considerable harvest progress this week, according to Saskatchewan Agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Weekly Crop Report. Thirtynine per cent of the crop is now in the bin, well ahead of the ďŹ ve-year (2013-2017) average of 25 per cent for this time of year. Thirty-two per cent of the crop is now swathed or ready to straightcut. Harvest is most advanced in the southwestern region, where 60 per cent of the crop is now combined. The southeastern region has 56 per cent combined, the west-central and the eastcentral regions has 32 per cent. The northeastern region has 14 per cent combined,

while the northwestern region has eight per cent combined. Ninety-seven per cent of fall rye, 92 per cent of winter wheat, 83 per cent of lentils, 86 per cent of ďŹ eld peas, 53 per cent of mustard, 49 per cent of durum, 46 per cent of barley, 28 per cent of spring wheat and 19 per cent of canola have now been combined. Twenty-six per cent of oats, 30 per cent of chickpeas, eight per cent of canaryseed and five per cent of ďŹ&#x201A;ax have been combined. Fifty-seven per cent of canola, 34 per cent of spring wheat and 11 per cent of mustard are swathed or ready to straight-cut. Not much progress has been made on soybeans, with harvest progress at ďŹ ve per cent combined, similar to the previous week. Across the province,

Rudyard Manor News Evelyn Park Bonnie Hart, Calgary; Margaret Debenham, Kennedy and Marie Travland, Coronach visited George and Doreen Cancade. Gerry Barsi, Regina visited on the weekend with Esther Barsi. Irene Flett, Yorkton visited Florence Cummins this week.

Marie Swallow, Wapella visited Sept. 6 with Ethel Lauritsen. John and Eli Cunningham of Moosomin were Sept. 7 visitors with Georgina Barsi. Gerald and Lynora Park, Calgary and Sandra Wood, Honolulu visited a few days with Evelyn Park.

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Operations Support at our store in Corning, SK

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topsoil moisture conditions on cropland are rated as 22 per cent adequate, 47 per cent short and 31 per cent very short. Hay land and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as 18 per cent adequate, 41 per cent short and 41 per cent very short. The majority of crop damage this past week was due to lack of moisture and strong wind. There were some reports of frost causing damage in parts of the province. Producers are busy swathing and combining crops. SaskPower reports four cases of farm machinery coming in contact with power equipment over the last week, bringing the total in August to 22. SaskPower reminds everyone to take their time and to be aware of overhead power lines crossing fields and farm yards this harvest season. Follow the 2018 Crop Report on Twitter at @SKAgriculture.

Friday, December 15, 2017 9

Wawota News Ross and Joanne Corkish attended the 47th biannual Dominion Royal Canadian League Convention recently. It was held in Winnipeg from August 24th-29th. Happy birthday to Irene Husband who celebrated her 91st birthday at MaryďŹ eld Villa. Family members the Husbands, Curries and DuďŹ&#x20AC;s attended and enjoyed cake and ice cream. Ireneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday was September 4th. Vanessa Rohatyn and her daughter, Gracie have moved to Regina as of last

Myrna Olson week. We wish them well in their new surroundings. On September 1st, the Wilson family held their 3rd annual threshing day at their farm. Over 190 people enjoyed the demonstration of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;old tyme styleâ&#x20AC;? harvesting from cutting to the ďŹ nal stage. A collection of old tractors, a wire hay baler, antique vehicles and a model steam engine were on display. A big thank you to the three generations of Wilsons, Ken, Kevin and Colton and families for making this a memorable event.

Born to Katelyn Matsella and Layne Saville of Carlyle on the birth of their son, Macsen Layne. He was born August 27th and weighed 7 lbs 11 oz. He is a grandson for Debbie Saville, Lance Saville (Herbert, SK), Ron and Donna Matsella of Carlyle. Great-grand parents are Cathy Maser (Medicine Hat), Joe Saville (Consul), Gerry Saville (Lethbridge) and Betty Ronvel of Saskatoon. Remember my news column is only as good as YOU make it!!

Glenavon News Shirley Schmidt Reta Pettit of Sherwood Park, AB visited with Don and Leah Leech. Jean Kotylak spent a few days with Loreen Kotylak in Regina while the men went north ďŹ shing and reported having a fun time. Frank and Gladys Englot, Anne Englot and Jean Kotylak attended the funeral of Annie Smuk in Hodgeville on Aug. 30. Annieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s husband John was a cousin of the Englots. Kally Malach and a group of family and friends gathered together for supper at Normâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Place in Windthorst to celebrate Kallyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sweet 16 birthday with a 2 tier birthday cake.

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Jean Kotylak of Glenavon, Loreen Kotylak of Regina and Darlene Romanow of Montmartre got together for their Sask Golden Girl birthday party. They enjoyed birthday cake, gifts, card games, meals and party. Shirley Schmidt went to Grenfell last week and had a visit with Linda Leech. A bridal shower was held for Brettiney Borowski on Sept. 8 at Church on the Hill. She received many lovely gifts and they served birthday cake as it was Brettineyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birthday.

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Permanent Full-Time Building Materials Supervisor at Kipling Home Centre

Permanent Full-Time Yard Attendant at Kipling Home Centre

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2 10

KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, Friday,September December 15, 14, 2018 2017

THE CLASSIFIED ADS :HHN *67 :HHNV *67 :HHNV *67 WK:HHN )5(( Ad rates are based on a minimum of 20 words (14¢ per word thereafter)

ALL CLASSIFIED ADS MUST BE PREPAID. VISA & MasterCard welcome

This newspaper accepts advertisements in good faith. We advise that it is in your interest to investigate offers personally. Publications by this paper should not be taken as an endorsement of the product or service offered.

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'($'/,1(021'$<6$730 Obituaries

OBITUARY

Obituaries

For Sale - Misc

ROSEMARIE HILDA MACDONALD

PROVINCE-WIDE CLASSIFIEDS. Reach over 550,000 readers weekly. Call this newspaper NOW or 306-649.1405 for details.

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Selling Your Land? I Can Help! - Justin Yin %,,     &9#%    !7   

*423).8).#!'-!),#/%!,38

Land For Sale FARMLAND WANTED

NO FEES OR COMMISSIONS!

PURCHASING: SINGLE TO LARGE BLOCKS OF LAND. PREMIUM PRICES PAID WITH QUICK PAYMENT. GREAT References Available A TOTAL OF 602 QUARTER SECTIONS SOLD ACROSS SASKATCHEWAN RENT BACK AVAILABLE Call DOUG 306-716-2671 saskfarms@shaw.ca Mobile/Manufactured Homes

Land For Sale

: !1-,!.$!1+%3).'0%#)!,)23 : /6%1&4,-!1+%3).'.%36/1+2 : &&%#3)5%.',)2(().%2% 6%"2)3%2 : 31/.',%#31/.)#!1+%3).' 3//,2 : %!341%$/.,/"!, : %!341%$).(%,/"%!), (% %23%1.1/$4#%1  %).$%%1/!$!2+!3//.

Announcements

Career Opportunities

For Sale - Misc Adver tisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.swna.com.

Feed & Seed HEATED CANOLA WANTED!! - GREEN CANOLA - SPRING THRASHED - DAMAGED CANOLA FEED OATS WANTED!! - BARLEY, OATS, WHT - LIGHT OR TOUGH - SPRING THRASHED HEATED FLAX WANTED!! HEATED PEAS HEATED LENTILS "ON FARM PICKUP" Westcan Feed & Grain 1-877-250-5252 Buying/Selling FEED GRAINS heated / damaged CANOLA/FLAX Top price paid FOB FARM

Western Commodities 877-695-6461 Visit our website @ www.westerncommodities.ca

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have workat-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employer-trusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-768-3362 to start training for your work-at-home career today! Steel Buildings / Granaries STEEL BUILDING CLEARANCE ... â&#x20AC;&#x153;SUMMER OVERSTOCK SALE BLAZING HOT DEALS!â&#x20AC;? 20X21 $5,845. 25X27 $6,588. 30X31 $9,564. 33X35 $9,833. 35X35 $11,955. End Wall Included. Pioneer Steel 1-855-212-7036

Upcoming Events SEPTEMBER 15 (Saturday): Tea, Baking and Garden Produce sale at Kipling United Church from 2:00 - 3:30. Everyone welcome! 47-3

ADVERTISING WORKS! CALL 306-736-2535

SEPTEMBER 29 (Saturday): Breast Cancer Treatment Fundraiser Walkathon. Registration at 1:30 pm, Kipling Legion. Walk starts at 2:00 pm. Tickets $15.00 available at Plainsview Credit Union, Balfour Drugs, Pharmasave, Three Sisters Foods, More Than Just Flowers, Kipling Home Hardware. Cocktails 5:30 pm, Supper 6:30 pm. Everyone welcome. Sponsored by Kipling Legion Ladies Auxiliary. 49-2

Impaired driving laws are changing: Stronger penalties in effect

Consequences for impaired driving are getting even tougher in Saskatchewan as of Sept. 1, including stronger penalties for drug-impaired drivers and for impaired drivers who transport children. The TraďŹ&#x192;c Safety (Miscellaneous) Amendment Act 2017 and The Miscellaneous Vehicle and Driving Statutes (Cannabis Legislation) Amendment Act, 2017 were both passed in the Spring sitting of the Legislature and come into eďŹ&#x20AC;ect Sept. 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never OK to drive impaired, whether itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s by drugs or alcohol,â&#x20AC;? Minister responsible for Saskatchewan Government Insurance (SGI) Joe Hargrave said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This new legislation reďŹ&#x201A;ects the seriousness of this oďŹ&#x20AC;ence, with more severe punishments for drugimpaired drivers, and those who make the bad decision to drive with children in the vehicle.â&#x20AC;? As of Sept. 1, zero tolerance for drug impairment will apply to all drivers. Zero tolerance means that drivers should not get behind the wheel with any level of impairing drugs in their system detectable by a federally-approved screening device, or a standardized ďŹ eld sobriety test. The province has also updated legislation and regulations so that tough administrative penalties that impaired drivers in Saskatchewan faced under existing legislation will also apply to anyone charged under three new federal drug-impaired driving laws (http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/cj-jp/sidl-rlcfa/ index.html). There will also be longer vehicle seizures for impaired drivers with passengers under 16 years of age in the vehicle. In addition, experienced drivers who are impaired and transporting passengers under 16 will face longer roadside licence suspensions. Penalties include: Health Services

Drug-Impaired Driving - Zero tolerance for all drivers - Immediate licence suspension - Vehicle seized for up to 60 days - Licence suspension for up to 5 years if convicted Impaired Drivers with Passengers Under 16 - Vehicle seized for up to 60 days - Licence suspended for up to 120 days - Licence suspension up to 18 months for new drivers Police can tell if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re driving while high (https://www.sgi.sk.ca/ news?title=think-a-policeofficer-can-t-tell-if-you-redriving-stoned--think-again-). If they suspect that a driver is impaired by a drug or alcohol (or a combination of both), they can demand that the driver take a standardized ďŹ eld sobriety test or use a roadside screening device. If the driver fails the ďŹ eld sobriety test or registers a failure on the roadside screening device, they can have their vehicle seized and licence suspended for at least three days. If the oďŹ&#x192;cer has reasonable grounds to believe that a driver is impaired by a drug or alcohol they can demand that the driver submit to an evaluation conducted by a Drug Recognition Evaluator (DRE) or a breath test at the police station. If a driver subsequently fails a DRE, or exceeds .08 blood alcohol concentration, that triggers Criminal Code charges, which results in a minimum 30-day vehicle seizure, an indeďŹ nite licence suspension until the charges are dealt with, and â&#x20AC;&#x201C; upon conviction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; potential ďŹ nes, jail time, ignition interlock requirements and driving prohibitions. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t matter if a drug is legal or not. If it impairs your ability to drive safely, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get behind the wheel. Prescription and over-thecounter drugs can also make you impaired, and combining drugs with alcohol increases impairment. For more information on the consequences of impaired driving, visit SGIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Drugs and alcohol page (https://www.sgi. sk.ca/drugs-alcohol).


Friday, September 2 KIPLING 14, 2018 CITIZEN

KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, December 15, 2017 11

Prairie Valley School Division is Kind Setting the Stage for the 2018-2019 School Year Kindness is front and centre in the Prairie Valley School Division as staff and students head back to class this week to start the 2018-2019 school year. “Be kind to one another, because being kind is something we all can do,” said Director of Education Ben Grebinski in his opening address to administrators this year, making this the school division’s statement of purpose for the 20182019 school year. “There is a lot of hurt out there and I think the world needs a gentler approach. It’s our job to be kind.” Each year, Grebinski sets the stage with his statement of purpose. This year, his focus on kindness was formed through his work with the Division’s social workers, child and family support workers and other learning supports staff, who noted teaching kindness and empathy would be helpful in an inclusive school division like Prairie Valley. The direction has picked

up steam across the Division with teachers and administrators alike sharing their gratitude for the direction. “So proud to work in a division that places kindness in the centre of all we do,” said Kelliher School Principal Lindy Olafson. The team at South Shore School in Regina Beach is already partnering with the community to create kindness rocks, which students hide around the community for others to find. “We had been thinking all summer about how we could bring more kindness to the classroom. When we found out that was the statement of purpose this year, we were elated,” said Nicole Young, the principal of South Shore School. “So we thought we would start the year off with a kindness initiative.” Students at that school spent time on their first day back painting kind messages on rocks that they later hid among the community for others to

find and keep. Others in the Division have created bulletin boards showcasing the statement of purpose, while the learning supports team made up of child and family services workers, social workers, speech-language pathologists, psychologists and teachers also have big plans. They are preparing kindness messages for each school, information and activity packages for International Random Acts of Kindness Week and kindness boards in schools, which help guide student learning around being kind and empathetic. “We need to remind ourselves that we are here for others; no matter the role, everyone working in education impacts the lives of children and youth, from bus drivers and caretakers to teachers and administrators,” said Grebinski. “If we understood the hurt that exists in any given heart at any given time, we would never want to add to it.”

Stand Out From The Crowd Advertise in Color

Principal Sarah Geisler from Lipton School showcasing the statement of purpose on a bulletin board in the school.

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SERVICES DIRECTORY Advertising PLACE YOUR AD HERE FOR

$5.00 / Week

Contracting

Law Firms

Tree Cutting

PALIK CONTRACTING LTD.

TROBERT LAW FIRM

Baker Enterprises

- Heavy Truck and Trailer Repair - Machine Shop - Esso Oil Dealer - Supplier New Steel SGI KEN PALIK Safety Kipling * 736-2850 Station

Memorial Counsellors

Barristers and Solicitors TROBERT, JAMES F., B.A., LL.B. ESTEVAN WICKLOW CENTRE

BUCKET TRUCK SERVICE • CUSTOM TREE CUTTING

Ben Baker

1-306-634-2616 or Fax 1-306-634-9881

60 Foot Reach

trobertlaw@sasktel.net

BRANCH OFFICES:

KIPLING, SASK.

Stoughton: Wednesday A.M. - Town Office Oxbow: Wednesday P.M. - 223 Main St. Kipling: Friday P.M. - 515 Main Street

Res. 306-736-8189 Shop: 306-736-2241

Cell. 306-736-7445

Trucking

OSMAN & COMPANY Law Office

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS and NOTARIES PUBLIC

SHANNON TRUCKING

Main Office: Moosomin 435-3851

Cemetery Memorials • In Cemetery Lettering Memorial Benches • Cenotaphs • Columbaria Cemetery Improvements • Memorial Restoration

With Branch Offices at: Kipling ............................. Wednesday • 736-8522 Redvers ............................... Thursday • 452-3445 Wawota ..................................... Friday • 739-2371

MICHAEL REY 306-901-7440 • LAURIE REY 306-901-7000 Call, Text or email • mrey@sasktel.net No obligation in-home consultation

Oilfield Construction Ken Ede Cell: 736-7768 Box 1002 Kipling, SK S0G 2S0 www.system3.ca

Oilfield, Farm & General Construction

MERVIN PHILLIPS

Still #1 bin, in the 982 since 1

Gary: 435-7445

BARRISTER and SOLICITOR

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of the Law Firm

PHILLIPS & CO.

2100 Scarth Street, Regina, SK S4P 2H6

WINDTHORST & DISTRICT LAW OFFICE HOURS: TUESDAY 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. in the Windthorst Village Office Building Phone:

1(306) 569-0811 for appointments

Let your customers know about the services you have to offer.

Dr. Clarke Hill D.V.M. Dr. Monica Schott D.V.M. Dr. Christine Ewert Hill D.V.M. Dr. Rafael Pineda D.V.M. Kipling, SK • #905 Main Street • (306) 736-2516 Carlyle, SK • Hwy. #13 North • (306) 453-2446 Redvers, SK • #1 Service Road • (306) 452-3558

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2 12

KIPLING CITIZEN

Friday, Friday,September December 15, 14, 2018 2017

Show your Rider Pride! Get your GREEN on! The Citizen Kipling

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303 RAILWAY AVE. KIPLING, SK • 306-736-2560

DR. BERNARD KU FAMILY DENTISTRY AND ORTHODONTICS

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Telephone:

525 Main Street

736-2433

Box 687 Kipling, SK • S0G 2S0

Fax: 736-8413

Peebles Co-operative Association Limited

Box 16 • Peebles, SK • S0G 3V0 Ph/Fax: 306-224-4521 Res. (306) 224-4938 E-mail: peebles.coop@sasktel.net

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Kipling Citizen September 14  
Kipling Citizen September 14  
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