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The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net GARFIELD® JIM DAVIS

COMICS

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 —Page D5 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

TUYIN

SPEED BUMP®

DAVE COVERLY

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

OSPUY

BLONDIE® DEAN YOUNG & STAN DRAKE

PRELUP VERRET

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: DOZED NACHO AFFECT DRIVER Answer: The politician spoke frankly to his dinner companion because he was a — CANDID DATE

REX MORGAN® FWOODY WILSON & TONY DIPRETA

BEETLE BAILEY® MORT WALKER

DILBERT® SCOTT ADAMS

BOUND & GAGGED® DANA SUMMERS

THE FAMILY CIRCUS®

BY BILL KEANE

CRYPTOQUIP

DOONESBURY® GARRY TRUDEAU

THE LOCKHORNS® BY BUNNY HOEST & JOHN REINER FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE® LYNN JOHNSTON

GOREN BRIDGE

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH ©2002 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, Inc.

AVOID THE THREAT Both vulnerable. South deals.

SALLY FORTH® CREATED BY GREG HOWARD

NORTH ♠ A Q 10 9 6 5 4 ♥ Vo i d ♦8 3 ♣K8 7 4 WEST EAST ♠3 ♠ Vo i d ♥AK9 8 5 2 ♥ J 10 7 6 4 3 ♦7 6 2 ♦K9 5 4 ♣ J 10 2 ♣AQ9 SOUTH ♠KJ 8 7 2 ♥Q ♦ A Q J 10 ♣6 5 3

The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ Pas s 4♠ Pas s Pas s Pas s

MUTTS® PATRICK MCDONNELL

BABY BLUES® RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT

PEANUTS® CHARLES M. SCHULZ

Opening lead: Jack of ♥

Bridge players are, by nature, superstitious. Often, however, they make their own bad luck. Consider South’s plight on this deal. The auction was soon over. Despite a strong hand in support, we endorse North’s pre-emptive raise to game, if for no other reason than to keep East-West out of the auction. As the cards lie, they can make 11 tricks at a heart contract. West led the jack of hearts. Declarer ruffed, drew the outstanding trump and took the diamond finesse, which lost. West lost no time switching to a club honor, and the defenders racked up three tricks in the suit for a one-trick set. “Two cards wrong out of two,” muttered South. “I’m jinxed!” “Quite the contrary,” retorted North. “You were lucky to escape a club lead, which would have doomed you from the outset. Now there is no excuse for not making 10 tricks.” Of course, North was correct. The only threat to the contract was that East held the ace of clubs and West the king of diamonds, in which case West had to be kept off lead to prevent a shift through the king of clubs. That could be accomplished by discarding a diamond from dummy at trick one instead of ruffing! Best defense is for East to win and return a diamond, but now a ruffing finesse is available as an avoidance play. Declarer rises with the ace, draws the trump, then continues with the queen of diamonds, discarding a club from the table should West follow low. If the finesse loses, declarer can discard two more clubs from dummy on high diamonds. If West covers, declarer ruffs, returns to hand with a trump, and discards two clubs on the diamonds, losing only two clubs and a heart. Either way 10 tricks are guaranteed.

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers’ responses sent in care of this newspaper or to Tribune Media Services Inc., 2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 7 5 0 3 8 . E-mail responses may be sent to gorenbridge@aol.com.)

CROSSWORD

By Eugene Scheffer

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