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Mitt Romney/Paul Ryan

Obama Repeats Serving the Tri-State Area Since 1907

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BY DAVID ESPO

AP SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT

The Journal 207 W. King St. Martinsburg, WV 25401 304-263-8931 800-448-1895 www.journal-news.net

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Earl Ray Tomblin

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Bill Maloney

Manchin defeats Raese in Senate race

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4 SECTIONS, 32 PAGES VOLUME 106, ISSUE 187

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On the Web: www.journal-news.net

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A woman caught on camera driving on a sidewalk to avoid a Cleveland school bus that was unloading children will have to stand at an intersection wearing a sign warning about idiots. Court records show a Cleveland Municipal Court judge on Monday ordered 32-year-old Shena Hardin to stand at an intersection for two days next week. She will have to wear a sign saying: “Only an idiot drives on the sidewalk to avoid a school bus.”

37% Brian Savilla

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Natalie Tennant

COMMISSIONER OF AGRICULTURE

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Patrick Morrisey

See MANCHIN, Page A2

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Classified Comics Horoscopes Neighborhood Obituaries Opinion Region Sports Stocks Weather

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Darrell McGraw

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Howard Swint

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John Raese argued that Manchin has helped the Democrats maintain a majority in the Senate that has allowed Obama to pursue his agenda. Manchin overcame both Raese and Mountain Party candidate Bob Henry Baber.

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CHARLESTON — West Virginia voters chose to send U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin back to Capitol Hill for a full six-year term on Tuesday, rejecting a GOP effort to derail his bid

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ASSOCIATED PRESS

by appealing to the state’s low regard for President Barack Obama. A Democrat like Obama, Manchin campaigned as an independent voice for the state who has disagreed with the president over such issues as coal, federal spending and the national debt. Courting the tea party vote, GOP nominee

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BY LAWRENCE MESSINA

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36% John Raese

GOVERNOR OF WEST VIRGINIA

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Joe Manchin

the track record he’d established after three decades in state politics. He’s been servMORGANTOWN — ing as acting governor since Democratic Gov. Earl Ray narrowly winning a special Tomblin shook off GOP chal- election for an unexpired term lenger Bill Maloney’s attempts in 2010. to link him to a president “The people of West Virwho’s unpopular in the state, ginia appreciate the experiwinning a full four-year term ence, the fiscal responsibility as West Virginia’s chief exec- that we’ve shown, the good utive Tuesday. financial planning,” Tomblin The state’s five electoral told The Associated Press. votes, as expected, went to “We plan to continue to GOP hopeful Mitt Romney move forward along that instead of President Barack same path and to continue to Obama. be responsible with the taxTomblin, the state’s payers’ dollars.” longest-serving Senate presiSee TOMBLIN, Page A3 dent, successfully banked on ASSOCIATED PRESS

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Gov. Tomblin wins full term

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ASHINGTON — President Barack Obama rolled to re-election Tuesday night, vanquishing former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and prevailing despite a weak economy that plagued his first term and put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions. “This happened because of you. Thank you” Obama tweeted to supporters as he celebrated four more years in the White House. After the costliest — and arguably the nastiest — campaign in history, divided government seemed alive and well. Democrats retained control of the Senate with surprising ease. Republicans were on course for the same in the House, making it likely that Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, Obama’s partner in unsuccessful deficit talks, would reclaim his seat at the bargaining table. Romney led narrowly in the popular vote, by about 30,00 votes out of more than 98 million cast, with ballots counted in 74 percent of the nation’s precincts. But Obama’s laserlike focus on the battleground states allowed him to run up a sizeable margin in the competition for electoral votes, where it mattered. He won Ohio, Wisconsin, Virginia, Iowa, New Hampshire, Colorado and Nevada, seven of the nine battlegrounds where the rivals and their allies poured nearly $1 billion into dueling television commercials. Romney was in Massachusetts, his long and grueling bid for the presidency at an unsuccessful end. He won North Carolina among the battleground states. Florida remained too close to call.

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52%√

Walt Helmick

48%

Kent Leonhardt

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Obama

FROM PAGE ONE

Page A2 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Manchin

U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin celebrates his victory with his wife, Gayle.

AP photo

FROM PAGE A1

“I think the people know me. They know that I fight for West Virginia, and I love every human being in this state,” Manchin told The Associated Press. “I love this country. We need to come together.” In a state where he suffers some of his lowest approval ratings, Obama lost West Virginia’s five electoral votes as he did in 2008, this time to Republican Mitt Romney. Manchin called for the eventual winner of the national race to launch an immediate 50-state “healing tour,” starting in West Virginia. “I’m just so committed to that. We just need to reach out,” Manchin said. “Forget about our party politics. Start thinking about our future.” Manchin and Raese had similarly sparred when they ran in a 2010 special election prompted by the death of U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd. A popular governor midway through his second term, Manchin overcame that attempt by Raese to tie him to Obama — partly with a now-famous ad that showed Manchin shooting a rifle at the president’s carbon emissions legislation. Raese lost by just more than 10 percent of the vote. The 65-year-old Democrat sought to build on that maverick image in this year’s rematch. He won the endorsement of the state Chamber of Commerce, the West Virginia Coal Association and the NRA, and outraised Raese more than eightfold. Raese has attracted less than $530,000 from contributors, and the multimillionaire and

industrialist has loaned his campaign nearly $800,000. But after repeatedly supporting his bids for office, the state’s largest anti-abortion group had targeted Manchin for defeat over his votes regarding the federal health care overhaul and Planned Parenthood. Endorsing Raese, West Virginians for Life urged votes against the incumbent in fliers distributed outside churches the Sunday before Election Day. “(Manchin) has kind of betrayed the pro-life movement, and I am very prolife,” said 60-year-old Janet Adams of Newburg, who voted for Raese. But Jeanie Farley and her husband of 55 years, Rick, said they voted against Raese. Among other concerns, the two Democrats cited the Republicans’ economic proposals. “It looks like the middle class has disappeared,” said Rick Farley, 76. Raese is chairman of the board of West Virginia Radio Corp. and the MetroNews radio network, and chief executive of steel and limestone producer Greer Industries. Besides the 2010 contest, Raese lost three previous statewide campaigns, including two for the Senate. Manchin wasn’t just campaigning in West Virginia. He endorsed Joe Donnelly, a Democratic U.S. Senate hopeful in Indiana, in a video last month. He taped a similar spot last week for Democrat Bob Kerry in Nebraska’s Senate race.

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The election emerged as a choice between two very different visions of government — whether it occupies a major, front-row place in American lives or is in the background as a less-obtrusive facilitator for private enterprise and entrepreneurship. The economy was rated the top issue by about 60 percent of voters surveyed as they left their polling places. But more said former President George W. Bush bore responsibility for current circumstances than Obama did after nearly four years in office. That bode well for the president, who had worked to turn the election into a choice between his proposals and Romney’s, rather than the simple referendum on the economy during his time in the White House. Unemployment stood at 7.9 percent on election day, higher than when he took office. And despite signs of progress, the economy is still struggling after the worst recession in history. There was no doubt about what drove voters to one candidate or the other. About 4 in 10 said the economy is on the mend, but more than that said it was stagnant or getting worse more than four years after the near-collapse of 2008. The survey was conducted for The Associated Press and a group of television networks. In the battle for the Senate, Democrats won seats currently held by Republicans in Indiana and Massachusetts. In Maine, independent former Gov. Angus King was elected to succeed retiring GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe. He has not yet said which party he will side with, but Republicans attacked him in television advertising during the race, and Democrats rushed to his cause. Polls were still open in much of the country as the two rivals began claiming the spoils of a brawl of an election in a year in which the struggling economy put a crimp in the middle class dreams of millions.

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The president was in Chicago as he awaited the voters’ verdict on his four years in office. He told reporters he had a concession speech as well as victory remarks prepared. He congratulated Romney on a spirited campaign. “I know his supporters are just as engaged, just as enthusiastic and working just as hard today” as Obama’s own, he added. Romney reciprocated, congratulating the man who he had campaigned against for more than a year. Earlier, he raced to Ohio and Pennsylvania for Election Day campaigning and projected confidence as he flew home to Massachusetts. “We fought to the very end, and I think that’s why we’ll be successful,” he said, adding that he had finished writing a speech anticipating victory but nothing if the election went to his rival. But the mood soured among the Republican high command as the votes came in and Obama ground out a lead in critical states. Like Obama, Vice President Joe Biden was in Chicago as he waited to find out if he was in line for a second term. Republican running mate Paul Ryan was with Romney in Boston, although he kept one eye on his re-election campaign for a House seat in Wisconsin, just in case. The long campaign’s cost soared into the billions, much of it spent on negative ads, some harshly so. In the presidential race, an estimated one million commercials aired in nine battleground states where the rival camps agreed the election was most likely to be settled — Ohio, New Hampshire, Virginia, Florida, North Carolina, Wisconsin, Iowa, Colorado and Nevada. In a months-long general election ad war that cost nearly $1 billion, Romney and Republican groups spent

more than $550 million and Obama and his allies $381 million, according to organizations that track advertising. In Virginia, the polls had been closed for several minutes when Obama’s campaign texted a call for volunteers “to make sure everyone who’s still in line gets to vote.” In Florida, there were long lines at the hour set for polls to close. Under state law, everyone waiting was entitled to cast a ballot. According to the exit poll, 53 percent of voters said Obama is more in touch with people like them, compared to 43 percent for Romney. About 60 percent said taxes should be increased, taking sides on an issue that divided the president and Romney. Obama wants to let taxes rise on upper incomes, while Romney does not. Other than the battlegrounds, big states were virtually ignored in the final months of the campaign. Romney wrote off New York, Illinois and California, while Obama made no attempt to carry Texas, much of the South or the Rocky Mountain region other than Colorado. There were 33 Senate seats on the ballot, 23 of them defended by Democrats and the rest by Republicans. Democratic Rep. Chris Murphy, a Democrat, won a Connecticut seat long held by Sen. Joe Lieberman, retiring after a career that included a vice presidential spot on Al Gore’s ticket in 2000. It was Republican Linda McMahon’s second defeat in two tries, at a personal cost of $92 million. The GOP needed a gain of three for a majority if Romney won, and four if Obama was re-elected. Neither Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada nor GOP leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky was on the ballot, but each had high stakes in the outcome.

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THE JOURNAL

Morrisey to represent Panhandle as West Virginia Attorney General

BY DAVE EMKE

JOURNAL REGIONAL EDITOR

MARTINSBURG — Voters in the Eastern Panhandle have long felt disconnected from Charleston, Patrick Morrisey said. After his victory over longtime state Attorney General Darrell McGraw in Tuesday’s election, though, Morrisey said he hopes to change that. “I’ll ensure that all parts of the state are going to get effective representation, and that includes the Eastern Panhandle, who has suffered for too long without adequate representation,” Morrisey said in a telephone interview with The Journal late Tuesday night. The race was tight, with

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58%√ Glen Gainer

44% Mike Hall

WEST VIRGINIA AUDITOR

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John Perdue

42%

Larry V. Faircloth

JUSTICE, SUPREME COURT OF APPEALS

23% Letitia Chafin

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27%√ Robin Davis

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from Newburg, backed Maloney because she didn’t like what she saw from Tomblin during his brief tenure. “Tomblin has been flying on Manchin’s coat tails, and I do not like that,” she said. “Everything was set in motion for him. I did not see anything that he did on his own. He just followed through with Manchin’s stuff.” “If he’d have shown me something that he had the initiative to do on his own,” she said, “he’d have had my vote.” West Virginia hasn’t elected a Republican governor since Cecil Underwood, who defeated Democrat Charlotte Pritt in 1996. Underwood lost in 2000 to Democrat Bob Wise. Several third-party and write-in candidates also ran, including the Mountain Party’s Jesse Johnson.

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“That was going to bankrupt the state in itself. They saw fit to make some adjustments to make it a viable, working process,” George said. “I’m proud of that fact — that I’m in a state that is fiscally sound and well-run. ... I’d hate to see it change drastically.” But Maloney, a longtime drilling engineer and successful business owner from Morgantown who had worked hard on his ground game, argued that the state needs drastic change. His campaign, like that of most statewide Republican candidates in West Virginia, has relied heavily on linking his opponent to an unpopular commander in chief. Obama is widely disliked in West Virginia, portrayed by political foes as an enemy of the coal industry. Barbara Bolyard, a 50year-old registered Democrat

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In a brief concession speech in Morgantown, Maloney said he ran his campaign for his grandson and for other generations of children “who have left West Virginia to find new opportunities.” “And we’re still hopeful we can bring all those children back to give them that opportunity right here in the Mountain State,” he said, vowing to continue to fight but also calling for unity. “This was a hard-fought campaign, but now it’s time to come together and work together for a better state,” Maloney said. “I want to ask all of you to work with Governor Tomblin to create a better West Virginia.” The candidates’ first campaign showdown was brief, but this battle has been long and bitter, heavy on negative attacks by TV and direct mail. Tomblin argued the state has made good progress under his leadership, and in Arthurdale, 67-year-old teacher Mike George agreed. The leadership that Manchin showed as governor was supported by Tomblin before he became chief executive, George said after casting his ballot for both. Together, the two Democrats pushed initiatives through the Legislature such as an overhaul of the state workers’ compensation program.

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FROM PAGE A1

several years, mostly from business groups. Davis argues that new rules for handling civil appeals resolve those concerns. Loughry’s campaign also received public money from a pilot program created as an alternative to traditional fundraising. But the Supreme Court blocked that program from providing additional funds in a September ruling.

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Tomblin

Court law clerk, had chronicled West Virginia political corruption in a recent book. That research became a major theme in his court campaign. Davis has campaigned on court projects targeting truancy and child neglect. She’s also supported the new court created to hear disputes among businesses. West Virginia’s court system has been under fire for

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CHARLESTON (AP) — Incumbent justice Robin Davis and newcomer Allen Loughry won West Virginia Supreme Court seats Tuesday. Voters handed Davis another 12-year-term to the five-member court Tuesday. The Democrat has sat on the state’s only appeals court since 1996. Loughry, a Republican and a longtime Supreme

es like predictability and want to have consistency from their attorney general, and that’s what they’re going to have as a result of this election.” Morrisey is the first Eastern Panhandle native to be elected to a statewide government role in several decades. He said he looks forward to helping the area, and the whole state, flourish from his new office. “We’re going to be sitting down with people from across the state, including the Eastern Panhandle, to talk about ways we can create a more dynamic business environment in the state,” he said. “The Eastern Panhandle will be poised to benefit from that approach.” Morrisey is a health care lawyer from Harpers Ferry.

WEST VIRGINIA TREASURER

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Davis, Loughry win Supreme Court seats

Morrisey winning 51 percent to 49 percent over the fiveterm incumbent. Morrisey said he plans to restore ethics to state government and the attorney general’s office, especially in light of the concerns of his home region. “The Eastern Panhandle was not happy with some of the unethical practices going on in the attorney general’s office, and we’re going to follow through on our plan to change how that office operates,” he said. “That’s going to be important, because if people in the Eastern Panhandle and across the state see that their attorney general acts with ethics in office, that’s going to make the state more friendly from a business perspective. Business-

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prompted by the death of U.S. Sen. Robert C. Byrd. Manchin said whoever wins the presidency must work to unite the nation. He proposed a 50-state healing tour, inviting the winner to come to West Virginia first. “I’m just so committed to that. We just need to reach out,” Manchin told The Associated Press. “Forget about our party politics. Start thinking about our future.” Tomblin’s GOP opponent, Bill Maloney, also invoked Obama while blaming the incumbent for the state’s chronically poor rankings in economic and education categories. Their race marked another rematch. Tomblin was Senate president acting as governor following Manchin’s departure when he narrowly beat Maloney in a special election last October. In the bitterly fought governor’s race, Tomblin cited how the state weathered the Great Recession and fragile recovery under his leadership. Maloney, a Morgantown drilling consultant and business owner, accused Tomblin of prospering at taxpayer expense.

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Romney carries W.Va.

CHARLESTON (AP) — West Virginia voters on Tuesday re-elected U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin and Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin, both Democrats, even as they rejected President Barack Obama’s bid for a second term and considered a lengthy ballot that also features a slew of legislative posts and a proposed constitutional amendment. Though registered Democrats outnumber Republicans by nearly 2-1 in West Virginia, GOP presidential hopeful Mitt Romney easily won the five electoral votes in the state where Obama suffers some of his lowest approval ratings. Still, Romney lost the overall race. In other races, Republican candidates worked to link Democratic incumbents to the unpopular president. They also threatened the Democrats’ majority in the House of Delegates. Republican John Raese made Obama a big part of his campaign against Manchin for a full six-year term in the Senate. Manchin was governor when he defeated Raese, a Morgantown multimillionaire and industrialist, in a 2010 special election

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page A3

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The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

23% John Yoder

26%√

Allen Loughry


Delaney defeats Bartlett

Page A4 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

THE JOURNAL

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

BY DAVID DISHNEAU ASSOCIATED PRESS

POTOMAC, Md. — Maryland Democrats picked up a seat Tuesday in the House of Representatives after political newcomer John Delaney defeated Republican incumbent Roscoe Bartlett in the state’s westernmost district. Redistricting in Maryland made Bartlett one of the most vulnerable incumbents in the nation by adding a large swath of Democratic-leaning Montgomery County to his district. With 57 percent of precincts reporting, Delaney had 58 percent of the vote, compared with 38 percent for Bartlett. Statewide, Democratic Sen. Ben Cardin won re-election to the U.S. Senate, defeating a Republican and a well-financed independent. In Maryland’s other seven House races, incumbents — six Democrats and one Republican — all won reelection. But it was Bartlett’s 6th District race against Delaney that attracted the majority of attention. Bartlett was first elected to Congress in 1992 after the longtime incumbent, conservative Democrat Bev Byron, was knocked off in a primary. At age 86, Bartlett is the second-oldest member of the House. Delaney defeated state legislator Rob Garagiola in the Democratic primary. Delaney claimed victory shortly before 10:30 p.m., and promised constituents at a celebration in Potomac that he would “work as hard as I can to use all of my abilities to make a difference in your lives.” In Hagerstown, retired medical assistant Carolyn Barton, a registered Democrat, said she voted for Delaney as she cast her ballot at the Emmanuel United Methodist Church. Barton said she may have voted for Bartlett in the past “but he’s getting old.” Registered Democrat Al Sedghi, a 51-year-old telecommunications consultant, voted at Robert Frost Middle School in Rockville for Delaney, partly because Delaney offered a detailed plan for improving education. “We need to make sure that the schools have sufficient funds for loans and that people are able to attend colleges,” he said. Cardin defeated Republican Dan Bongino and independent Rob Sobhani. With 51 percent of precincts reporting, Cardin had 56 percent of the vote, compared to 27 percent for Bongino and 17 percent for Sobhani. Cardin was first elected to the Senate in 2006 after a long career in the House of Representatives. Bongino is a former Secret Service agent. Sobhani had previously run unsuccessful campaigns as a Republican and spent more than $4 million of his own money to flood the airwaves and finance his run this year as an independent. Cardin said in a phone interview Tuesday evening that in the next Congress “the most important thing is to work across party lines” and get a budget deal done that includes a mix of spending cuts and new revenue. He said he is gratified Maryland voters responded positively to his first term. He congratulated Bongino for running “an honorable campaign” and declined to comment on Sobhani’s candidacy.

AP photo

Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate Elizabeth Warren, center, casts her ballot as she and her husband, Bruce Mann, right, visited the polls near their Cambridge, Mass., home on Election Day Tuesday. Warren defeated Sen. Scott Brown, who was elected in a special election in 2010 after the death of Sen. Ted Kennedy.

Dems capture Senate seats in Massachusetts, Indiana

BY DONNA CASSATA ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Majority Democrats snatched Republican-held Senate seats in Indiana and Massachusetts on Tuesday, complicating the GOP’s uphill effort to take control of the Senate. Independent Angus King won the GOP Senate seat in Maine to add a dose of uncertainty to the fierce fight for the majority. Democratic Rep. Joe Donnelly edged out tea party-backed Indiana state treasurer Richard Mourdock in a race rocked by the Republican candidate’s clumsy comment that pregnancy resulting from rape is “something God intended.” Mourdock also upset some Indiana voters for his decision to sue to stop the federal auto bailout of Chrysler, which means jobs building transmissions to thousands in Kokomo. And he alienated some in his own party with his divisive win over six-term Sen. Richard Lugar in the May GOP primary. Lugar refused to campaign for him. In Massachusetts, Democrat Elizabeth Warren knocked out Republican Sen. Scott Brown, who had stunned the political world in January 2010 when he won the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy’s seat. The strong Democratic tilt in the state and President Barack Obama’s easy win over former Gov. Mitt Romney in Massachusetts helped the consumer advocate in her bid. The race was one of the most expensive in the country — $68 million — even though both candidates agreed to bar outside spending. Republicans set their sights on three Democratic-held seats — Nebraska, North Dakota and Virginia. GOP candidates in those states grabbed the early lead. Democrats currently hold a 53-47 edge in the Senate, including the two independents who caucus with them. Republicans need a net of four seats to grab the majority, three if Republican Mitt Romney wins the presidency. The caustic campaign for control of the Senate in a divided Congress was marked by endless negative ads and more than $1 billion in spending by outside groups on races from Virginia to Montana, Florida to New Mexico. The outcome in Ohio and Virginia was closely linked to the presidential race. Republicans and Democrats in Massachusetts, North Dakota and Montana hoped that energetic campaigns and personality would lead to ticket-splitting by voters. King prevailed over Republican Charlie Summers and Democrat Cynthia Dill in the race to replace Republican Sen. Olympia Snowe, who blamed partisan gridlock in Washington for her unexpected decision to retire after 18 years in the Senate. In Ohio, Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown survived an onslaught of outside spending, some $30 million, to defeat state treasurer Josh Mandel. In Pennsylvania, Democratic Sen. Bob Casey survived a late scare from businessman Tom Smith, who invested more than $17 million of his own money in the race. Democratic Rep. Chris Murphy won the

AP photo

Joe Donnelly, Indiana Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate, casts his vote Tuesday in South Bend, Ind. Donnelly won the Senate seat that was held by Republican Richard Lugar, who lost in the primary to Richard Murdock.

Connecticut Senate seat held by Sen. Joe Lieberman, the independent who was the Democratic Party’s vice presidential nominee in 2000. Murphy’s win marked the second straight defeat for former wrestling executive Linda McMahon, who spent $50 million of her own wealth in a failed effort against Sen. Richard Blumenthal in 2010 and more than $42 million this election cycle. Texas sent tea party-backed Ted Cruz to the Senate as the Republican won the seat held by retiring GOP Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison. Cruz will become the third Hispanic in the Senate, joining Sen. Bob Menendez, D-N.J., and Marco Rubio, R-Fla. In Florida, Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson triumphed in his bid for a third term, holding off a challenge from Republican Rep. Connie Mack. Republican groups had spent heavily against Nelson early in the race, but the moderate Democrat was a prolific fundraiser with wide appeal among Democrats and some Republicans in the Panhandle. Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders won a second term in Vermont. Democratic Sens. Sheldon Whitehouse in Rhode Island, Ben Cardin in Maryland and Tom Carper in Delaware were all re-elected. Cruising to another term were Democratic Sens. Debbie Stabenow in Michigan, Kirsten Gillibrand in New York, Amy Klobuchar in Minnesota and Menendez in New Jersey. In West Virginia, Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin won a full term even though his state went heavily for Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Tennesseans gave Republican Sen. Bob Corker a second term. Wyoming voters did the same for Sen. John Barrasso, and Republican Roger Wicker captured another term in Mississippi. King has resolutely refused to say which party he’d side with if elected, and the outcome of the presidential election and the

final Senate lineup could influence his decision. Members of both parties have indicated that they expect King — the former governor and one-time Democrat who supports President Barack Obama — to align with Democrats. One factor could be the millionplus dollars that Republican-leaning groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and Karl Rove’s organization spent on ads criticizing King. The arithmetic was daunting for Democrats at the start of the election cycle — they had to defend 23 seats to the GOP’s 10. Further complicating the calculation were Democratic retirements in Virginia, Wisconsin, North Dakota, Hawaii, Nebraska and New Mexico as well as the retirement of Lieberman. Republicans had to deal with retirements in Arizona, Texas and Maine. Republican hopes of reclaiming the Senate suffered a major blow when the GOP candidate in Missouri made awkward remarks about rape and abortion. Democratic Sen. Claire McCaskill was considered the most vulnerable incumbent, but Republican Rep. Todd Akin severely damaged his candidacy in August when he said women’s bodies have ways of avoiding pregnancy in instances of “legitimate rape.” GOP leaders, including Romney, called on him to abandon the race. Akin stayed in and is counting on support from evangelicals to lift his prospects in a state that favors Romney. Democrats and Republicans in a dozen states faced an onslaught of outside money that financed endless negative commercials and ugly mailings that left voters exasperated. The record independent spending — $50 million in Virginia and $40 million in Wisconsin in addition to $33 million in Ohio — reflected the high-stakes fight for the Senate.


THE JOURNAL

GOP tries to pick up governors’ offices

The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page A5

BY JIM SUHR

ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS — North Carolina voters elected their first Republican governor in two decades Tuesday, fanning the GOP’s hope of broadening their party’s hold on governor’s mansions across the country. The victory by former Charlotte Mayor Pat McCrory came two years after Republicans snatched six governors’ offices in the midterm elections. Those victories gave the party 29 governorships to 20 for Democrats and one independent entering Tuesday’s elections in which 11 gubernatorial races were to be decided. When all the ballots are counted, Republicans could have as many as 33 governorships — the most since the 1920s and one more than they had in the 1990s. McCrory defeated Democratic Lt. Gov. Walter Dalton to become North Carolina’s first GOP chief executive since Jim Martin left office in early 1993. McCrory narrowly had lost his gubernatorial bid in 2008 to Democrat Beverly Perdue, who opted not to run this year. Indiana voters went with Republican Mike Pence, a 12-year congressman who defeated Democrat John Gregg and Libertarian Rupert Boneham to succeed GOP Gov. Mitch Daniels, who is barred by state law from seeking a third term. Democratic governors are leaving office in North Carolina, Montana, New Hampshire and Washington, raising Republican hopes that at least some of those offices can be flipped to the GOP. But New Hampshire’s governor’s mansion remained in Democratic hands Tuesday, as did those in Vermont, Delaware and West Virginia. Chief executives of conservative North Dakota and Utah stayed in the Republican column with Tuesday’s reelections of popular incumbents. They included Jack Dalrymple, who took over two years ago in North Dakota when John Hoeven resigned to move to the Senate. Dalrymple won his first full term, defeating rancher and Democratic state Sen. Ryan Taylor. Recent polls have shown a tight race in Washington state, where the GOP hasn’t occupied the governor’s mansion in more than three decades. The GOP also is competing in Missouri, the latter a state where national Republican and Democratic governors’ groups have poured millions into the race between Democratic incumbent Gov. Jay Nixon and Republican businessman rival Dave Spence. While federal elections often can be referendums on the national economy, statewide races are often decided by matters unique to those states, including whether voters like and trust a certain candidate, a national political observer said Monday. “The races for governor and races for senator are high-profile for each state, and the outcomes will be determined largely by the personalities of those candidates and the issues in those states,” said David Yepsen, director of the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute.

AP photo

People watch early election results displayed on a utility lift suspended from the front of the GE Building at Rockefeller Center New York on Tuesday.

Media careful with early coverage

N

BY DAVID BAUDER

AP TELEVISION WRITER

EW YORK — In an impatient age of social media and instant communication, a close presidential election Tuesday forced patience upon an army of journalists anxious for answers. Hours after some of the first polls closed, news organizations said most states that were considered true battlegrounds were too close to call. Burned eight years ago by early exit polls that proved misleading, there was care taken not to draw too many conclusions this time — partly, as CBS’ Bob Schieffer said, because many of the findings were contradictory. “This is going to be one of the great nail-biters tonight,” said Chris Matthews on MSNBC. Two of the three biggest broadcast networks had new leaders in place for presidential election night coverage. Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos teamed on ABC, and Scott Pelley led the CBS coverage. Brian Williams was back in the anchor seat at NBC. But 2012 was notable for the vast array of outlets that an interested consumer could command to create their own media experience on different screens, with websites offering deep drill-downs in data and social media hosting raucous conversations. A still-unclear picture early in the evening led to some tortured language on television. “We are not in receipt of any information that we’re trying to hint about,” said NBC’s Brian Williams before 9 p.m. EST. “All we’re saying is, if you’re in the Romney organization, you would probably like some of these battlegrounds to have closed by now, or very soon.”

“This is going to be one of the great nail-biters tonight.”

“Waffle cone, please,” Beck said. When ABC’s Diane Sawyer asked David Muir for the latest news from the Romney campaign, he reported the family had pasta for dinner and the candidate indulged in his favorite peanut butter and honey sandwich. Fox News was most insistent on warning its viewers not to draw too many conclusions from exit polls, yet conversely spent the most time taking direction from them. Commentator Bill O’Reilly said the Chris Matthews Romney campaign had decided to take no and ride out its victory in the first MSNBC chances debate until election day. That would have worked if it had not been for Sandy, which rendered Romney’s campaign invisible for News outlets carefully parsed informaseveral days because of storm coverage. tion and sometimes used the same facts for If Obama wins, “Sandy is one of the reacontradictory conclusions. sons,” he said. Fox News analyst Brit Hume noted an The media personality with perhaps the exit poll finding that 42 percent of voters most on the line was Nate Silver of The said Superstorm Sandy was an important New York Times, whose FiveThirtyEight factor in their vote, suggesting that was a blog was sought out by 20 percent of the positive for President Barack Obama people who visited the newspaper’s websince he was widely considered to have site Monday. He has used statistical data been effective in his response. With the throughout the campaign to predict an same information, the web site Politico Obama victory and by Tuesday, had foreheadlined: “Exit Survey: Sandy Not a cast a 90.9 percent chance that Obama Factor.” would win. On CBS, Scott Pelley noted that exit CNN’s Wolf Blitzer was an excitable polls and early returns in Ohio seemed to host, exclaiming “wow” when a close be breaking Obama’s way. Yet GOP strate- result popped on the screen. John King’s gist Karl Rove, a Fox analyst, used a white computer screen promoted confusion board to indicate county-by-county turnout because it painted states red or blue based results looked positive for Republican Mitt on incoming votes and not, as is usually the Romney. case, after the network had projected the “Nobody has made more out of more race. fragmentary returns,” Fox’s Chris Wallace On ABC, Diane Sawyer’s relaxed, said. folksy delivery drew social media attention. There was a certain amount of vamping The rock group They Might Be Giants for time. Glenn Beck’s online network, The tweeted: “and Diane Sawyer declares Blaze, had a blackboard straight out of the tonight’s winner is ... chardonnay!” 1960s as a tote board. Beck killed time on Four years after she was CBS’ top the air by asking for cookie dough ice anchor, talk show host Katie Couric joined cream from the on-set food bar. ABC to monitor social media reaction.

Ryan victorious in House election

BY DINESH RAMDE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE — Paul Ryan came up short in his vice presidential bid, but his backup plan worked. The Wisconsin congressman easily won re-election Tuesday night to the U.S. House seat he has held since 1998. He also won his previous congressional elections by comfortable margins.

Even before he was tapped as Mitt Romney’s No. 2, Ryan was seen as a rising star within the Republican Party. As chairman of the powerful House Budget Committee, he gained prominence when he drew up an austere budget blueprint that would reshape Medicare for many people into a voucher-like program. He also attracted attention for wanting to keep tax breaks in place that were set to expire for the wealthy.


EDITORIAL PAGE

Page A6 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

The Journal

WWW.JOURNAL-NEWS.NET

Serving the Tri-State Area Since 1907

Craig A. Bartoldson

Publisher cbartoldson@journal-news.net

Christopher Kinsler

School Reform Editor ckinsler@journal-news.net

Teachers unions should be on board with changes

Officials of West Virginia’s two big teachers’ unions found themselves in something of a quandary recently, regarding a study of the power wielded by such organizations in this and other states. On one hand, they were happy the report recognized how strong the unions are here. But on the other, they seemed apprehensive lest the public gain too much appreciation of their power. West Virginia has the 13th-strongest teachers’ unions in the country, according to a study by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and Education Reform Now. Some of the study indeed needs to be elaborated upon, as officials of the West Virginia Education Association and the state chapter of the American Federation of Teachers noted. For example, the report stated that in our state, employers — that is, county boards of education — contribute a relatively large amount to employees’ retirement accounts. As the union leaders explained, much of that is to pay down unfunded liabilities from the past, not to help teachers in the future. But teachers’ unions do make use of a tremendous amount of political clout in West Virginia. They have managed to stymie attempts to provide incentive pay for good teachers as well as geographic pay differentials that could help some border counties attract and retain educators now lured away by higher-paying states such as Virginia and Maryland. The unions have blocked a state charter school law as well as improved teacher evaulation methods. No one involved in Mountain State politics doubts the power the unions can bring to bear, especially against governors and legislators who cross them. Public school reform is likely to be high on the Legislature’s to-do list when lawmakers gather for the annual regular session in January. If teachers’ union officials are serious about their oft-repeated slogan that “it’s for the kids,” they will not block reforms necessary to improve schools.

TODAY IN HISTORY

Today is Wednesday, Nov. 7, the 312th day of 2012. There are 54 days left in the year. Today’s Highlight in History: On Nov. 7, 1972, President Richard Nixon was re-elected in a landslide over Democrat George McGovern. On this date: In 1811, U.S. forces led by Indiana Territory Gov. William Henry Harrison defeated warriors from Tecumseh’s Confederacy in the Battle of Tippecanoe. In 1861, former U.S. President John Tyler was elected to the Confederate House of Representatives (however, Tyler died before he could take his seat). In 1862, during the Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln replaced Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan as commander of the Army of the Potomac with Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside. In 1912, black boxing champion Jack Johnson was indicted in Chicago for allegedly violating the Mann Act with a white woman, Belle Schreiber. (Johnson was convicted and sentenced to a year in prison; he fled the U.S., later returning to serve his term.) In 1916, Republican Jeannette Rankin of Montana became the first woman elected to Congress. In 1944, President Franklin D. Roosevelt won an unprecedented fourth term in office, defeating Thomas E. Dewey. In 1962, Republican Richard Nixon, having lost California’s gubernatorial race, held what he called his “last press conference,” telling reporters, “You won’t have Nixon to kick around anymore.” In 1973, Congress overrode President Richard Nixon’s veto of the War Powers Act, which limits a chief executive’s power to wage war without congressional approval. In 1992, former Czechoslovak leader Alexander Dubcek, whose failed attempt to loosen the Communist grip on his country became known as the “Prague Spring,” died at age 70. Ten years ago: In his first news conference since the midterm elections, President George W. Bush, charting an agenda for the new Republican Congress, said that homeland security came first and that an economic-recovery plan with new tax cuts would wait until the next year. Dick Gephardt stepped down as House Democratic leader in the wake of his party’s election losses. Today’s Birthdays: Evangelist Billy Graham is 94. Actor Barry Newman is 74. Singer Johnny Rivers is 70. Singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell is 69. CIA Director David Petraeus is 60. Actor Christopher Knight (”The Brady Bunch”) is 55. Rock musician Tommy Thayer (KISS) is 52. Actress Julie Pinson is 45. Rock musician Greg Tribbett (Mudvayne) is 44. Actor Christopher Daniel Barnes is 40. Actors Jeremy and Jason London are 40. Actress Yunjin Kim is 39. Rock musician Zach Myers (Shinedown) is 29. Rapper Tinie Tempah is 24.

Letters to the Editor

Send letters via The Journal’s Virtual Newsroom at www.journal-news.net

Attorney General should investigate price gouging

tion for innovation and the reason we constantly strive to provide services that meet their changing needs. Customers are at the By David L. Van Middlesworth center of all we do. Martinsburg: A storm of this magnitude creates unique and unpredictable conditions. Our crews I left Martinsburg for Parkersburg last have been and continue to be committed to Thursday morning. Prior to leaving, I filled work safely and quickly to restore your my gas tank at $3.85/gal. When I arrived in broadband, telephone and other communicaParkersburg that afternoon, gas near my tion services. No act of nature will change motel was $3.45/gal. When I filled up on our commitment to you, so please let us Saturday before leaving, it was $3.42/gal. know how we can help you. Our contact When I arrived home in Martinsburg, gas was number is 1-877-854-1705. priced at $3.79/gal, a whopping 6-cent drop. Most gas comes from a refinery in Baltimore or even Philadelphia. Either way, it must be trucked farther to Parkersburg than to Martinsburg, unless they have constructed By Betty Miles a pipeline that I have not heard about. So, why the discrepancy in price? Evidently, the Martinsburg: Martinsburg gasoline cartel is alive and prosWith our electric off for hours, my huspering on the backs of everyone in this area. band and I relived the past “good old days” Maybe the attorney general should be when we were children at home with our investigating the price-fixing, which I parents. We had no electric in our houses believe is still supposed to be illegal. Or then, so we’re used to having kerosene maybe the other residents will continue to lamps for light at night. Well, kerosene lamp put their heads in the sand and ignore this is a good substitute for electric light. Our litprice gouging. tle radio provided music and news as we worked our word search puzzle books and heard updates on Hurricane Sandy. As we prepared for bed by flashlight, our prayer to God is let there be light. By Theodore Sean Michael Pickett Martinsburg:

Storm allowed for a trip back to ‘good old days’

Scientists should look into gravity for power

Instead of continuing to spend massive dollar amounts on maintaining the energy status quo, continuing to pour dollars into energy collection that still centers on fossil fuels, why don’t the scientists look to gravity for a power source? After all, gravity is present everywhere in the universe. It’s actually the ultimate power source for the universe. It is what keeps our sun round, and is the force that moves the earth and all her sister planets in their orbits around the sun. It is free, non-polluting, exists all around us and why aren’t laboratories around the U.S. filled with new-age scientists working to solve the problems that are created by harnessing free gravity? The brain trusts that are found in our best institutions should concentrate their research on harnessing gravity and creating gravity motors to power all our vehicles, from motor scooters to space flight vehicles.

If you’re pro-life, your actions should prove it By Virginia Lynch Graf, D. Min Charles Town:

Politicians who claim to be pro-life should prove it! Before I make my argument, I begin by saying a pro-life label is an oxymoron. Who isn’t for life? I believe this label is used primarily to denigrate political opponents. So, those who insist on calling themselves pro-life should clearly stand up for all life. Pro-life has to be more than denying victims of rape access to Medicaidfunded abortions, or insisting that a rape victim did all in her power to fight the aggressor, or forcing women to undergo transvaginal ultrasounds, or insisting on an unbelievable assault on contraceptives. Pro-life has to embrace a quality of life in America for all from beginning to end. If you claim to be pro-life, do you advocate an increase in minimum wage so that both parents don’t have to work two jobs each and leave children unattended? Do you stand for the Paycheck Fairness Act so that equal pay is given for equal work? Pro-life stands for Ken Arndt, president — East Region strengthening the Violence Against Women Frontier Communications Act, not weakening it as the Republicans voted this year. Pro-life would not misuse The brutal effects of Hurricane Sandy the filibuster to block job creation bills as claimed lives, destroyed property and disthe country suffered a terrible recession. rupted life and commerce across much of Pro-life would not reverse Obamacare, the the eastern United States, including West Affordable Care Act, which says you can’t Virginia. The men and women of Frontier deny medical service because of a pre-existCommunications have been involved in ing condition. A decent healthcare system ongoing recovery efforts. with the individual mandate assures every citI thank our devoted employees, most of izen quality care. if we reverse the achievewhom are represented by the Communicaments made on healthcare in the USA, we are tion Workers of America and the Internaputting insurance companies back in charge tional Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. of who gets care and who doesn’t. They have worked around the clock to keep Pro-life would not disparage the investour facilities operating even during proments that senior citizens made as entitlelonged commercial power outages. Our ments and deny senior citizens their benefits. technicians struggled through deep snow Pro-lifers would not claim that the top 1 perand debris to deploy generators and backup cent are severely overtaxed and need relief, batteries to keep telecommunication faciliwhile denying the working poor and those ties functioning. They used chain saws to who rely on Medicare/Medicaid assistance. gain access to our facilities to repair damMost Medicaid money goes to pay for elderly aged and severed fiber and telecommunica- care. Pro-lifers would stand up to the fossil tions lines. They risked their well-being and fuel industry in West Virginia and across left their families to serve all of our cusAmerica to demand a healthy relationship to tomers, especially critical facilities such as the environment. As long as we allow fossil 911 emergency centers and hospitals. fuel industries to take charge, we are heading Our call center representatives have for catastrophic environmental collapse. Look worked with customers to coordinate our how often we now have these horrific storms! response. They have heard our customers’ Pro-lifers would not allow schools to sufstories and truly understand the magnitude fer continual cuts to education so that evenof this historic storm. They live in the com- tually only the wealthy have access to qualimunities Frontier serves and are feeling the ty education and job opportunities. Pro-lifers effects of Sandy first-hand. would stand for the unions which created a Most of all, I thank our customers for more equitable way of sharing our natural their understanding and patience during this resources. Prolife means facing the huge difficult time. Our customers are our inspira- problem of human trafficking across the

Frontier crews working to repair Sandy damage

country. Pro-life does not advocate war under the guise of patriotism when often the rush to war is based on economic interests. The U.S. Constitution charges us to provide for the general welfare of our citizens. The Judeo-Christian tradition and every other religion in the USA has a version of the Golden Rule — “Do unto others as you would have them do to you.” A pro-life claim would be credible if politicians took this to heart.

Leaders must regain vision of ‘The American Dream’ By Eric L. Kerns Martinsburg:

I realize the election is over, but wouldn’t it have been interesting to ask the presidential candidates this question: “What do you believe is “The American Dream?” I believe most Americans have lost sight of the true definition of “The American Dream.” For those who fought in the Revolutionary War, “The Dream” became something to protect and something worth fighting for. Without them, we would have a different “Dream” for sure. Then the Civil War tested our notion of who could have access to this dream. Thank God for the courage and conviction of those who believed that the dream was not just for those of a particular race or creed. The dream allowed our great grandparents and grandparents to invent, to create and to build businesses. They fought two world wars to insure that the “Dream” would live on. For people of these early generations an understanding of “The American Dream” was simple and yet profound. They fought and gave their lives so that their children would be able to go on living “The Dream.” Somewhere in the previous generation, we began to confuse the definition of “The Dream” with the prosperity that results from it. Somewhere the conversation turned from the ability to work to how much one made. Somewhere the definition of “fairness” changed from equal opportunity to equal results. Somewhere, and over a period of time, “The Dream” came to mean something different altogether. Today, I fear that the answer to the question in the first paragraph for many people, including many of our politicians, would be “a home of your own,” or “a high-paying job,” or “money in the bank,” or “that my kids have it easier than I did.” There is nothing wrong with any of those things, but they are not “The American Dream!” The American Dream is the freedom to speak, to think, to work, to pray, to worship, to criticize your government, to build your own business, to care for others and to share with them the prosperity that resulted from “The American Dream.” I pray that our leaders regain a correct perspective on “The American Dream” before those who are inspired by it seek a new country in which to “Dream.”

Student looking for help on West Virginia project By Justin N. Pawtucket, R.I.:

I am writing to you to say hello from Rhode Island. I’m a seventh-grader that goes to Goff Junior High in Pawtucket, R.I. In my geography class, we are working on a long project in which we are responsible for creating an oral, written and poster project on a particular U.S. state. Could you please publish this letter in your paper so that your readers could help me on my project? My teacher explained that first-hand information from citizens of our chosen state would be more helpful than information we find off the Internet and books. If your readers could send me some information, pictures or tourist information to my school, it would help me so much. Thank you for your help with my report and project. Editor’s note: The school address is Goff Junior High, Attn. Justin N., 974 Newport Ave., Pawtucket, RI 02861.


JOURNAL JUNCTION

The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

Editor’s note: Journal Junction offers the public a forum to applaud successes, discuss issues, point out problems and review the events of the day in a constructive manner. Journal Junction comments should be limited to two to four sentences and be no longer than 80 words. Longer comments should be submitted as “Letters to the Editor,” which is a separate forum. The Journal's classified ads section offers help to those with lost or found items. This is a sampling of comments received today. Any others, subject to editing, are published in the online Journal Junction at www.journalnews.net under opinions.

From Jefferson County: The biggest wastes in the state of West Virginia are the regions, Region 9 and Region 8. They all have big salaries. They have forecut people in staff and all they do is give out awards and they don’t really do anything, yet they get tremendous wages, which is never reported in the newspaper.

From Martinsburg: The Martinsburg Post Office is a complete joke. Carriers can’t read correct addresses, deliver mail to wrong homes, no stamps in the stamp machines and long lines with not enough help at the windows.

From Berkeley County: I just received a phone call from “Microsoft” that they were receiving error messages from my computer. This is a scam to seize control of your computer and steal your identity and address list. Microsoft does not care what happens when you buy their software unless you call them for tech support.

From Inwood: I am mortified by the inadequacy of the voting setup at Valley View. They didn’t have enough power cords for the voting booths, thus causing them to have to link all booths together. In turn, people had to walk behind everyone else, once they were done, while people continued to vote. So much for confidentiality. To me, that’s just icky.

From Harpers Ferry: “Children are to be seen, not heard.” Enough said. To reach Journal Junction, call 304-263-3381, Ext. 333, 800-448-1895, Ext. 333, or send your comments via The Journal’s Virtual Newsroom at www.journal-news.net

Biggest late poll problem long lines in key states Voters cast their ballots on Election Day Tuesday at R.S. Payne Elementary School in Lynchburg, Va.

BY CURT ANDERSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Voters in key states such as Florida and Virginia waited in long lines hours after polls closed Tuesday night to cast ballots, even as politicians and their supporters urged them not to give up despite the long delays. Candidates turned to social media to encourage voters through the long wait. “#StayInLine #StayInLine #StayInLine” Wisconsin Democratic Senate candidate Tammy Baldwin tweeted. The three states allow voters who were in line when polls closed to cast ballots. High turnout rather than glitches or problems appeared to be the cause of the long lines, but there were plenty of other problems around the country. Many were in Pennsylvania, including a confrontation involving Republican inspectors over access to some polls and a voting machine that lit up for Republican Mitt Romney even when a voter pressed the button for President Barack Obama. One Florida elections office mistakenly told voters in robocalls the election was Wednesday. The Election Protection coalition of civil rights and voting access groups said they had gotten more than 80,000 complaints and

E st.1918

questions on a toll-free voter protection hotline. “The calls have been hot and heavy all day long,” said Barbara Arnwine, president of the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law. Aside from the lines and other scattered problems with voter access and machine failures, there didn’t appear to be any wholesale disenfranchisement of voters, few tense confrontations among poll monitors and no major instances of election fraud. “Despite the shameful attempts to suppress voting, voters are standing up,” said Bob Edgar, president and chief executive of Common Cause. Still, Election Day was far from glitch-free. And voters faced a whole different set of challenges in parts of New York and New Jersey ravaged by Superstorm Sandy. In Philadelphia, the Republican Party said 75 legally credentialed voting inspectors were blocked from polling places in the heavily Democratic city, prompting the GOP to obtain a court order providing them access. Local prosecutors were also looking into the reports. Democratic Party officials did not immediately return a message seeking comment.

Also in Pennsylvania, Department of State spokesman Ron Ruman said the voting machine in the central part of the state that switched a person’s vote from Obama to Romney has been recalibrated and is back in service. Video of what Ruman called a “momentary glitch” was widely viewed on YouTube. Pennsylvania was also the scene of what a state Common Cause official called “widespread” confusion over voter ID requirements. The state this year enacted a new photo ID requirement, but it was put on hold for Tuesday’s election by a judge amid concern many voters would not be able to comply in time. Barry Kauffman, executive director of Common Cause in Pennsylvania, said election workers in many places were demanding IDs even though they are not required. It was unclear, however, just how many voters may have been turned away or discouraged. Also in Philadelphia, a judge ordered a mural of Obama covered up after a Republican election worker snapped a picture of it at a school polling place, according to a statement from the Republican Party. The battleground state of Ohio was the scene of yet another court battle, this one

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involving a lawsuit claiming voting software installed by the state could allow manipulation of ballots by people not connected to official election boards. A judge, however, flatly dismissed a lawsuit seeking to stop use of the software. The Florida robocall glitch occurred in Pinellas County, where the supervisor of elections said about 12,000 voters were wrongly told they could vote Wednesday. Spokeswoman Nancy Whitlock said the office had contracted with a company called callfire.com to call voters who had requested mail ballots but had not yet returned them. Whitlock said calls went to those voters without a problem Thursday, and then again Monday. Back in Ohio, officials in Franklin County — where the capital city of Columbus is located — barred the tea party-linked True the Vote group from monitoring polling places because applications to do so weren’t filed properly. Catherine Engelbrecht, president of the Houstonbased group, claimed the Ohio Democratic Party was behind pressure that led several local Ohio candidates to withdraw their permission for the group’s members to act as election observers.

AP photo

Elsewhere, the Election Protection coalition reported problems with ballot scanners in the Ohio cities of Cleveland, Dayton and Toledo; late-opening polling places in minority neighborhoods in Galveston, Texas; and some precincts in the Tampa, Fla., area where voters were redirected to another polling place where they must cast a provisional ballot. Both political parties in Nebraska accused each other of voter disenfranchisement after a woman claimed she was handed a ballot already filled out for Romney and Republican Rep. Lee Terry — a situation elections officials chalked up to a mistake. The GOP, meanwhile, contended some voters were being falsely told in recorded phone calls that they were ineligible to cast ballots. In New Orleans, advocates said they received several complaints from large Vietnamese American communities that in at least three major polling places, language services were not being provided to voters needing help with translations. Of particular concern were several proposed constitutional amendments and ballot initiatives, said Jennifer Coco, a volunteer field director with the Louisiana Election Protection Program.

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Page A8 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

FIVE-DAY FORECAST

gToday

gTonight

WEATHER

TRI-STATE WEATHER FORECAST gThursday

gFriday

gSaturday

gSunday

Cloudy

Cloudy

Partly cloudy

Sunny

Mostly sunny

Sunny

HIGH: 44∂

LOW: 34∂

HIGH: 51∂ LOW: 32∂

HIGH: 56∂ LOW: 34∂

HIGH: 59∂ LOW: 39∂

HIGH: 59∂ LOW: 42∂

National forecast Forecast highs for Wednesday, Nov. 7

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

W E S T

Cloudy

OHIO

V I R G I N I A PA.

Wheeling 46° | 28°

Morgantown 46° | 30°

Brandon Jefferson Academy

Charleston 54° | 34° Fronts Cold

-0s

0s

Showers

10s

Rain

20s 30s 40s

T-storms

Pressure

Warm Stationary

50s 60s

70s

Flurries

80s

Low

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Bluefield 46° | 27°

Snow

Cumberland 46° | 30° Washington 45° | 39°

W.VA.

Bristol 55° | 37°

Roanoke 54° | 34°

Washington 41° | 32°

Richmond 48° | 36°

N.C.

The Nick Family Harpers Ferry, WV Salesman: Dave Wilt

Police: Shooting suspectwas‘methodical’

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — A parolee who killed two people and wounded two others on Tuesday at a California chicken processing plant where he worked moved methodically between his first three victims, putting a handgun against their head or neck before pulling the trigger, police said. Lawrence Jones shot 32year-old Fatima Lopez in the back as she tried to flee then put the gun to the head of Estevan Catano and pulled the trigger but was out of bullets, Fresno Police Chief Jerry Dyer said. Jones, 42, then went outside the Valley Protein plant, where he reloaded his gun, shot himself and died later at a hospital, the chief said. The victims inside the plant did not hear the shooter because it was loud and at least some of them wore noise protectors, Dyer said. “He had opportunity to shoot other co-workers that were in the business at this time, but he chose not to,” Dyer said. “He walked around them in order to get very close to the intended targets, place the gun very close and fire a round.”

NYC fears looting as new storm threatens

NEW YORK (AP) — Richard Chan prowled around his cold, dark Staten Island home with knives and a sword to protect it from thieves, standing his ground as another East Coast storm threatened and police went through neighborhoods with loudspeakers warning people to get out. “I still have some valuables. I just can’t leave it,” he said Tuesday. “I just don’t want to lose my stuff to some dirtbag.” While city officials strongly encouraged stormravaged communities to seek higher ground before today’s nor’easter, Chan was among a group who adamantly refused to leave, choosing to stick close to the belongings they have left.

Norfolk 50° | 48° © 2012 Wunderground.com

PA. Hagerstown 43° | 30°

Wilmington 45° | 37°

N.J. Baltimore 45° | 41°

W.VA.

Charlottesville 45° | 36°

KY.

© 2012 Wunderground.com

M A R Y L A N D

Ice

PA.

OHIO

VA.

90s 100s 110s

V I R G I N I A

TENN.

Beckley 48° | 28°

KY.

Dover 48° | 41° Salisbury 46° | 43°

VA.

Accomac 52° | 43°

© 2012 Wunderground.com

Crystal Radcliffe Inwood, WV Salesman: Brett Wright

NATION

AROUND THE

day: A new storm that threatened to complicate Hurricane Sandy cleanup efforts today now looks like it will be weaker than expected. As the storm moves up the Atlantic coast from Florida it now is expected to veer farther offshore than earlier proSince the superstorm jections had indicated. Jeff made landfall more than a week ago, killing 40 people Masters of the private weather service Weather Underin the city, more than 100 ground says that means less in 10 states and leaving wind and rainfall on land. millions without power, Even so, he said winds police said overall crime has actually gone down, not could still gust to 50 mph in up. There are few reports of New York and New Jersey this afternoon and evening. looting storm-damaged And Lauren Nash, a metehomes. orologist from the National But Alex Ocasio wasn’t Weather Service, said wind convinced. The nursing gusts might blow down tree home worker planned to limbs weakened from Sandy ride out the latest storm in and cause more power outhis first-floor Rockaway apartment — even after see- ages. Tonight, gusts may occasionally reach 60 mph in ing cars float by his front coastal Connecticut and Long door during Sandy. Island, she said. As the water receded, New Jersey Gov. Chris men dressed in dark clothes Christie warned Tuesday that broke down the door and high winds may mean some were surprised to find him residents who regained and other residents inside. “They tried to say they were power will lose it again, and the wind could also slow rescue workers, then took efforts to restore power. off,” he said. There is “nothing we can do the storms,” he said. Good news for coast: to stop Storm surges along the Nor’easter to weaken coasts of New Jersey and NEW YORK (AP) — New York are expected to Weather experts had good reach perhaps 3 feet, only news for beleaguered northhalf to a third of what Hurrieast coastal residents Tuescane Sandy caused last week,

ALMANAC

Statistics for Martinsburg as of 8 p.m. yesterday

gTemperature High Low Normal Normal Record Record

high low high (2004-08) low (1930-62)

44∂ 24∂ 56∂ 35∂ 71∂ 19∂

24 hours Month to date Average for the month Year to date Year to end of month

0.00” 0.00” 2.89” 28.63” 34.95”

gPrecipitation

gNational Cities

Martinsburg 43° | 30°

Huntington 57° | 39°

-10s

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

gTri-state forecast West Virginia: Today will be cloudy with a high of 44. Tonight will be cloudy with a low of 34. Virginia: Today will be cloudy with a high of 43. Tonight will be cloudy with a low of 34. Maryland: Today will be cloudy with a high of 43. Tonight will be cloudy with a low of 35. Pollen Count: 0.1/Low

. JOURNALWWW

NEWS

.NET

Visit our website for additional weather information: 14-day extended forecast, radar maps, satellite photos, current conditions, useful weather information.

CITY HIGH Anchorage 25 Atlanta 54 Boston 44 Chicago 48 Cleveland 48 Dallas 76 Denver 71 Honolulu 84 Miami 77 New Orleans 71 New York 41 San Francisco 67

gSun and Moon Sunrise today Sunset today Moonrise today Moonset today

gMoon Phases New

First

6:47 5:04 11:41 1:10

Full

Nov 13 Nov 20 Nov 28

James Reynolds Hay Market, VA Salesman: Woody Scarborough

Masters said. While that should produce only minor flooding, he said it will still cause some erosion problems along the New Jersey coast and the shores of Long Island, where Sandy destroyed some protective dunes. In New York City, Mayor Mike Bloomberg said people who remained in some in extremely flood-prone areas would be asked to leave their homes voluntarily “out of precaution.” The city ordered construction stopped and parks closed for the upcoming storm. Coastal Virginia could also get a surge of 2 or 3 feet, causing minor flooding on the east side of Chesapeake Bay during high tides Wednesday morning and evening, Masters said. However, most of the storm’s rain will stay offshore, with maybe an inch or two expected in Massachusetts and less than an inch elsewhere along the coast, he said. Up to an inch of snow may fall in northeastern New Jersey and the lower Hudson River valley, weather service meteorologist Mike Layer said. Central Massachusetts and western Connecticut also could get an inch or two of snow, according to Masters.

LOW FCST 10 sun 36 rain 37 rain 35 cldy 32 cldy 49 sun 46 sun 72 cldy 54 sun 48 sun 35 rain 53 cldy

Authorities: 1 dead, 3 injured in hospital fire

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Preliminary information indicates a spark and fire at a North Carolina hospital that killed a patient and injured three workers occurred during a defibrillation, a procedure typically used to deliver an electric shock to the heart, according to authorities. Spokesman Jim Jones of the state Department of Health and Human Services didn’t elaborate on the specifics of what happened. He said in an email that both the spark and fire took place during a defibrillation early Tuesday at Durham Regional Hospital. Defibrillation is generally used to re-establish a normal heart rhythm. Fire officials investigating the blaze have not said what caused the fire. A Durham Regional Hospital spokeswoman said the fire was limited to one room of Select Specialty Hospital, a separately licensed acute care facility that leases space on the hospital’s sixth floor and has 30 beds. The fourth and fifth floors also suffered water damage, authorities said. Twenty-two patients of Select Specialty and about 20 Durham Regional patients were moved to other rooms, said

a.m. p.m. p.m. p.m.

Last Dec 6

Jill Eyler Martinsburg, WV Salesman: Dave Wilt

Kellie Peacock, marketing director at Durham Regional. The fire was reported about 2:15 a.m. When firefighters arrived, the hospital sprinkler system had extinguished the blaze. Hospital officials were investigating exactly how the fire occurred and just where it began, said Katie Galbraith, Durham Regional’s chief of operations. The patient who died was critically ill, Peacock said. The medical examiner will determine the timing and cause of the patient’s death, she added. Two Select Specialty employees and one employee of Duke University Health System were injured, she said. The names of the dead and injured were not immediately released. Durham Regional is a 369-bed acute care hospital.


REGION [The Journal]

B1 PAGE

WWW.JOURNAL-NEWS.NET

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Obituaries B3

A Gamble on Question 7

7 7 7 Local officials look for next step after bill

BY MICHELLE HORST

games to its existing five casinos. The language of the ballot question indicates the “primary purpose” of adding table games at the five existing CHARLES TOWN — The ballot Maryland casinos and adding a sixth Question 7 in Maryland passed after casino in Price George’s County, Md., the unofficial vote tally Tuesday would be for education. evening, and West Virginia officials “This all started in West Virginia,” immediately will look to what necesSnyder said of Maryland, Ohio and sary steps will have to be taken. Sen. Herb Snyder of the 16th Sena- Pennsylvania’s gaming legislation. Penn National, owners of the Hollytorial District, said this legislation is a wood Casino at Charles Town Races, copy of what West Virginia already had, and because it was so successful, has invested more than $400 million at Charles Town, according to Snyder, Maryland went on to copy that in and he believes the company will gambling – and now it will add table JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

work to protect its investment. “We will compete head to head with Maryland,” Snyder said. “Is it helpful? No, it’s not. But we will compete with them,” he said. According to the West Virginia Lottery, $6.4 million is expected for the Board of Education, counties and municipalities this year, with $4 million going to the Jefferson County Board of Education. Penn National states on its website that lost revenue from Maryland competition will affect the amount available to state funds and education.

Maryland approves gambling expansion

ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Maryland voters have passed a ballot measure to expand gambling in the state. The vote for Question 7 on Tuesday came after the most expensive political advertising campaign in Maryland's history. More than $90 million was spent on television and radio ads. Gov. Martin O'Malley called a special session in August to take up the gambling expansion to allow table games like blackjack and a casino near the nation's capital. Lawmakers approved the legislation, which required voter approval. Supporters say they voted for the ballot question to keep Maryland gamblers from spending their money in neighboring states like Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Opponents say they voted against the expansion because they did not believe the money would be used for education as lawmakers have said. VOTERS ON TUESDAY ALSO approved allowing illegal immigrants who meet certain criteria to pay in-state tuition at public colleges, making Maryland the first state in the nation to pass by popular vote a version of the Dream Act. Illegal immigrants can pay in-state rates if they attend a Maryland high school for three years and if they or their parents can show they filed state income taxes during that time. "We rejoice and give praise that Marylanders pushed our state out in front as a beacon to other states and to our president in how we treat the stranger in our midst," said Bishop Douglas Miles, chair of the Maryland Industrial Areas Foundation. It is a consortium of Maryland congregations, schools and community groups that has been a strong supporter of the ballot question. Kevin Bruffey, a 35-year-old Cockeysville resident, said the Dream Act would bring financial consequences. He described Maryland as already being a "sanctuary state" for illegal immigrants due to other laws, and he said this law will draw more to the state. "It's going to be a huge burden for the taxpayer," Bruffey said. Maryland residents faced a variety of highprofile ballot questions this year, including whether to allow same-sex marriage. Votes were very close.

See GAMING B2

Shirley wins second term as sheriff C

S

CHALRES TOWN — With the end of his 12th year in the state Senate coming to a close, Sen. Herb Snyder will again be returning to his long-held Senate seat for another four-year term. Snyder gathered 20,434 votes, with opposing Republican candidate Jim Ruland ending with 17,450 votes in the senatorial district that includes portions of both Jefferson and Berkeley counties. “I am humbled once again. I’m always humbled to win an election,” Snyder said. “I don’t know if it’s all the work that I’ve done or reflection of my reputation in Charleston, that I think is pretty good, but I’m very, very pleased,” he said. Currently serving as the Chairman of the Senate Government Organizations Committee, a position that he said brings more weight into the Eastern Panhan-

See SNYDER B2

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BY MICHELLE HORST

W.VA. SENATE 16TH DISTRICT

E P U B L I C A N

Snyder re-elected to state senate

50.7%√

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CHARLES TOWN — Incumbent Jefferson County Sheriff Robert E. “Bobby” Shirley won a second four-year term as sheriff after besting his Republican opponent in a close race during Tuesday’s general election. With all 32 Jefferson County precincts reporting, unofficial results show the 61-year-old Democrat, who was indicted in June by a federal grand jury. won his re-election bid with 50.71 per-

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JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

49.3%

for me for their support and belief in me, and, outside of that, Earl EFFERSON OUNTY HERIFF Ballenger ran a good, clean campaign. I’m appreciative of that, and Earl Bobby I’m appreciative of the fact that the voters still support me and believe Ballenger Shirley in me,” Shirley said Tuesday night. Ballenger won 48.78 percent of the vote and earned a total of 10,216 votes, according to the unofficial results. The remaining .51 percent of the vote, or 106 total votes, went to write-in candidates. cent percent of the vote, earning a opponent, Earl Ballenger, by 404 Ballenger thanked those who total of 10,620 votes. The unoffivotes. voted for him and supported him in cial results show Shirley beating his “I want to thank those who voted

D

BY EDWARD MARSHALL

53.9√% Herb Snyder

46.1% Jim Ruland

the election. “I’d like to thank those people. I’m a little disappointed in the outcome, but people made their voice heard and they chose the incumbent. Other than that, I don’t really have a whole lot to say,” Ballenger said Tuesday night.. A native of Jefferson County, Shirley was first hired as a deputy in 1981 and attended the West Virginia State Police Academy in 1982. During his career with the sheriff’s department he worked his way

See SHIRLEY B2

Confusion, long lines irk voters during election BY HOLLY SHOK

experience. “I was one who also got moved to a new district and polling place with no MARTINSBURG — Berkeley County notice from the county,” said Catlett. voters faced more than just long lines on “Went to three places because poll workers didn’t have correct info either. This Election Day. Some encountered confuhappened to many, many people at Mussion in knowing where to cast their balselman High, where I finally ended up. lots. Various comments posted on The Jour- Once I got to the right place, only in line nal’s Facebook page — detailing waits of 30 minutes. But all the runaround was very frustrating. Epic fail by Berkeley more than an hour and experiences of designated precinct commotion — served County. Lots of voters in the wrong to sum up the day’s various voter frustra- places,” Catlett posted. According to Chief Deputy of Elections. tions Bonnie Woodfall, the designated “They changed my polling place. No voting precinct of many residents has notification. I was talking to people in changed since the Oct. 4, 2011, general line and this was the 3rd polling place that they were sent,” Penni Moler posted. election. A redistricting was completed Erika Shiflet Catlett shared a similar See VOTERS B2 JOURNAL STAFF WRITER


REGION

Lawrence earns narrow victory

Page B2 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

STATE DELEGATE 65TH DISTRICT

Voters

48% Jill Upson

have shown that they believe in my record,” Lawrence said. leadership abilities and my proven She acknowledged what she

FROM PAGE B1

before the primary elections and voters, she said, would have received their new registration cards in the mail between March and April. “I don’t know what people did with their cards,” she said. Woodfall said the confusion can simply be chalked up to residents ignoring their mail. “They kept the old card and didn’t bother to open the new one,” she said. “And didn’t vote in the primary, evidently.” Voters phoning into the Berkeley County voter registration office seeking their correct voting location after finding the one they had reported to was incorrect, were located in the computer system and directed to their designated precinct, Woodfall said. “We are giving out correct information,” she said. A list of polling places was available on the Berkeley County Council website prior to the election. Though according to Erica Epperson, of Martinsburg, some of the information — specifically the voting location designated to precinct 49 — was incorrect. Epperson said she has been a registered voter since 1992. Her assigned voting location has subsequently changed with moves she has made throughout the area. Most recently she was redistricted and designated to vote at Faith Christian Academy, as part of precinct 49, where she subsequently voted in the primary election. Today, however, when Epperson reported to Faith Christian Academy, she only saw signs directing voters comprising precinct 13. Epperson said she was told by poll workers that her designated polling location was Spring Mills Primary School.

52%√

Tiffany Lawrence

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BY RACHEL MOLENDA

CHARLES TOWN — Just 282 votes separated Democratic incumbent Tiffany Lawrence and firsttime candidate Jill Upson in the race for the 65th district of the West Virginia House of Delegates. Lawrence, who will begin her third term as delegate in January, said she was delighted at the news of her re-election. “I am sincerely humbled once again to see that my constituents

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

“The odd thing was they had the log facing the poll worker and they had everyone there sign it upside down. I am only hoping they won’t consider that as an invalid signature.” Penny Moler

referred to as “out-of-state money and negativity” that threatened her campaign, and said she believed “good prevails.” “I’m glad that my voters have educated themselves on the issues and me, as a legislator and as a candidate,” Lawrence said. Among her top priorities are increasing communication between her constituents and her office in Charleston, as well as working to make West Virgina’s budgetary process more transparent. “I have a long laundry list of

Q U E S T I O N He said even though the display wasn’t endorsed by either candidate, he felt the display sent a message to all of the precinct’s voters. Segraves said he contacted Jefferson County clerks who responded that they would look into it. In addition to polling location confusion, Moler also questioned polling place practices. “The odd thing was they had the log facing the poll worker and they had everyone there sign it upside down. I am only hoping they won’t consider that as an invalid signature. Also, I was the only one in line that they asked for a driver’s license that I noticed. They may have asked others. When I got home I wished I had turned the book around to sign,” Moler posted. Some of the day’s grievances were not so serious, rather merely bizarre — at least according to Dave Blankenship of Bakerton. “It was a little weird,” he said. “I’ve voted at the same polling area since 2002.” But yesterday, Blankenship — part of the A through K voting lineup — was processed as soon as he entered the Bethel United Methodist Church polling precinct, even though a line of approximately 25 voters — part of the L through Z voting lineup — sprawled ahead of him. Blankenship questioned poll clerks as to why his alphabetical standing granted him superiority. They did not have answers, he said. “I’ve never had an experience before where there was such a disorganization of people waiting in line,” Blankenship said. “It seems to be a statistical anomaly.”

Epperson, who doubted she would have time to travel to the polling place prior to work, encountered another precinct 49 voter in the same situation. Epperson said the other voter reported to SMPS and found that he was referred back to Faith Christian Academy. Upon investigation, poll clerks found Epperson’s name on their registered voter list and she was able to cast her ballot. “I think that to make that type of mistake, it’s almost fraudulent in a lot of ways,” she said. “I have a feeling that I am one of several hundred.” Epperson was asked by friends why she didn’t choose to early-vote to avoid Election Day hassle. “I don’t have Thanksgiving dinner on Wednesday. I don’t open my presents on Christmas Eve. I want to vote on Election Day,” Epperson said. “I like the atmosphere. It’s a tradition.” Eddie Segraves, of Ranson, said he witnessed potential voting violations at his designated precinct, Ranson Elementary School in Jefferson County. Segraves said a classroom project — a student mockelection between the two - Staff writer Holly Shok main presidential party candidates, Barack Obama and can be reached at 304-2633381, ext. 131, or Mitt Romney, featuring a hshok@journal-news.net. winner — was on display.

Anthony Bencivenga “Tell you the truth, I’m not a big fan of gambling or the whole casino lifestyle because I’ve seen what it’s brought to this area. I’ve seen crime go up. It just doesn’t feel like home anymore.”

7 :

W H A T

Doug Mayne Being originally from Maryland and now residing in Charles Town, Maryland dropped the ball, this is something they should have done 10 years ago. Without the table slots, the racetrack would not have survived.

Gaming

T H E Y ’ R E

Lindsey Monroe “I’m still on the fence about that one. I get what everybody is saying about (being) iffy on if the money would really go to the teachers and the schools. You want what’s promised to you.”

ing elected officials to be suspended from office once convicted of certain crimes and removed automatically if they plead guilty or no contest. That tightens current law, which only removes someone from office at sentencing. The tuition measure,

FROM PAGE B1

up the ranks from being a road deputy to a sergeant and was later promoted to a lieutenant before retiring in 2006 with more than 25 years of experience. After retiring, he was hired by the U.S. Customs Border and Protection Advanced Training Center in Harpers Ferry. He was the lead supervisor for security there for 2 1/2 years before being elected sheriff in 2008 and taking office in 2009. Shirley is currently awaiting trial in federal court after being indicted earlier this year on one count of deprivation of rights under the

Snyder

- Staff writer Rachel Molenda can be reached at 3004-263-8931, ext. 215, or rmolenda@journalnews.net.

FROM PAGE B1

On a separate ballot question, Maryland voters approved the state's congressional redistricting map. It had been petitioned to the ballot by opponents who said it had been gerrymandered to favor Democrats. Voters also passed a constitutional amendment requir-

Shirley

bills that I’m currently working on that I’m hoping to bring to fruition this year,” Lawrence added. With her continued representation of Jefferson County, Lawrence said she is excited to get back to Charleston. “There’s a lot more work to be done, and I’m going to hit the ground running,” she said.

color of law and falsifying a document with the intent to obstruct a federal investigation of an alleged Dec. 27, 2010, beating of convicted bank robber Mark Daniel Haines following a police pursuit. His defeated challenger, Ballenger, is also a native of Jefferson County and served 24 years with the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department before retiring in 2009. Ballenger graduated from Harpers Ferry High School in 1967. After high school, he enlisted in the U.S. Army for three years and received an honorable discharge. He

FROM PAGE B1

dle’s voice in Charleston. Snyder also serves as part of the Senate Rules Committee. “It’s our turn,” Snyder said of the Eastern Panhandle. “That, aside any issue – roads or taxes or healthcare – it’s our time,” he said. According to Snyder, West Virginia’s bond rating has been increased by Wall Street; the state has addressed every long term debt it had; and has lowered taxes through fiscal responsibility. Before the election, Snyder disagreed with his Republican challenger, in that the state is

not a mess to clean up, and he is proud of the state and the work that Sen. Joe Manchin and Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin have done in reference to fiscal responsibility. “It’s very easy to stand outside when you’re promoting yourself in the political campaign. I think it’s shameless to say how bad West Virginia is. I dare say that West Virginia is in the best managerial and fiscal shape it’s been in the history of the state,” Snyder said in a previous interview with The Journal. Although he said this has been a “rough” election

S A Y I N G

Stephen Staub “I think it’s fine. I think if (Marylanders) want to have it, more power to them. I don’t think it provides as much in business and industry as people think it does.”

signed by Gov. Martin O'Malley last year, was the first to be successfully petitioned to this year's ballot. It's been on hold pending the outcome of Tuesday's vote. About a dozen other states have similar laws, but Maryland is the first that has approved it by popular vote.

went on to serve 15 years with the Central Intelligence Agency. He began his law enforcement career in 1985 and started out working in the the county’s old jail. From there, he became a road deputy and eventually attended and graduated from the West Virginia State Police Academy. In 1999, he was awarded the Police Shield of Valor resulting from an engagement in a domestic confrontation with an armed assailant. He retired from the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Department with the rank of sergeant.

year with all the “negative, dirty politics,” he is very pleased with the turnout. “This makes me want to work that much harder for the people, because I know they are paying attention,” Snyder said. Snyder, 58, lives on a beefcattle farm in Shenandoah Junction next to Wildwood Middle School. In fact, he sold the land on which the school sits to the Jefferson County Board of Education. Snyder is an environmental chemist by trade, father to six children and grandfather to five.

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OBITUARIES

The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

Everett R. Henry Jr.

Everett R. “Bill” Henry Jr., 82, passed away peacefully at his home Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, surrounded by his family. He was under the care of Hospice, Central WV Aging Services, and Home-Based Primary Veterans Care. Born May 16, 1930, in Martinsburg, he was the son of the late Lillian Comer Henry and Everett R. Henry Sr. He worked at the Interwoven Mill for 20 years as a machinist and retired from Mack Truck after 20 years of service. Bill served two years in the U.S. Army in the M.P. Division and attended local schools. He was a member of Christ Reformed United Church of Christ. He loved going fishing and hunting, camping, gardening, and spending time with family and friends. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Sue Wolf Henry; four children, Debra Lupis, Mark Henry and wife, Fran, Tara Simpson and husband, Buddy, and Scott Henry and friend, Susan Griffith; eight grandchildren, Jason Lupis, Jacob and Natalie Henry, Jeremiah, Marin, and Hunter Simpson, and Hillary and Caullen Griffith and five greatgrandchildren. Bill is also survived by one brother, Allen Henry, one aunt, Frances Comer, and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Family will receive friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at Rosedale Funeral Home. Graveside service will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, at Rosedale Cemetery with Dr. Thomas Hartshorn and the Rev. Malcom Cadd officiating. Interment with military rites will follow. In lieu of flowers donations made be made to Hospice of the Panhandle, 122 Waverly Court, Martinsburg, WV 25403 or Christ Reformed Church, 117 E. Burke St., Martinsburg, WV 25401. Arrangements entrusted to Rosedale Funeral Home. Online condolences may be left at www.rosedalefuneral.com.

Robert “Tracy” Scott

Robert “Tracy” Scott, 46, of Martinsburg, passed away Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, at his mother’s residence. Born Nov. 10, 1965, in Baltimore, Md., he is the son of Annett Elizabeth (Campbell) Alger, of Martinsburg, and Billy Lee Scott Sr., of Tanneytown, Md. He was a member of Dovel Hollow Pentecostal Church in Stanley, Va. In addition to his parents, he is survived by two brothers, Billy Lee Scott Jr., of Hedgesville, and Thomas E. Scott, of Hanover, Pa. Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. today at Brown Funeral Home with Pastor Jack Campbell and Pastor L. Jack Rudy officiating. Interment will be held at Pleasant View Memory Gardens. Online condolences may be offered at www.Brown FuneralHomesWV.com.

David M. Hall

David M. Hall, 66, died Nov. 5. Services are 11 a.m. Thursday Nov. 29, at Berkeley Springs Church of Christ. Interment private. Arrangements by Helsley-Johnson.

Amy S. Bussard

Amy Sue Ryan Nee Bussard, 49, of Dancing Leaf Drive, Martinsburg, lost her two-year battle with cancer and went into eternity Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, with the same grace and dignity that she exhibited in life. She is survived by her loving husband of 31 years, Steven; her children, son, Joshoua Andrew, and daughters, Caitlyn Elizabeth and Sarah Bethany. She is also survived by her mother, Patsy McAfee, of Keedysville, Md., and stepfather, William McAfee; father, Johnny Bussard, of Boonsboro, Md., and stepmother, Hazel Bussard; brothers, Mike and Joel; half brother, Christopher; stepsisters, Kathy and Linda; stepbrother, Greg; and many nieces and nephews. Amy was preceded in death by her younger brother, Lynn. There will be no viewing. A celebration of life will be held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 17, 2012, at her church home, The Good Shepherd Ministries, with the Rev. Steven McCullough officiating. The family will receive friends before and after the service. Burial will be private and at the convenience of the family. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to The Good Shepherd Ministries at 19763 Longmeadow Road, Hagerstown, MD 21742. Arrangements were made by J.L. Davis Funeral Home, Smithsburg, Md.

Catherine P. Shelly

Catherine P. Shelly, 87, of Inwood, passed away Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, at Canterbury Center. Born Nov. 20, 1924, in Bronx, N.Y., she was the daughter of the late Joseph Crosby and Elizabeth (Kenny) Crosby. She was a member of St. Leo Catholic Church, the Catholic Daughters, and the Rosary Society. She is survived by her three sons, Dr. Richard W. Shelly and wife, Vicki, of Roanoke, Va., James M. Shelly, of Inwood, and Michael S. Shelly, of Dinwiddie, Va.; one daughter, Patricia A. Jencks and husband, Frank, of Alexandria, Va.; three grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; one brother, Joseph Crosby, of Leland, N.C.; and a cousin, Alice Cooke, of Inwood. She was preceded in death by her husband of 53 years who passed on April 30, 1998, Earl W. Shelly. A Mass of Christian burial will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at St. Leo Catholic Church with Father Brian Shoda, celebrant. Interment prayers will be said at St. Leo Cemetery. Family will receive friends from 6:30 to 8 p.m., with Rosary service at 7:30 p.m., today at Brown Funeral Home South Berkeley Chapel in Inwood. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to St. Leo Catholic Church, c/o Pantry Fund, P.O. Box 93, Inwood, WV 25428. Online condolences may be offered at www.Brown FuneralHomesWV.com.

Clifford Righttenour

Clifford Righttenour, 81, passed away Sunday. Services are 2 p.m. Friday at Hedgesville Chapel. Arrangements are by Brown Funeral Home.

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Charlotte A. Turley

Charlotte A. Turley, 59, of Charleston, formerly of St. Albans, passed away on Sunday, Nov. 4, 2012, at home. She was born on Feb. 14, 1953, to the late Charles and Helen Dillow Viands. She graduated from Charles Town High School and was a former employee of Meyer and Ford law firm in Charleston. Charlotte was preceded in death by her parents; as well as daughter, Dara Coulter; and her brother, Charles David Viands. She is survived by her husband of 33 years, Ricky Turley, of Charleston; sister, Marlene Dopson, of Ranson; mother-in-law, Donna High; and nephew, Jamie Dopson, of Ranson. A service to honor the life of Charlotte will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, 2012, at Snodgrass Funeral Home, South Charleston, with the Rev. Ken Carter officiating. Burial will be in Cunningham Memorial Park, St. Albans. Family and friends may visit from 6 to 8 p.m. today at the funeral home. Special “thanks” to her caregivers, Connie Roberts, of St. Albans, and Barbara Simpson, of Nitro. Memories of Charlotte may be shared by visiting www.snodgrassfuneral.com and selecting the obituary. Snodgrass Funeral Home, South Charleston, is handling the arrangements.

Frances D. Strother

Services will be held at 11 a.m. today at EacklesSpencer & Norton Funeral Home. Interment will be in Cedar Hill Cemetery.

Laurence J. Rita K. Shira Katherine Shira, 58, Birmingham III of Rita Martinsburg, passed away

Laurence “Michael” Joseph Birmingham III, 41, of Inwood, passed away Saturday, Nov. 3, 2012. Born Sept. 30, 1971, in Martinsburg, he is the son of Florence Joan (May) Birmingham, of Inwood, and the late Laurence Joseph Birmingham Jr. He was a member of Central Church of Christ. In addition to his mother, he is survived by four sisters, Catherine Lynne Weikert, of Waynesboro, Pa., Christine Elaine Keith and Elizabeth Kaye Birmingham, both of Nashville, Tenn., and Carolyn Ann Marino, of Harpers Ferry; nieces, Jennifer Lynne Jordan, of Inwood, and Denise Nichole Davies, of Nashville. He was well loved by numerous aunts, uncles and cousins on his mother’s side. In addition to his father, he was preceded in death by his grandparents, John May Sr. and Thelma May, Laurence Joseph Birmingham Sr. and Garnet Vernon Birmingham. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, Nov. 9, 2012, at Brown Funeral Home with Allan Hornbuckle officiating. Interment will be held at Bunker Hill Cemetery. The family will receive friends from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 8, at the funeral home. Online condolences may be offered at www.Brown FuneralHomesWV.com.

ON THE RECORD Berkeley County Central Dispatch

Nov. 5, 2012 ¯ 1:44 a.m. — heart trouble, Edgemont Terrace, ambulance ¯ 1:50 a.m. — chest pain, Salem Church Road, ambulance ¯ 4:39 a.m. — abdominal pain, Open Meadow Lane, ambulance ¯ 7:09 a.m. — psychiatric problem, Evergreen Drive, ambulance ¯ 9:25 a.m. — psychiatric probCharles R. Biggs, 84, died lem, Grenadine Court, ambulance ¯ 10:04 a.m. — traffic accident, Nov. 2. Services are 11 a.m. Eagle School Road, ambulance Saturday Nov. 17 at St. ¯ 11:18 a.m. — sick person, Mark’s Episcopal Church, Homewood Hollow, ambulance Berkeley Springs. Arrange¯ 11:43 a.m. — traumatic injury, ments are by Helsley-Johnson. Hospital Drive, ambulance ¯ 11:43 a.m. — sick person, North Queen St., medic ¯ 12:06 p.m. — hemorrhage, West John St., ambulance ¯ 12:15 p.m. — sick person, Williamsport Pike, medic Larry G. Townson, 58, ¯ 2:33 p.m. — back trouble, passed away Thursday. Fam- Pedal Car Drive, ambulance ily will receive friends 6 to ¯ 3:59 p.m. — unconscious per8 p.m. today at Brown son, Kates Hollow Road, medic Funeral Home. ¯ 4:18 p.m. — chest pain, Tinning Court, ambulance ¯ 4:19 p.m. — sick person, Graizer St., medic ¯ 4:29 p.m. — breathing problem, Grapevine Road, ambulance ¯ 4:45 p.m. — unconscious perPatricia A. Ware, 74, son, Wanda Mae Court, ambulance passed away Friday. Servic¯ 6:18 p.m. — chest pain, Apple es are 11 a.m. today at Harvest Drive, ambulance Brown Funeral Home. ¯ 8:59 p.m. — breathing problem, Gloucester Drive, ambulance

Charles R. Biggs

Larry G. Townson

Patricia A. Ware

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Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page B3

Jefferson County Central Dispatch

Nov. 5, 2012 EMS ¯ 8:41 a.m. — fall, Summit Point Road, Co. 6, Co. 11 ¯ 10:15 a.m. — fall, Spring St., Co. 1, Co. 11

.NET

Obituaries from the last seven days are available on our website www.journal-news.net.

Monday, Nov. 5, 2012, at the VA Medical Center in Martinsburg. Born June 9, 1954, in Colver, Pa., she was the daughter of the late August Eckenrode and Edna Marie (Brown) Eckenrode. Mrs. Shira was a veteran of the U.S. Army and employed as a registered nurse for seven years for the VA Medical Center. She is survived by her sons, Daniel Shira, of Clovis, N.M., and Christopher Shira, of Lynchburg, Va.; brother, August Eckenrode; and three sisters, Edna Glass, Lucille Hritoz and Agnus Lute. Memorial Mass will be held at noon today at St. Leo Catholic Church in Inwood with Father Brian Shoda, celebrant. Interment prayers will be said at The Basilica of St. Michael Cemetery, Loretto, Pa. Arrangements are by Brown Funeral Home. Online condolences may be offered at www.Brown FuneralHomesWV.com.

POLICE LOGS

If you have information about these or any other Berkeley County crimes, contact Crime Solvers at 304-267-4999. Your identity will remain anonymous, and rewards of up to $1,000 are offered for tips.

Martinsburg Police Department

Nov. 5, 2012 ¯ 12:57 a.m. — traffic stop, New York Ave., warning issued ¯ 1:10 a.m. — traffic stop, K Mart, warning issued ¯ 1:29 a.m. — traffic stop, Lowes, citation issued ¯ 2:26 a.m. — traffic stop, East Moler Ave., warning issued ¯ 4:26 a.m. — traffic stop, Cracker Barrel, warning issued ¯ 8:58 a.m. — traffic stop, Old Mill Road, warning issued ¯ 9:15 a.m. — larceny, East Race St., report taken ¯ 10:15 a.m. — destruction of property, Stonewall Haven, advised of options ¯ 11:51 a.m. — larceny, Prentiss Point Parkway, advised of options ¯ 1:20 p.m. — abandoned vehicle, Surrey Court, advised of options ¯ 1:29 p.m. — traffic stop, Payton Place, warning issued ¯ 2:12 p.m. — disputes, Spring St., advised of options ¯ 2:41 p.m. — shoplifting, Foxcroft Ave., report taken ¯ 3:38 p.m. — traffic stop, Wilson St., warning issued ¯ 3:54 p.m. — traffic stop, Raleigh St., warning issued ¯ 4:05 p.m. — traffic stop, South Tennessee Ave., warning issued ¯ 4:07 p.m. — traffic stop, South Maple St., warning issued ¯ 4:13 p.m. — arrest, North Queen St. ¯ 4:18 p.m. — traffic stop, Winchester Ave., citation issued ¯ 4:27 p.m. — traffic stop, Silver Lane, warning issued ¯ 4:30 p.m. — traffic stop, Addition St., warning issued ¯ 4:43 p.m. — traffic stop, Edwin Miller Blvd., citation issued ¯ 4:44 p.m. — traffic stop, Old Mill Road, warning issued ¯ 4:47 p.m. — juvenile problem, South Raleigh St., advised of options

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Teri Shields raised eyebrows when she allowed her 11-year-old daughter, Brooke, to be cast as a prostitute in 1978’s “Pretty Baby.” A few years later, she permitted a teenage Brooke SHIELDS Shields to famously star in a series of commercials for Calvin Klein jeans, provocatively professing that nothing comes between “me and my Calvins.” Teri Shields died last week in New York City, according to Jill Fritzo, a spokeswoman for Brooke Shields. She was 79. The New York Times reported the elder Shields died following a long illness related to dementia. Teri Shields started promoting her daughter as an actress and model when she was still an infant and managed her until her 20s. Shields described her daughter’s fan appeal in a 1978 TV interview: “They see total innocence, which is totally there. And two, they have the sexy child too, they have the sexy person — that appeals to them.” Brooke Shields parted ways professionally with her mother in 1995, describing the move as “the hardest thing.” She told Rolling Stone the following year that “something didn’t feel right.” “I had hopes and dreams, and I wasn’t doing anything to go toward them,” she said. “The focus was on creating a persona rather than a talent.” Teri Shields said in 1996 that she was proud of her daughter for taking control of her life and career. “I felt that she had to be on her own. It kills me once in a while. I would like to get over it,” she said in an interview on TV’s “Extra.” “I would love for Brooke to be my best friend, but you can’t because I am her mother and she is my daughter.” Shields is survived by a sister and two granddaughters.

¯ 4:50 p.m. — traffic stop, Porter Ave., warning issued ¯ 4:51 p.m. — traffic stop, West Burke St., warning issued ¯ 4:52 p.m. — traffic stop, Old Mill Road, warning issued ¯ 4:52 p.m. — traffic stop, Ambrose Towers, warning issued ¯ 5:04 p.m. — traffic stop, North High St., warning issued ¯ 5:05 p.m. — traffic stop, Old Mill Road, warning issued ¯ 5:17 p.m. — traffic stop, I-81 NB, citation issued ¯ 5:21 p.m. — traffic stop, Moler Ave., warning issued ¯ 5:35 p.m. — traffic stop, Foxcroft Ave., warning issued ¯ 5:37 p.m. — traffic stop, West Martin St., warning issued ¯ 5:59 p.m. — traffic stop, John St., warning issued ¯ 6:09 p.m. — traffic stop, Woodbury Ave., warning issued

In M em ory of W illiam R .Bak er,Jr

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Berkeley council to welcome new 37.9% and familiar faces James Barbour

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3.0% John Orem

MARTINSBURG — With the unofficial count for all Berkeley County votes released at approximately 11:30 p.m., Elaine Mauck and James “Jim” Barnhart were elected to the Berkeley County Council. Mauck received 20,265 votes; Barnhart received 18,723 votes; and Mark Barney received 16,397 votes. All results are unofficial until the votes are canvassed Nov. 13. Incumbent candidate Mauck, receiving 37 percent of total votes, said she appreciates the confidence residents have placed in BY EDWARD MARSHALL her, especially since there is more she feels pendent party affiliation. He won a total of JOURNAL STAFF WRITER is left for her to do. 5,056 votes. “I hope to finish what I started, particuThe remaining 2.59 percent of the vote, or MARTINSBURG — Incumbent Berkeley 930 votes, went to write-in candidates, one larly concentrating on the fiduciary overCounty Sheriff Kenneth “Kenny” Lemaster of whom was John Orem. Orem, a Republi- sight of these committees that the Berkeley Jr. won a second four-year term as sheriff County Council is responsible for,” Mauck can, lost a close race to Barbour in May’s after garnering the most votes in Tuesday’s said. Republican primary. general election. This term will be her first full six-year Lemaster’s service with the Berkeley With all 66 Berkeley County precincts County Sheriff’s Department began in 1977 term. She previously served a two-year reporting, Lemaster, a Democrat, secured term after the decision was made in 2010 as a uniformed patrol officer. In 1982, he 45.45 percent of the vote and earned a total was promoted to corporal and shift supervi- to increase the Berkeley County Council of 16,331 votes, according to the unofficial sor until 1989, when he earned the rank of from three members to five. results. When Berkeley County Council Presisergeant and became an investigator in the “I’d like to thank all the people that did department’s Criminal Investigation Section. dent Bill Stubblefield chose not to run for vote for me. I believe it was a tough race reelection, an opportunity emerged for a In 1991, Lemaster was promoted to lieuwith the presidential race, especially in tenant in charge of investigations for approx- new member to join the council. Berkeley County, but I do appreciate the With 34 percent of total votes, Barnhart imately seven years. In 1998, he transferred support and help I’ve got from not only the will fill Stubblefield’s vacated seat, beginto the Eastern Panhandle Drug and Violent people who voted for me but for the people ning January 3, 2013 — the first council Crime Task Force before returning to the who helped me put up signs, that camdepartment in 1999 as investigative supervi- meeting in January. paigned for me, that made donations and “I plan to conduct the business of Berkesor and an administrative officer within the donated their time to help me put up and take department. ley County the best way possible … get to down many signs in Berkeley County. A big In 2000, he was promoted to captain over know the position, get to know the people,” thanks to all them,” Lemaster said. Barnhart said. the entire department and was appointed to His Republican challenger, James W. Bar- the position of chief deputy sheriff in 2001, Barnhart does not credit any one aspect bour, received 37.89 percent of the vote, in which he served until 2008 under former of his campaign as swaying voters, but the winning a total of 13,612 votes. overall combination of his experience, Sheriff Randy Smith. “I want to thank everybody that came out familiarity and knowledge of the county Barbour was born and raised in Berkeley and supported me, and I plan on running and his belief in his slogan, “Build a Better County. In 2009, he retired from the U.S. again in four years. I appreciate all the supBerkeley.” Army with 25 years of service. During his port and all the help I got from everybody,” service, he was a military police officer and In the race for Berkeley County assessor, Barbour said. Republican Larry Hess quickly established worked as a military police operations serPlacing third in the race was Carlton geant. He also has a degree in administration a lead over Democrat Shawn Conaughty. “Cootsie” DeHaven, who received 14.07 Hess received 21,913 votes or 63 percent and operational field and law enforcement. percent of the vote. DeHaven, a registered He is presently a security contractor with the of total votes, and Conaughty received Republican, didn’t run in the May primary, 12,789 votes or 37 percent of votes. U.S. Department of Homeland Security. but obtained enough voter signatures to This election was Hess’ second attempt The results won’t be official until the canappear on Tuesday’s ballot with an Indeto be elected to Berkeley County assessor, vassing of the vote Nov. 13. first running in 2004. Hess said having

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29.0% Mark Barney

34.0√% Jim Barnhart

37.0%√ Elaine Mauck

experienced both the winning and losing side of the race, he is thankful for the residents who voted for him, stating “it feels twice as good.” “It feels wonderful. … It’s something you’ll remember your entire life,” Hess said. Hess has been an employee in the Berkeley County Assessor’s Office for 25 years and said he is excited to explore a new aspect of working in the Assessor’s Office. — Staff writer Samantha Cronk can be reached at 304-263-8931, ext. 132, or scronk@journal-news.net.

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CHARLES TOWN — The only seat up for grabs on the Jefferson County Commission will be turned back over to Jane Tabb for the next term, according to the complete but unofficial election results released Tuesday evening. Tabb upset Democrat Frances Morgan, recieving 12,178 votes to 8,905 for Morgan. She previously served on the county commission from 2001-06. In the 2006 election, Tabb lost the position to Democrat Frances Morgan. “I am just ecstatic,” Tabb said in reference to her re-election. Republican Tabb lives in Kearneysville and works on her family’s farm. She is a program assistant for the West Virginia University Extension Service in addition to running a catering service. A pollution problem on her farm from what used to be a nearby landfill led to Tabb’s interest in county government. “In the midst of trying to solve the problem on the farm, I started attending county commission meetings. I just became very interested in local politics, and I have no ambition to go any further, I really enjoy being home at night and seeing my husband every day,” Tabb said after her win Tuesday night. Tabb said one of the first things she plans on doing when she returns to the commission is to become familiar with her fellow commissioners. Other than Commissioner Dale Manuel, the remaining three seats are held by different representatives than those who served on the commission during Tabb’s previous term. “I need to make sure things are where I think they are, and I’m sure there are some things that I need to learn — changes to ordinances and the beginnings of the comprehensive plan. I’m just very eager to get to work,” Tabb said. Tabb said she wants members of the community to know they are able to contact her with any questions and concerns they

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42.2% Frances Morgan

57.8√ % Jane Tabb

might have. Even if she is not able to fix the problems, she said that helping people find answers and just listening are things she enjoys. “I really want to represent all the citizens. I feel there is a silent majority out there going to work every day, getting their kids to do their homework and taking care of elderly parents — they do not know what’s going on in the county; they just don’t have the time. Those are the folks I want to represent,” Tabb said. According to Tabb, Jefferson County has a bright future and she said she is looking forward to getting to work on making sure that it is the brightest future possible. In the assessor race, Democrat Angela L. Banks, the incumbent candidate, won with 11,228 over challenger Gary Dungan’s 9,483. — Staff writer Michelle Horst can be reached at 304-725-6581 or mhorst@jour nal-news.net.


THE JOURNAL

Espinosa rolls to victory in 66th District

The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

BY RACHEL MOLENDA

40%

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page B5

59%√

“I think folks want their government to do very much the same JOURNAL STAFF WRITER TATE ELEGATE TH ISTRICT thing they do within their household, and that’s live within their Paul CHARLES TOWN — In a landJohn means,” he said. slide victory, Paul Espinoza was Espinosa While Espinosa is excited to get Maxey elected to represent the 65th Disto work in Charleston, he said he trict in the West Virginia House of recognizes that he will not have the Delegates Tuesday night. The firstperfect answers to issues right time candidate defeated Democratic away. opponent John Maxey by 1,332 “I realize there’s a lot of issues votes. that perhaps I don’t know enough Espinosa, a Jefferson County about to make an intelligent decinative, said he represented a fiscalsion,” he said. “I think a big part of ly conservative option for voters the fact that they want us to be very The new delegate also said he my job as a legislator will be to listhroughout his campaign. careful with how we’re spending ran on a platform of limited govten to folks, listen to both sides of “I think ... the thing that seemed money, make sure we’re spending ernment when it comes to spending the issue.” to resonate most with voters was it wisely,” Espinosa said. on statewide programs.

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Espinosa, a Republican delegate, said he has no problem working across party lines to pass sensible legislation for the Eastern Panhandle and the state. “I’m results-oriented,” Espinosa said. “That’s something that I can certainly accomplish, being able to work with Republican and Democrats in order to forge legislation that makes sense for West Virginia.” - Staff writer Rachel Molenda can be reached at 304-263-8931, ext. 215, or rmolenda@journalnews.net.

Skinner cruises past Simon in 67th District

BY RACHEL MOLENDA

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CHARLES TOWN — West Virginia will be able to welcome its first openly gay representative to the state legislature in January. Democratic candidate Stephen Skinner was elected to represent the 67th district, which is comprised of the northern tier of Jefferson County. Skinner, a local attorney and Jefferson County native, said he was honored by the electorate’s decision. “I’m excited and I am humbled at the same time,” Skinner said after results were announced Tues-

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day night at the Jefferson County courthouse. The candidate, while involved with community organizations such as the Jefferson County Democratic Executive Council and the West Virginia Commission on the Arts,

had never run for office before this campaign. While he will be a firsttimer to the statehouse, Skinner said he is confident in his ability to represent Jefferson County and the Eastern Panhandle in Charleston. “I’m ready to get in there and

start working on day one,” he said. “My number one priority is making sure that Charleston hears us and addresses our needs and not a onesize-fits-all solution to the problems in the state.” While Skinner confirmed he will be the first openly gay delegate to serve in the state’s legislature, he said it was a non-issue when it came to his campaign. “I want to commend everyone for voting in a race ... that didn’t focus on sexual orientation,” he said. Elliot Simon, Skinner’s Republican opponent, conceded the race when 75 percent of results were released on election night. “I think we ran a very good race,” Simon said. “I congratulate Stephen Skinner on his victory.”

“It’s very hard to compete with that kind of money,” Simon said of the fundraising difference between the two camps. “I just thank everybody who worked so hard on our campaign.” Skinner, who was one of several candidates featured in a negative ad mailer campaign in late October, said he was nonetheless satisfied with the way his campaign ran. “I am proud that I ran a hundred percent positive campaign,” he said. “And that the people of the 67th district didn’t let the negative ad mailers ... impact the vote.” - Staff writer Rachel Molenda can be reached at 304-263-8931, ext. 215, or rmolenda@journalnews.net.

Same-sex marriage, marijuana measures move forward

BY DAVID CRARY

AP NATIONAL WRITER

Voters a continent apart made history Tuesday on two divisive social issues, with Maine and Maryland becoming the first states to approve same-sex marriage by popular vote while Washington state and Colorado legalized recreational use of marijuana. The outcomes in Maine and Maryland broke a 32state streak, dating back to 1998, in which gay marriage had been rebuffed by every state that held a vote on it. They will become the seventh and eighth states to allow same-sex couples to marry. “For the first time, voters in Maine and Maryland voted to allow loving couples to make lifelong commitments through marriage — forever taking away the right-wing talking point that marriage equality couldn’t win on the ballot,” said Chad Griffin of the Human Rights Campaign, a national gay-rights group. Washington state also was voting on a measure to legalize same-sex marriage, while Minnesota voters were considering a conservativebacked amendment that would place a ban on samesex marriage in the state constitution.

The outcomes in the four states could possibly influence the U.S. Supreme Court, which will soon be considering whether to take up cases challenging the law that denies federal recognition to same-sex marriages. The marijuana measures in Colorado and Washington set up a showdown with the federal government, which outlaws the drug. Colorado’s Amendment 64 will allow adults over 21 to possess up to an ounce of marijuana, though using the drug publicly would still be banned. The amendment would also allow people to grow up to six marijuana plants in a private, secure area. Washington’s measure establishes a system of statelicensed marijuana growers, processors and retail stores, where adults can buy up to an ounce. It also establishes a standard blood test limit for driving under the influence. The Washington measure was notable for its sponsors and supporters, who ranged from public health experts and wealthy high-tech executives to two of the Justice Department’s top former officials in Seattle, U.S. Attorneys John McKay and Kate Pflaumer. “Marijuana policy reform remains an issue where the people lead and the politi-

cians follow,” said Ethan Nadelmann of the Drug Policy Alliance, which opposes the co-called “war on drugs.” ‘’But Washington State shows that many politicians are beginning to catch up.” Estimates have showed pot taxes could bring in hundreds of millions of dollars a year, but the sales won’t start until state officials make rules to govern the legal weed industry. In Massachusetts, voters approved a measure to allow marijuana use for medical reasons, joining 17 other states. Arkansas voters were deciding on a similar measure that would make it the first Southern state in that group. Maine’s referendum on same-sex marriage marked the first time that gay-rights supporters put the issue to a popular vote. They collected enough signatures over the summer to schedule the vote, hoping to reverse the outcome of a 2009 referendum that quashed a gay-marriage law enacted by the Legislature. In both Maryland and Washington, gay-marriage laws were approved by lawmakers and signed by the governors earlier this year, but opponents gathered enough signatures to challenge the laws. In Minnesota, the question

Ford wins back Morgan County Commission seat

was whether the state would join 30 others in placing a ban on gay marriage in its constitution. Even if the ban is defeated, same-sex marriage would remain illegal in Minnesota under statute. Heading into the election, gay marriage was legal in six states and the District of Columbia — in each case the result of legislation or court orders, not by a vote of the people. In California, voters were deciding whether to repeal the state’s death penalty. If the measure prevailed, the more than 720 inmates on death row there would have

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ers Stotler and Swaim on rebuilding the courthouse and securing low interest loans to do so. She accused Ford of just going along BERKELEY SPRINGS — Former Morand not having a real record. gan County Commissioner Bob Ford, RepubShe was an advocate for closing the curlican, will return in January. rent animal control shelter and building a He beat Democratic incumbent Brenda new one, and said Ford and his fellow comHutchinson 3,457 to 3,330. Ford vacated missioners didn’t consider the residents when the seat for the 1st Magisterial District six locating it on W.Va. 9 near a church, comyears ago, opting not to run again. Hutchin- munity center, and homes. son, a first-time candidate, beat Republican Animal control had been a hot topic in Wayne Omps and took office in 2007. 2012 at commission meetings. Ford said in There are three magisterial districts. A October the commission operated the shelter commissioner runs from each district, but is with no complaints when he was in office, voted on by the county as a whole. Ford and they were forced to set up an animal resides in Sir John’s Run, and Hutchinson control because the Humane Society wanted resides in Great Cacapon. more than the county could afford to shelter Ford was a registered Democrat when he confiscated animals. was commissioner from 2000-06, but Ford’s strongest numbers came from switched to the Republican Party in 2008. precincts in Allen, Rock Gap and Sleepy “No question it was a tight race,” said Creek districts and parts of Bath district. Ford amid cheers from supporters and hugs Hutchinson’s strongholds were Cacapon and from family as the final results were read last Timber Ridge districts and parts of Bath and night. “We ran a pretty clean campaign on Allen districts. our side. I can’t say the same for the other “Brenda did a good job as commissioner, side. We’ll bring some honesty and integrity and congratulations to Bob,” said Stacy back to the county commission.” Dugan, commission president. The race was a contentious one. Hutchin“I’m just glad the people turned out. It son went on the offensive at a candidate was about 55-60 percent turnout,” commisforum in October, citing her accomplishsioner Brad Close said. “And I cannot wait ments with former Republican commission- to work with Commissioner Bob Ford.”

Shambaugh re-elected as Morgan sheriff

BERKELEY SPRINGS — Vince Shambaugh will retain his role as Morgan County sheriff after defeat-

ing challenger Larry Bradley. Shambaugh received 4,169 votes; Bradley, 2,816.

In the race for assessor, Ronald McIntire received 4,018 votes and John Allen Swaim received 2,824.

out all affirmative action programs in state government hiring, education and contracting practices. Similar steps have been taken previously in Arizona, California, Michigan, Nebraska and Washington. — Florida voters rejected a proposal that would have banned government mandates for obtaining insurance such as required by President Barack Obama’s health care overhaul. Floridians also rejected a proposed constitutional amendment that would have limited revenue growth to match increases in population and cost of living.

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their sentences converted to life in prison. While 17 states have ended capital punishment, most did so through legislative action. Only in Oregon, in 1964, did voters choose to repeal the death penalty; they later reversed themselves to reinstate it. In all, there were 176 measures on the ballots Tuesday in 38 states, according to the Initiative and Referendum Institute at the University of Southern California. Other notable measures: — In Oklahoma, voters approved a Republicanbacked measure that wipes

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THE JOURNAL

Barrett upsets Duke in 61st district Page B6 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

BY JOHN MCVEY

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

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MARTINSBURG — Five Republicans won seats as Berkeley County magistrates in a packed race that saw 10 candidates vying for five open seats in Tuesday’s general election. With 66 Berkeley County precincts reporting, Incumbent Republican candidate Joann Overington was the top vote-getter, receiving a total of 20,592 votes and 13.81 percent of the vote, according to the unofficial results. Placing second in the vote tally was incumbent Republican Harry Snow, who won 12.37 percent of the vote and a total of 18,437 votes. The third seat went to Republican and first time candidate Charles “Charlie” Cole, who earned 11.68 percent of the vote and a total of 17,418 votes in Tuesday’s election. The fourth open seat was won by Republican Robert “Rob” L. Lowe II, who earned 11.43 percent of the vote and a total of 17,047 votes. The fifth and final seat up for grabs in Tuesday’s election went to Republican Betty Jo Hersh, who earned 11.30 percent of the vote and a total of 16,844 votes. The only incumbent candidate not to win re-election in Berkeley County was Democrat Jim Humphrey. He placed sixth in the overall vote tally with 13,485 votes. Meanwhile, in Jefferson County, with all 32 voting precincts reporting, unofficial results show all three incumbents in that race won re-election to their seats as magistrates. — Staff writer Edward Marshall Coming in first place in the vote can be reached at 304-263-8931, tally was incumbent Democrat Gail ext. 182, or emarshall@journalBoober with 22.68 percent of the news.net.

21.8√%

Mary Paul Rissler

attempt to unseat Duke. He lost in the 2010 general election. Barrett is a lifelong Berkeley County resident and owns Anthony’s Pizza in Inwood. “The first thing is to get situated in Charleston,” Barrett said. “There’s a lot of prep work needed before the first of the session. We want to hit the ground running. The people of the 61st district deserve a delegate who is ready on day one.” All vote totals are unofficial until certified by the Berkeley County Council after it canvasses the vote, beginning Nov. 13.

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vote and a total of 10,328 votes. The second top vote-getter, incumbent Democrat Bill Senseney, received 22.46 percent of the vote and a total of 10,229 votes. Rounding out the top three was incumbent Democrat Mary Paul Rissler, who won re-election to her seat with 21.76 percent of the vote and a total of 9,906 votes. The three incumbent magistrates faced off against two Republican challengers in Tuesday’s election to see who would fill three seats up for election. Republican Bill Arnicar came in fourth in the overall vote tally with 16.51 percent of the vote and a total of 7,517 votes. Fellow Republican Peter Onoszko finished the night with 16.42 percent of the vote and a total of 7,478 votes. The remaining .17 percent of the vote, or a total of 76 votes, went to write-in candidates. In Morgan County, Republican incumbents Greg Miller and Kermit Ambrose both won re-election to their seats as magistrates there. Voters chose from three candidates to fill two seats up for election. The top vote-getter was Ambrose, who won re-election with 35.63 percent of the vote and a total of 3,764 votes. Miller came in second with 34.57 percent of the vote and a total of 3,652 votes. Debra Ditto, the sole Democratic candidate in the race, finished third with 29.81 percent of the vote and a total of 3,149 votes. The results won’t be official until the canvassing of the vote Nov. 13.

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Poor House Road west of the city and includes land on the west side of Interstate 81 annexed by MarMARTINSBURG — Jason Bartinsburg since the 2000 Census. Walter Jason rett, the Democrat, upset incumbent Previously, the 54th ran from Duke Barrett Walter Duke, the Republican, in the Martinsburg to Hedgesville along race for the 61st House of Delethe W.Va. 9 corridor. gates district. Duke said the new district lines With 14 of 14 precincts reportdid not help him. ing, Barrett received 3,258 votes, “I lost three good districts and or about 53 percent. Duke received gained two that had higher Demo2,933 votes, or about 47 percent. cratic registration,” he said Tuesday “First, I want to thank Walter night at the GOP headquarters. Duke for his service to Martinsburg “Apparently, Barrett’s people had a and Berkeley County and his serv- knocked on a few thousand doors.” whelmingly in the past,” he said. better ground game.” ice in the House of Delegates,” Barrett, 30, said the change in The 61st district was redrawn Duke, 65, was first elected to the Barrett said Tuesday night outside the district boundaries helped his and renumbered after the 2010 House in 2002. He retired from the Democratic Party headquarters. campaign. Census. While the former 54th dis- Berkeley County school system “And I want to thank my support“There were areas not in the new trict retained its core — the City of after 33 years teaching history. ers. It was a tough campaign. We district that Walter won overMartinsburg — it now extends to This was Barrett’s second JOURNAL STAFF WRITER

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MARTINSBURG — Republican Mike Folk pulled out a narrow victory over Democrat Donn Marshall in the newly created 63rd House of Delegates district. With 11 of 11 precincts reporting, Folk garnered 2,850 votes, or about 51 percent, to 2,793 votes, or about 49 percent for Marshall. “It was a tough race,” Folk said Tuesday night at GOP headquarters. “I was just myself. I was not going to be something I’m not. Everybody who said they would vote for me, I asked them to spread the word. It

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was a grassroots movement. It had eral professional positions. to be. I was outspent 3-1.” Folk, 43, wants to get people This was Folk’s first run for elec- involved. tive office. A lifelong resident of “I want to reach out — it takes Berkeley County, Folk has held sev- more than Republicans,” he said.

After the 2010 Census, the 63rd district was one of two new House districts added to the Eastern Panhandle counties because of the region’s increased population. It encompasses about the northeast third of Berkeley County. The additional district gave Berkeley County five full districts and one district shared with Morgan County. This was Marshall’s second run for a seat in the West Virginia House of Delegates. He unsuccessfully challenged veteran Delegate John Overington, R-Berkeley, two years ago in the old 55th district. Marshall was visibly disappointed Tuesday night, speaking in the Berkeley County Courthouse where

results were being projected on a giant screen. “Two more years of excuses and ineffectiveness,” he said. “I ran a positive campaign. There was a lot of mud thrown at me. I’m honored by the people who supported me. I met a lot of great people.” Originally from Morgantown, Marshall, 48, worked for the Defense Intelligence Agency. All vote tallies are unofficial until certified by the Berkeley County Council after the vote canvass, which begins Nov. 13. — Staff writer John McVey can be reached at 304-263-3381, ext. 128, or jmcvey@journal-news.net.

Va. limits eminent domain All of Va.’s 11 representatives

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Voters have approved an amendment to the Virginia Constitution limiting government’s ability to take private property through eminent domain. The amendment approved Tuesday had been championed by Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli and the Virginia Farm Bureau Federation. They argued property rights are so fundamental, they should be enshrined in the Constitution. Opponents warned that passage could cost state and local governments tens of

millions of dollars. They said a 2007 ruling was sufficient to protect property owners. The amendment was inspired by a 2005 U.S. Supreme Court decision that gave governments broad powers to seized private property for economic development. Since then, more than 40 states have enacted constitutional and legislative guarantees to blunt powers of eminent domain. Another amendment allowing legislators to delay a one-day reconvened legislative session also passed.

earn re-election to Congress

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia’s U.S. House incumbents have all won re-election. Results of Tuesday’s election leave Republicans with an 8-3 advantage over Democrats in the state’s House of Representatives delegation. The sweep by incumbents

stands in stark contrast to the last two congressional elections in Virginia. In 2008, Democrats rode Barack Obama’s coattails to pick up three seats and gain a one-seat edge. In the midterm election two years later, Republicans gained three seats to re-establish their 8-3 advantage.

In Tuesday’s most closely watched races, Republican Rep. Scott Rigell turned back Democrat Paul Hirschbiel Jr. in the Hampton Roads 2nd District and House Majority Leader Eric Cantor beat Democrat Wayne Powell in the 7th District, which includes the Richmond area.


The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

THE JOURNAL

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page B7

A New Choice

AP photo

People ride atop a vehicle waving a Puerto Rican flag during elections in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012. Puerto Ricans are electing a governor as the U.S. island territory does not get a vote in the U.S. presidential election. But they are also casting ballots in a referendum that asks voters if they want to change the relationship to the United States. A second question gives voters three alternatives: become the 51st U.S. state, independence, or sovereign free association, a designation that would give more autonomy.

Puerto Rico votes on US ties and chooses governor

BY DANICA COTO ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — Puerto Ricans faced a fundamental question on Election Day: Should they change their ties with the United States? Citizens in the U.S. island territory cannot vote in the U.S. presidential election, but many were excited to participate in a referendum on whether to push the territory toward statehood, greater autonomy or independence. Car horns blared and party flags waved after polling sta-

tions closed following what election officials said was a high voter turnout. During the day, many voters carried umbrellas against the blistering tropical sun as temperatures neared 90 degrees Fahrenheit (31 degrees Celsius). The two-part referendum first asked voters if they wanted to change Puerto Rico’s 114-year relationship with the United States. A second question gave voters three alternatives if they wanted a change: become a U.S. state, gain independence, or have a “sovereign free

association,” a designation that would give more autonomy for the territory of 4 million people. With 243 of 1,643 precincts reporting late Tuesday, 75,188 voters, or 53 percent, said they did not want to continue under the current political status. Fortyseven percent, or 67,304 voters, supported the status quo. On the second question, 65 percent favored statehood, followed by 31 percent for sovereign free association and 4 percent for independence. “Puerto Rico has to be a state. There is no other

option,” said 25-year-old Jerome Lefebre, who picked up his grandfather before driving to the polls. “We’re doing OK, but we could do better. We would receive more benefits, a lot more financial help.” But 42-year-old Ramon Lopez de Azua said he favored the current system, which grants U.S. citizenship but prevents Puerto Ricans from voting for president unless they live in the United States, and gives those on the island only limited representation in Congress. “Puerto Rico’s problem is

not its political status,” he said. “I think that the United States is the best country in the world, but I am Puerto Rican first.” Both President Barack Obama and rival Mitt Romney said they supported the referendum, with Obama pledging to respect the will of the people if there was a clear majority. Any change would require approval by the U.S. Congress. Puerto Rico held non-binding referendums in 1967, 1993 and 1998, with statehood never garnering a clear majority and independence

never obtaining more than 5 percent of the vote. The island also was electing legislators and a governor, with Gov. Luis Fortuno of the pro-statehood New Progressive Party seeking a second term. Fortuno, a Republican, was challenged by Alejandro Garcia Padilla, whose Popular Democratic Party favors the status quo. With 817 of 1,643 precincts reporting late Tuesday, Garcia had 427,604 votes, or 48 percent, while Fortuno had 422,506 votes, or 47 percent.

Small businesses look ahead to Obama’s 2nd term

EW YORK (AP) — President Barack Obama’s re-election to a second term takes away some of the uncertainty that small business owners have been carrying around. The question now is whether he can satisfy those who say he hasn’t done enough to help them expand and create jobs. During Obama’s first term, the president pointed to steps he took to help small companies, such as proposing the Small Business Jobs Act of 2010 that cut taxes for small companies and made it easier for them to obtain federally guaranteed loans. These steps have helped some small businesses start their recovery from the recession. “We’ve been seeing steady albeit modest growth in the economy since the president took office and we are cautiously optimistic,” says John Arensmeyer, CEO of Small Business Majority, an organization that lobbies on behalf of small companies. Even so, many small business owners are critical of the president’s performance. They are anxious about taxes and the bulging federal deficit. Many opposed the health care overhaul and complain that they are being squeezed by excess regulations. So now that Obama has

won four more years, what can small business owners can expect from Obama on taxes, health care, the economy and regulation? The Associated Press interviewed small business experts and advocates to find out. TAXES No president has a complete say over how much anyone, including small business owners, will pay in taxes. Expect the divided Congress to battle over Obama’s request to raise the top tax rate on many business owners to 39.6 percent during 2013. That’s the highest personal tax rate, and it affects some small businesses because their owners report their business taxes on their personal returns. Republicans in the House, many who were aligned with Republican nominee Mitt Romney, will oppose that tax increase, and the result may be a stalemate. “I don’t think anything’s going to change,” says Peter Cohan, a lecturer in entrepreneurial strategy at Babson College in Wellesley, Mass. But Obama has made a point of proposing tax cuts that will benefit many small companies. He’s calling for the corporate tax rate to drop to 28 percent from its current 35 percent. Manufacturers

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would pay no more than 25 percent. He’s also backing more liberal tax deductions for small businesses that invest in new equipment. “Congress will be more willing to work with the president on these small businesstargeted tax policies,” Arensmeyer says. Recent history shows that Arensmeyer may be right. Earlier this year, there was bipartisan support in Congress for the Jumpstart Our Small Business Startups Act. It was designed to help small companies get financing more easily.

HEALTH CARE Obama’s re-election means the health care overhaul will continue to be implemented, but small businesses still have to wait to find out how much it will eat into their profits. Key provisions of the law go into effect in 2014, including the requirement that businesses with 50 or more employees provide affordable health insurance for their workers. What employers don’t know yet is how much that insurance will cost. That won’t be determined until states set up exchanges where individuals and companies can buy coverage. Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney promised to make changes to the

law. Now that the overhaul has survived the re-election of Obama and a fight that advanced earlier this year to the U.S. Supreme Court, another big legal challenge is unlikely, says Risa LavizzoMourey, president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

of Bush administration tax cuts that takes effect with the new year. But if the deficit isn’t dealt with soon, taxes will have to rise in the coming years. That would leave small business owners with less money to invest in their companies. “That is ultimately going to be a huge problem. As govTHE ECONOMY AND ernment grows and the size of THE FEDERAL BUDGET the deficit grows, that when Obama may not be able to you’ll see a drag on economic do much to get the economy growth,” Primo says. growing much faster than it is now. REGULATION “I think both candidates Look for Obama to continwere way overselling what ue a mixed record on regulathey can do to create jobs and tion — creating more rules help the economy,” says that small businesses will David Primo, an associate need to follow, but also being professor of political science vigilant that regulations won’t and business administration at be too burdensome. the University of Rochester in “On the plus side, Obama New York. has signed a handful of execuThe federal deficit is part of tive orders directing agencies the problem. Obama has to to review and ease, where curtail spending — but feder- possible, regulations that have al government spending is an undue burden on small equal to nearly a quarter of business,” says Molly Brogan, income produced by U.S. citi- a spokeswoman for the zens. Cut government spend- National Small Business ing, including federal con- Association, a group that lobtracts, and small businesses bies on behalf of small comlose revenue and may cut panies. But she also says govjobs. Many have put hiring ernment agencies keep creatplans on hold because of ing regulations that many uncertainty about what’s small businesses find probknown as the fiscal cliff — lematic, for example, proposthe combination of severe als from the Equal Employbudget cuts and the expiration ment Opportunity Commis-

sion that prohibit employers from requiring that workers have a high school diploma or conducting background checks. “I don’t think there’s going to be a massive amount of difference for small businesses,” says Catherine Rudder, a public policy professor at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va. “Obama in his policies is quite moderate and quite willing to compromise.” Small business owners who are unhappy with regulations created during Obama’s first term are likely to find ways to get around them — particularly when it comes to health care. Some owners reluctant to buy health insurance for employees will make sure their companies don’t have the equivalent of 50 full-time workers — the threshold at which they’d have to provide coverage under the health care law. But owners will be happy with the Obama administration’s regulations that are designed to help them — lending and counseling programs at the Small Business Administration will continue to be a priority. “They can expect continued policies to foster small business,” says Caroline Daniels, a lecturer in entrepreneurship at Babson College.

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THE JOURNAL

Page B8 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Republicans ready to grasp renewed House control

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

BY ALAN FRAM

ASSOCIATED PRESS

AP photo

House Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) talks with poll workers after voting at Ronald Reagan Lodge, Tuesday in West Chester, Ohio.

BY BOB LEWIS

AP POLITICAL WRITER

among a dwindling number of moderate Blue Dog Democrats, has represented the district in Kentucky horse country surrounding Lexington, since 2004 but faced voters who heavily favored Republican challenger Mitt Romney, who easily carried the state over Obama. Republicans also ousted Rep. Larry Kissell of North Carolina, a two-term veteran who was among several Democrats in the state who faced far tougher districts due to GOP-controlled redistricting. In Pennsylvania outside Pittsburgh, Republicans defeated Democrat Mark Critz in what was one of the year’s most expensive races, with both sides spending a combined $13.7 million. Also defeated was Democratic Rep. Kathy Hochul of New York, who won a 2011 special election to her seat by attacking Republicans for trying to revamp Medicare. There were 62 districts where no incumbents were running at all, either because they had retired or lost earlier party primaries or because the seats were newly created to reflect the census.

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RICHMOND, Va. — By the thinnest of margins, President Barack Obama won Virginia for the second election in a row, edging Mitt Romney in a fiercely contested race in the battleground of Virginia despite a fired-up and organized Republican Party intent on reclaiming the state it once owned. Tim Kaine also defeated Republican George Allen on Tuesday, keeping both of Virginia’s Senate seats in Democratic hands. All 11 of Virginia’s U.S. House members cruised to easy victories over littleknown challengers. Allen conceded defeat to Kaine shortly before 11 p.m., and the race was called for Kaine shortly thereafter. Four years ago, Obama became the first Democrat in 44 years to win Virginia in a presidential race. The president had a lead in polling and appeared headed for a repeat in Virginia until Romney pulled within the statistical margin of error in October, after Obama’s poor performance in the first presidential debate. At polling places across Virginia, long lines of voters stood in chilly temperatures for hours beyond the 7 p.m. poll closing, evidence of a passionate and deeply divided electorate. Those in line by that time were allowed to vote. Some gave up and went home. Spending in the Senate race topped $80 million, obliterating all records for a statewide race in Virginia. The majority, $53 million, came from outside, independent organizations, many of which do not have to disclose their wealthy donors. That’s the largest amount for any Senate contest in the country this election cycle. About 60 percent of that money was spent either in opposition to Kaine or support of Allen. In U.S. House races, the eight incumbent Republicans, including House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, and three Democrats all easily brushed off little-known, sparsely funded challengers.

Voters by overwhelming margins approved two constitutional amendments. One limits eminent domain, which is the government’s ability to take private property for economic development needs. Virginia’s legislature outlawed the practice in 2007, leading opponents to say the amendment is not needed. The other makes a constitutional change giving the General Assembly more leeway in setting its one-day reconvened session each spring where it considers gubernatorial vetoes and amendments to legislation. Don Palmer, executive secretary of the State Board of Elections, said the long lines would force polls to remain open in some of the state’s largest localities hours beyond their 7 p.m. closing times. They included the counties of Arlington, Fairfax, Giles, Halifax, Henrico, Prince William, Spotsylvania, Culpeper and Montgomery and the cities of Chesapeake, Hampton, Norfolk, Richmond, Roanoke and Virginia Beach. The state’s new voter ID law was not a factor. The law required people who lacked proper identification to vote a provisional ballot that would count only if local registrars receive proof of identity by noon Friday. But the SBE reported only 2,053 by 11 p.m. The law was passed by Republicans in the name of preventing fraud, but was decried by critics as a bid to suppress the votes of Democratic constituencies such as minorities, the poor, elderly and disabled. In a heavily Democratic, mostly black area near downtown Richmond, chief election officer Susan Woodson said that by midafternoon, more than 1,500 of the precinct’s 3,000 registered voters had cast ballots, and only five required provisional ballots because of the new law. In the campaign’s final week, both presidential candidates and their A-list surrogates have blanketed Virginia, which for 40 years was a reliably Republican afterthought in presidential politics.

ousted by Ann Kuster, the Democrat he defeated narrowly two years ago; and Francisco Canseco of Texas. In Maryland Democrats defeated 10-term GOP veteran Rep. Roscoe Bartlett of Maryland in a race that was preordained after Democrats controlling the state legislature added more Democratic suburbs near Washington to his western Maryland district. Embroiled in an unexpectedly tight re-election race was conservative Rep. Michele Bachmann, R-Minn. One victor was Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., who was his party’s vice presidential nominee on the ticket with the losing presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Another winner was Rep. Jesse Jackson Jr., D-Ill., the Chicago lawmaker who took medical leave from Congress in June and has been at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota for treatment of bipolar disorder. His only campaigning has been by automated phone calls to voters. In Kentucky, GOP attorney Andy Barr defeated Democrat Ben Chandler after losing to him by just 647 votes in 2010. Chandler,

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trailing. An exit poll of voters showed that just 21 percent said they backed the tea party, which had fueled the big GOP House gains in 2010. The GOP’s seemingly inevitable victory in the House was a contrast to how the party was performing elsewhere on the national stage. Obama defeated Republican Mitt Romney for the presidency and Democrats hold onto control of the Senate. Democrats in Illinois controlled the redrawing of congressional districts after the latest Census, and the new lines proved too tough for several incumbent House Republicans. Conservative tea party freshmen Reps. Joe Walsh and Bobby Schilling lost, as did moderate freshman Robert Dold and seventerm veteran Judy Biggert, a social moderate. Other losing GOP freshmen were Rep. David Rivera of Florida, who was hurt by investigations into his past campaign financing; Ann Marie Buerkle of New York, who lost to the Democrat she defeated in 2010, Dan Maffei; and New Hampshire Republican Charlie Bass,

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they responded by renewing our House Republican majority,” he said at a gathering of Republicans in Washington. “The American people also made clear there’s no mandate for raising tax rates.” One of the top fights when Congress returns for a postelection session this month will be over the looming expiration of income tax cuts first enacted a decade ago under President George W. Bush. Republicans want to renew them all, while President Barack Obama wants the cuts to expire for the highest-earning Americans. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., refused to concede. She told Democrats rallying a few blocks away from the GOP rally where Boehner spoke that by evening’s end, Democrats would end up “exceeding everyone’s expectations and perhaps achieving 25,” the number of added seats Democrats would need to gain House control. Though seven GOP freshmen were defeated, 65 of them were re-elected by early Wednesday morning in the East. Six others were leading in their races, but four were

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WASHINGTON — Republicans had renewed control of the House within their grasp early Wednesday as the two parties traded gains from the Eastern seaboard to the Southwest. Shortly past midnight in the East, Democrats had knocked off nine GOP House members — including six members of the huge tea party-backed House GOP freshman class of 2010. That included four Republican incumbents from Illinois and one each from Maryland, Florida, New York, New Hampshire and Texas. Republicans nearly matched that as their candidates defeated one Democratic incumbent apiece in Kentucky, New York, North Carolina and Pennsylvania and picked up an open seat each in Arkansas, Indiana, North Carolina and Oklahoma held in this Congress by Democrats who retired or ran for another office. With almost two-thirds of the 435 House races called by The Associated Press, Republicans had won 209 seats and were leading in 28 more. A party needs 218 seats to control the House. It seemed likely the party mix in the new House would resemble the current one, which Republicans control 242193, including two GOP and three Democratic vacancies. The pickups were so evenly divided that it was unclear if either party would add to its numbers overall. Democrats had taken 155 districts and led in 39 others. Even before renewed GOP control was clinched, House Speaker John Boehner, ROhio — re-elected to his seat without opposition — claimed victory and laid down a marker for upcoming battles against President Barack Obama, who was reelected to a second term in the White House. “The American people want solutions, and tonight

When combined with losses by incumbents, the number of new House members in the next Congress was still below the 91 freshmen who started serving in 2011 — a number unmatched since 1993. Just weeks ago, Democrats had said they could win the 25 added seats they need to wrest control of the House. As Obama’s lead over GOP challenger Mitt Romney shrank as Election Day approached, Democrats’ expectations for coattails that would boost their House candidates shrunk as well. Republicans, building off their enhanced control of statehouses, also did a robust job of protecting their incumbents and weakening Democrats when congressional district lines were redrawn after the 2010 census, especially in states like Pennsylvania and North Carolina. In addition, out of a record $1.1 billion House candidates and their allies spent in this year’s races, more than 60 percent of it went to Republicans. The economy and jobs dominated the presidential campaign, but there was little evidence either party had harnessed those issues in a decisive way at the House level. Both sides agreed that this year’s election lacked a nationwide wave that would give either side sweeping strength — as occurred when Democrats seized control in 2006 and expanded their majority in 2008, and Republicans snatched the chamber back in 2010. Polls underscored the public sentiment that Democrats had hoped they could use to their advantage. A CBS News-New York Times poll late last month showed just 15 percent of Americans approved of how Congress was handling its job, near its historic lows. And an Associated PressGfK poll in August showed that 39 percent approved of congressional Democrats while just 31 percent were satisfied with congressional Republicans.

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The Journal

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 The Journal— C1

304-596-6446

jobs.journal-news.net

AW ARD B E AU TY SC H O OL

Corporate Claim s/Log Audit M an ager The Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator is respon sible for effectively m an agin g all property an d liability in su ran ce claim s, W orker’s Com pen sation , su brogation , an d Cargo Claim s to settlem en t an d m ain tain in g appropriate files an d records. D epen din g on the com plexity an d risk exposu re, m an agem en t of these claim s m ay be su bject to the advice an d in pu t of attorn eys, the appropriate in su ran ce carrier, an d the D irector of Safety an d Risk M an agem en t. Addition ally the Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator isrespon sible for the collection ,recon ciliation an d reportin g of allrisk m an agem en t data an d for m axim izin g the u se of the com pu terized database to facilitate claim s trackin g, m an agem en t an d data retrieval. The Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator w ill participate in appropriate train in g an d developm en t program s m ade available by the com pany,com pletin g those program s successfully. The Log Au dit su pervisor w ill provide effective m an agem en t to staff m em bers. En su re adheren ce to com pany policies an d procedu res, m ain tain con stan t com m u n ication betw een shift person n el, retain staff, an d provide excellen t in tern al/extern al cu stom er service. They are fu rther respon sible for th e cost-effective u se of the com pany resou rces in clu din g m an pow er, n ecessary tools for the job, an d supplies.Essen tia lJo b Fu n ctio n s:*Aggressive an d cost-efficien t claim s m an agem en t.*M ain ten an ce of the Risk M an agem en t System database to in su re accu racy an d in tegrity of data w hen providin g dem ographic, fin an cial an d claim data.*Provide claim s in form ation as requ ested by the in su ran ce com pan y, attorn eys, or com pany officials for periodic m eetin g, claim s review , etc.*Gen erate an d provide various reports,charts,etc.on safety related issu es,as requ ested.Gen erate an d provide a d hoc reports, data, etc. as n eeded. *Provide safety data to the Sales D epartm en t for bids, as n eeded. *U se effective listen in g an d com m u n ication skills w hen in teractin g w ith others in the com pany, in su ran ce com pan ies,claim an ts,etc.*Com ply w ith com pany safety policies an d procedures,an d w ith applicable govern m en t regu lation s, specifically an d particu larly O SH A recordable claim data. *Assist Safety M an agers w ith investigation ,han dlin g an d reportin g of any claim at any facility,as requested. *Assist in organ ization an d produ ction of com pany an d/or in du stry safety even ts, com petition s an d other activities.*Provide cross train in g an d su pport to design ated back-u p to in su re con tin u ity of respon siblites du rin g tim es of u n availability. Schedu le staff person n el to cover all shifts in log au dit an d fuelcoun ter.Daily m an agem ent of log audit an d fuelcoun ter departm en ts.Provide leadership an d supervision to allperson n elin your departm en ts. En su re in tern alan d extern alcu stom er service n eed s are m et. Spearhead hirin g process for departm en ts. Train all n ew person n el in log au dit an d fu el coun ter.Com plete an d m ain tain perform an ce review s on departm en t person n el.Adhere to proper DO T ru les an d regu lation s. S co pe o f Respo n sibility: *Prim ary liaison betw een com pany an d in su ran ce broker, in su ran ce adju sters, attorn eys, past an d presen t in su ran ce carriers.*M ain ten an ce of claim s files.*Prepare claim s review s w ith in su ran ce carriers an d Board of D irectors Reports.*U pdate docum en tation of procedures for allclaim s han dlin g.*Gen eration of paym en t for property dam age an d cargo claim s as appropriate.*Resou rce for Safety M an agers, Term in al M an agers an d other corporate person n el w ith regard to all aspects of claim s m an agem en t.*Com pile an d gen erate w eekly claim report an d distribu te to design ated in dividu als.*Com pile accu rate su brogation an d cargo claim fin an cial data. Su brogation - in itiate\follow u p\ an d n egotiate claim settlem en t.*Cargo Claim s - in pu t claim in to Risk M an agem en t file\follow up w ith custom er\n egotiate claim am oun t\coordin ate salvage. *Com pile period-en d reserve adju stm en ts an d reportin g for all claim s reflected on in su ran ce carrier loss ru n s.*Com pile period en d reserve adju stm en ts an d reportin g for all in -hou se equ ipm en t repair claim s.*Recon cile period-en d an d year-en d accou n tin g reports;develop an d m ain tain fin an cialreports u sed to recon cile accou n t departm en t data, in clu din g data en try of all equ ipm en t repairs in to the AS400 as paym en t an d au dit of those repairs w hen the repair cost is for safety related dam age. * D evelop an d distribute relevan t dem ographic reports,usin g the Risk M an agem en t system ,for allclaim types. *D evelop an d m ain tain dem ographic or fin an cial report as requ ested *M ain tain the Safety D epartm en t Bon u s an d Aw ard program eligibility, advisin g appropriate Accou n tin g an d Payroll person n elof eligible drivers an d n on -drivers each period an d at year-en d,in accord w ith the com pa ny program . *M ain tain appropriate O SH A Claim files an d com plete O SH A Reports.*Train others in u se of an d en try of claim s in to the Risk M an agem en t System ;access to an d use of reports.Decisio n M a kin g: The Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator fin alizes m in or ($5000 or less) property dam age claim s to settlem en t. The Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator fin alizes m in or ($5000 or less) cargo claim s to settlem en t. The Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator w orks w ith the in suran ce com pany an d the D irector of Safety an d Risk M an agem en t to determ in e a plan of action for other claim s an d w orks w ithin that plan of action . Au th o rity: The Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator has the au thority to develop in tern al claim s procedu res n ecessary to en su re the sm ooth operation of the Claim s D epartm en t. The direct, daily su pervision of the Corporate Claim s Adm in istrator resides w ith the D irector of Safety an d Risk M an agem en t. Co m m u n ica tio n : Proficien t oral an d w ritten com m u n ication skills that dem on strate clarity, precisen ess, an d com pleten ess, an d are u sed w ith in tern al an d extern al con tacts. Ed u ca tio n : U n dergradu ate degree in Bu sin ess Adm in stration , Fin an ce or a related field preferred; relevan t w ork history m ay be an acceptable su bstitu te. Proficien t train in g in com pu ter skills, in clu din g database m an agem en t.Experien ce:2 years claim settlem ent,i.e.,In suran ce claim s an d w orker’s com pen sation claim s. Som e fin an cial an d accou n tin g backgrou n d. D em on strated skill in organ ization , detail orien tation an d self m otivation . Skills in n egotiatin g an d su brogatin g claim s, w ork w ith property dam age claim s. Certifica tio n : N on e requ ired. Licen se in Property & Casu alty In su ran ce preferred. Ph ysica lRequ irem en ts: Ability to sit for exten ded periods of tim e Ability to reach, ben d, stoop, etc. to m an age file storage an d accessability to clearly an d com pletely com m un icate in person , in w ritin g , by telephon e an d throu gh the u se of com pu ters.This description is a gen eral statem en t of requ ired m ajor du ties an d respon sibilities perform ed on a regu lar an d con tin u ou s basis. It does n ot exclu de other duties as assign ed an d issubject to review an d revision . APPLY BY FAX O R EM AIL: FAX :3 01-223 -5 988 Em a il:lb o n eb ra ke@ d m b o w m a n .co m

ANNOUNCEMENTS 5

Special Notices

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FREE CARE

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This publication never knowingly publishes advertising that is untruthful, fraudulent or misleading and has adopted standards for acceptance or rejection of advertising. We strive to promote ethical business practices in the marketplace and to serve the best interest of the public. If you have questions as to the legitimacy of an advertisement offer or claim, it is recommended that you contact the Better Business Bureau to check on the reliability of the firm placing the ad. The Better Business Bureau can be reached on an automated 24 hour help line at 202-393-8000 or at www.mybbb.org

6

Lost & Found

FOUND KEYS

Found on S. Maple St. in Martinsburg on 11/2/12. Call to Describe:

304-270-6861 KITTEN FOUND

Small, 2 - 3 mo. old kitten found near Snake Lane on Dry Run Rd. Call 754-7783

EMPLOYMENT

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Chrysler Techs

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Coordinator of Socially Necessary Services Degree in Human Services a plus. Flexible hrs. Send Resumes to: Callahan Counseling Services P.O. Box 1074 Martinsburg, WV 25402

CUSTOMER SERVICE CLERK The Journal in Martinsburg has an opening for a part time customer service clerk in our circulation department. Candidate should have some computer experience and must be able to work weekends and early evening. Hours during the week are 12pm-7pm. Saturday is 10am-4pm and Sunday 6am-12pm. If you are interested in working in a fast paced office and provide excellent customer service, please apply to:

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APPLY BY FAX O R EM AIL: FAX :3 01-223 -5 988 Em a il:lb o n eb ra ke@ d m b o w m a n .co m 20

Help Wanted

Adolescent Substance Abuse Counselor Professionally Licensed a plus, full-time. Send Resumes to: Callahan Counseling Services P.O. Box 1074 Martinsburg, WV 25402

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Driver GREAT HOME TIME!

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LPN: Provide a variety of nursing services to behavioral health consumers. Qualifi-ca-tions: Valid WV nursing license and driver’s license with a clean driving record. Experience with I/DD consumers preferred. Send cover letter and resume to: jobs@eastridgehs.org EastRidge Health Systems, Attn: HR Dept. 235 S. Water St. Martinsburg, WV 25401 Fax: (304) 263-8141 Visit our website at

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Regional Flatbed. Home Daily, Full Benefits 40-45 cpm, CDL-A req.

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Fed Ex Ground Linehaul CDL-A-DBL’s Must be at least 25 yrs. old w/3 yrs. exp. Home Daily, No Touch Freight/All Drop & Hook Mileage pd, $500 Sign on Bonus. Must pass background check (571)246-3147 or

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HOUSEKEEPER, live-in. Light housekeeping & cooking inexchange for room & board.

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HIT YOURS WITH...

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Machine Attendant/ Bartender

PT & FT/Flexible Hours. Please send resume to email to: sschrock@comcast.net Or Call: 304-262-0067

MECHANIC

needed in busy shop to provide routine maintenance on vehicle fleet used for security driver training programs. Own tools req. Full-time (Wed.Sun.). Excellent benefit package upon completion of 90-day trial period. Pay based on experience. Apply To: Summit Point Raceway Associates, Inc., 201 Motorsports Park Circle, Summit Point, WV 25446

304-725-6512

Mechanic

wanted w/ exp. on equipment and big trucks. Steady year round work. Must have own tools. Loudoun County area. Must have drivers license

540-822-4600

NOW HIRING!!! Aerotek is seeking qualified welders, machinists, industrial painters, and assemblers. Various Shifts. $14.0017.19/hr. Must have 1 year of experience. Call 717.267.0087 or 1-800-973-1496

20

Help Wanted

NOW HIRING: Companies desperately need employees to assemble products at home. No selling, any hours. $500/wk potential! Info:

1-985-646-1700 Dept. WV-137

Now Hiring Full Time 20-30 people needed. All departments, Full time positions. Weekly pay/bonuses. Incentive starting at $400-$800/week Call now for interview

304-205-0928

Package Handlers

3 01-73 3 -4 5 20 w w w.Aw a rd Bea u tyS cho o l.co m

•Fin a n cia lAid Ava ila ble (to those w ho qualify)

•D a y & Even in g S ch ed u les •N o H igh S ch o o lD iplo m a o r G ED Requ ired •Jo b Pla cem en t Assista n ce 26 E.An tieta m S treet Ha g ersto w n ,M D 2174 0

En ro ll To d a y Fo r Decem b er 3 ,2012 C la sses 20

Help Wanted

Sales Associates Full & Part time at Tri State Exxon

Looking for a team player & excellent customer service skills. Must be available to work weekends & have flexible hrs. Located on Rt. 340 between bridges, near Harpers Ferry. Apply today 540-668-6710 37245 Jefferson Pike, Purcellville, Va 20132

SALES REPRESENTATIVES We are seeking a sales representative who can successfully identify and qualify sales opportunities for area businesses in the form of print and online advertisements. The ideal candidate will proactively communicate with clients and prospective clients and follow-up on all sales opportunities. The ability and desire to interact with customers and prospects in person as well as by telephone and email is essential. The ideal candidate must possess effective communication skills, have a pleasant and outgoing personality and have a successful track record of providing excellent customer service. The environment is deadline oriented and fast paced but can be extremely rewarding for the person who thrives on exceeding goals and utilizing creativity. This is a full time position, Monday through Friday and includes incentives, gas reimbursment, insurance, paid vacation and 401(k).

Please mail, email or fax your resume and cover letter to:

The Journal, Judy Gelestor, Advertising Director, 207 W. King Street, Martinsburg, WV 25401 Email:

Pre-K-4 for Christian Daycare in Hillsboro, VA. Certification and Experience preferred. Must be 21 and love children. Call:

540-668-6357 RECEPTIONIST

Positive Attitude Required! Medical office seeking receptionist full & part-time that is able to take directions in stride while dealing with patients & other team members. Cross training in other areas of the office required, such as assisting the doctor. Send resumes to: Box #470356 c/o The Journal 207 W. King St. Martinsburg, WV 25401

Registered Dietician Williamsport Rehabilitation and Nursing Center is seeking an energetic registered dietician to join our contemporary team on a consultant basis. Interested candidates should submit their resume to:

sbishop@bgf.org No Phone Calls. Please Learn more!

www.wrv-bgf.org EOE

Professional/ Technical

HVAC MECHANIC

Government facility in Shepherdstown, WV $23.89/hr. 5+ yrs. facility operations. Journeyman lic. EPA cert. Min. 3 yrs. HVAC controls exp. req., proven customer service. Excellent benefit pkg. Apply at: www.ravenservices.us EOE M/F/V

MANUFACTURING / SKILLED TRADES JOBS! No Resume? No Problem! Monster Match assigns a professional to handmatch each job seeker with each employer! This is a FREE service! Simply create your profile by phone and, for the next 90-days, our professionals will match your profile to employers who are hiring right now!

CREATE YOUR PROFILE NOW BY PHONE FREE! Call Today!! Use Job Code 41! 1-888-652-2249 or

Jobs.journal-news.net No Resume Needed! Call the automated phone profiling system today so our professionals can get started matching you with employers that are hiring NOW! Choose from one of the following positions to enter your information: ¯ Welder ¯ Metal Worker ¯ Tool & Die ¯ Machine Repair ¯ Millwright BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE JOURNAL AND MONSTER.COM

jgelestor@journal-news.net fax: 304-267-2829 - EOE

Part & Full time Openings Multiple shifts

248-436-8105 Pre-School Teacher

21

23 Septic Tech

Will train right person. Must have drivers license For inspections, repairs, and service of septic systems. Loudoun County area. Year round work.

540-822-4600

Social Worker

The Region 8 Planning and Development Council is seeking a social worker. Office is located in Martinsburg, WV on the grounds of the Veterans Administration’s Medical Center. The position requires WV Social Work License and five years work experience as a social worker. A bachelor’s degree in social work or a closely related field may substitute for the five years experience. The PDC will give preference to individuals with both a degree and experience. The annual salary for this position is up to $35,000. Fringe benefits include health insurance, retirement, vacation and sick leave. Additional details can be obtained from the Region 8 PDC by email: mail@regioneight.org Interested individuals should send a letter of interest and resume to Region 8 PDC, Social Worker Position, P. O. Box 849, Petersburg, WV 26847. The PDC may fill this position any time after November 16, 2012. The Region 8 PDC is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Health Care/ Medical

DENTAL HYGIENIST

WV State Lic. Req. for Reg. Dental Hygienist 1-4 days a week. We’re looking for the right individual that is willing to work as a team to improve the oral health of our patients. Please include days available. Send resumes to: Box #470358 c/o The Journal 207 W. King St. Martinsburg, WV 25401

FARM & GARDEN

47

Firewood

A-1 FIREWOOD, all oak, very well seasoned, split & delivered. $70 1/2 cord, $140 a cord. 304-676-6781

ALL OAK FIREWOOD

Seasoned, split & delivered. 1, 2 & 4 cord loads. R. Barrett: 304-671-3713 or 304-754-8683

FIREWOOD- All seasoned hardwood. $70 a 1/2 cord, $140 a cord. 304-582-0040 301-305-2873 Firewood for sale, mixed hardwood, $70 for half cord, $140 for full cord, delivered 304-876-6510/ 671-1272 FIREWOOD, seasoned, mixed hardwoods. Reasonable pricing. Will deliver! 304-579-7974

Seasoned Firewood, 1 and a 1/2 cords for $140 304-728-6660 304-707-4363 Seasoned Oak FIREWOOD for sale. $160/cord or 2 cords/ $300. S. Barrett 304-676-6881


C2 — The Journal Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Classifieds Call (304) 263-8931

Stony Pointe Apartments November Special 70

Dogs/Cats/ Others

70

Cute Puppies For Sale!

Puppies starting at $199

1/2 Security Deposit

Dogs/Cats/ Others Free to indoor home only. 10 weeks, female, ready to go. Also, 3 - 7 mo., 2 males, 1 female. Call 304-433-7055

59 East Rd. Martinsburg, WV

www.westvirginiapuppy.com Yorkie, Morkie , Foxy Chi, Yorkie Chon, Yorkie Pom, Chihuahua, Shih Poo, Mal Shih, Mini Bull & Many More!

Thurs. 11-3, Fri-Sat-Sun 11-6

District Way • (304) 283-8631 • Martinsburg www.aikensgroup.com

Recently Built & Very Spacious! Corporate Apartments Available

REAL ESTATE

304-267-6333 / 904-6289 FREE KITTENS to a good home. Call after 10am 304-596-0087

Considerspay/neuterforyourpetstoreduceoverpopulation. Ifyouwouldlikeinfoaboutspay/neuterprogramsinthe EasternPanhandle,visitwww.animaladvocateswv.comor emailinfo@animaladvocateswv.com. MORKIE PUPPIES Maltese/Yorkie, adorable, fluffy, shedless,Tan, black, M & F. $300 ea. Call 304-279-2634

93

Mobile Homes Sale

Martinsburg, used 14x70, 3 Br, 2 Ba, set up in nice quiet park. Financing avail. $14,900

ß304-263-5900ß 2011 Norris Designer double wide 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 28x52, drywall through out, glamour bath with linen cabinets, dynamic kitchen with all GE appliances, recessed lighting and pantry, walk-in closets, delivered and installed on your lot

Retail Price $71,900 * ßDiscount $12,000ß ßSALE PRICE $59,900ß

Wampler’s Homes, Inc 1-800-949-7772

Located 4 miles North of Winchester on Rt. 11 Virginia Dealer

TRANSPORTATION

61

Yard/Garage Sales

67

USED TIRES, $15 and up, mounting, balancing available. 304-274-6666

69

ß MOVING SALE ß 70 Bon Aire Dr. Shepherdstown. Sat. Nov. 10th, 9am.

65

Musical

GUITARS: Gretsch G5122. Fender-Acoustic 2 Oscar SchmidtElectric/Acoustic +more 304-725-8540/582-5973

66

Giveaways

RACING WHEELS (4), Mitsubishi 3000 GT, $50 each. 304-876-0909 WINDSHIELD, Honda cycle, new. $50 304-876-0909

67

Misc. for Sale

Adjustable Queen Sleep Number Bed w/ pump and remotes, full massage, excellent cond., $1,400 304-262-3014

All-Around Vacations

Unlimited lifetime travel packages! Classic package only $1295 304-707-0191

CEMETERY LOTS, Five, Rosedale. Double-stack capacity. $2,400 each or $11,000 for all five. 301-898-5175

ßßCEMETERY LOTSßß 2 spaces Garden of Everlasting Life in Pleasant View. $1,800 304-274-0361 CEMETERY PLOT- Edge Hill, Charles Town. Sixspots: Cost $1,500 but selling for $1,000 each. 410-206-1904 GOLF CART- Yamaha. Gas. 4” lift-kit. Runs great $1,500 obo. 304-886-1264 HOT TUB- Two-Person. Solara, excellent shape w/ massager $1500 obo. 304-754-3860 Inside granite front mausoleum for cremation. Pleasant View, Martinsburg $2,850 obo 240-675-1777

In Veterans sect. Rosedale Cemetery, 1 lot & 2 spaces, 1 burial vault. SPECIAL: $2,500 for all. 304-229-5594 / 767-5594

JC Higgins automatic 22, like new, $600 304-725-8529

OAK WOOD, 18 in. pcs., $225. Door, 6 panel, interior, $10. Dresser, antique, cherry, mirror.$500 304-724-1468

PLAYBOY MAGAZINES: Selling each year in sets. 60’s: $35/yr. 70’s: $25/yr. 80’s & 90’s+up: $15/yr. Info: 410-227-4292 QURAN: FREE English translation copy of the noble Quran.

304-267-5827

RIFLE- Winchester 300 short mag, bolt action, Shot less than 1 box of shells. $625. 304-283-7502

SHOTGUN - Browning “Gold” 12 ga. 3 1/2, Semi-auto, excellent condition w/ extras. $700. 304-676-9335

TOTAL WOOD HEATSafe, clean, efficient and comfortable OUTDOOR WOOD FURNACE from Central Boiler. Jake and Audrey’s Farm & Garden

304-856-1115

Misc. for Sale

Wanted to Buy

AA coins & Currency. I buy 1 or complete collections + any gold & silver jewelry, Top prices! Call 304-268-3451 Airplane propellers, pre1930s buttons & political items, compasses, surveying equip., Civil War, steamship menus.

717-352-3072

Always Buying! Jewelryall kinds. Old postcards, photos & other old stuff! CASH Paid! Call Now! 304-261-5271

Berkeley Co. books, postcards, jewelry of all kinds, elegant glassware, Fostoria, Fenton, Heisey. 304-279-2298

Buying WWII & WWI US and German

Military Items 304-263-4639

Cash paid for canning jars Fruit, sausages presses, cabbage shredders, any tools, peelers & pitters 304-995-6157 COINS/COLLECTIONS Small Collector pays cash for coins/collections/gold.

Will come to you. ß301-807-3266ß

NEED CASH?- WILL BUY: Coins, Antiques, Guns & Other Things & Stuff! Call: 304-268-3451 or 582-8205 Wanted to buy antiques & collectibles, everything from peas to soup, attic & cellar contents & jewelry 304-995-6157

WANTED TO BUY:

Old Milk Bottles, vintage restaurant creamers, small antiques, etc. Call: 304-582-6070 or 229-9911

78

RENTALS

Townhouses

ARE YOU READY? ONLY $950/month!

3 BR, 2.5 BA Hammond’s Mill Townhome w/ basement, deck, washer/dryer Pets okay.

304-283-0205 FIRST MONTH $500!

81

Apartments UnFurnished

FALL INTO SAVINGS!

Newly Renovated 2 & 3 BR Apartments!

Move- in Special: 2 BR: Move in for $99 &

receive $99 off of next month! 3 BR: Even Better! Ask us! W/D incl! 2 BR rental-assisted apartments. avail. to qualified applicants.

Call: 304-262-6257 Restrictions Apply. Oak Tree Village Apts. Vouchers Welcome. Pets with restrictions.

82

Houses for Rent

3 Br, 1 Ba w/ detached garage, $800/mo. + sec. dep. Credit & background check req. 304-263-5451

2 BR Duplex-Martinsburg, Burke St. No pets. $775 ß304-263-6101ß

3 BR, N. College St. CAC, $725 ß304-263-0311ß

Modern sm. 3 Br 2 Ba rancher in Martinsburg $895/mo. +1 yr. lease, credit check & references No pets. Ideal for young or retired couple 304-267-4748

83

Business Property

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE in Middleway Modern office space for short or long term lease available as low as $1.15 per sq. ft. Call 386-672-4560

84

Lots & Acreage

Hunting Properties

3 bed, 2.5 bath, $1,050 with garage, or $950 with basement. $100 discount for rent paid before 1st.

Jefferson County: 59 acre & 16 acre parcels. Also, Berkeley County: 28 acre & 16 acre parcels on Back Creek. $500 lease per person.

80

85

304-267-0425

Apartments Furnished

Corporate Apartments! Short-term, full furnished All utilities incl.! Flexible terms, pets conditional.

81

304-820-3333

Apartments UnFurnished

AUTUMN MOVE-IN SPECIALS ON 3 BEDOM APARTMENTS Spring Mills/Evergreen Apts. Washer/Dryer - No Pets New Fitness Center @ Spring Mills 1, 2, 3 BR APTS

304-274-5158

www.springmillsapts.com

2 BD, 1 BA, S. Berkeley, no pets, $550/mo.+dep. 304-839-2330

1 & 2 Bedroom, w/ stove, refrigerator,AC,W/S, NO PETS. Starting at $595. 304-263-0385 or 261-5580

304-267-6527 1BR Apartments $500/mo. ß304-264-0713ß

2 Br Martinsburg W/D hook-up, lg. closets, No Pets, $700/mo. + dep. 301-293-6825/ 524-7880

1 BR 3231 Shepherdstown Rd, Martinsburg newly renovated $500/mo

304-263-2818 or go to gtttwv.com

2 BR W/D, stove, fridge, AC, 184 Greensburg Rd $600+$600 dep

304-263-2818 or go to gtttwv.com

304-283-8208

Mobile Homes for Rent

3 BD, 1 1/2 BA, Pikeside, no pets, $650/mo.+dep. 304-839-2330

2 Br, 1 Ba on private lot, Falling Waters Rt. 11, C/A, W/D, $675/mo. Call after 6pm 304-274-3392

Hedgesville- Country Setting, Creek access

304-258-3625

88 Rooms for Rent

CHARLES TOWN, Room & Board. Independant living in a family atmosphere at local farm. $1800/mo. 304-279-4037

Downtown Martinsburg Gorgeous house to share Everything & parking incl. $400/mo. Short/long term 304-995-4905 / 263-0446

T h e Jo u r n a l R e a l E s t a t e C l a s s i f i e d s Your “Key” to finding a new home!

CHEVY, Silverado 2500 ext cab 4x4, ‘91, new 350 v8, cold a/c,new tires,etc. w/cap. $4,000 obo. 304-728-4350

107 Autos Wanted

I will pay $200 and up for unwanted cars, trucks & vans 304-725-0688 or 304-671-4373

I will pay $200 up to $600 cash for unwanted cars, trucks, and vans. We will pick up. 304-596-7097

Classifieds

CHEVY SILVERADO, LS ‘02, garage kept, exc. cond.,reg cab, full bed w/liner,Z71,99K mi $7900, 304-839-6095

Ask one of our customer service representatives to help you word your ad for the best response!

BUICK LeSabre- ‘99. 3.8 litre. V-6. 120k mi., new paint/headliner, Michelin tires. $3,500. 304-820-8456 CADILLAC Seville ‘77, new blue paint, sun roof, excellent condition, Beautiful car!! $2,000 304-728-4350

MGB GT ‘73, Barn-find car,mechanically refurbished no rust, new interior, $7,000 304-263-4174 / 268-9440 MGB Roadster ‘79, complete restoration on rust free car, minor performance modifications $8000 304-263-4174 / 268-9440 MGB Roadster ‘68 totally mechanically refurbished, no rust, needs paint & body work $4,000 304-263-4174 / 268-9440 MGB Roadster 1971 wire wheels, project car, runs & drives, stored indoors, $2000 304-263-4174 / 268-9440 STUDEBAKER Lark ‘63, V8, everything new, needs paint, No Rust. Excellent driver. $2,500 304-728-4350

100

Boats & Accessories

ZODIAK RAFT, 12 ft., & 6hp Yamaha motor. $1,000. 304-995-6975

Domestic Autos

CHEVROLET Nova ‘73 350 turbo, Posi rear, Mag wheels, Yenko clon, Price Negotiable 410-227-4292 CHEVY Impala Lt ‘12, 27k mi, spoiler, V6, remote start, warranty, accepting trade, $14,500 firm 301-730-8817

CORVETTES WANTED 1953-1982 & 1995-2008. Any condition, cash buyer. Call Frank: 1-800-369-6148

DODGE RAM 1500 SLT, ‘01, V8, 4x4, w/tool box, 4 drs, 154,900 mi., great shape, runs good.$5,300 304-229-8167 or 270-0495

FORD PROBE GT, ‘95, 5 speed, 194K mi., new plugs, wires, full exhaust. Needs work. $1250 304-820-8660

KIA SPECTRA, ‘02, 4 dr., auto., 128K mi., A/C, gray, new tires, tune up, good cond. $2,800 obo. 304-995-4872 LINCOLN MARK IIIV LSC,‘98, MINT cond., only125K mi., $5,000 obo 304-728-4350

VOLKSWAGON JETTA, ‘01, VR6, silver, 145k mi., exc. condition. $3,000 304-229-8167 or 270-0495

102

2 & 3 Br. No pets. $550-700/mo. 304-754-8411

Hedgesville - W/S incl. $580+dep. No pets.

CHEVY, Pathfinder ‘77 4x4 Van, 350/350, NP205 transfer, Dana 44/56,body needs work, $4800 obo 304-261-8417

WE BUY Unwanted cars & trucks. We will pick up AND PAY TOP $$$ 304-229-3522

101

226 Winchester Ave 1 BR W/S/T $575/mo. ß304-886-0257ß

Trucks/ Trailers

Antique/ Classic Car

99

MERCHANDISE

106

Imported Autos

PONTIAC Firebird ‘95 Convertible, white, auto, great cond., 120k/mi., $3100 obo, Harper’s Ferry 202-280-9926

VOLKSWAGON BEETLE, ‘04, silver, 43K mi., good inspection, $12,000. Call before 6 pm. 304-725-7905

104

RVs

NEWMAR Kountry Star 3904, ‘04, 39 ft, diesel, 28,400 mi., 3 slide outs, sleeps 6, a/c. $46,700 304-806-3154

106

Trucks/ Trailers

BUICK Roadmaster station wagon, ‘94, excellent condition, Seating for 7. Yes, I said 7! $5,000 obo 304-728-4350 CAR MATE, ‘06, encl. 7’x16’ trailer, screwless sides, dbl back drs, 1 side dr, many extras! 304-671-5814, after 5pm

108

4 Wheel Drive

CHEVY Trail Blazer, ‘03, fully loaded, tow package, new tires. $7,000, Firm. 304-725-2382

JEEP WRANGLER- 2001, Red. AC, cruise-ctrl., foglights, new stereo & tires, hard-top, $64k mi. $9,975 304-279-9709

109

Vans

HONDA Element EX ‘10 Handicap acc. x-wav, hydrolic dr. ramp sys. under 6k/mi. cost $47k $33,000 304-263-0321

LEGAL NOTICES 110

Legals/ Public Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF BERKELEY COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA PAMELA JEAN GAMES-NEELY, PROSECUTING ATTORNEY OF BERKELEY COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA ON BEHALF OF THE EASTERN PANHANDLE DRUG & VIOLENT CRIMES TASK FORCE PETITIONER, Vs. $270.00 in US Currency, more or less, One Archos 10, No serial number, One Sylvania T.V. Model# LD320SS8A, Serial# J46714227, One Phillips T.V. Model# 32PFL3505D/57, Serial # DS1A1023196940, and One Dell Inspiron Laptop, Model#PP41L, Serial# 10366185601, RESPONDENT. Case No. 12-P-139 Judge: Yoder, DIV VIII NOTICE OF FILING PETITION FOR FORFEITURE The Object of this suit is to seek an Order forfeiting the described property pursuant to the West Virginia Contraband Forfeiture Act (Chapter 60A, Article 7 of the West Virginia Code, as amended). TO: ANY CLAIMANT OF A RIGHT IN SAID PROPERTY: $270.00 in US Currency, more or less, One Archos 10, No serial number, One Sylvania T.V. Model# LD320SS8A, Serial# J46714227, One Phillips T.V. Model# 32PFL3505D/57, Serial # DS1A1023196940, and One Dell Inspiron Laptop, Model#PP41L, Serial# 10366185601, RESPONDENT. You have the right to file a claim to the herein described property on or before Monday, December 10, 2012, (thirty days after date of first publication). Any such claim must clearly state the identity of the Claimant and an address where legal process can be served upon said Claimant. The Eastern Panhandle Drug & Violent Crimes Task Force are responsible for the seizure of the respondent property. The seizure took place on May 31, 2012 in Berkeley County, West Virginia. Said property was owned by Josh Ferguson, Tina Ferguson, George Ferguson and/or Rodney Ferguson and found in connection with distribution of controlled substances. After the date for filing said claims, an Order of the Court directing forfeiture of the seized said property and vesting ownership of said property in the State shall be sought. If you fail to file a claim,

110

Legals/ Public Notices

thereafter an Order, upon proper hearing shall be entered against said property and against your claim for the relief sought in the Petition. A copy of said petition can be obtained from the undersigned Clerk at her office. Entered by the Clerk of Said Courts on this the 26th day of October, 2012. Virginia M. Sine Clerk of Berkeley County Circuit Courts By Deputy Betty A Hutsler 10:31,11:7 (2t)

ORDER OF PUBLICATION FAMILY COURT OF BERKELEY COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA KANDI S. BIVENS PLAINTIFF DIBANOR GARCIA RESPONDENT Case No: 02-D-716 1. THE OBJECT OF THIS SUIT IS TO ESTABLISH CHILD CUSTODY. TO THE ABOVE NAMED RESPONDENT: It appearing by affidavit filed in this action that Kandi S. Bivens is a nonresident of the State of West Virginia, it is hereby ordered that Kandi S. Bivens Serve upon Dibanor Garcia, Plaintiff’s attorney, whose address is, 182 Corvette Drive, Martinsburg WV 25405 an answer, including any related counter claim or defense you may have to the complaint filed in this action on or before DECEMBER 03, 2012. If you fail to do so, thereafter judgment, upon proper hearing and trial, may be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint.

A copy of said complaint can be obtained from the undersigned Clerk at this office. ENTERED BY SAID CLERK OF THIS COURT November 01, 2012 Virginia M. Sine, Circuit Clerk. By Deputy; Roberta Turner 11:7,14 (2t) PUBLIC AUCTION

For default in rent payment and pursuant to the West Virginia Self Storage Lien Act, a public auction will be held at Midway Self Storage, LLC, 1496 Files Cross Road, Martinsburg, WV 25404 at 10:30 am on November 30, 2012. Contents of each unit will be sold as is, without warranty, in its entirety to the highest cash bidder. Inspection of units is at time of sale. Buyers must remove entire contents of unit by 5 pm the day of auction. ¯Unit 418 Lisa Forbes ¯Unit 349 Adam Fisher Midway Self Storage, LLC reserves the right to refuse any bid and cancel any or all portions of the sale without notice. 11:7 (1t)

PUBLIC NOTICE Eastern Panhandle FCU is offering for private sale 2001 Chevrolet Corvette Convertible, VIN 1G1YY32G815131813, $22,000. Sale of this vehicle will be made AS ISno warranty. 100% financing for qualified buyer. Located at Rt. 9W & GM Access Rd, Martinsburg. 304-263-2887 11:7,8,9 (3t)

REQUEST FOR BIDS Seeking bids for Grounds-Maintenance contract, including Turf Maintenance and Snow Removal, for residential development in Martinsburg. Contract term: 1 year, with two 1-year option periods. Eligible bidders will be responsible for all labor and materials, and will provide evidence of insurance, all appropriate licensing/permits, and references. Interested parties should contact (304) 263-8081 for more details, NO LATER THAN 11/10/2012. 11:3,5-10 (7t) REQUEST FOR BIDS Seeking bids for the construction of a neighborhood marker for Apple Knolls Estates in Martinsburg. Available contractors should provide design drawings/details and alternatives, cost quotes for each, estimated duration of work, and availability. Eligible bidders will be responsible for all permitting and insurance. Interested parties should contact (304) 263-8081 for more information, NO LATER THAN 11/10/2012. 11:3,5-10 (7t) TRUSTEE’S SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE The undersigned Substitute Trustee, by virtue of the authority vested in him by that certain Deed of Trust, dated the 16th day of June, 2008, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Jefferson County, West Virginia, in Trust Deed Book 1723, at page 160 and re-recorded in Trust Deed Book 1724, at page 561, Pamela S. Simone did convey unto Richard A. Pill, Esq., Trustee(s), certain real property described in said Deed of Trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Seneca Trustees, Inc., as Substitute Trustee by a

110

Legals/ Public Notices

Substitution of Trustee dated December 22, 2009 and recorded in the aforesaid Clerk’s office; and default having been made under the aforementioned Deed of Trust, and the undersigned Substitute Trustee having been instructed by Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Jefferson County Courthouse in Charles Town, West Virginia, on

November 27, 2012 at 1:00 o’clock pm

the following described real estate, together with its improvements, easements and appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in Shepherdstown District, Jefferson County, West Virginia, and more particularly described as follows: Lot Number 15, Phase 2, Colonial Hills, Shepherdstown District, containing 4,171.525 square feet, as designated on the plat dated November 10, 2004, made by Alpha Associates Incorporated title, “Colonial Hills Phase 2 Final Plat”, and of record in the Office of the Clerk Commission of Jefferson County, West Virginia, in Plat Book No. 21, at page 896 (Slide No. 1482B), to which reference is hereby made. At the time of the execution of the Deed of Trust, this property was reported to have an address of: 63 Swearingen Way, Shepherdstown, WV 25443. The referenced real estate will be conveyed with no covenants of warranty, and subject to all covenants, restrictions, easements, rights of way and reservations which may be a matter of record in the aforesaid Clerk’s Office or visible upon the ground, all prior liens and encumbrances, including, without limitation, liens for real estate taxes, incinerator, sanitary and sewer charges. The purchasers at the sale shall be responsible for paying the recording costs and also the tax on the privilege of transferring real property (the cost of the tax stamp to be affixed to the deed). The purchasers shall be responsible for payment of all real estate taxes. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Substitute Trustee shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. TERMS: $24,000.00 in cash and/or certified funds as deposit with the balance due and payable within 30 days of the day of sale. FEDERAL TAX LIEN: In the event that there are Federal Tax Liens against the property, the United States would have the right to redeem the property within a period of 120 days from the date of such sale or the period allowable for redemption under local law, whichever is longer. Pursuant to the Deed of Trust, the Trustee may postpone the sale by public announcement at the time and place designated or by posting a notice of the same, and act by agent in the execution of the sale. The parties secured by the Deed of Trust reserve the right to purchase the property at such sale. SENECA TRUSTEES, INC. 6108 Mid Atlantic Drive Morgantown, WV 26508 (304) 413-0044 (304) 292-2918 Toll free: (888) 534-3132 Reference File No. 20-031935-09 10:31,11:7 (2t) TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated December 28, 2007, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 2220, at page 0430, Jeanine K. Hansell did convey unto Stephen M. Matthias, Esq., Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401 on: November 26, 2012 At 12:04 PM The following described parcel of real estate, situate, lying and being in Opequon District, Berkeley County, West Virginia, being more particularly described as follows: Lot 54 of Manor Park, Phase 2, as shown on that Plat of Manor Park, Phase 2, recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of

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Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Plat Cabinet 12, at Slide 56, together with the right to use the streets and roadways shown on the aforesaid Plat. AND BEING that same real estate conveyed from Dan Ryan Builders, Inc. to Jeanine K. Hansell, by Deed dated December 28, 2007, of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, immediately prior hereto. SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record in existence. 165 Quartz Road, Martinsburg, WV 25404 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $21,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

10:31,11:7

(2t)

TRUSTEES‘ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated March 11, 2008, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 2253, at page 23, Rodney C. Fulk and Sherry M. Fulk did convey unto William B. Summers, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401on: November 26, 2012 At 12:08 PM All those two (2) certain parcels of real estate, together with the improvements thereon and the appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in Martinsburg District, Berkeley County, West Virginia, and more particularly described as follows: Lot 2 and Lot 3, Block 30, substituted Map Plat A of the Rosemont Company‘s Addition to the Town of Martinsburg, as shown and described on a Plat thereof which is recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, west Virginia, in Deed Book 125, Page 278, and being known for postal purposes as 116 N. Delaware Avenue, Martinsburg, West Virginia (Tax Map 8, Parcel 15).


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Legals/ Public Notices

This conveyance is made subject to all restrictive covenants, conditions, easements, rights of way and limitations of record, particularly those set forth in a Deed from The Rosemont Company, a Corporation, to Virginia Riley Shipley dated the 1st day of August, 1946, and recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office in Deed Book 178, at Page 652. Being the same property conveyed to Sherry M. Fulk and Rodney C. Fulk by Janet R. Rountree, Executrix of the Estate of Virginia R. Shipley, deceased, by Deed dated October 31, 2001 and recorded in Book 680 at Page 642. 116 North Delaware Avenue, Martinsburg, WV 25401 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $24,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

10:31,11:7

(2t)

TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated January 26, 2007, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 2073, at page 27, Bradley D. Kinser and Angelic Kinser did convey unto Lenders First Choice, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401on: November 26, 2012 At 12:02 PM That certain lot or parcel of land, with the improvements thereon and the appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in Opequon District, Berkeley County, West Virginia, and more particularly bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a corner stake in an original fence line corner to Downs; thence with Downs S 88 degrees E 242 feet to a stake in the fence; thence with other lands of Horner, S 31 degrees W 202 feet to a stake; thence still with other lands of Horner, N 88 degrees W 242 feet to a stake in the easterly side of a 12 foot roadway; thence with the Easterly

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side of said 12 foot roadway N 31 degrees E 202 feet to the point of beginning, containing 1 acre, more or less, as shown by a plat of said record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 238 at page 505. 175 Parallel Lane, Martinsburg, WV 25401

The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code section 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $29,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

10:31,11:7

(2t)

TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated November 9, 2005, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 1806, at page 629, Donald W. Gordon and Myerling L. Gordon did convey unto James B. Crawford, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401on: November 26, 2012 At 12:00 PM Beginning at a stake on the Southerly side of West Virginia Secondary Route No. 32 and the Northeasterly corner of other land of Lawrence W. Helmick, et ux; thence with the Southerly edge of said road, S. 55 10‘ E. a distance of One Hundred (100) feet to a stake on the Southerly edge of said road and the Northwesterly corner of land owned by Judy; thence S. 33 28‘ W. a distance Two Hundred Twenty (220) feet along Judy, in part, and along Helmick, in part, to a stake, corner of Helmick; thence N. part and along Helmick, in part to a stake, corner of Helmick, thence N. 55∫ 10‘ W. a distance of One Hundred (100) feet to a stake, corner of other land of said Helmick; thence N. 33 28‘ East a distance of Two Hundred Twenty (220) feet to the point of the beginning, containing .50 of an acre, according to a Plat prepared by R.L. Long, Jr. dated March 30, 1972, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the

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County Court of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 259, at Page 598.

4118 Tabler Station Road, Inwood, WV 25428 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code section 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $14,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

10:31,11:7

(2t)

TRUSTEES‘ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated May 23, 2008, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 2272, at page 222, David Whalen and Bernadette Whalen did convey unto Old Republic (Randy Conrad), Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401on: November 26, 2012 At 12:06 PM ALL THAT CERTAIN parcel of real estate, with improvements thereon, and the appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in Martinsburg District, Berkeley County, West Virginia, being more particularly bounded and described as follows: “Remainder Lot B”, containing 0.2920 acres, as shown upon that certain Plat Plan prepared by Gamma Associates, dated February 25, 1991, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the Count Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed Book 480, at page 648. AND BEING the same parcel of real estate conveyed to David K. Whalen and Bernadette Whalen by Deed dated July 1, 1997, from Amalia O. Savelli and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed Book 583, at page 554. 217 North Delaware Avenue, Martinsburg, WV 25401 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing

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Legals/ Public Notices

real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $19,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

10:31,11:7

(2t)

TRUSTEES’ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated February 14, 2005, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 1599, at page 436, Darren C. Roberts and Kimberly D. Roberts did convey unto Scott K. Swaim, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401on: November 26, 2012 At 12:10 PM All that certain lot or parcel of real estate with the improvements and appurtenances thereunto belonging situate in the Gerrardstown District of Berkeley County, West Virginia, being more particularly bounded and described as follows: Lot A, containing 1.449 Acres and Residue Lot, containg 1.453 Acres as shown on the plat of survey dated February 8, 1995 , prepared by Truman, Yebernetsky & Roberts, Inc., which plat is recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia in Deed Book 587, at Page 439. Subject to that certain deed of easement and right of way recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office in Deed Book 749, at Page 72. And being the same real estate which was conveyed to Darren C. Roberts and Kimberly D. Roberts by deed dated August 26th, 2002 from Tabb Lee Robers and Jennifer L. Roberts and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed Book 709 at Page 551. Less and Except Lot A, containing 1.449 acres, as described in Outsale Deed between Darren C. Roberts and Kimberley D. Roberts unto Donald R. Stotelmyer and Betty L. Stotelmyer in Book 925, Page 619 on 04/28/2009. 278 Runneymeade Road, Bunker Hill, WV 25413 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way,

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conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code section 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $23,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

10:31,11:7

(2t)

TRUSTEES‘ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated January 10, 2007, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 2056, at page 199, Donna Susan Runyon and Terry Lee Runyon and Gary Wade Runyon, Sr. did convey unto Randall R. Conrad, II, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401 on:

December 10, 2012 at 12:02 PM

ALL THAT CERTAIN lot or parcel of real estate, with the improvements thereon and the appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate in Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia, being more particularly bounded and described as follows: “Beginning at a point on the East side of South Church Street and 40 feet (Measured Northwardly) from a stake (No. 2) corner of F.S. Hooge; thence Northwardly along the East side of said Church Street 35 feet; thence Eastwardly 51 1/2 feet along the Eversole property to the Copenhaver lot; thence Southwardly along the aforesaid lot 35 feet to the property of J.W. Snowden; thence West-

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wardly with said property 51 1/2 feet to the place of beginning.” AND BEING the same parcel of real estate conveyed to Kenneth W. Runyon by Deed dated June 24, 1999, from Beulah Frances Cazer by Tina L. Yommer and Steven A. Yommer, her Attorneys-in-Fact, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia in Deed Book 623, at Page 316. The said Kenneth W. Runyon passed from this life on May 19, 2005, and by virtue of his Last Will and Testament devised said property unto Donna Susan Runyon, Gary Wade Runyon, Sr., Terry Lee Runyon, Donna Susan Runyon, Trustee for Dale Brent Runyon and Geraldine M. Murray. 316 South Church Street, Martinsburg, WV 25401 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $7,047 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

11:7,14

(2t)

TRUSTEES‘ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated December 21, 2007, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 2216, at page 189, Samuel Crouse and Bradley Wolford did convey unto James B. Crawford III, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at

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the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401 on:

December 10, 2012 at 12:06 PM

All that certain lot, with any improvements thereunto belonging, situate in the City of Martinsburg District, in Berkeley County, West Virginia. All of Lot No. 424, Section 2, Phase 1, The Gallery Subdivision as set forth on a Final Plat dated May 1, 2006, prepared by Greenway Engineering, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia in Plat Cabinet 12, at Slide 109. 317 Bertelli Court, Martinsburg, WV 25403 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $17,902 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

11:7,14

(2t)

TRUSTEES‘ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated March 24, 2003, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 1210, at page 321, Martin Warriner and Rebecca Warriner did convey unto James B. Crawford, III, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the

110

Legals/ Public Notices

Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401 on:

December 10, 2012 at 12:04 PM

All those certain lot or parcels of land with the improvements and appurtenances thereunto belonging, situate, lying and being in Arden District, Berkeley County, West Virginia and more particularly described as follows: Lot No. 35, Section 1, Phase 2 of Crestfield Subdivision as shown upon the plat of Section 1, Phase 2, of Crestfield Subdivision, dated October 9, 2002, made by P.C. DiMagno Engineers-Surveyors, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Plat Cabinet 9, at Slide 189, together with the right to traverse the streets and roads of said Subdivision in common with other Crestfield Subdivision lot owners for purposes of ingress and egress to and from said real estate. 226 Bunting Avenue, Martinsburg, WV 25401 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $15,811 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

11:7,14

(2t)

TRUSTEES‘ SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated August 28, 2006, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 1977, at page 480, Sharon L. Self-Vitale did convey unto David D. Pill, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk‘s


C4 — The Journal Wednesday, November 7, 2012

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Legals/ Public Notices

Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Berkeley County Courthouse, 100 West King Street, Martinsburg, West Virginia 25401 on:

December 10, 2012 at 12:08 PM

All that certain lot or parcel of real estate together with the improvements thereon and appurtenances thereto belonging, situate in the City of Martinsburg District, Berkeley County, West Virginia, and more particularly described as follows: All that certain parcel of real estate, with the improvements thereon, situate and being in the City of Martinsburg, Berkeley County, West Virginia, being known for postal purposes as 828 Virginia Avenue , Martinsburg, and being known and designated as Lot No. 2, Block 65, of the M.M.M. & I. Co‘s Addition, as shown on that certain plat recorded among the Berkeley County Land Records in Deed Book 89, at Page 3. AND BEING the same parcel of real estate conveyed to Sharon L. Self-Vitale, by Deed dated the 15th day of August, 2006, from C&F Rentals, LLC. a West Virginia limited liability company, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Berkeley County, West Virginia, immediately preceding this instrument. 828 Virginia Avenue, Martinsburg, WV 25401 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser‘s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale

110

Legals/ Public Notices

describe above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in “AS IS” condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees‘ deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code Sect. 38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser‘s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $13,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier‘s check made payable to “Teays Valley Trustees, LLC,” and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956

http://foreclosure.closingsource.net

11:7,14

(2t)

FREE BEES

111 Bargains Under $500

AIR HOCKEY TABLE, Harvard, 6’x3’, owners manual $40. 304-229-5064

AIR PURIFIER, Ionic Pro, (no filters needed), pd. $190 at Bed & Bath, asking $50. 304-754-5352

AMPLIFIERS- Frontman 212R, $120. Randen R675D, $150. 304-725-8540/582-5973

BARRELS (10) 55 gallon metal w/removable lids. Like new, great for feed, burning, fuel. 2 for $25 304-267-4648, 268-5952 BASEBALL CARD Factory, Topps, 1987, sealed set, 792 cards. $25 304-263-1383 BASEBALL CARDS, 5 boxes, $40 304-267-0898

BASKETS, Longaberger, Ten, all for $400 or $45 ea. Call after 4pm 304-821-1895 BICYCLE, Boys, 12 in. w/helmet, like new $12. 304-267-9166

BIKE, Schwinn, 100 year commemorative, 1874-1974, like new. $500. 304-258-5619

BIRD CAGE, lg. w/2 perches. Made for smaller birds, approx. 3 ft x 2 ft $25 304-876-9300

111 Bargains Under $500

BOOKS, 65 hardcover, $40 obo 304-229-5662

BOOTS, High top Wolverine boots, 10 1/2, extra wide, never worn, $189 new, will sell for $100 firm 304-725-6234 / 676-8717 BULBS, new, 40W, 48”, cool white, 30/box $35 304-229-5694

BUNK-BED- U.S. Army WWII wooden. Easy setup (8 bolts). $100. Call Joe 304-725-9179 BUSH HOG, 5 FT., 3 pt hitch, like new, used 6 times, $450, negotiable 304-274-2497

CAKE DECORATING EQUIPMENT- Retiring after 30 yrs. Stands, pans etc. All for $250. 304-616-2939

CAR PARTS: Parting out ‘97 VW Jetta GT 2.0 gas engine (no trans). $499 or call for price per part: 304-582-5595 CAT TREE, carpeted, 5 1/2 ft., exc. cond., 5 platforms w/tubular swing. $100 obo 304-702-3940

CHINA, antique, variety of pieces. $75 for everything. 304-731-0391

CHINA, 30pcs. set for 6, white w/ gold trim, plates, soup bowls, salad plates, cups,saucers, perfect $35 304-229-0332

COFFE TABLE, oval w/ 2 matching drop-leaf end tables. All for $125 304-754-3978

COMMODE - Adult portable, $75. Walker, w/ wheels, $25. 2 Shower chairs, $35/1-$25 Call 304-725-2480,10-2

COMPUTER, HP, Windows XP Pavilion. Pur chased from Sam’s Club. $125 304-725-2569, 279-4869 COVERALLS, womens snowsuit, grey, size S, St. John’s Bay, like new, $20. 304-728-8430

CRICKET CAKE MACHINE, new in box & lg. assortment of edible fondant images.$200obo. 304-258-2933 CROSS-BOW w/ scope. New bolts and cocking device. $150 obo. 304-886-1264

CUPBOARD, old, antique, has glass doors, wooden doors & a drawer. $300 304-676-1026 DECANTERS, 1976 Bicentennial, 8 Patriot & 2 musical bookends, painted porcelain. $500 304-264-2283

DESK, Maple, secretary, small w/drawer & storage area, 2’wide x 3’tall, 12” deep, $80 304-725-4167 DINING ROOM TABLEStucturally perfect, little wear. Seats 6, includes 4 chairs. $100 obo. 304-725-4775

DOLLS, Royal Doulton, 5 Victorian dolls, $175 304-283-1089

111 Bargains Under $500

DRESSER, antique w/mirror, good condition. $175 304-886-1288

DRUM SET, 5 pc. set inc. cymbals & stands, throne, dbl bass pedals & Remo heads. $275 304-671-1669 EXERCISE BIKERecumbent, indoor, like new, $100 304-262-1825

FILE CABINET- 4 drawer, metal, like new, $10. 304-274-6044 FREE Sapling cedar, maple, etc. Berry bushes, you dig. 304-707-2905 GLIDER CHAIR w/ ottoman, like new. $125 304-725-7322

GOLF CLUBS, handmade metal shaft, used 2 times. $100. Golf bags (2) $10 ea. 304-754-6066 GOLF HAND CART: carbon fiber, sturdy, light weight. $30 304-754-6066 GUN CABINET, holds 6 rifles & storage drawer, like new. $100 304-731-0391 HAY/GRAIN wall mount racks, heavy duty, exc. cond. $45 for pair. 304-258-0738

HEATER, forced air, military, 120,000 BTU, model H-82, 73 hrs on unit. $325 obo. Call Mark 301-991-9172 HORSE CLIPPERSheavy duty, extra blades, new, Oster Clipmaster, $45, New blades, $15 304-596-4253

HORSE, old child’s riding, metal. Asking $100. 304-725-5073 JACKET, Men’s denim, Arizona brand w/sherpa lining, size large. $20 304-267-4897

JEANS, boys, AE Size (x3) & Aero (26x28), Urban Pipeline, Lee Dungarees, sz 14. 9 pr./$25 304-229-0881 KINDLE FIRE w/case & stand, like new, hardly used. $125 304-264-0172

LAWN SWEEPER, Agri-Fab 42”, pull behind tractor. $130 Call 304-582-4626

MEAT/FOOD GRINDER, oyster, works good/good condition. $40. Call 304-263-2653

MODEM, USRobotics 56K USB +CD. Connect online quicker, send email attachs faster. $45. 304-263-6858 NORDIC Track Achiever cross country ski exerciser, takes 2 to move, stored for 2 yrs. FREE! 304-258-5422.

ORNAMENTS, Christmas, gingerbread theme, 46 pcs+2 standing ginger -bread people, all for $55. 304-876-1558 PLANT STANDS, 2 column, 3 ft. tall, $10 ea. 304-596-4253

D ryw all,B athroom s, B asem ents,Flooring , Int/E xt Painting , R oofs & R otten W ood R epairs

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Rem odelin g * D ecks & Addition s Pressure Clean in g * Free Estim ates

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PRINTER, HP 1020, Laser jet, & 2 new cartridges, $100. 304-702-0955

QUILTING FRAME, Q-Snap. Free standing, 28”x39” work surface, ht. 30 1/2 in. PVC type. $50 304-876-1558

RECLINER Chairs, many styles, $65 - $85 304-262-0002 RING- Diamond and sapphires, $295. 304-283-1089

ROCKING CHAIRS, (2), wooden, $95 304-262-0002 SAFE, combination, not fireproof. $35 304-229-5662

SAW, Craftsman Compound 10” on a rigid miter saw utility vehicle. Asking $250 obo, Call 304-671-5814 SAW, DeWalt 12” Combination miter saw in exc. cond., $195. Miter saw stand, $75. 304-267-0209 SHOES, Men’s black, steel toe shoes, size 11, like new. $20. 304-267-4897

SHOWER DOOR, New, sliding, framed, Kohler, “Naturalist” glass. $100. 304-258-8775 SINK, white pedestal base & bowl, new. $70 304-229-0332

111 Bargains Under $500

111 Bargains Under $500

SMARTPHONE, Samsung Galaxy Prevail, new, sealed/box, no activation fee or contract, $80 304-229-7154

TRAINS (HO) lg. assortment of accessories, platform, bldgs., landscaping, etc. Take all $400 304-267-6745

STEREO, surround sound system by RCA, inc. 5 speakers, sub woofer, $125, obo. 304 596-1522

TREES - ready for you to cut for firewood. FREE! 304-274-3268

SOFA & Matching chair, barely used, apt. size, charcoal. $500 firm. 304-725-8540/582-5973

STOOLS, solid oak swivel bar stools, great condition, 3 total, $110 304-229-4299 STOVE, white enamel, Rockwood, 2 burner, coal/wood. $100 304-267-8203 SWING, lightweight, wooden, $25 304-274-6044 TABLE, dining room, cut glass $175. Call 304-702-5610

TABLE, Oak, claw foot w/leaf & 6 chairs. Hutch w/glass doors. $175 all. 304-676-6931

TIRES - 4, P205-70-R-15, All season, excellent condition.$200 obo. Call 10am-2pm 304-725-2480

TIRES (2) P255-70R15 tires (2) P315-60R15. TA Drag Radials, mounted on aluminum mags,new $300 304-725-6234 / 676-8717 TIRES, Snow, 225x15, Michelin on Ford wheels, excellent shape. $90 304-725-4167

TREES- Christmas trees, multi-colored lights (1) 7’ $15, & (1) 4’ $10, wreaths & swags $2 - $5 ea. 304-876-1558

TRUCK RACK, Overcab, fits 8’ bed, $115. Skid fuel tank, 225 gal. w/pump $240. 304-676-6213

TV - 32” Sharp, excellent condition $100, obo, leave message 304-820-7695

111 Bargains Under $500

WHEELCHAIR, Electric, excellent condition. $500, firm 304-676-3955

WHEELS, Cavalier factory aluminum, 16x6 w/205-55-16 tires, fits ‘95 -2003, $200 firm. 304-229-5064 WRINGER WASHER, square aluminum tub, works good. $175 304-535-2364

WVU football & basketball game tapes, 40 total, VHS format, free to any Mountaineer fan. 304-725-3783

TYPEWRITER, electric cartridge, w/extra cartridges. $50 304-725-1250 VINTAGE RADIO, 8 track, record player, floor model, wooden, works. $30 304-754-5352

WALNUT, air dried over 25 yrs, $1.25 foot, approx. 300 ft. 304-267-4748

WASHER & DRYER, almost new. $200 for both. 304- 229-5459 WELDER, Lincoln, 180 amp, helmet, cart... $75 Torches, bottles, helmet, cart, $150, or $195/all 304-398-0531 WHEELCHAIR- $65. 304-229-5694

Questions About Delivery Of Your Morning Newspaper Call Circulation Directly at

(304) 596-6447


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PE

LAST

CH

dd 5.66 +.34 4 43.70 +7.89 45 34.80 -.03 14 64.82 -.22 dd 2.07 -.04 ... 1.00 -.02 55 8.74 +.13 7 39.25 +.57 dd 9.62 +.26 15 31.94 +.06 10 31.70 -.63 2 33.12 +.32 61 15.32 -.57 dd .83 -.20 dd .12 +.00 13 582.85 -1.77 13 11.46 +.37 dd 8.66 +.32 dd 7.60 -.35 cc 73.46 +1.10 56 15.19 +.08 13 42.67 +.64 26 9.94 +.19 q 34.33 -1.23 8 35.56 +.48 15 87.29 +.43 13 72.02 +1.61 dd 5.35 +.01 30 33.27 +.18 23 31.39 -.19 12 20.86 +.15 17 46.88 +.25 18 15.49 -1.04 q 13.70 +.13 q 10.10 +.03 53 18.03 +.42 ... 9.05 ... 42 38.49 +.06 6 18.54 +.27 12 17.48 +.08 12 38.47 +1.15 dd 2.20 +.03 20 37.42 +.65 21 24.10 -6.27 20 37.17 -.26 dd 3.49 +.08 7 58.22 +.69 23 35.57 +.01 9 11.90 +.05 q 1.31 -.09 q 17.14 +.57 11 38.79 +.07 6 9 13 q q 10 17 13 21 23 17 21 32 12 30 12 ... 31 14 9 13

9.53 15.32 50.51 15.31 16.49 41.42 50.47 34.74 50.97 30.52 64.07 25.33 71.36 31.95 55.15 91.61 21.17 43.18 43.20 11.42 40.35

+.18 -.23 -.15 -.32 -.53 +1.16 +.15 -.10 +.04 +.46 +.01 +.45 +.62 -.06 -7.73 +.98 -.08 -.01 +.65 +.17 +.89

28

16 10 dd 7 17 ... 10 17 20 13 5 22 dd 12 q q q q q q q q q q 9 13 ... 9 23 11 10 dd 34 10 11 15

4.55

21.59 26.19 2.55 6.00 12.07 3.99 32.76 47.61 5.92 13.83 14.40 62.62 5.31 6.57 16.70 54.86 19.21 9.10 12.89 31.01 38.11 42.13 54.07 82.34 21.73 10.18 15.34 42.88 71.01 26.72 8.59 9.36 7.10 8.54 94.87 53.82

-.09

+.18 +.62 +.02 +.02 +.41 +.09 +.47 +.27 -.41 +.68 +.39 +.24 +.24 +.20 +.31 +.44 +.21 +.02 +.13 +.84 +.32 +.33 +.51 +.61 -.11 +.12 +.19

+.61 +.22 +.22 +.13 +.14 +.13 -1.03 +.77 +.41

16 104.70 +1.48 dd 10.31 +.21 45 7.22 +.20 13 41.38 +.22 9 31.21 +.70 q 50.34 +.95 10 8.16 +.02 17 87.97 +.51 21 45.92 +.25 10 35.03 +.34 dd 6.09 +.25 16 29.86 +.23 ... 26.49 +.08 dd 18.19 +.44 25 23.00 +.49 11 24.27 -1.34 20 28.14 +.16 13 48.50 +.11 55 24.28 +.36 ... 2.77 ... 11 61.50 +.51 17 13.01 -.01 12 2.99 +.48 73 6.56 +.10 16 31.63 +.38

12 11 10 19 ... 15 ... q q q 43 18 dd dd 10 12 5

59.08 80.42 29.04 40.00 21.97 24.71 50.04 65.72 27.00 55.12 17.89 60.37 3.36 4.27 57.34 6.80 9.06

+.35 +.46 +.52 -.25 +.25 +.13 +2.28 +.12 -2.17 -.78 +.05 -.06 -.35 -.15 +.89 +.22 +.16

To add a stock or mutual fund call the stocks editor at 263-8931 ext. 218.

X-Y-Z Xerox Yahoo Zynga n

30-YR T-BONDS 2.92%

p

+.04

CRUDE OIL $88.71

1.24 ... ... ... .20 1.15e .70f 1.44e 2.06f ... ... 1.99e ... 1.10 1.20 ... .88 .50f 2.00 1.25f .17 ... ...

20 13.68 -.08 q 166.30 +3.07 q 142.96 +1.11 21 13.89 ... 4 30.29 +1.45 dd 5.09 -3.11 ... 5.75 +.25 5 2.81 -.02 dd 5.73 -.02 q 40.20 +.04 q 72.75 +1.15 q 16.15 +.18 q 37.43 +.40 21 50.64 +.72 9 11.73 +.16 29 51.71 +.70 7 4.92 ... 12 18.85 +.14 dd 2.40 +.04 ... 16.20 +.32 dd 2.99 +.01 27 64.18 +.58 19 29.94 +.47 19 12.07 +.24 9 11.42 -.24 16 dd dd q dd ... 8 q 41 11 dd ... dd 14 cc ... 11 6 16 22 7 5 dd

24.21 20.47 5.40 32.56 22.26 18.78 30.06 42.31 44.30 9.34 11.82 27.08 3.57 33.94 25.83 11.53 34.32 12.41 98.15 33.46

+.51 +.22 -.12 +.95 +1.13 +.09 +1.18 +.27 +.10 +.16 -3.13 +.17 -.38 -.14 +.15 +.28 +.30 +.19 -.01 +.25

6.67 +.08 17.46 +.09 2.24 ...

Stock Footnotes: Stock Footnotes: cld - Issue has been called for redemption by company. d - New 52week low. ec - Company formerly listed on the American Exchange's Emerging Company Marketplace. g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. h - Does not meet continued-listing standards. lf - Late filing with SEC. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year. The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. pr - Preferences. pp - Holder owes installments of purchase price. rt - Right to buy security at a specified price. rs - Stock has undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within the last year. wi Trades will be settled when the stock is issued. wd When distributed. wt - Warrant, allowing a purchase of a stock. u - New 52-week high. un - Unit,, including more than one security. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Dividend Footnotes: a - Extra dividends were paid, but are not included. b - Annual rate plus stock. c Liquidating dividend. e - Amount declared or paid in last 12 months. f - Current annual rate, which was increased by most recent dividend announcement. i Sum of dividends paid after stock split, no regular rate. j - Sum of dividends paid this year. Most recent dividend was omitted or deferred. k - Declared or paid this year, a cumulative issue with dividends in arrears. m - Current annual rate, which was decreased by most recent dividend announcement. p - Initial dividend, annual rate not known, yield not shown. r Declared or paid in preceding 12 months plus stock dividend. t - Paid in stock, approximate cash value on ex-distribution date. PE Footnotes: q - Stock is a closed-end fund - no P/E ratio shown. cc - P/E exceeds 99. dd - Loss in last 12 months. Source: The Associated Press. Sales figures are unofficial.

OMX

Close: $8.33 0.89 or 12.0% The office supply retailer said that cutting costs pushed its third-quarter net income higher, despite weak demand for electronics. $10

Medifast

Close: $29.11 2.29 or 8.5% Thanks to new advertising and programs, the weight-loss company said that its third-quarter profit rose more than 40 percent. $30

8

28

6

26

4

A

$4.09

S O N 52-week range $8.77

Vol.: 5.7m (3.2x avg.) PE: 17.7 Mkt. Cap: $721.59 m Yield: 1.0%

AOL

AOL

Close: $43.70 7.89 or 22.0% The Internet company posted a third-quarter profit, reversing a loss a year earlier. The results beat Wall Street’s expectations. $45

24

Weight Watchers

50

30

45

Vol.: 10.0m (5.6x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $4.11 b

PE: 4.1 Yield: ...

FUELS

Commodities Oil jumped $3.06 to $88.71 per barrel, its highest settlement price in two weeks. Gold rose, aided by the weakening dollar. Gold and the dollar often move in opposite directions.

$40.60

WTW

A

S O N 52-week range $82.91

Vol.: 3.2m (4.2x avg.) PE: 13.7 Mkt. Cap: $3.08 b Yield: 1.3% CLOSE

Crude Oil (bbl) 88.71 Ethanol (gal) 2.35 Heating Oil (gal) 3.05 Natural Gas (mm btu) 3.62 Unleaded Gas (gal) 2.70 METALS Gold (oz) Silver (oz) Platinum (oz) Copper (lb) Palladium (oz)

PE: 31.0 Yield: ...

Close: $55.37 7.89 or 16.6% The weight-loss company said that its third-quarter earnings fell, but its results still easily beat Wall Street expectations. $60

35

$13.49

S O N 52-week range $29.20

Vol.: 560.1k (4.3x avg.) Mkt. Cap: $451.96 m

55 S O N 52-week range $43.93

A

$12.97

40 A

MED

PVS.

85.65 2.31 2.98 3.55 2.62

CLOSE PVS. 1714.10 1682.20 32.02 31.11 1558.30 1542.70 3.51 3.47 619.35 602.20

AGRICULTURE CLOSE Cattle (lb) 1.26 Coffee (lb) 1.51 Corn (bu) 7.41 Cotton (lb) 0.70 Lumber (1,000 bd ft) 324.70 Orange Juice (lb) 1.08 Soybeans (bu) 15.17 Wheat (bu) 8.77

PVS. 1.25 1.51 7.36 0.70 314.40 1.08 15.04 8.66

%CHG

+3.57 +0.13 +2.35 +1.77 +3.00

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DFA EmMkCrEqI EmMktValI IntSmCapI USLgValI Davis NYVentA m Dodge & Cox Bal Income IntlStk Stock

DoubleLine TotRetBdN b

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40.04 40.43 33.90 11.27 18.07 30.74 28.51 30.44 53.10 39.28 31.43 19.99 20.04 19.55 18.16 19.65

31.20

19.36 28.81 15.24 22.70 36.42

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77.34 +.61 +16.8 13.93 -.02 +7.8 33.33 +.34 +9.0 120.38 +1.44 +20.4 11.37

...

+8.8

+.21

+9.0

10.27

+.02 +16.2

20.19 49.22 9.38 77.60 29.21 14.48 12.06 14.37 11.81 94.86 39.43 73.76 19.52 10.27 11.40 11.02

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28.83

22.94

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+.12 +11.8

+3.06

EURO $1.2817

+.0025

p

GOLD $1,714.10

+31.90

p

Energized sales Monster Beverage has been getting a boost this year from strong demand for its energy drinks, despite growing concern over regulations. The soda and juice maker, which reports third-quarter earnings today, has seen sales increase on an annual basis by double-digit percentage rates the past three quarters. Monster has been expanding further into international markets, which has helped drive sales.

The lame-duck market Investors may be in store for a big year-end move in the stock market, given how tight this presidential race has been. The brokerage firm LPL Financial analyzed market performance following the nine presidential races since 1976 and found that stocks had bigger price swings following tight contests. The lack of a clear front-runner only causes investors to remain uncertain about how to proceed. LPL categorized four races as close — 1976, 1980, 2000 and 2004 — based on the fact that the candidate who ultimately lost was ahead in the Gallup polls conducted during the campaign’s final two weeks. After those four elections, stocks moved an average 6.4 percent up or down by year’s end. That’s

nearly triple the average 2.2 percent change following elections that weren’t as close. One exception was 2008, an election that was relatively close, but not as tight as this one. Stocks proceeded to fall by nearly 10 percent after the election, but that year was an outlier because of the financial meltdown. By almost any measure this year’s election has been a tight one. A narrow victory is sure to deepen polarization and leave the winner without a strong mandate to face mounting problems — most urgently, averting the “fiscal cliff” of higher taxes and deep automatic cuts in spending to take effect beginning Jan. 1. LPL cautions that the negotiations to strike a deal, coming on the heels of a hard-fought election, could drive wide market swings and result in modest losses.

1976 Carter defeats Ford

6.2%

1980 Reagan defeats Carter

Post-election performance: The S&P 500 index has risen by the end of the year following two-thirds of the presidential elections since 1976. Close elections

4.2%

-1.1%

1984 Reagan defeats Mondale

1988 G.H.W. Bush defeats Dukakis

1.5% 4.3%

1992 Clinton defeats G.H.W. Bush

4.1%

1996 Clinton defeats Dole -7.6%

2000 G.W. Bush defeats Gore 7.6%

2004 G.W. Bush defeats Kerry -9.6%

2008 Obama defeats McCain Average change after close elections: +/- 6% Average change after other races: (ex-2008): +/- 2% Mark Jewell; J. Paschke • AP

Source: LPL Financial

Stocks of Local Interest NAME

AT&T Inc Alcatel-Lucent BB&T Corp Baker Michael CBS Corp B Citigroup City Holding Columbia Labs Corning Inc DuPont Equifax Inc Frnkln Univ Honeywell Intl Humana Huntgtn Bancshs Lowes Cos MFS Multm Tr PCM Fund Penney JC Co Inc Praxair Inc Putnam Premier 3M Company US Steel Corp Verizon Comm Viacom Inc B WGL Holdings Inc WalMart Strs Waste Mgmt Inc

52-WK RANGE LO HI

TICKER

T ALU BBT BKR CBS C CHCO CBRX GLW DD EFX FT HON HUM HBAN LOW MMT PCM JCP PX PPT MMM X VZ VIAB WGL WMT WM

27.41 0.91 21.03 17.50 23.35 23.30 29.44 0.55 10.62 43.06 33.38 6.37 48.82 59.92 4.66 21.48 6.40 10.50 19.06 93.46 5.00 75.49 17.67 35.17 39.86 37.65 56.26 29.77

MutualFunds

Stock indexes rose for the second straight day Tuesday as investors NAV waited to see the results of the presidential election. Investors hope the FUND close of the campaign will bring more clarity on how policies and reguAmerican Funds lations by the government will affect corporate profits. They also want AMCAPA m 21.35 to see whether the country can close the gap between its revenue and BalA m 20.34 spending. Energy stocks led the market higher, lifted by a rise in the BondA m 12.95 price of crude oil. Computer Sciences jumped to the largest gain in the CapIncBuA m 52.88 Standard & Poor’s 500 index after reporting quarterly earnings above CapWldBdA m 21.51 financial analysts’ expectations. The S&P 500 has risen in four of the CpWldGrIA m 36.43 last five days. OfficeMax

p

M $41.38 Macy’s sales trends in the $44 $30.42 July-to-September period bode well for the 36 company’s latest earnings. The retailer said last ’12 week that revenue at its 28 est. stores grew by nearly 4 Operating percent to $6.08 billion, $0.32 $0.29 EPS ahead of Wall Street’s 3Q ’11 3Q ’12 expectations. The pickup Price-earnings ratio: 13 in sales also continued based on past 12 months’ results into October. Macy’s Dividend: $0.80 Div. yield: 1.9% reports third-quarter results today. Source: FactSet

SHFL Ent ... SpdrGold ... S&P500ETF2.85e Schwab .24 SeagateT 1.28 SvcSource ... SiderurNac .43e SiriusXM ... SprintNex ... SP HlthC .76e SP Engy 1.22e SPDR Fncl .25e SP Inds .80e Standex .28 Staples .44 Starbucks .84f SumFWV ... Symantec ... Synovus .04 TaiwSemi .50e Tellabs .08 Teradata ... TexInst .84f TitanMet .30 TwoHrbInv 1.44m U-V-W UBWV UtdContl USecBc AL US OilFd USSteel Vale SA ValeroE VangEmg VerizonCm VishayInt Vivus Vodafone Vringo Walgrn WREIT WeathfIntl WellsFargo WstnUnion Whrlpl WmsCos

...

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page C5

Brighter sales outlook

Kraft’s new start

KRFT $44.70 Kraft Foods delivers its first earnings $48 $45.10 report today since spinning off its global snack business. 45 The company’s third-quarter results will give investors a glimpse of how Kraft operates without the benefit of 42 est. brands such as Oreo, Cadbury and Operating Nabisco. As of October, those brands $0.88 $0.69 EPS are now part of a separate public 2Q ’12 3Q ’13 company, Mondelez International. Price-earnings ratio: lost money Kraft retains some well-known gro- based on past 3 months’ results cery brands of its own, including Dividend: $2.00 Div. yield: 4.5% Velveeta, Miracle Whip and Oscar Mayer. Source: FactSet FrontierCm .40 G-H-I GenElec .68 GenMotors ... GenOn En ... Genworth ... Goodyear ... Groupon ... Hallibrtn .36 HarleyD .62 HeclaM .06e Hertz ... HewlettP .53 HomeDp 1.16 HovnanE ... HuntBncsh .16 iShGold ... iShBraz 1.48e iSh HK .55e iShJapn .20e iSTaiwn .47e iShSilver ... iShChina25 .93e iShEMkts .82e iS Eafe 1.72e iShR2K 1.32e Intel .90 Interpublic .24 ItauUnibH .60e J-K-L JPMorgCh 1.20 JohnJn 2.44 JohnsnCtl .72 Keycorp .20 Kinross g .16 LSI Corp ... LeapFrog ... LockhdM 4.60f LyonBas A 1.60a M-N-O M&T Bk 2.80 MGM Rsts ... MIPS Tech ... Macys .80 MarathnO .68 MktVGold .15e MarvellT .24 McDnlds 3.08f Merck 1.68 MetLife .74 MicronT ... Microsoft .92f Mondelez .52 MorgStan .20 NCR Corp ... NYSE Eur 1.20 NetApp ... NewmtM 1.40 NewsCpA .17 NokiaCp .26e NorflkSo 2.00 Nvidia ... OfficeDpt ... OnSmcnd ... Oracle .24 P-Q-R PNC 1.60 ParkerHan 1.64 PeabdyE .34 PnnNGm ... Petrobras .74e Pfizer .88 Phillips66 n 1.00f PwShs QQQ .61e PrUVxST rs ... PrUShSP rs ... PulteGrp ... Qualcom 1.00 QksilvRes ... RF MicD ... Raytheon 2.00 RegionsFn .04 RschMotn ... S-T

n

STOCKS

Fidelity Spartan 500IdxAdvtg 500IdxInstl 500IdxInv

50.68 50.68 50.67

+.40 +16.5 +.40 +16.5 +.39 +16.4

FrankTemp-Frank Fed TF A m 12.75

... +10.6

First Eagle GlbA m

49.46

+.28

+8.1

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... +12.3 +.01 +12.9 +.01 +12.2

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Ivy AssetStrC m

+.12

FrankTemp-Mutual Discov A m 29.88

Harbor CapApInst IntlInstl d

42.03 59.78 24.76

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13.54 13.48

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+.20 +13.5

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+8.3

Legg Mason/Western EmgMktsC m 19.97 GlblEqA m 9.30 LgCpValA m 20.28

+.23 ... +.10 +9.8 +.21 +19.4

Loomis Sayles BondI BondR b

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Longleaf Partners LongPart 31.02 Lord Abbett ShDurIncA m

15.08 15.01 4.65

MFS WVMuniBdA m 11.76

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Oppenheimer DevMktA m DevMktY

PIMCO AllAssetI AllAuthIn ComRlRStI HiYldIs LowDrIs RealRet TotRetA m TotRetAdm b TotRetC m TotRetIs

29.49 19.44

34.57 34.26

12.73 11.25 6.84 9.57 10.64 12.61 11.57 11.57 11.57 11.57

+.28 +15.7

...

...

+6.3

+8.5

-.01 +11.0 -.01 +10.8

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CLOSE

CHG %CHG

34.80 1.00 29.25 22.06 34.43 38.47 35.49 .62 11.90 44.55 50.61 7.38 63.53 76.16 6.57 33.29 7.38 12.01 23.53 110.00 5.59 90.86 22.26 44.30 50.61 39.33 73.76 32.23

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Permanent Portfolio

49.17

+.40

Scout Interntl d

31.87

7 1 7 5 8 0 8 1 3 2 0 9 0 5 8 0 0 8 2 8 7 8 4 7 7 3 9 4

38.58 2.66 34.37 27.43 38.32 38.72 37.50 2.96 15.75 57.50 51.36 7.56 63.48 96.46 7.25 33.63 7.41 12.60 43.18 116.93 5.90 95.46 32.52 48.77 56.91 44.99 77.60 36.35

TotRetrnD b TotlRetnP

Schwab S&P500Sel d T Rowe Price BlChpGr CapApprec EqIndex d EqtyInc GrowStk HiYield d IntlStk d MidCapVa MidCpGr NewEra NewHoriz NewIncome R2025 Real d Rtmt2020 Rtmt2030 SciTech ShTmBond SmCpStk SmCpVal d USBdEnIdx d USL/CCr Value Thornburg IntlValI d

11.57 11.57

-.02 -.02

-0.1 -2.0 +1.1 +0.5 +1.2 +3.1 +2.5 +2.7 +0.4 +0.5 +1.3 -1.5 +1.2 +0.8 +3.1 +0.7 +0.1 +0.3 +0.8 +0.5 +0.4 +1.4 +5.3 +0.2 -0.2 +0.6 +0.8 -0.2

+9.7 +9.9

+2.1

22.62

+.18 +16.5

45.18 23.35 38.53 26.44 37.24 6.91 14.06 25.17 59.13 43.88 35.31 9.95 13.19 20.83 18.00 18.94 26.29 4.86 35.99 39.42 11.73 15.20 26.51

+.18 +.12 +.30 +.26 +.14 ... +.13 +.17 +.46 +.55 +.16 -.02 +.08 +.05 +.10 +.11 +.31 ... +.27 +.35 -.03 +.09 +.26

27.05

+.23 +11.1

+.09

USAA AggGrow 35.93 +.23 CABond 11.12 +.01 CapGrowth 6.77 +.07 CorstnMod 13.82 +.03 CorstnModAgrsv23.25 +.07 EmergMkt 17.07 +.10 ExtMktIdx 13.28 +.11 FirstStGr 11.47 +.06 GNMA 10.34 -.02 Grow 16.55 +.13 GrowInc 16.26 +.12 GrowTax 14.68 +.05 HYOpp 8.71 +.01 Income 13.54 -.02 IncomeStk 13.69 +.11 IntermBd 11.02 -.02 Intl 24.82 +.18 NYBond 12.56 +.01 NasdaqIdx 7.72 +.02 PrcMtlMin 30.25 +.67 S&P500M 21.41 +.17 SciTech 14.44 +.10 ShTmBond 9.28 -.01 SmCapStk 14.94 +.13 TaxEInt 13.74 ... TaxELgTm 13.96 ... TaxEShTm 10.85 ... TgtRt2030 12.16 +.06 TgtRt2040 11.61 +.07 TgtRtInc 11.55 +.02 TotRetStr 9.08 +.06 VABond 11.69 ... Value 15.11 +.16 WorldGro 20.98 +.18 Vanguard 500Adml 131.90 +1.04

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+16.5

YTD 1YR WK MO QTR CHG %RTN P/E t r t t s s s s s s s r s s s s t t t s s s s t t s s s

r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r

r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r r

+15.1 -35.9 +16.2 +12.5 +26.9 +46.2 +4.7 -75.2 -8.3 -2.7 +30.6 +10.3 +16.9 -13.1 +19.7 +31.2 +9.8 +11.5 -33.1 +2.9 +7.7 +11.2 -15.9 +10.4 +11.5 -11.1 +23.4 -1.5

500Inv DivGr GNMA GNMAAdml HYCorAdml HltCrAdml HlthCare ITGradeAd InfPrtAdm InfPrtI InflaPro InstIdxI InstPlus InstTStPl IntlGr IntlGrAdm IntlStkIdxAdm IntlStkIdxIPls LTGradeAd LifeMod MuIntAdml MuLtdAdml MuShtAdml Prmcp PrmcpAdml STCor STGradeAd Star TgtRe2015 TgtRe2020 TgtRe2030 TgtRe2035 TgtRe2040 TgtRe2045 TgtRetInc Tgtet2025 TotBdAdml TotBdInst TotBdMkInv TotBdMkSig TotIntl TotStIAdm TotStIIns TotStIdx WellsI WellsIAdm Welltn WelltnAdm WndsIIAdm WndsrII

+25.5 -55.7 +27.1 +8.8 +36.7 +23.1 +11.5 -75.0 -16.4 -5.5 +41.7 +19.5 +19.2 -11.6 +24.4 +56.3 +18.6 +19.4 -29.5 +11.1 +4.0 +15.9 -23.6 +24.3 +25.6 -4.4 +29.9 +6.9

12 13 15 12 13

9 14 21 q 21 10 12 22 q q dd 20 q 14 dd 41 15 20 16 17

DIV

1.76 ... 0.80 ... 0.48f 0.04 1.40 ... 0.36f 1.72 0.72 0.46 1.64f 1.04 0.16 0.64 0.48 0.96a ... 2.20 0.36 2.36 0.20 2.06f 1.10 1.60 1.59 1.42

131.88 +1.03 +16.4 16.84 +.14 +14.2 11.03 -.02 +3.1 11.03 -.02 +3.2 6.06 ... +13.5 62.76 +.34 +19.3 148.70 +.80 +19.3 10.47 -.04 +8.9 29.24 -.07 +6.0 11.91 -.03 +6.0 14.89 -.03 +5.9 131.02 +1.02 +16.5 131.03 +1.02 +16.5 32.28 +.26 +16.0 18.70 +.13 +7.7 59.52 +.40 +7.8 24.14 +.17 +7.0 96.56 +.67 +7.1 11.02 -.09 +12.3 20.97 +.08 +9.8 14.42 ... +8.1 11.19 ... +3.0 15.93 ... +1.3 70.08 +.56 +12.1 72.76 +.59 +12.2 10.87 -.02 +4.0 10.87 -.02 +4.1 20.78 +.08 +10.6 13.54 +.04 +9.6 24.05 +.10 +10.3 23.52 +.13 +11.5 14.16 +.09 +12.1 23.27 +.16 +12.3 14.61 +.10 +12.3 12.24 +.01 +7.3 13.70 +.06 +10.9 11.16 -.03 +4.5 11.16 -.03 +4.5 11.16 -.03 +4.4 11.16 -.03 +4.5 14.43 +.10 +7.0 35.66 +.29 +15.9 35.66 +.28 +15.9 35.65 +.29 +15.8 24.57 +.01 +11.7 59.53 +.03 +11.8 34.41 +.13 +13.6 59.43 +.22 +13.6 52.78 +.52 +18.4 29.73 +.29 +18.3

Waddell & Reed Adv GlbBondA m 4.02

Western Asset MortgBkSecsA m10.88 S/TBdA m 3.93 Yacktman Yacktman d

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Fund footnotes: e – Ex-capital gains distribution. f – Previous day’s quote. n - No-load fund. p – Fund assets used to pay distribution costs. r – Redemption fee or contingent deferred sales load may apply. s – Stock dividend or split. t – Both p and r. x – Ex-cash dividend. NA - No information available. NE - Data in question. NN - Fund does not wish to be tracked. NS - Fund did not exist at start date. Data based on NAVs reported to Lipper, Inc. by 6 p.m. Eastern.


ENTERTAINMENT

n’t what George (Jeremy Sisto) expected in the new episode “Foam Finger.” Alan Tudyk also stars.

Page C6 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

DRS.

DONOHUE & ROACH Your Good Healt h

Unsafe, safe food treatments

DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND ROACH: I purchased a large bag of green grapes. They taste great, but the bag stated that the grapes were treated with sulfur dioxide. Is this safe? Can the chemical be removed? — M.L. ANSWER: Sulfur dioxide is used as a preservative, especially in dried fruits, but also in grapes (both fresh and in winemaking). Sulfur dioxide is considered to be safe; however, some people are sensitive to it, and it may even cause asthma symptoms in those who are predisposed. Washing the grapes in plain tap water is effective. Alternatively, you could buy organic grapes, which have much less pesticide residue than ones conventionally grown. But most people have no trouble with foods treated with sulfur dioxide. DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND ROACH: I take a 15minute walk within a halfhour of rising, and more often than not, I experience intense lower-jaw pain, tooth pain and sometimes a headache in the back of my head. If I go to the gym, I can do 30-45 minutes of nonstop aerobics with no pain of any kind! What’s going on? — A. ANSWER: One thing you might be experiencing is pain in your temperomandibular joint. The joint is in the jaw area, and you can feel it in front of your ear when you open and close your mouth. TMJ pain is very common and usually is worse on one side. The pain often is worst first thing in the morning because of its association with teeth clenching or grinding at night. Your dentist is your first stop to look for dental problems that can cause TMJ pain syndrome, and you also may need to see your internist or general practitioner. He or she should be able to diagnose why you have TMJ pain and offer some treatments, which may include anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen or naproxen. However, I also am concerned about the possibility of temporal arteritis, a much rarer condition caused by inflammation in the arteries in your head. If there is no problem in the TMJ, then your internist should consider the diagnosis of temporal arteritis. The fact that you can exercise more intensively without any pain says this likely is not coming from your heart. Occasionally, the symptoms of heart disease or a heart attack can be present in the jaw, but I doubt that is the case here. DEAR DRS. DONOHUE AND ROACH: On four occasions, I have seen “zig zags” in one eye, and at other times the other eye. I have been to the eye doctor three times and found nothing. Looking back, I was stressed each time. ANSWER: These sound like floaters. Floaters are bits of protein or cellular debris that seem to move around in the field of vision. They are common, and generally do not indicate that anything is wrong. However, a sudden increase in the number of floaters, especially in the presence of visual changes such as flashing lights, can be a sign of a vitreous detachment or retinal detachment, which are eye emergencies. — Drs. Donohue and Roach regret that they are unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column whenever possible.

WEDNESDAY PRIMETIME MOVIES SPORTS NEWS REALITY NOVEMBER 7, 2012 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 BROADCAST ABC2 NewsCHANNELS ABC World The List (N) Let’s Ask The Middle The Neigh- Modern Fami- Suburgatory Nashville Rayna thinks about News Nightline ^ at 6PM (N) News (S) (cc) America (S) “The Safe” bors (N) (S) ly “Arrested” (9:31) (N) (S) moving on. (N) (cc) (11:35) (N) News4 at 6 (cc) NBC Nightly Access Holly- The Voice “The Live Playoffs, Part 2” The top 20 hopefuls Chicago Fire “Hanging On” News4 at 11 Tonight Show $ News (N) (S) wood (N) perform. (N) (S Live) (Part 2 of 2) (cc) (10:01) (N) (cc) (DVS) (cc) w/Jay Leno Fox 5 News TMZ (N) (S) The Simpsons The Big Bang The X Factor “Top Finalists Perform Live” The top 12 finalists Fox 5 News at Ten (N) Fox 5 News TMZ (N) (S) % Edge at 6 (N) (cc) (cc) Theory (cc) perform. (N) (S Live) (cc) Edge at 11 (cc) ABC 7 News ABC World Wheel of For- Jeopardy! (N) The Middle The Neigh- Modern Fami- Suburgatory Nashville Rayna thinks about ABC 7 News Nightline _ at 6:00 (N) News tune (N) (S) (S) (cc) “The Safe” bors (N) (S) ly “Arrested” (9:31) (N) (S) moving on. (N) (cc) at 11:00 (N) (11:35) (N) 9News Now CBS Evening 9News Now Entertainment Survivor: Philippines (N) (S) Criminal Minds A killer in Mia- CSI: Crime Scene Investiga- 9News Now Late Show ) at 6pm (N) News/Pelley Tonight Tonight (cc) mi targets prostitutes. (S) tion “Pick and Roll” (N) (S) at 11pm (N) W/Letterman 11 News at 6 NBC Nightly Inside Edition Access Holly- The Voice “The Live Playoffs, Part 2” The top 20 hopefuls Chicago Fire “Hanging On” 11 News at 11 Tonight Show + (N) (cc) News (N) (S) (N) (S) wood (N) perform. (N) (S Live) (Part 2 of 2) (cc) (10:01) (N) (cc) (DVS) (N) (cc) w/Jay Leno Eyewitness News at 6 (N)

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WEDNESDAY PRIMETIME MOVIES SPORTS NEWS REALITY NOVEMBER 7, 2012 6:00 6:30 7:00 7:30 8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30

CABLE CHANNELS Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars Duck DyA&E Storage (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) (cc) Texas Texas nasty (N) CSI: Miami “Long Gone” Ho- CSI: Miami “Crowned” Mur- Movie: ›› Behind Enemy Lines (2001, Action) Owen Wilson, Gene AMC ratio searches for a missing der at a childrenʼs beauty Hackman, Gabriel Macht. An American flight navigator is stranded in warfamily. (S) (cc) pageant. (S) (cc) torn Bosnia. (cc)

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NBA Countdown (N) NFL32 (N) (Live) (cc) Madden NFL Alumni Skills ESPN2 Challenge (N) (cc) Melissa & Melissa & Movie: ›› The Pacifier (2005, Comedy) Vin Diesel. A Movie: ››› Beetlejuice (1988) Michael Keaton. Two The 700 Club (S) (cc) FAM Joey (cc) Joey (cc) Navy SEAL becomes the guardian of five siblings. ghosts try to scare away their homeʼs new tenants. Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant: Impossible Restaurant Stakeout “When Restaurant: Impossible FOOD Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Restaurant: Tension between owners. “The Main Dish” the Catʼs Away” “University Grill” Two and a Two and a Two and a Two and a Movie: ›› Predators (2010) Adrien Brody. Premiere. American Horror Story: American Horror Story: FX Half Men (S) Half Men (S) Half Men (S) Half Men (S) Fearsome aliens hunt a band of human fighters. 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ESPN

TODAY’S BIRTHDAY (Nov. 7). Bounty will befall you, so take it with a smile. You’ve been generous with those who needed your help in the past, and now it comes full circle. One relationship takes up more of your time in the next seven weeks. A new development at the end of December improves your living arrangement. February brings travel. Cancer and Libra people adore you. Your lucky numbers are: 4, 14, 34, 20 and 16. It may feel as though we are looking ahead at yesterday. The difference between progression and regression is arguable on the first full day of Mercury’s retrograde in Sagittarius. And with Mercury within a one-degree orb of the trine position to Uranus, the difference between good luck and bad luck might also be undetectable. ARIES (March 21-April 19). You don’t require that

THE NEWS

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

HOROSCOPE

Blame your environment. Then make the effort to HOLIDAY arrange, clean and decorate space to maximize its MATHIS your potential to inspire you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. Astrology 22). Though your intellect is among the most disciplined around, the backward motion of your guidpeople agree with you, but ing planet could have you if they are to remain in your doubting yourself. Hold on. good graces, they must at Tomorrow’s moon will bolleast give you a respectful ster your confidence once quality of attention while more. you argue your point. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. TAURUS (April 20-May 23). Love is not always a 20). You have two equally “many-splendored thing” as glamorous options tonight. the old song title suggests. You’ll be torn between Sometimes love is a motshowing up on the scene in tled mess in need of the all your glory and lounging kind of attention that only on the couch in your pajathose who truly love each mas. Both ways bring good other would bother to give. fortune, so you can’t go SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. wrong. 21). You’ll spend time on GEMINI (May 21-June secretive efforts. The fact 21). There’s a learning that no one knows makes curve to everything, even your efforts all the more love. Do not assume you sweet. You are like a tree, already know all there is to hiding the intricate lace of know about another person. your beautiful roots under Ask new questions, and the ground. stay observant. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. CANCER (June 22-July 22-Dec. 21). You would be 22). Your talent is a unique surprised to know who treasure. Trying to fit your thinks of you throughout gift into someone else’s the day and in the magic mold would be unwise and moments before sleep. counterproductive. Also, Someone awaits your warm resist making comparisons smile, so do not show up or putting yourself through blank-faced. unnecessary tests. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Jan. 19). When things are If you’re unmotivated, it difficult for someone you may not be your fault. care about, you hurt, too.

But there is something you like about this pain. It’s a mending pain that pulls you closer together with your loved ones. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 18). Overworking might fatten your bank account, but it will do nothing for your wealth. Your true riches grow luxuriantly as you spend long stretches of time with loved ones. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). Whether changing your life or changing your mind, change of any size will be good for you now. Tonight, follow your highly developed intuitive sense to a strange but wonderful situation. ASTROLOGICAL QUESTIONS: “I have a disturbing recurring dream about my girlfriend. I dream that I’m in a wooded area, and I find her living there in a cave. I try to get her to come with me, but she says that we can only be together in the woods. Then I notice that she has a tail. Sometimes the tail is fluffy, and sometimes it’s more like a switch. Anyway, I haven’t told my girlfriend about these dreams, but I’m worried that they are telling me something negative about her, because in the dream, I feel like I have to get away from her. I’m a Scorpio, and my girlfriend is a Taurus.” A recurring dream is one tool your subconscious uses

PEOPLE IN

Swift shocked by response to ‘Red’

LONDON — Taylor Swift says the response to her latest album, “Red,” has been “unbelievable.” The American singer was speaking at Westfield London shopping mall Tuesday, where she was switching on the Christmas lights. Speaking after the big moment, Swift said: “I had hoped that my fans would get what I was doing there — that they would embrace it. And the fact that they celebrated that and 1.2 million of them went out and bought it the first week and it became my first U.K. No. 1 album, it is absolutely unbelievable.”

ABC raises nearly $17M for relief

NEW YORK — ABC says its national “Day of Giving” raised nearly $17 million for Superstorm Sandy relief. Throughout its programming Monday, the network urged viewers to contribute to the American Red Cross to help victims of the storm, which affected several Northeastern states, but hit New Jersey and the New York metropolitan area particularly hard. Appeals were aired all day on ABC programming, on Disney’s syndicated shows and across other Disneyowned networks. Major contributors include ABC personalities Barbara Walters, George Stephanopoulos and Mark Cuban, the Dallas Mavericks owner and star of ABC’s “Shark Tank.” The Samsung Corp. also made a major gift. In addition, the Walt Disney Co. made a $1 million contribution to local charities. NBC held a telethon Friday for storm victims that raised nearly $23 million.

Bruno Mars touts ‘SNL’ hosting gig

NEW YORK — Bruno Mars’ recent appearance on “Saturday Night Live” was more like “Saturday Night Fever”: He says he had so much fun hosting the show, he’d be happy to do it again. “Whatever ‘SNL’ wants from me, they can always call me,” the smiling 27year-old said in an interview. “I don’t know who told them I can act or anything cause I can’t. I don’t know what they saw. (But) whatever they need from me, they can get.” The singer-songwriter’s Oct. 20 appearance as host and musical guest gave the NBC variety show its second best ratings this season behind last week’s episode, hosted by comedian Louis C.K.

— From wire reports

to get your attention, intuitive Scorpio. Since the emotion of a dream is one of your best interpretive clues, I gather that going deeper into the “woods” of this relationship is frightening to you on some level. As for your Taurus’ tail, was it like a cow tail or a fox tail? Investigate the mythological creature called a Huldra for further clues. She is beautiful and seductive, though she hides a cow (or fox) tail and usually has disruptive intentions. CELEBRITY PROFILES: Indie film princess Parker Posey is currently working on a film project with Nicole Kidman and Tim Roth about former Hollywood star Grace Kelly. This versatile Scorpio actress, born when the sun, Mercury and Neptune were all in Scorpio and the moon was in quick-witted Gemini, regularly improvises with comedy superstars in the mockumentaries of Christopher Guest. — If you would like to write to Holiday Mathis, please go to www.creators.com and click on “Write the Author” on the Holiday Mathis page, or you may send her a postcard in the mail. To find out more about Holiday Mathis and read her past columns, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


NATION

Prosecutors: Sergeant Bales aware of Afghanistan attack The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net

AP image

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales, seated at front right, listens Monday during a preliminary hearing in a military courtroom at Joint Base Lewis McChord in Washington state.

BY GENE JOHNSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

JOINT BASE LEWISMcCHORD, Wash. — The medic saw Staff Sgt. Robert Bales covered in blood and knew from the pattern of the staining it wasn’t his own. He asked where it came from and where he’d been. Bales shrugged, the medic, Sgt. 1st Class James Stillwell, testified Tuesday. “If I tell you, you guys will have to testify against me,” Stillwell quoted him as saying. The statement was one of many attributed to Bales that suggest he knew what he was doing the night he surrendered after a two-village killing spree in southern Afghanistan, prosecutors say. The remarks, offered by fellow soldiers testifying for the government Monday and Tuesday, could pose a high hurdle for defense lawyers who have indicated that

Bales’ mental health will be a big part of their case. The testimony is part of a preliminary hearing being held to help determine whether the case goes to a court martial. Defense lawyers have noted that Bales was serving his fourth deployment, and had suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder as well as a concussive head injury in Iraq. One witness testified Tuesday that he was quick to anger. The 39-year-old father of two from Lake Tapps, Wash., faces 16 counts of premeditated murder and six counts of attempted murder in the March 11 attack on the villages of Balandi and Alkozai, which counted nine children among its victims. One of the worst atrocities of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, the attack prompted the U.S. to halt combat operations for days in the face of protests, and military

Aide brings new light to sex case involving general BY MICHAEL BIESECKER ASSOCIATED PRESS

FORT BRAGG, N.C. — An Army captain testified Tuesday that her commanding general initiated a sexual affair during a combat tour in Iraq and threatened to kill her and her family if she told anyone. The woman said Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Sinclair was extremely controlling, even telling her how much water to drink and when and where she could use the bathroom during a later combat tour in Afghanistan. She said she repeatedly tried to end the relationship and asked Sinclair, a married man, for a transfer. On two occasions, she testified the general ended such conversations by exposing himself and physically forcing her to perform oral sex. The Associated Press does not identify victims of alleged sexual assaults. When a prosecutor asked if Sinclair should have been able to tell that she did not want to participate, the captain responded: “Yes, I was crying.” The woman testified on the second day of a military hearing at Fort Bragg on whether there was enough evidence to court-martial Sinclair on charges including forcible sodomy, wrongful sexual conduct and engaging in inappropriate relationships. It is a rare criminal case against a general and the details from the hearing are the first public narrative of the alleged offenses that prosecutors say involved a total of five women: four of them military subordinates and one a civilian. During the testimony, the woman often broke down in tears as she recounted their 3year relationship. As she spoke, Sinclair repeatedly rolled his eyes, sighed audibly and stared at his former aide from the defense table as she sobbed. She did not look back at him. The woman says she was honored at first by the attention from Sinclair, who she said was highly regarded. They first had sex in 2008 at a forward operating base in Iraq, she said. “I was extremely intimidated by him. Everybody in the brigade spoke about him like he was a god,” she said. The captain testified that she believed Sinclair’s threats

to kill her because he had gone through Ranger training, knew how to kill with his hands and had a reputation as being unfazed by violence in battle. Sinclair was deputy commander in charge of logistics and support for the 82nd Airborne Division in Afghanistan before being abruptly relieved in May during the criminal probe. He has been on special assignment since then at Fort Bragg, the sprawling post that is home to the 82nd Airborne. Sinclair’s former commanding officer, Maj. Gen. James Huggins, testified Monday that he launched the criminal investigation March 19 after the captain came to his office at the division’s headquarters in Afghanistan late at night and in tears. She reported that she had been involved in an affair with Sinclair. Adultery is a crime under the military code of justice and Huggins said the captain understood that making such a report could end her military career. After making her report, her security clearance was suspended and she was relieved of her duties. The captain was also referred for a mental health assessment. On Tuesday, the captain testified that Sinclair could be cold and demeaning to her and other female officers in the brigade, calling some of the other women degrading and profane names. She testified she once told him in private he shouldn’t talk about female officers that way, especially when lower-ranking soldiers might overhear him and follow his example. “He said he was a general and he could say whatever the (expletive) he wanted,” she testified. But she said he could also be warm and affectionate when the two were alone, acting as her mentor in military matters and promising to leave his wife of 20 years so they could be together. After becoming so conflicted and depressed about the relationship she wished for her own death, the soldier testified she finally reported the affair and the abuse after finding messages from another woman in the general’s military e-mail account, which she reviewed as part of her work duties.

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page C7

investigators couldn’t reach the crime scenes for a month. A prosecutor’s opening statement and witness testimony Monday suggested Bales spent the evening before the massacre at his remote outpost of Camp Belambay with two other soldiers, watching a movie about revenge killings, sharing contraband whiskey from a plastic bottle and discussing an attack that cost one of their comrades his leg. Within hours, a cape-wearing Bales slipped away from the post and embarked on a killing spree of his own, said the prosecutor, Lt. Col. Jay Morse. He attacked one village then returned to Belambay, where he woke up a colleague and reported what he’d done, Morse said. The colleague testified that he didn’t believe Bales and went back to sleep. Bales headed out again, Morse said, and attacked the second village, bringing his death toll to 16 before returning once again in the predawn darkness, bloody and incredulous that his comrades ordered him to surrender his weapons. His return to the base was captured on surveillance video, Morse said. Soldiers testified that after being taken into custody, Bales told them, “I thought I was doing the right thing.” “It’s bad, it’s really bad,” he reportedly added. And Stillwell, the medic, said Bales told him that the soldiers at Camp Belambay would appreciate his actions once the fighting season ramped up: “You guys are going to thank me come June.” At another point, Bales remarked, “I guess four was too many” — an apparent reference

to the number of family compounds in the attacked villages, Morse said Monday. Bales was largely calm and compliant when he turned himself in following the massacre, several soldiers testified Tuesday. He followed orders and sometimes sat with his head in his hands, as though the magnitude of what he had done was sinking in, one said. At one point, Bales made a joke — pointing his finger, in the shape of a gun, at two soldiers guarding him — in what they took as a failed effort to ease the tension. But Bales also deliberately mangled his laptop, said two soldiers assigned to guard him as he gathered his things. One of them, Sgt. Ross O’Rourke, testified that he removed the laptop from Bales’ rucksack after the defendant told him he didn’t want to take it with him. O’Rourke said Bales then grabbed the computer and folded the screen back, breaking it. That didn’t damage the hard drive, O’Rourke said, and investigators still could have retrieved information from the computer. O’Rourke didn’t testify about what information might have been uncovered. On Monday, Cpl. David Godwin testified that Bales asked him to bleach his blood-soaked clothes. Two other soldiers, Pfcs. Derek Guinn and Damian Blodgett, testified Tuesday that they were on a guard shift early March 11 when they heard scattered gunfire coming from Alkozai, the first village attacked. They used thermal imaging and then shot up flares to illuminate the area, but couldn’t make out what was

going on. Blodgett said he reported it to the operations center on base, and a specialist told them to monitor it and let him know if it came toward them. The shooting lasted for 30 to 40 minutes, Blodgett said. Guinn said he considered Bales to be bipolar: “Sometimes he was in a really good mood, and he seemed really angry sometimes, or easily annoyed.” Two other witnesses said that later, an interpreter arrived with two Afghan National Army soldiers who reported that they had seen an American come and go from the base. Guinn gave a slightly different account when he recalled that the interpreter said the soldiers had seen two Americans arrive on base, and one head back out. After the shootings, some Afghan villagers questioned whether they could have been carried out by one soldier. Bales has not entered a plea, and is not expected to testify. His attorneys, who did not give an opening statement, have not discussed the evidence, but say Bales has post-traumatic stress disorder and suffered a concussive head injury during a prior deployment to Iraq. Bales has not participated in a medical evaluation known as a “sanity board,” because his lawyers have objected to having him meet with Army doctors outside their presence. Bales’ lawyers called their first witness Tuesday, a soldier who bagged the blood-soaked clothes Bales had been wearing as evidence. The testimony focused primarily on how the evidence was handled.

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Syria envoy warns on future of country BY ZEINA KARAM ASSOCIATED PRESS

BEIRUT — The U.N.-Arab League envoy for Syria warned Tuesday that the country could become another Somalia — where al-Qaida-linked militants and warlords battled for decades after the ouster of a dictator — if the civil war is not ended soon. Battles between regime forces and Syrian rebels left more than 140 people dead across Syria on Tuesday, while the brother of Syria’s parliament speaker was gunned down in Damascus — the latest victim of a wave of assassinations targeting high-ranking supporters of President Bashar Assad’s regime. The violence aroused new concern about the faltering diplomatic efforts to try to end the conflict, with the U.N. political chief warning that the Syria crisis risks “exploding outward” into

Lebanon, Turkey and Israel. Britain’s prime minister offered the latest long shot — that Assad could be allowed safe passage out of the country if that would guarantee an end to the fighting. But there has been no sign the embattled Syrian leader is willing to step down as part of a peaceful transition to save the country. Assad has vowed to militarily crush the nearly 20-month old rebellion against his rule, and aides say a new president will only be chosen in elections scheduled for 2014. U.N.-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi, who, like his predecessor Kofi Annan has been unable to put an end to the conflict, warned the civil war could spiral into new levels of chaos. “The situation in Syria is very dangerous,” Brahimi said in remarks published Tuesday in the pan-Arab daily

Al Hayat. “I believe that if the crisis is not solved ... there will be the danger of Somalization. It will mean the fall of the state, rise of warlords and militias.” Somalia has been mired in conflict for more than two decades after warlords overthrew the east African nation’s longtime dictator in 1991 and then turned on each other. The government, backed by African Union troops, is currently battling Islamist extremist rebels linked to al-Qaida. Syria, by comparison, has always had a strong central government, and despite losing large swaths of territory, the regime still maintains a grip on many parts of the country, including Damascus, the seat of Assad’s power, where basic government services still function. But if the regime collapses, the country could fast shatter along multiple fault lines, leading to protracted bloodshed.

AP image

This image taken from video obtained from Shaam News Network, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows smoke rising from the city during heavy bombing from military warplanes in Houla, Syria, Tuesday.

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Crosby jumps into discussions on lockout Page D3

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

MICKEY FURFARI Fan Fare

Cogdell stays with WVU

MORGANTOWN — Damon Cogdell of Miami has been a huge help to West Virginia University’s football program as both a player and coach. Cogdell was a two-year starting linebacker for the Mountaineers in 1997-98, then he developed quarterback Geno Smith and sent him on to WVU four years ago. This will be his 11th year as the head football coach at Miramar High School. And he’s a leader in WVU’s Florida connection. Cogdell was a schoolboy standout at Miramar, graduated, then decided to attend Chaffey in California. After spending two years there, he was contacted by both the University of Miami and West Virginia. “I heard a lot of good things about coach Don Nehlen,” Cogdell said. “So I decided to go there.” Cogdell was redshirted as a transfer in 1996, then was a standout linebacker in 199798. Cogdell, who was 6-foot-2 and weighed 235 pounds, played in only eight games before requiring hip surgery as a junior. But he didn’t miss a game his senior year. For his two seasons, Cogdell recorded 107 tackles, including 76 solos, one interception, one forced fumble, one recovery, two sacks and two pass break-ups. His career-high total tackles was 13 in a win against Virginia Tech. At the time, Nehlen was quoted in the media guide that Cogdell demonstrated perhaps the most-determined work ethic during rehab of any player during the coach’s years 21 years at WVU. After spending two years in Georgia as an assistant coach, he got the head job at Miramar. His 10-year record there is a most impressive 50-11. Last year’s team went 14-1 and finished as Florida state runner-up. Cogdell said, “I certainly love coaching. That’s what I really enjoy doing.” Asked why he chose WVU over Miami as a player, he replied: “When I was going through the recruiting process, I decided that it was great playing for Don Nehlen. I thought he was a great guy and a great coach. “He also had a great program. He had a great family, and the Mountaineer fans were wonderful. Those are great people up there.” Nehlen had this to say about Cogdell in a recent interview: “He wasn’t a naturally gifted football player. But he had enough that he became a pretty solid linebacker.” Cogdell graduated with a degree in coaching and physical education. Nehlen is not surprised Cogdell has been so successful coaching at one of the best Class 8-A schools in Florida. “He is one of the most respected high school coaches in the country right now.” Nehlen thinks having Cogdell at Miramar is great for WVU. “He obviously had a wonderful experience at WVU, and he’s sending us some outstanding recruits,” the Hall of Fame retiree said. Nehlen said he sat down and had a nice chat with his former player when the two met here last spring. Cogdell is married and has three children — a son and two daughters. “I enjoyed my years playing football at West Virginia,” Cogdell concluded. “I’m also enjoying coaching down here.”

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Scoreboard D4 • Comics D5

Hurricane blows through Eagles CLASS AAA STATE SOCCER TOURNAMENT

BY DAVE MORRISON

JOURNAL SPORTS WRITER

CAHRLESTON — It didn’t take Felipe Thompson to make his case. Just under three minutes to be exact. The Hurricane senior exchange student scored a quick goal, and it was all the Redskins would need to beat Hedgesville (14-71) in the semifinals of the Class AAA state soccer tournament at Schoenbaum Stadium. Not that it was the only goal Hurricane (21-0-1) would score. Three more to be exact in a 4-0 win that sends Hurricane to the state championship for the first time during a four-year run that includes two undefeated regular seasons and three Region III championships. It was Thompson’s 47th goal of the season and came when Hedgesville keeper Ethan Waters collided with teammate Josh Taggert. “It was just miscommunication between Josh and I,” said Waters, who left the game momentarily after the collision but returned. “Felipe slipped the ball by me. I was basically trying to be big and trying to make the

HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER HEDGESVILLE 0 EAGLES 14-7-1

HURRICANE 4 REDSKINS 21-0-1

goal small.” “Getting off to a quick start was key for us,” Hurricane coach Jim Dagostine said. “I want to congratulate Hedgesville. They had a great season. I was proud of our kids for coming out fast and taking care of business.” That would be the only goal the Rio Grande-bound Thompson would score. The high-scoring Redskins were not done. Just five minutes later Daniel McKnight was centered the ball in front of the net from about 16 yards out. He dribbled, wound up and found the back of the neck. AP photo Alex White added another goal with 17:21 remaining in the first half, and Trevor Felipe Thompson of Hurricane, right, makes a move on

See EAGLES D3 ment Wednesday in Charleston.

Hedgesville’s Josh Taggart during the state soccer tourna-

Sister, sister

Ferrettis going to state tourney on different teams

BY ERIC JONES

JOURNAL SPORTS WRITER

Journal photo illustration by Ron Agnir

Ashley Ferretti, left, of Hedgesville and Kaitlin Ferretti of Musselman are sisters who are playing in the state volleyball tournament on different teams.

They both have the same last name. They both wear the No. 4. They both live in the same household. They both will play in the state volleyball tournament this weekend in Charleston. They are the Ferretti sisters: Ashley and Kaitlin. They share almost everything in life, including a close sisterly bond. What they don’t share is a volleyball team. Ashley Ferretti, a senior, plays for Hedgesville, and Kaitlin Ferretti, a sophomore, plays for Musselman. That came as a result of the two switching to public school after attending St. Joseph School for nine years. Both got to choose where they went to school, and Ashley chose Hedgesville, while Kaitlin chose Musselman — mainly because of teammates with whom they had played volleyball throughout their youth years. That has created a unique rivalry, of sorts, in the Ferretti household, somewhat similar to the rivalry between the Applemen and Eagles. The only exception is that the rivalry between the two talented sisters is muted at home. In fact, what happens on the court rarely comes home with them. “We don’t really bring it home with us,” Ashley Ferretti said. “There’s no trash talking,” Kaitlin Ferretti said. There’s just a little back-and-forth banter between sisters, who, so close in age, consider themselves to be best friends. However, when Musselman and Hedgesville play each other, the sister connection goes out the window for a few hours. “It’s all business,” Kaitlin said. “I’m aware of it, but it’s a sport, you have a job to do,” Ashley said. “I don’t really think about it during the match.” There are, however, times when the intensity between the two does come out during the match. “Last year, during a match, I hit a ball that

See FERRETTIS D3

Sugar Bowl to host Big 12-SEC game

NEW YORK (AP) — New Orleans will be the site of the new marquee bowl game between the Southeastern Conference and Big 12. The conferences made the announcement Tuesday. The game will still be called the Sugar Bowl and will be played in the Superdome. The agreement between the leagues and the bowl is for 12 years. The SEC has a long history with the Sugar Bowl. Seventy-one times an SEC team has played in the game, far more than any other league. The very first Sugar Bowl in 1935 matched Tulane, then of the SEC, against Temple. “New Orleans and the Sugar Bowl are synonymous with post-season college football. For many years, fans have enjoyed the color and pageantry that New Orleans offers,” SEC Commissioner Mike Slive said in a statement. “We look forward to competing against the Big 12 as a new championship tradition begins on

“This gives us the chance to extend the Sugar Bowl’s long-standing relationship with the Southeastern Conference and to develop a new relationship with the Big 12 Conference.” Paul Hoolahan, Sugar Bowl chief executive officer

New Year’s Day.” The story was first reported by ESPN.com Several sites were vying to host the game, including Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas. Atlanta, Houston and San Antonio also submitted bids to host the game, but it came down to Arlington and New Orleans. “From the moment this game was announced, there has been tremendous excitement associated with the collaboration between these two conferences. That excitement is reflected in the bids received to host this game.

There were great cities, attractive destinations, and impressive venues to consider,” Big 12 Commissioner Bob Bowlsby said. “Now Big 12 fans can look forward to a New Year’s tradition and coming to New Orleans to support their team. We are thrilled about our long-term association with our SEC colleagues and to be in partnership with the Allstate Sugar Bowl.” The new college football playoff begins after the 2014 season and the first Sugar Bowl in the new format will be played Jan. 1, 2015. It will

match the champions from the SEC and Big 12, unless those teams are selected to the national semifinals. In that case, two other highly rated teams from those conferences will be paired up. “We’re pleased to have been selected to host this great game,” Sugar Bowl Chief Executive Officer Paul Hoolahan said. “This gives us the chance to extend the Sugar Bowl’s long-standing relationship with the Southeastern Conference and to develop a new relationship with the Big 12 Conference.” The game will be part of the semifinal rotation for the new playoff system, along with the Rose Bowl and the Orange Bowl. At least three more sites need to be picked, with the Fiesta Bowl in Glendale, Ariz., and Arlington and Atlanta the leading candidates. How often each site will host a semifinal has yet to be determined by officials.


SPORTS

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SPORTS

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Wednesday, November 7, 2012 — Page D3

Crosby looks to score in talks

AROUND

NHL, players group resume negotiations to try to end lockout

Indiana to miss two key freshmen players

INDIANAPOLIS — No. 1 Indiana will open its season Friday night without two key freshmen players. On Tuesday, the NCAA suspended 6-foot-8 forward Hanner Mosquera-Perea and 7-foot center Peter Jurkin for the first nine games this season and will require them to repay a portion of the impermissible benefits they received to a charity of their choice. Enforcement officials at the governing body officials found the players’ AAU coach Mark Adams provided them with $9,702 and $6,003 in plane tickets, meals, housing, a laptop computer, a cellphone and clothing. Mosquera-Perea must pay back approximately $1,590. Jurkin must repay $250 to be reinstated. The NCAA said in a statement Tuesday night both players were qualified to receive the benefits from the nonprofit organization Adams used to help international players obtain travel documents and cover travel costs to the U.S. The problem was that Adams also was considered an Indiana booster because he donated $185 to the Varsity Club from 1986-92, and boosters cannot provide benefits to players. Adams had been involved in a previous eligibility case that involved an additional $2,655 to former Indiana basketball player Tijan Jobe.

All Breeders’ Cup horses past drug tests

ARCADIA, Calif. — Drug testing of horses running in the Breeders’ Cup at Santa Anita came back clear. The California Horse Racing Board said testing was completed Tuesday after samples were delivered on Sunday to the Kenneth L. Maddy Equine Laboratory at UC Davis. Testing began within 24 hours of the Breeders’ Cup Classic, the final race of the two-day world championships that ended Saturday. All horses underwent pre-race blood testing for total carbon dioxide levels, while post-race testing for prohibited drugs was done on the first four finishers in all of the 15 races, plus random horses selected by the stewards. In addition to routine testing, 25 percent of all horses preentered in the Breeders’ Cup were randomly selected for outof-competition testing, and those samples cleared before the event.

Former NFL receiver faces jail in battery

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — Former NFL wide receiver David Boston could face nearly three years in prison for punching a woman last year. Palm Beach County prosecutors say the 34-year-old Boston pleaded guilty Monday to aggravated battery. He faces up to 35 months in prison at a Dec. 7 hearing. Authorities say Boston had been drinking at a Boca Raton home last November when he punched a woman twice in the head, leaving a wound that required 10 stiches. Boston was a star at Ohio State and went to the Pro Bowl with the Arizona Cardinals in 2001. He also played for the San Diego Chargers and then the Miami Dolphins before injuries and legal problems ended his career. Telephone and email messages seeking comment from Boston’s attorney weren’t immediately returned.

Big East moves soccer tourney from N.J.

CHESTER, Pa.— The Big East men’s soccer championship has been moved from New Jersey to PPL Park outside Philadelphia. The tournament runs Friday-Sunday. It was moved from Red Bull Arena in Harrison, N.J., where it had been held the previous two years. The decision was made because of lingering issues from the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy. Red Bulls general manager Jerome de Bontin says the stadium has limited resources because of the storm and is also hosting an MLS playoff game this week. Georgetown, the No. 2 seed, will face No. 4 Marquette in the first game. Third-seeded Notre Dame plays against No. 1 Connecticut in the second game. PPL Park, a state-of-the-art 18,500-seat Major League Soccer stadium, serves as the home of the Philadelphia Union of the MLS. Tickets that were purchased through Red Bull Arena, where the MLS New York Red Bulls play, will be honored.

MLBPA absolves Cabrera’s agents

INDIAN WELLS, Calif. — The baseball players’ union concluded Melky Cabrera’s agents didn’t know about a scheme to create a phony website in a defense of his positive drug test but said they failed to properly manage the employees of the firm who tried to carry out the scheme. Brothers Sam and Seth Levinson, the heads of ACES Inc., were probed by the Major League Baseball Players Association after MLB’s investigations department discovered the attempt to concoct evidence. Cabrera, the San Francisco Giants outfielder who was the MVP of the All-Star game, was suspended 50 games in August after testing positive for testosterone. “After a thorough investigation, we concluded none of the ACES principals were involved in or had knowledge of the Cabrera scheme,” union head Michael Weiner said Tuesday from Los Angeles, where he was attending agents’ meetings. “We also concluded there was an issue with supervision of employees.” Weiner said action had been taken against the Levinsons, but would not be more specific, and said ACES remains eligible to represent all players. ‘We are pleased to have been cleared of wrongdoing by the players’ association after its thorough investigation, and we greatly appreciate the support we received from our players,” Seth Levinson said in a statement.

Baseball GMs meeting in California

INDIAN WELLS, Calif. — After a week without power at his home in Connecticut, the New York Yankees’ Brian Cashman arrived at the general managers’ meetings ready to do business. The weather was hot, but the trade market was not. The annual GM meetings, back in the Coachella Valley for the first time in seven years, start just a week after the World Series and often spark discussions that lead to trades and signings later in the offseason.

— From wire reports

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NEW YORK (AP) — The lockedout NHL players’ association returned to the bargaining table Tuesday, and this time brought Sidney Crosby along. On Day 52 of the lockout that has delayed the start of the hockey season and threatened to wipe it out completely, the league and the players sat down for the second round of negotiations in four days at an undisclosed site. Not only were NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly and union special counsel Steve Fehr there, as they were for a marathon session by themselves Saturday. They were joined by Commissioner Gary Bettman, NHLPA executive director Donald Fehr, a handful of team owners, and 13 players including Crosby, who has been an active participant in the process. “We’re hopeful that we’ll start bargaining and we’ll continue bargaining until we find a way to make a deal,” Donald Fehr said Tuesday before talks started. “Sometimes that goes in rather long sessions with short breaks and sometimes you take a few hours or half a day or a day to work on things before you come back together. I don’t know which it will be. “We certainly hope we’ll be continuing to meet on a regular basis. I hope they do, too. I’m just not making any predictions.” Fehr’s brother Steve met with Daly

on Saturday in a secret location, and neither provided many details of what was discussed, but both agreed that the meeting was productive. That was proven when the sides agreed to quickly meet again Tuesday. There had been no negotiations since talks broke off on Oct. 18 until Saturday. “The players’ view has always been to keep negotiating until we find a way to get agreement and you sort of stay at it day by day, so it’s very good to be getting back to the table,” Donald Fehr said. “We hope that this time it produces more progress than we’ve seen in the past, and that we can find a way to make an agreement and to get the game back on the ice as soon as possible. “We’re hopeful that we’ll start bargaining and we’ll continue bargaining until we find a way to make a deal.” The NHL requested that the exact location for Tuesday’s negotiations in New York be kept secret, and the players’ association adhered. Time is becoming a bigger factor every day that passes without a deal. The lockout, which went into effect Sept. 16 after the previous collective bargaining agreement expired, has already forced the cancellation of 327 regular-season games — including the New Year’s Day outdoor Winter Classic in Michigan. Whether any of the games that have

Redskins players defend coach

ASHBURN, Va. (AP) — Mike Shanahan’s players are supporting their coach after he seemingly wrote off the Washington Redskins’ season and then said his comments had been misinterpreted. “I thought he clarified exactly what he meant, how it wasn’t portrayed the way it needed to be,” said co-captain London Fletcher, a 15year veteran. “He let us know exactly how he feels about this season, how he feels about the guys in this locker room. Coach Shanahan’s a proven winner, a two-time Super Bowl-winning head coach. He’s not a person who gives up on a season.” Fletcher doesn’t agree with criticism of Shanahan for his comments.

“To portray him in that light is not fair to him, not fair to this football team. You get a couple of games to go your way, especially in November, you’re right in the thick of things.” But no matter what the coach said or meant, Washington faces an uphill challenge to salvage its season. After three straight defeats, the Redskins are 3-6 and back in last place in the NFC East for a fifth straight season heading into a five-day break during their bye week. “We’re frustrated to lose football games, but no one in this locker room would ever quit and there’s no coach that would never give up,” said ninth-year Redskins tight end Chris Cooley, who was re-

PRINCETON — Three members of the Shepherd University women’s soccer team have been named to the 2012 all-West Virginia Conference women’s soccer team. Sophomore midfielder Kasey Canterbury earned firstteam honors, junior defender Erika Martin was a secondteam choice, while junior forward Morgan Gabriel gained honorable mention. Canterbury started in all 18 games for the Rams. She recorded three goals and added three assist for nine points. She is tied for second place on the team in scoring (nine points) and also ranks second in assists (three). Martin started in all 18 games for the Rams. She had one assistn. Martin helped anchor a Shepherd defense that posted seven shutouts and surrendered just one goal on five occasions. Gabriel tied for the team lead in goals with four and led the team with three-game-winning tallies. She added one assist for nine points to rank second on the squad. — Staff reports

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FROM PAGE D1

Cunningham finished his team’s scoring in the second half. “We came in with high expectations,” Hedgesville coach Wes Cole said. “We got behind early and it kind of deflated us a little bit. I was proud of the way we fought in the second half.” Most of the action in the game took place on the Hedgesville end, as the Redskins’ defense continually kept the Eagles at bay. There were very few opportunities for Hedgesville to score. Cole refused to blame the 12-day layoff due to the tournament being relocated from Beckley to Charleston for his team starting slowly. “Both teams played under the same circumstances,” Cole said. “(Thompson) is a pretty solid goal scorer. They got off to a good start and they have a very good team.” “Hedgesville came out to play and they played us physical, which was great,” White said. “Getting up early like we did was big for us, and getting a second goal quick just added to our confidence. If we can complete this it would just make my senior year.” For Hedgesville, it is just the beginning of things to come. “It was good to get the experience,” Cole said. “We hope to build on this.”

and seeing the team struggle, but it was also hard not seeing her play,” Kaitlin said. That moment was probably harder for the Ferretti parents, Joe and Penny Ferretti. They had to watch not one, but both of their daughters sit on the sidelines during the most important tournament of the year. “That was the worst time for me. It was hard to watch,” Joe Ferretti said. Joe and Penny Ferretti, whose oldest daughter Natalie played volleyball at St. Maria Goretti, Md., have spent the past two years watching a lot of volleyball in several different places. They have been busy, to say the least. “There were many nights when we were traveling between high schools. It can get pretty crazy,” Joe Ferretti said. “I remember clearly the first time they took the court against each other, I thought to myself, ‘Why are we doing this?’’’ “You see them walk in halfway through the match, and you know they’ve just showed up from the other match,” Ashley Ferretti said. The Ferretti parents did their best to show support for both teams when Hedgesville and Musselman were playing. A few ways include sitting in the

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ter of a man when things are down. He probably could have said it a lot better, (but) it’s not what Coach Shanahan said. It’s about how we respond coming out of this bye week. It’s going to be hard to come to work now. Do we have the right guys? I think we do, but until we go out and prove it, who knows?” Defensive end Chris Baker, who rose from the practice squad in 2011 to being in the rotation this year, said Shanahan’s comments about evaluating personnel rang true. “It’s an evaluation period all year,” Baker said. “That’s exactly how it is week to week. If you’re not good enough, they’re going to find someone to replace you.”

FROM PAGE D1

landed at Kaitlin’s feet, and I said to her, ‘You didn’t like that did you?’” Ashley said. “I got a look from the referee, and I had to explain that she was my sister. I wasn’t thinking anything of it.” When they’re not competing against each other, they’re supporting each other in a big way. When Ashley’s playing, Kaitlin is there watching, if she’s not playing herself. It’s the same when Kaitlin’s playing and Ashley’s not. “We had a tournament at Hedgesville recently and she showed up in one of my shirts, with blue sweatpants on,” Ashley said. “If I was going to watch her game, it would the same way.” Besides sharing the same genes, they share the experience of missing out on last year’s state tournament. Both were deemed ineligible for the state tournament after trying out for a club team, which was against the West Virginia Secondary Schools Activities Commission rules. It hit both teams hard, with Musselman losing three players and Hedgesville losing seven players. More than that, it was devastating for both sisters to not be able to play and to not see each other play. “It was hard not being able to play

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signed on Oct. 22 after being out of the league for the first seven weeks. “It will be good (for) our young players, our young quarterback (Robert Griffin III) to have a little bit of time to relax and get away from it and come back and really try to make a run. Hopefully we have a chance to make games important in November and December.” Cooley starred for Washington teams that rallied from records of 5-6 in December 2005 and 5-7 in December 2007 to make the playoffs. “It’s easy to play when you’re winning and everything’s good,” said defensive end Kedric Golston, who also played on the 2007 team. “You find out the true charac-

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been called off through Nov. 30 can be rescheduled if an agreement is made soon hasn’t been determined. But the NHL has already said that a full 82game season won’t be played. Back in October, the players’ association responded to an NHL offer with three of its own, but all of those were quickly dismissed by the league — leading to nearly three weeks of no face-to-face discussions. Daly and Steve Fehr kept in regular contact by phone and agreed to meet again last weekend. The NHL has moved toward the players’ side in the contentious issue of the “make-whole” provision, which involves the payment of player contracts that are already in effect and whose share of the economic pie that money will come from. Other core economic issues — mainly the split of hockey-related revenue — along with contract lengths, arbitration and free agency will also need to be agreed upon before a deal can be reached. The players’ association accepted a salary cap in the previous CBA, which wasn’t reached until after the entire 2004-05 season was canceled because of a lockout. The union doesn’t want to absorb the majority of concessions this time after the NHL recorded record revenue that exceeded $3 billion last season.

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middle of the stands, keeping their expressions stone-cold. Then there’s the “Mussville” shirt that has the name Ferretti and the No. 4 on the back. (The No. 4 was picked by the girls on purpose). Sometimes there’s even a wardrobe change by Penny, who will switch from a Hedgesville to Musselman shirt when the two are playing separately and put on a neutral color when they are playing each other. Mainly, Joe and Penny have always hoped for a good match when their daughters face each other. “Mom says she cheers for good volleyball,” Kaitlin said. Joe and Penny will see some good volleyball this weekend as they travel with their daughters to watch the state tournament. “We’re thrilled that both teams made it down there,” Joe Ferretti said. “From a parent’s perspective, the goal was for both teams to make it.” Both of the Ferretti girls are hoping to lead their teams to a team title. Either way, they’ll be rooting on each other. Ashley will be Kaitlin’s biggest fan, and Kaitlin will be Ashley’s biggest fan. When all is said and done, tthey’re first and foremost sisters and best friends.

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SCORE BOARD SPORTS

Page D4 — Wednesday, November 7, 2012

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL Pairings for the first round of the high school football playoffs: CLASS AAA FIRST ROUND Friday or Saturday Times, sites TBD No. 16 Oak Hill (7-3) vs No. 1 Cabell Midland (10-0) No. 15 Woodrow Wilson (6-4) vs. No. 2 Martinsburg (9-1) No. 14 Hurricane (6-4) No. 3 George Washington (8-2) No. 13 Elkins (7-3) vs. No. 4 Huntington (8-2) No. 12 Point Pleasant (8-2) vs. No. 5 Morgantown (8-2) No. 11 Lewis County (8-2) vs. No. 6 University (8-2) No. 10 Musselman (7-3) vs. No. 7 Capital (7-3) No. 9 Wheeling Park (7-3) vs. No. 8 Spring Valley (7-3) SECOND ROUND Nov. 16 or 17 Times, sites TBD Oak Hill-Cabell Midland winner vs. Wheeling Park-Spring Valley winner Woodrow Wilson-Martinsburg winner vs. Musselman-Capital winner Hurricane-George Washington winner vs. Lewis County-University winner Elkins-Huntington winner vs. Point Pleasant-Morgantown winner SEMIFINALS Nov. 23 or 24 Times, sites TBD CHAMPIONSHIP At Wheeling Island Stadium Saturday, Dec. 1, noon ——— CLASS AA FIRST ROUND Friday or Saturday Times, sites TBD No. 16 Clay County (5-5) vs. No. 1 Wayne (10-0) No. 15 Mingo Central (5-5) vs. No. 2 Keyser (9-1) No. 14 River View (6-4) vs. No. 3 Bridgeport (7-2) No. 13 Braxton County (6-4) vs. No. 4 Robert C. Byrd (9-1) No. 12 Roane County (6-4) vs. No. 5 Bluefield (8-2) No. 11 Summers County (7-3) vs. No. 6 Frankfort (8-2) No. 10 Wyoming East (7-3) No. 7 Scott (7-3) No. 9 Nicholas County (6-3) vs.

No. 8 Ritchie County (7-3) SECOND ROUND Nov. 16 or 17 Times, sites TBD Clay County-Wayne winner vs. Nicholas County-Ritchie County winner Mingo Central-Keyser winner vs. Wyoming East-Scott winner River View-Bridgeport winner vs. Summers County-Frankfort winner Braxton County-Robert C. Byrd winner vs. Roane County-Bluefield winner SEMIFINALS Nov. 23 or 24 Times, sites TBD CHAMPIONSHIP At Wheeling Island Stadium Friday, Nov. 30, 7:30 p.m. ——— CLASS A FIRST ROUND Friday or Saturday Times, sites TBD No. 16 Moorefield (5-4) vs. No. 1 Tucker County (10-0) No. 15 Williamtown (6-4) vs. No. 2 Magnolia (9-1) No. 14 Buffalo (7-3) vs. No. 3 Wahama (10-0) No. 13 Tug Valley (8-2) vs. No. 4 Madonna (9-1) No. 12 Wirt County (7-3) vs. No. 5 St. Marys (9-1) No. 11 Meadow Bridge (8-2) vs. No. 6 Greenbrier West (9-1) No. 10 Wheeling Central (7-3) vs. No. 7 East Hardy (9-1) No. 9 Valley Fayette (8-2) vs. No. 8 Clay-Battelle (9-1) SECOND ROUND Nov. 16 or 17 Times, sites TBD Moorefield-Tucker County winner vs. Valley Fayette-Clay-Battelle winner Williamstown-Magnolia winner vs. Wheeling Central-East Hardy winner Buffalo-Wahama winner vs. Meadow Bridge-Greenbrier West winner Tug Valley-Madonna winner vs. Wirt County-St. Marys winner SEMIFINALS Nov. 23 or 24 Times, sites TBD CHAMPIONSHIP At Wheeling Island Stadium Saturday, Dec. 1, 7 p.m.

Major League Soccer Playoff Glance

Saturday, Nov. 17 or Sunday, Nov. 18: semifinal winners, TBD

WILD CARDS Wednesday, Oct. 31: Houston 2, Chicago 1, Houston advances Thursday, Nov. 1: Los Angeles 2, Vancouver 1, Los Angeles advances

WESTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals San Jose vs. Los Angeles Sunday, Nov. 4: San Jose 1, Los Angeles 0 Wednesday, Nov. 7: Los Angeles at San Jose, 11 p.m.

EASTERN CONFERENCE Semifinals D.C. United vs. New York Saturday, Nov. 3: New York 1, D.C. United 1 Wednesday, Nov. 7: D.C. United at New York, 8 p.m.

Seattle vs. Real Salt Lake Friday, Nov. 2: Real Salt Lake 0, Seattle 0 Thursday, Nov. 8: Seattle at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m.

Kansas City vs. Houston Sunday, Nov. 4: Houston 2, Kansas City 0 Wednesday, Nov. 7: Houston at Kansas City, 9 p.m. Championship Saturday, Nov. 10: semifinal winners, 3:30 p.m.

Championship Sunday, Nov, 11 or Monday, Nov. 12: semifinal winners, 8 or 9 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 18: semifinal winners, 9 p.m. MLS CUP Saturday, Dec. 1: Eastern champion vs. Western champion, 4:30 p.m.

MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER

To reach the sports department: Call 304-263-8931 or 800-448-1895 Fax: 304-267-2903 e-mail: sports@journal-news.net Submit scores via our Virtual Newsroom at www.journal-news.net

THIS WEEK’S EVENTS Friday High School Football Musselman at Capital in state Class AAA playoffs, 7:30 p.m. High School Volleyball State Tournament at Charleston Musselman vs. Cabell Midland, 10 a.m. (approximately) Hedgesville vs. Spring Valley, 3 p.m. (approximately)

College Volleyball Davis and Elkins at Shepherd, 7 p.m.

sCOLLEGE FOOTBALL 8 p.m. ESPN2 — Bowling Green at Ohio GOLF 12 Mid TGC — European PGA Tour, Singapore Open, first round

SOCCER 2:30 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Celtic vs. Barcelona at Glasgow, Scotland 8 p.m. FSN — UEFA Champions League, Manchester United at Braga (same-day tape) NBCSN — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinal, second leg, DC United at New York 11 p.m. ESPN2 — MLS, playoffs, conference semifinal, second leg, San Jose vs. LA

SPORTS ON TV

NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Philadelphia at New Orleans 10:30 p.m. ESPN — San Antonio at L.A. Clippers

TRANSACTIONS

Tuesday’s Sports Transactions By The Associated Press BASEBALL American League BALTIMORE ORIOLES — Promoted director of sales and fan service Neil Aloise to vice president of ticketingg and fan services, director of communications Greg Bader to vice president of communications and marketing, and director of finance Mike Hoppes to vice president of finance. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association NBA — Fined L.A. Lakers G Steve Blake $25,000 for directing inappropriate language toward a fan. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS — Waived G Jeremy Bridges from injured reserve. CAROLINA PANTHERS — Placed WR/KR Kealoha Pilares on injured reserve. Activated WR David Gettis from the physically-unable-toperform list. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed LB Jerrell Harris to the practice squad. COLLEGE DAVIDSON — Fired football coach Tripp Merritt. Promoted associate head coach Brett Hayford to interim head coach.

TUESDAY’S RACING RESULTS HOLLYWOOD CASINO AT CHARLES TOWN RACES

First Race - Six And A Half Furlongs. Purse $26,000, 2 yo, Maiden Special Weight. Off: 07:15 PM Time: 1:21.30 Owner: Copperville Farm (Susan H. Wantz) Trainer: Figgins, III, Ollie L.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 1/2 Str Fin :Odds 5-Music Town Castro, C. 5 3 1-1/2 1-1 1-3 1/2 1-3 1/2 7.00 4-Thunder Clan Navarro, K. 4 2 5-1 1/2 4-hd 3-hd 2-1 1/4 2.90 6-Blue Catillac Larrosa, G. 6 5 2-1/2 2-1/2 2-1/2 3-1 7.80 1-La La's Cookin Rivera, J. 1 1 3-3 1/2 3-3 4-2 4-2 1/2 1.10 7-Essay Cruise, G. 7 6 7-6 7-6 6-3 1/2 5-ns 54.30 8-Busy Listening Reynolds, L. 8 7 6-hd 5-hd 5-hd 6-7 1/4 12.60 3-Hoosier Star Navarro, J. 3 4 4-hd 6-1 7-2 1/2 7-6 3/4 6.30 2-Classy Collection Schneider, J. 2 8 8 8 8 8 65.10 $2 Mutuels: 5 Music Town $16.00 $6.60 $4.00 4 Thunder Clan $4.20 $3.40 6 Blue Catillac $5.00 Exacta (5-4), $59.80; Superfecta (5-4-6-1), $1,012.20; Trifecta (5-4-6), $420.60 Second Race - Six And A Half Furlongs. Purse $11,000, 3 yo's & up, Claiming $5,000$4,500. Off: 07:46 PM Time: 1:20.90 Owner: Melinda B. Golden Trainer: Viands, Stacey R.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 1/2 Str Fin :Odds 10-Devil's Candy Dunkelberger 9 5 2-hd 2-1 1-hd 1-1/2 1.80 4-Follow the Whales Milford, N. 3 2 4-hd 3-2 1/2 2-3 2-7 1/2 13.00 5-Miss Gold Buckle Reynolds, L. 4 8 8-1 7-1 5-1 1/2 3-1 2.60 6-Has to Be Roses Lopez, A. 5 3 1-1 1/2 1-1/2 3-2 1/2 4-2 2.50 3-Prize of Prospect Schneider, J. 2 9 10 10 7-1/2 5-1 88.30 1-Credit Risk Reynolds, K. 1 1 5-1 4-1/2 4-1/2 6-3 1/4 25.60 7-Horizontal Love Navarro, K. 6 4 3-1 5-1/2 6-1 7-hd 11.60 9-Ad Damnum Rodriguez, V. 8 6 7-1 1/2 8-1 8-2 8-5 1/4 48.40 11-Da' Kiss Almodovar, G.10 7 6-2 6-1 9-2 9-5 1/4 22.40 8-Breadman's Honey Bocachica, A. 7 10 9-2 1/2 9-1 1/2 10 10 28.90 $2 Mutuels: 10 Devil's Candy $5.60 $3.80 $2.60 4 Follow the Whales $10.20 $5.60 5 Miss Gold Buckle $2.80 Daily Double (5-10), $62.20; Exacta (10-4), $38.80; Superfecta (10-4-5-6), $295.20; Trifecta (10-4-5), $128.60 Late Scratches: Di Colas Holiday, R C's Aphrodite, Bonnygreen, Calling Elvenette

Third Race - Four And A Half Furlongs. Purse $26,000, 2 yo, Maiden Special Weight. Off: 08:23 PM Time: :53.21 Owner: Taylor Mountain Farm LLC (James W. Casey) Trainer: Casey, James W.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 Str Fin :Odds 2-Lucky Candy Lopez, A. 2 5 1-1/2 1-3 1/2 1-3 1/4 3.30 10-Red Hot Diva McGowan, M. 10 2 4-1/2 4-1 2-nk 1.60 3-Ms. Fool Proof Dunkelberger, T.3 4 3-1/2 2-hd 3-3/4 5.50 9-Tilt Til Dawn Castro, C. 9 1 5-3 3-hd 4-4 1/4 6.30 1-Sweetie Whittaker, D. 1 9 6-1/2 6-2 5-1 1/2 17.20 5-Come to Daddy Larrosa, G. 5 7 8-5 1/2 8-5 6-nk 12.60 4-Just Struttin' Bocachica, A. 4 6 7-1 1/2 7-1/2 7-7 1/2 7.40 6-Di Colas Mystery Jude, J. 6 8 9 9 8-2 1/4 23.70 8-Ima Iny Snow, M. 8 3 2-2 1/2 5-2 1/2 9 44.70 7-Lonesome Prairie Perez, N. 7 10 10-99 10-99 10-99 131.90 $2 Mutuels: 2 Lucky Candy $8.60 $3.80 $3.20 10 Red Hot Diva $3.40 $2.60 3 Ms. Fool Proof $2.80 Daily Double (10-2), $30.00; Exacta (2-10), $35.80; Superfecta (2-10-3-9), $580.80; Trifecta (2-10-3), $133.00; Pic 3 (5-10-2), $1Late Scratches: Emblem's Purge

Fourth Race - Four And A Half Furlongs. Purse $11,000, 3 yo's & up, Claiming $5,000$4,500. Off: 08:51 PM Time: :53 Owner: Freedom Acres, Inc. (Jerry Kolybadiuk) Trainer: Runco, Jeff C.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 Str Fin :Odds 8-Yankee Babe Navarro, K. 7 2 1-1/2 1-2 1/2 1-2 1/2 1.70 11-Island Memories Cruise, G. 10 1 3-1 1/2 2-1 1/2 2-1/2 21.10 6-Prisoner of Hope Ramirez, E. 5 7 4-1/2 4-2 3-4 1/2 1.30 4-River Waltz Bocachica, A. 3 5 5-1/2 5-1 1/2 4-3/4 13.90 7-Luna Luz Soodeen, R. 6 3 2-2 3-hd 5-1/2 25.20 1-Tender Echos Peltroche, F. 1 6 7-hd 7-2 6-nk 86.90 10-Jean's Dream Marrero, C. 9 4 8-1 1/2 6-hd 7-3 78.80 2-Kiss My Lion Whittaker, D. 2 9 9-hd 8-1 8-1/2 117.00 5-Acallforjoe Batista, A. 4 8 10 10 9-1 1/4 11.00 9-Bumble Boogie Almodovar, G. 8 10 6-1 9-1 1/2 10 5.20 $2 Mutuels: 8 Yankee Babe $5.40 $4.00 $2.80 11 Island Memories $11.40 $5.40 6 Prisoner of Hope $2.40 Daily Double (2-8), $26.00; Exacta (8-11), $73.80; Superfecta (8-11-6-4), $991.20; Trifecta (8-11-6), $188.00 Late Scratches: Sheswonhotmama, D'flying Pulga, Sexy Athenea, Icy and Civil

Fifth Race - Four And A Half Furlongs. Purse $26,000, 2 yo, Maiden Special Weight. Off: 09:18 PM Time: :53.04 Owner: Shannon E. Casey Trainer: Viands, Stacey R.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 Str Fin :Odds 10-Hasta Lavista Dunkelberger, T.10 1 2-1 1-1 1/2 1-nk 8.40 1-Bettieswintergreen Santiago, W. 1 8 3-1 1/2 2-1 2-1 3/4 1.50 6-Believe the Cat Larrosa, G. 6 4 4-hd 4-1 1/2 3-4 1.00 7-T. J. Bodgit Whittaker, D. 7 5 5-4 5-2 4-1/2 35.60 5-Aye a Cat Sanchez, J. 5 3 1-1/2 3-1 5-3/4 16.90 2-Devlish Trix Castro, C. 2 9 7-1/2 6-hd 6-nk 15.10 9-Sonshines On Susie McGowan, M. 9 2 6-2 1/2 7-4 7-4 18.20 3-Cat's Last Tango Lopez, A. 3 10 10 8-hd 8-2 3/4 53.10 4-Havens Testamony Perez, N. 4 7 9-1/2 9-1/2 9-1 111.40 8-Smokin' Lucy Soodeen, R. 8 6 8-1/2 10 10 75.60 $2 Mutuels: 10 Hasta Lavista $18.80 $7.00 $2.60 1 Bettieswintergreen $3.20 $2.20 6 Believe the Cat $2.20 Daily Double (8-10), $84.20; Exacta (10-1), $76.60; Superfecta (10-1-6-7), $2,117.60; Trifecta (10-1-6), $141.60; Pic 3 (2-8-10), $442.00; Pic 4 (2/10/11/12/13/14-2-8-10), $1,676.80 Late Scratches: Margaret High, Silver Sal

Sixth Race - Four And A Half Furlongs. Purse $11,000, 3 yo's & up, Claiming $5,000$4,500. Off: 09:44 PM Time: :51.55 Owner: Dallas Delorme Trainer: Grams, Timothy C.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 Str Fin :Odds 10-Satan's Mistress McGowan, M. 10 1 2-1 1/2 1-3 1/2 1-6 3/4 18.50 5-Sultryeyesforu Reynolds, K. 5 7 7-hd 4-1 1/2 2-nk 21.90 2-Riteplace Ritetime Bocachica, A. 2 6 3-1 3-1 3-1 1/2 29.40 8-Wild and Gotaway Barber, R. 8 8 8-1 1/2 8-2 4-nk 2.60 4-The Urugaucha Lopez, A. 4 5 4-2 5-1/2 5-1 4.20 1-Shine for Me Navarro, K. 1 10 9-2 7-hd 6-nk 3.10 7-Cozy At Midnight Larrosa, G. 7 4 6-hd 6-1/2 7-1/2 80.40 6-You're Kinda Neat Almodovar, G. 6 2 1-1 2-hd 8-2 3.60 9-Ally Bear Perez, L. 9 3 5-hd 9-1 9-3/4 22.50 3-Irish Garden Batista, A. 3 9 10 10 10 8.50 $2 Mutuels: 10 Satan's Mistress $39.00 $13.20 $7.80 5 Sultryeyesforu $20.20 $10.20 2 Riteplace Ritetime $14.20 Daily Double (10-10), $702.80; Exacta (10-5), $747.00; Superfecta (10-5-ALL-ALL), $793.80; Trifecta (10-5-2), $10,216.40 Late Scratches: Merry Lynn, Bid Report, Setas Sassy Shoes, Freshcat

Seventh Race - Four And A Half Furlongs. Purse $11,000, 3 yo's & up, Maiden Claiming $5,000-$4,500. Off: 10:10 PM Time: :53.98 Owner: Robert A. Carter Trainer: Viands, Stacey R.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 Str Fin :Odds 2-Time Is Now Lopez, A. 1 10 4-3 2-6 1-1/2 11.30 1-Absolute Russian Navarro, K. 2 9 1-2 1-1/2 2-7 3/4 1.20 10-Run Dixie Sanchez, J. 10 2 2-hd 4-hd 3-nk 6.90 7-Sharpie's Son Rodriguez, M. 7 3 6-hd 7-1 1/2 4-1/2 12.80 4-J. R.'s Boy Whitacre, G. 4 4 8-6 8-4 1/2 5-1 17.60 3-Lil Missile Larrosa, G. 3 8 7-1/2 5-1 6-hd 45.80 5-Lukwhatdacatdrugin Milford, N. 5 5 5-1/2 6-1/2 7-nk 8.30 9-Tri Omega Whittaker, D. 9 1 3-1/2 3-hd 8-3 3/4 12.00 6-Custis Jude, J. 6 6 9-1 9-1 9-10 23.60 8-Shark Week Snow, M. 8 7 10 10 10 4.20 $2 Mutuels: 2 Time Is Now $24.60 $7.80 $4.60 1 Absolute Russian $3.20 $3.00 10 Run Dixie $5.00 Daily Double (10-2), $1,022.20; Exacta (2-1), $102.20; Superfecta (2-1-10-7), $2,477.00; Trifecta (2-1-10), $398.00; Pic 3 (10-10-2), $3,191.40

Eighth Race - Four And A Half Furlongs. Purse $26,000, 3 yo's & up, Allowance. Off: 10:37 PM Time: :51.24 Owner: Barbara J. Houck Trainer: Barr, Donald H.. Horse Jockey PP St 1/4 Str Fin :Odds 4-Fear the Facelift Monterrey, R. 4 3 5-1 1/2 3-2 1-nk 1.70 1-Autumn Affair Sanchez, J. 1 6 2-1 1/2 1-hd 2-1 3.30 6-Ideal Thoughts Whitacre, G. 6 1 1-1/2 2-1 1/2 3-3 3/4 1.90 2-Sweet Dixie Dollar Navarro, K. 3 7 7-3 4-3 4-3 3/4 15.30 5-J P's Outlaw Milford, N. 5 4 3-1 5-1 5-1 23.10 1A-Tribal Verse Schneider, J. 2 8 8 6-1 6-1 1/2 3.30 7-Purses Galore Reynolds, K. 7 2 4-hd 7-1 1/2 7-3/4 28.60 8-Moon Glo Mae Ho, W. 8 5 6-1/2 8 8 6.50 $2 Mutuels: 4 Fear the Facelift $5.40 $2.80 $2.20 1 Autumn Affair $3.40 $2.40 6 Ideal Thoughts $2.20

WEDNESDAY’S RACING ENTRIES HOLLYWOOD CASINO AT CHARLES TOWN RACES

Post Time: 7:15PM First Race, $13,000, Maiden Claiming $7,500-$6,500, 3 yo's & up, 6 1/2F 1 - Two Step B Perez, N. 120 10-1 2 - Santorini Sun Navarro, J. 118 4-1 3 - Joe's Prize McGowan, M. 120 8-1 4 - Never Mobil Reynolds, L. 120 2-1 5 - Tumultuous Dooley, C. 122 10-1 6 - Laurens Jester Maldonado, R. 120 10-1 7 - Micro Boy Whittaker, D. 118 15-1 8 - P K's Smile Reynolds, K. 118 5-2

Second Race, $14,000, Claiming $6,250-$6,000, 3 yo's & up, 1 1/16M 1 - Gold Raptor Navarro, K. 118 4-1 2 - Coastal Drive Batista, A. 123 9-2 3 - Bigum Ramirez, E. 118 5-1 4 - Beau American Lopez, A. 119 12-1 5 - Shop Smart Maldonado, R. 121 8-1 6 - Some Kinda Trouble Rodriguez, V. 113 15-1 7 - My First Sip Milford, N. 116 3-1 8 - Noah's Harvest Whittaker, D. 122 7-2 Third Race, $11,000, Maiden Claiming $5,000-$4,500, 3 yo's & up, 6 1/2F 1 - Country Hello Milford, N. 115 8-5 2 - Mountaineer Maniac Maldonado, R. 118 20-1 3 - Moycullen Snow, M. 118 6-1 4 - Prufrock Peltroche, E. 116 8-1 5 - Market Square Hero Castro, C. 120 20-1 6 - Harold T Reynolds, K. 118 20-1 7 - Win the Green Navarro, K. 115 5-1 8 - Our Door Prize Whittaker, D. 118 15-1 9 - D Wag Peltroche, F. 118 4-1 10 - Lookinatdbriteside Whitacre, G. 118 8-1

Fourth Race, $11,000, Claiming $5,000-$4,500, 3 yo's & up, 1 1/16M 1 - Baby Time Lopez, A. 119 8-1 2 - Brooks in Town Rodriguez, V. 110 15-1 3 - Last of His Kind Almodovar, G. 119 5-2

4 - Dspite All My Rage 5 - Devil's Hall 6 - Sultry Prospector 7 - Celtic Heir 8 - Buckey Road 9 - Caroline's Dancer 10 - Black Tie Boogie 11 - Explosive Whirl 12 - Up to Mischief 13 - Eye Sea a Pirate 14 - Premium Justice

Mawing, A. Snow, M. Whittaker, D. Ramirez, E. Cruise, G. Reynolds, L. Soodeen, R. Reynolds, K. Mawing, A. Ho, W. Rodriguez, M.

119 118 118 118 117 117 118 119 119 117 119

20-1 30-1 3-1 8-1 4-1 6-1 20-1 7-2 8-1 12-1 8-1

Fifth Race, $13,000, Maiden Claiming $7,500-$6,500, 3 yo's & up, F & M (fillies and mares), 4 1/2F 1 - Upsetter McGowan, M. 121 2-1 2 - Color Girl Barber, R. 119 6-1 3 - Candy Girl Can Maldonado, R. 119 8-1 4 - Silent Honor Ho, W. 119 10-1 5 - Iridescent Beauty Lopez, A. 117 5-1 6 - Miss Johann's Kee Navarro, K. 114 4-1 7 - Dayze Mae Cafe Reynolds, K. 121 20-1 8 - Closed Mouth Cruise, G. 121 12-1 9 - Prized Storm Sanchez, J. 119 10-1 10 - Torpedo Alley Peltroche, E. 121 20-1 11 - Mr Kipps Star Freites, A. 119 12-1

Sixth Race, $16,000, Claiming $8,000-$7,000, 3 yo's & up, F & M (fillies and mares), 4 1/2F 1 - Salty Not Sweet Whitacre, G. 119 4-1 1a - Davina's Baby Ho, W. 118 4-1 2 - Knobie Sanchez, J. 119 8-1 3 - Proof's Repar Dooley, C. 118 15-1 4 - Printscess Poach Larrosa, G. 119 12-1 5 - Nicknmina Milford, N. 116 10-1 6 - Tuftikus Ho, W. 118 6-1 7 - Battletown Inn Reynolds, L. 118 15-1 8 - Get Glued On Ramirez, E. 119 8-1 9 - Candle of Gold Lopez, A. 116 5-2 10 - Ole Rocky Top McGowan, M. 118 5-1 Seventh Race, $11,000, Claiming $5,000-$4,500, 3 yo's &

Saturday High School Football Woodrow Wilson at Martinsburg in state Class AAA playoffs, 1:30 p.m. Men’s College Basketball Bowie State at Shepherd, 7 p.m.

up, 7F 1 - Still the One 1a - Pride of Mary 2 - Loose N Capable 3 - Run Fat Boy Run 4 - Dr. Finnegan 5 - Dr. Balin 6 - Inner Power 7 - Punk Robinson 8 - Stopthefever 9 - Wild Man Walkin 10 - Leroy's Pride 11 - Peruano Smoke 12 - He Devil

McGowan, M. Perez, N. Bocachica, A. Houghton, T. Larrosa, G. Schneider, J. Cruise, G. Perez, L. Castro, C. Rodriguez, V. Maldonado, R. Freites, A. Reynolds, L.

118 118 120 120 118 118 120 120 120 113 120 120 120

15-1 15-1 8-1 8-5 20-1 20-1 10-1 10-1 4-1 5-1 9-2 20-1 12-1

Eighth Race, $26,000, Allowance, 3 yo's & up, 1 1/8M 1 - Fine Navarro, K. 112 6-1 1a - Tiz Friday Navarro, K. 112 6-1 2 - Luca's Wind Dancer Reynolds, L. 123 6-1 3 - Robb's Warrior Castro, C. 119 20-1 4 - Strawberry Cupcake Lopez, A. 121 5-1 5 - Chuck Town Charlie Marrero, C. 119 10-1 6 - Clear Reason Ramirez, E. 117 7-2 7 - Osprey Dunkelberger, T. 121 10-1 8 - Figpenn Navarro, J. 119 3-1

Ninth Race, $11,000, Maiden Claiming $5,000-$4,500, 3 yo's & up, 6 1/2F 1 - Clever Cat Diamond Perez, L. 120 8-1 2 - Macho Style Jude, J. 115 12-1 3 - Savastep Cruise, G. 118 12-1 4 - Devil Career Rodriguez, M. 118 4-1 5 - Black 'n Tan Reynolds, L. 118 15-1 6 - Woodbegoodificould Larrosa, G. 116 6-1 7 - Jenny's Earthquake Dooley, C. 118 2-1 8 - Not for Granted Reynolds, K. 118 20-1 9 - Templewood Castro, C. 118 9-2 10 - Family Faith Milford, N. 111 8-1 11 - Proud Era Peltroche, F. 118 12-1 Copyright 2012 EQUIBASE Company LLC.

www.journal-news.net ≤ The Journal

NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATION National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct GB New York 3 0 1.000 — Brooklyn 1 1 .500 1¢ Boston 1 2 .333 2 Philadelphia 1 2 .333 2 Toronto 1 3 .250 2¢ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 3 1 .750 — Orlando 2 1 .667 ¢ Charlotte 1 1 .500 1 Atlanta 1 1 .500 1 Washington 0 2 .000 2 Central Division W L Pct GB Milwaukee 2 0 1.000 — Chicago 3 1 .750 — Indiana 2 2 .500 1 Cleveland 2 2 .500 1 Detroit 0 3 .000 2¢ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 4 0 1.000 — Dallas 3 1 .750 1 Memphis 2 1 .667 1¢ Houston 2 1 .667 1¢ New Orleans 2 1 .667 1¢ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Minnesota 2 1 .667 — Oklahoma City 2 2 .500 ¢ Portland 2 2 .500 ¢ Utah 1 3 .250 1¢ Denver 0 3 .000 2 Pacific Division W L Pct GB Golden State 2 2 .500 — L.A. Clippers 2 2 .500 — Sacramento 1 3 .250 1 Phoenix 1 3 .250 1 L.A. Lakers 1 3 .250 1 Monday’s Games New York 110, Philadelphia 88 Minnesota 107, Brooklyn 96 Miami 124, Phoenix 99 Memphis 103, Utah 94 Dallas 114, Portland 91

San Antonio 101, Indiana 79 Sacramento 94, Golden State 92 Cleveland 108, L.A. Clippers 101 Tuesday’s Games Chicago 99, Orlando 93 Oklahoma City 108, Toronto 88 Detroit at Denver, late Wednesday’s Games Phoenix at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Washington at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Indiana at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Miami, 7:30 p.m. Denver at Houston, 8 p.m. Orlando at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Philadelphia at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Memphis at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Toronto at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Utah, 9 p.m. Detroit at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Cleveland at Golden State, 10:30 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 10:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Oklahoma City at Chicago, 8 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Portland, 10:30 p.m. ——— NBA Scoring Leaders Scoring G FG FT PTS AVG Harden, HOU 3 36 27 106 35.3 Bryant, LAL 4 40 18 107 26.8 Anthony, NYK 3 27 18 78 26.0 Davis, ORL 2 22 7 51 25.5 Crawford, LAC 4 30 23 96 24.0 Irving, CLE 4 35 18 95 23.8 Lowry, TOR 3 23 17 71 23.7 Howard, LAL 4 33 27 93 23.3 James, MIA 4 36 14 92 23.0 Durant, OKC 3 23 19 68 22.7 Redick, ORL 2 16 7 45 22.5 Bosh, MIA 4 35 18 89 22.3 Aldridge, POR 4 39 10 88 22.0 Mayo, DAL 4 29 10 86 21.5 Westbrook, OKC 3 24 14 64 21.3 Gasol, MEM 3 21 21 63 21.0 M. Williams, UTA 4 30 16 83 20.8 Martin, OKC 3 17 16 62 20.7 Williams, ATL 2 12 14 41 20.5 Pierce, BOS 3 19 16 61 20.3

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE

National Football League AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 5 3 0.625 262 170 Miami 4 4 0.500 170 149 N.Y. Jets 3 5 0.375 168 200 Buffalo 3 5 0.375 180 248 South W L T Pct PF PA Houston 7 1 0.875 237 137 Indianapolis 5 3 0.625 159 191 Tennessee 3 6 0.333 182 308 Jacksonville 1 7 0.125 117 219 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 6 2 0.750 199 176 Pittsburgh 5 3 0.625 191 164 Cincinnati 3 5 0.375 189 218 Cleveland 2 7 0.222 169 211 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 5 3 0.625 235 175 San Diego 4 4 0.500 185 157 Oakland 3 5 0.375 171 229 Kansas City 1 7 0.125 133 240 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA N.Y. Giants 6 3 0.667 254 185 Philadelphia 3 5 0.375 133 183 Dallas 3 5 0.375 150 181 Washington 3 6 0.333 226 248 South W L T Pct PF PA Atlanta 8 0 01.000220 143 Tampa Bay 4 4 0.500 226 185 New Orleans 3 5 0.375 218 229 Carolina 2 6 0.250 149 180 North W L T Pct PF PA Chicago 7 1 0.875 236 120 Green Bay 6 3 0.667 239 187 Minnesota 5 4 0.556 204 197 Detroit 4 4 0.500 192 188 West W L T Pct PF PA San Francisco6 2 0.750 189 103 Seattle 5 4 0.556 170 154 Arizona 4 5 0.444 144 173 St. Louis 3 5 0.375 137 186 Thursday’s Game San Diego 31, Kansas City 13 Sunday’s Games Green Bay 31, Arizona 17 Chicago 51, Tennessee 20 Houston 21, Buffalo 9 Carolina 21, Washington 13 Detroit 31, Jacksonville 14 Denver 31, Cincinnati 23 Baltimore 25, Cleveland 15 Indianapolis 23, Miami 20 Seattle 30, Minnesota 20 Tampa Bay 42, Oakland 32 Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Giants 20 Atlanta 19, Dallas 13 Open: N.Y. Jets, New England, San Francisco, St. Louis Monday’s Game New Orleans 28, Philadelphia 13 Thursday, Nov. 8 Indianapolis at Jacksonville, 8:20 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 11 Atlanta at New Orleans, 1 p.m. Detroit at Minnesota, 1 p.m. Denver at Carolina, 1 p.m. San Diego at Tampa Bay, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Miami, 1 p.m. Buffalo at New England, 1 p.m. Oakland at Baltimore, 1 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Cincinnati, 1 p.m. N.Y. Jets at Seattle, 4:05 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m. Dallas at Philadelphia, 4:25 p.m. Houston at Chicago, 8:20 p.m. Open: Arizona, Cleveland, Green Bay, Washington Monday, Nov. 12 Kansas City at Pittsburgh, 8:30 p.m. ——— NFL Team Stax Week 9 TOTAL YARDAGE AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE OFFENSE Yards Rush Pass New England 3526 1197 2329 Denver 3196 855 2341 Indianapolis 3127 847 2280 Houston 2974 1104 1870 Tennessee 2946 889 2057 Pittsburgh 2938 839 2099 Oakland 2868 618 2250 Kansas City 2860 1199 1661 Cincinnati 2844 767 2077 Cleveland 2808 803 2005 Baltimore 2768 866 1902 Buffalo 2751 1130 1621 Miami 2660 895 1765 San Diego 2585 847 1738 N.Y. Jets 2539 878 1661 Jacksonville 2035 672 1363 DEFENSE Yards Rush Pass Pittsburgh 2101 709 1392 Houston 2289 659 1630 San Diego 2574 672 1902 Denver 2601 833 1768 N.Y. Jets 2776 1131 1645 Kansas City 2780 1008 1772 Indianapolis 2818 1046 1772 Cincinnati 2859 936 1923 Oakland 2955 993 1962 New England 2958 709 2249 Miami 3057 671 2386 Baltimore 3090 1116 1974 Jacksonville 3143 1099 2044 Buffalo 3343 1356 1987 Cleveland 3421 1190 2231 Tennessee 3728 1274 2454 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE OFFENSE Yards Rush Washington 3436 1481 N.Y. Giants 3356 985 Detroit 3287 829 Green Bay 3141 897 New Orleans 3091 648 Dallas 3060 667 Atlanta 3013 788 Tampa Bay 3011 1048 Minnesota 3006 1309 Philadelphia 2991 1045

Pass 1955 2371 2458 2244 2443 2393 2225 1963 1697 1946

San Francisco 2952 1349 1603 Seattle 2809 1250 1559 Carolina 2759 930 1829 Arizona 2659 686 1973 Chicago 2595 1028 1567 St. Louis 2532 850 1682 DEFENSE Yards Rush Pass San Francisco 2171 699 1472 Dallas 2500 856 1644 Chicago 2545 704 1841 Detroit 2564 850 1714 Carolina 2744 952 1792 St. Louis 2744 844 1900 Philadelphia 2748 913 1835 Seattle 2783 922 1861 Atlanta 2850 1020 1830 Arizona 2886 1135 1751 Minnesota 3039 1056 1983 Green Bay 3077 885 2192 Tampa Bay 3187 618 2569 N.Y. Giants 3441 1062 2379 Washington 3581 866 2715 New Orleans 3770 1412 2358 AVERAGE PER GAME AMERICAN FOOTBALL CONFERENCE OFFENSE Yards Rush Pass New England 440.8 149.6 291.1 Denver 399.5 106.9 292.6 Indianapolis 390.9 105.9 285.0 Houston 371.8 138.0 233.8 Pittsburgh 367.3 104.9 262.4 Oakland 358.5 77.3 281.3 Kansas City 357.5 149.9 207.6 Cincinnati 355.5 95.9 259.6 Baltimore 346.0 108.3 237.8 Buffalo 343.9 141.3 202.6 Miami 332.5 111.9 220.6 Tennessee 327.3 98.8 228.6 San Diego 323.1 105.9 217.3 N.Y. Jets 317.4 109.8 207.6 Cleveland 312.0 89.2 222.8 Jacksonville 254.4 84.0 170.4 DEFENSE Yards Rush Pass Pittsburgh 262.6 88.6 174.0 Houston 286.1 82.4 203.8 San Diego 321.8 84.0 237.8 Denver 325.1 104.1 221.0 N.Y. Jets 347.0 141.4 205.6 Kansas City 347.5 126.0 221.5 Indianapolis 352.3 130.8 221.5 Cincinnati 357.4 117.0 240.4 Oakland 369.4 124.1 245.3 New England 369.8 88.6 281.1 Cleveland 380.1 132.2 247.9 Miami 382.1 83.9 298.3 Baltimore 386.3 139.5 246.8 Jacksonville 392.9 137.4 255.5 Tennessee 414.2 141.6 272.7 Buffalo 417.9 169.5 248.4 NATIONAL FOOTBALL CONFERENCE OFFENSE Yards Rush Pass Detroit 410.9 103.6 307.3 New Orleans 386.4 81.0 305.4 Dallas 382.5 83.4 299.1 Washington 381.8 164.6 217.2 Atlanta 376.6 98.5 278.1 Tampa Bay 376.4 131.0 245.4 Philadelphia 373.9 130.6 243.3 N.Y. Giants 372.9 109.4 263.4 San Francisco 369.0 168.6 200.4 Green Bay 349.0 99.7 249.3 Carolina 344.9 116.3 228.6 Minnesota 334.0 145.4 188.6 Chicago 324.4 128.5 195.9 St. Louis 316.5 106.3 210.3 Seattle 312.1 138.9 173.2 Arizona 295.4 76.2 219.2 DEFENSE Yards Rush Pass San Francisco 271.4 87.4 184.0 Seattle 309.2 102.4 206.8 Dallas 312.5 107.0 205.5 Chicago 318.1 88.0 230.1 Detroit 320.5 106.3 214.3 Arizona 320.7 126.1 194.6 Minnesota 337.7 117.3 220.3 Green Bay 341.9 98.3 243.6 St. Louis 343.0 105.5 237.5 Carolina 343.0 119.0 224.0 Philadelphia 343.5 114.1 229.4 Atlanta 356.3 127.5 228.8 N.Y. Giants 382.3 118.0 264.3 Washington 397.9 96.2 301.7 Tampa Bay 398.4 77.3 321.1 New Orleans 471.3 176.5 294.8 ——— AFC Individual Leaders Week 9 Quarterbacks Att Com P. Manning, DEN 292 203 Roethlisberger, PIT 298 200 Brady, NWE 320 209 Schaub, HOU 249 159 Dalton, CIN 285 182 P. Rivers, SND 263 175 Fitzpatrick, BUF 256 158 C. Palmer, OAK 330 201 Flacco, BAL 276 165 Hasselbeck, TEN 220 138 Rushers Att Yds A. Foster, HOU 192 770 Chr. Johnson, TEN 147 736 Ridley, NWE 150 716 J. Charles, KAN 132 634 R. Rice, BAL 131 622 McGahee, DEN 146 620 T. Richardson, CLE 152 575 Spiller, BUF 78 562 Re. Bush, MIA 122 534 Greene, NYJ 139 509 Receivers No Yds Wayne, IND 61 835 Welker, NWE 60 736 A.. Green, CIN 51 735 Decker, DEN 46 583 De. Thomas, DEN 45 756 Bowe, KAN 45 571 R. Gronkowski, NWE 43 580 And. Johnson, HOU 42 562 Ant. Brown, PIT 42 499 Ke. Wright, TEN 42 381 Punters No Yds Fields, MIA 39 2012 Anger, JAC 49 2375 Scifres, SND 32 1545 McAfee, IND 33 1587 Lechler, OAK 42 2016 Kern, TEN 42 2007 Donn. Jones, HOU 42 1981 Malone, NYJ 41 1921 B. Colquitt, DEN 31 1452

Yds 2404 2203 2408 1918 2130 1866 1674 2355 1990 1361

TDInt 20 6 16 4 16 3 12 4 14 11 12 10 15 9 13 8 10 6 7 5

Avg 4.01 5.01 4.77 4.80 4.75 4.25 3.78 7.21 4.38 3.66

LGTD 46 10 83t 3 41 5 91t 2 43 6 31 4 32t 5 56t 4 65t 4 36 5

Avg 13.7 12.3 14.4 12.7 16.8 12.7 13.5 13.4 11.9 9.1

LGTD 30t 3 59 2 73t 8 55 7 71t 4 46 3 41 7 60t 2 27 1 35 3

LG 63 73 66 64 68 63 66 61 67

Avg 51.6 48.5 48.3 48.1 48.0 47.8 47.2 46.9 46.8

Huber, CIN

37 1731 Punt Returners No Yds McKelvin, BUF 13 253 M. Thigpen, MIA 15 212 Kerley, NYJ 10 141 Ad. Jones, CIN 10 127 Cribbs, CLE 23 289 Br. Tate, CIN 12 126 Arenas, KAN 21 211 T. Holliday, HOU 16 147 Hilton, IND 13 103 Jac. Jones, BAL 10 79 Kickoff Returners No Yds Jac. Jones, BAL 13 435 McKelvin, BUF 12 357 Cribbs, CLE 27 801 McKnight, NYJ 20 586 C. Rainey, PIT 20 581 M. Thigpen, MIA 18 508 D. McCourty, NWE 13 359 Goodman, SND 18 497 Br. Tate, CIN 18 491 D. Thompson, BAL 15 389 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Pts A. Foster, HOU 11 10 A.. Green, CIN 8 0 Decker, DEN 7 0 R. Gronkowski, NWE 7 0 H. Miller, PIT 6 0 R. Rice, BAL 6 6 T. Richardson, CLE 6 5 O. Daniels, HOU 5 0 Greene, NYJ 5 5 Ridley, NWE 5 5 Kicking PAT FG Gostkowski, NWE 29-29 Janikowski, OAK 14-14 Suisham, PIT 18-18 P. Dawson, CLE 16-16 S. Graham, HOU 28-28 Tucker, BAL 20-20 Nugent, CIN 21-21 Vinatieri, IND 13-13 Succop, KAN 11-11 Bironas, TEN 19-19 ——— NFC Individual Leaders Week 9 Quarterbacks Att Com A. Rodgers, GBY 327 219 M. Ryan, ATL 299 206 Ale. Smith, SNF 209 145 Brees, NOR 342 209 Jo. Freeman, TAM 253 141 Griffin III, WAS 262 172 R. Wilson, SEA 234 145 Kolb, ARI 183 109 E. Manning, NYG 318 194 Cutler, CHI 241 144 Rushers Att Yds A. Peterson, MIN 168 957 M. Lynch, SEA 185 881 Do. Martin, TAM 154 794 Morris, WAS 164 793 Gore, SNF 119 656 L. McCoy, PHL 146 623 Bradshaw, NYG 141 618 Forte, CHI 107 539 Griffin III, WAS 81 529 M. Turner, ATL 128 517 Receivers No Yds Harvin, MIN 62 677 B. Marshall, CHI 59 797 Witten, DAL 58 538 Cruz, NYG 57 717 Fitzgerald, ARI 51 585 Gonzalez, ATL 50 495 Ca. Johnson, DET 48 767 R. White, ATL 47 709 Cobb, GBY 45 500 Colston, NOR 44 626 Punters No Yds Morstead, NOR 36 1843 J. Ryan, SEA 36 1801 Hekker, STL 34 1666 McBriar, PHL 20 963 A. Lee, SNF 31 1478 Bosher, ATL 30 1398 Zastudil, ARI 59 2724 Weatherford, NYG 33 1521 Masthay, GBY 44 1959 Kluwe, MIN 40 1765 Punt Returners No Yds Ginn Jr., SNF 17 210 Cobb, GBY 19 211 Sherels, MIN 18 179 Logan, DET 20 183 Hester, CHI 19 171 L. Washington, SEA 22 187 Parrish, TAM 15 119 P. Peterson, ARI 34 263 Franks, ATL 10 68 Sproles, NOR 10 66 Kickoff Returners No Yds Harvin, MIN 16 574 L. Washington, SEA 15 436 Sproles, NOR 14 402 Cobb, GBY 20 556 Ky. Williams, SNF 12 330 D. Wilson, NYG 31 832 Hester, CHI 11 295 J. Rodgers, ATL 11 294 Banks, WAS 19 467 Benn, TAM 13 306 Scoring Touchdowns TD Rush Jam. Jones, GBY 8 0 Do. Martin, TAM 8 7 Cobb, GBY 7 0 Cruz, NYG 7 0 B. Marshall, CHI 7 0 And. Brown, NYG 6 6 Colston, NOR 6 0 Griffin III, WAS 6 6 V. Jackson, TAM 6 0 A. Peterson, MIN 6 6

Tynes, NYG M. Bryant, ATL Walsh, MIN Gould, CHI Ja. Hanson, DET Barth, TAM Akers, SNF Hauschka, SEA Zuerlein, STL D. Bailey, DAL

Kicking PAT FG 24-24 22-22 19-19 26-26 19-19 25-25 21-21 17-18 10-10 13-13

65

46.8

Avg 19.5 14.1 14.1 12.7 12.6 10.5 10.0 9.2 7.9 7.9

LGTD 88t 1 72t 1 68t 1 81t 1 60 0 32 0 27 0 36 0 14 0 19 0

Avg 33.5 29.8 29.7 29.3 29.1 28.2 27.6 27.6 27.3 25.9

LGTD 108t1 59 0 74 0 100t1 68 0 57 0 104t1 39 0 45 0 49 0

Rec Ret 1 8 7 7 6 0 1 5 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

66 48 42 42 38 36 36 30 30 30

LG Pts 17-20 53 80 19-20 52 71 17-18 52 69 17-17 52 67 13-15 51 67 15-16 56 65 14-16 49 63 16-22 53 61 16-18 52 59 13-16 47 58

Yds 2383 2360 1659 2549 2047 1993 1639 1169 2426 1774

TDInt 25 5 17 6 12 5 22 8 16 5 8 3 13 8 8 3 12 9 12 8

Avg 5.70 4.76 5.16 4.84 5.51 4.27 4.38 5.04 6.53 4.04

LGTD 74 6 77t 4 70t 7 39t 5 37 4 34 2 37 4 46 3 76t 6 43 4

Avg 10.9 13.5 9.3 12.6 11.5 9.9 16.0 15.1 11.1 14.2

LGTD 45 3 39t 7 35 1 80t 7 37t 4 25 4 51 1 59 4 39t 6 40 6

LG 70 73 68 64 66 63 68 60 65 59

Avg 51.2 50.0 49.0 48.2 47.7 46.6 46.2 46.1 44.5 44.1

Avg 12.4 11.1 9.9 9.2 9.0 8.5 7.9 7.7 6.8 6.6

LGTD 38 0 75t 1 77t 1 48 0 44 0 52 0 26 0 26 0 22 0 16 0

Avg 35.9 29.1 28.7 27.8 27.5 26.8 26.8 26.7 24.6 23.5

LGTD 105t1 83 0 48 0 46 0 94 0 66 0 38 0 77 0 55 0 55 0

RecRet Pts 8 0 48 1 0 48 6 1 42 7 0 42 7 0 42 0 0 38 6 0 36 0 0 36 6 0 36 0 0 36 LG Pts 26-29 50102 20-23 55 82 19-20 55 76 16-18 54 74 17-19 53 70 13-17 57 64 14-19 63 63 15-18 52 62 17-20 60 61 15-17 51 58


The Journal ≤ www.journal-news.net GARFIELD® JIM DAVIS

COMICS

Wednesday, November 7, 2012 —Page D5 THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

TUYIN

SPEED BUMP®

DAVE COVERLY

Find us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/jumble

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

©2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

OSPUY

BLONDIE® DEAN YOUNG & STAN DRAKE

PRELUP VERRET

Print your answer here: Yesterday’s

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

(Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: DOZED NACHO AFFECT DRIVER Answer: The politician spoke frankly to his dinner companion because he was a — CANDID DATE

REX MORGAN® FWOODY WILSON & TONY DIPRETA

BEETLE BAILEY® MORT WALKER

DILBERT® SCOTT ADAMS

BOUND & GAGGED® DANA SUMMERS

THE FAMILY CIRCUS®

BY BILL KEANE

CRYPTOQUIP

DOONESBURY® GARRY TRUDEAU

THE LOCKHORNS® BY BUNNY HOEST & JOHN REINER FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE® LYNN JOHNSTON

GOREN BRIDGE

WITH OMAR SHARIF & TANNAH HIRSCH ©2002 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, Inc.

AVOID THE THREAT Both vulnerable. South deals.

SALLY FORTH® CREATED BY GREG HOWARD

NORTH ♠ A Q 10 9 6 5 4 ♥ Vo i d ♦8 3 ♣K8 7 4 WEST EAST ♠3 ♠ Vo i d ♥AK9 8 5 2 ♥ J 10 7 6 4 3 ♦7 6 2 ♦K9 5 4 ♣ J 10 2 ♣AQ9 SOUTH ♠KJ 8 7 2 ♥Q ♦ A Q J 10 ♣6 5 3

The bidding: SOUTH WEST NORTH EAST 1♠ Pas s 4♠ Pas s Pas s Pas s

MUTTS® PATRICK MCDONNELL

BABY BLUES® RICK KIRKMAN & JERRY SCOTT

PEANUTS® CHARLES M. SCHULZ

Opening lead: Jack of ♥

Bridge players are, by nature, superstitious. Often, however, they make their own bad luck. Consider South’s plight on this deal. The auction was soon over. Despite a strong hand in support, we endorse North’s pre-emptive raise to game, if for no other reason than to keep East-West out of the auction. As the cards lie, they can make 11 tricks at a heart contract. West led the jack of hearts. Declarer ruffed, drew the outstanding trump and took the diamond finesse, which lost. West lost no time switching to a club honor, and the defenders racked up three tricks in the suit for a one-trick set. “Two cards wrong out of two,” muttered South. “I’m jinxed!” “Quite the contrary,” retorted North. “You were lucky to escape a club lead, which would have doomed you from the outset. Now there is no excuse for not making 10 tricks.” Of course, North was correct. The only threat to the contract was that East held the ace of clubs and West the king of diamonds, in which case West had to be kept off lead to prevent a shift through the king of clubs. That could be accomplished by discarding a diamond from dummy at trick one instead of ruffing! Best defense is for East to win and return a diamond, but now a ruffing finesse is available as an avoidance play. Declarer rises with the ace, draws the trump, then continues with the queen of diamonds, discarding a club from the table should West follow low. If the finesse loses, declarer can discard two more clubs from dummy on high diamonds. If West covers, declarer ruffs, returns to hand with a trump, and discards two clubs on the diamonds, losing only two clubs and a heart. Either way 10 tricks are guaranteed.

(Tannah Hirsch welcomes readers’ responses sent in care of this newspaper or to Tribune Media Services Inc., 2010 Westridge Drive, Irving, TX 7 5 0 3 8 . E-mail responses may be sent to gorenbridge@aol.com.)

CROSSWORD

By Eugene Scheffer


NEIGHBORHOOD [The Journal]

D6 PAGE

KATHY MITCHELL & MARCY SUGAR Annie’s Mailbox

Strange living situation

WWW.JOURNAL-NEWS.NET

167th delivers power

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Food D7

Gives support to hurricane victims BY 2ND LT. STACY L. GAULT

167TH AIRLIFT WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS OFFICER

very important to make sure everything is marked correctly and balanced,” Ferrell said. Cargo can be loaded at either the front or back of the C-5. With that in mind, Ferrell said if the vehicles could make it under the 153-inch clearance at the back of the aircraft, they would easily drive through the front cargo door at the nose because of higher height restrictions. In addition to the cargo, four utility workers accompanied the equipment on the aircraft to volunteer their time and skills to assist the residents of New York and New Jersey, the most heavily affected areas. “I guess I felt like if something like that ever happened here, I’d want people to help out,” said J.J. Muth of Salt River Project, one of the utility companies represented. As for Phil Ochoa of Arizona Public Service, he recently vacationed in Long Island, N.Y., with his family and found the residents friendly and welcoming. So when the hurricane hit, he knew what he was going to do. “Seeing the devastation instantly made me want to go back and help the people there,” Ochoa said. Located at Stewart Air National

MARTINSBURG — Hurricane Sandy, nicknamed “Frankenstorm,” has killed more than 80 people in the U.S., left millions without power and potentially changed the Atlantic coastline. Dear Annie: My Considered one of the biggest boyfriend lives with a storms to hit the Northeast in the woman who gave birth to his past few years, it has left millions of child. He says it is not a Americans without basic necessities romantic arrangement. She such as water, heat and electricity. United States Air Force photo by 2nd Lt. Stacy L. Gault wanted to get pregnant, and To help the process of restoring An airman with the West Virginia Air National Guard’s 167th Airlift Wing he provided the genetic mate- electric, civilian power companies directs a power utility truck onto a C-5 for transportation to Stewart Air rial. He sleeps on the sofa. from the West Coast lent equipment National Guard Base in Newburgh, N.Y. My issue is, when he and personnel to the heavily affected wants to spend time with this areas. On Nov. 3, airmen with the kid, the mother must always 167th Airlift Wing transported four Guard Base, the 105th Airlift Wing is 105th Airlift Wing. be present. She also isn’t power utility trucks in a C-5 from less than 70 miles north of New York “We are all grateful for the opporaware that he is dating me, Phoenix Sky Harbor International City. It established an Aerial Port of tunity to help our fellow New Yorkand we’ve been together for Airport to Stewart Air National Debarkation (APOD) to bring critical ers in another way.” two years. He is divorced, Guard Base, Newburgh, N.Y. power line reconstruction personnel Air National Guard units around and his ex-wife and other Senior Master Sgt. Doug Ferrell, and equipment from the West Coast the country continue to engage in the children don’t know about the primary loadmaster for the misto the Northeast, expediting the return dual mission, serving both the indithis child. He expects me to sion, said transporting civilian of power to citizens. vidual states and country as a whole. keep his secret, stay away equipment provides challenges in “The complexity of and effort Ferrell said he loves this type of from the birth mother and be securing the cargo in the aircraft involved in this APOD mission mission and has participated in every fine with all of this — even because they are tied down differdirectly corresponds to the impor- disaster relief effort the 167th Airlift when overnight trips are ently than military vehicles. tance of the effort to the overall Hur- Wing has helped with since 1982. planned. “There aren’t any specific tie ricane relief effort,” said Col. Timo“It’s what we do, and what makes I will never be fine with down rings on the vehicles, so it’s thy LaBarge, commander of the us the unit we are,” he added. this. He says I should trust him. But, Annie, I just can’t wrap my head around why I should blindly accept this. Am I wrong? — Third Wheel Dear Third: Your boyfriend is juggling three separate lives: one with you, one with his ex-wife and children, and another with his “secret” child and the biological mother. We can think of no good reason for BY PAMELA COYLE are wrong. Rich or poor, healthy or this man to be living with ill, smart or challenged — you another woman unless he has FROM THE DIRECTOR’S CHAIR change the world around you by made a commitment to her in MARTINSBURG — November is being in it. addition to his child. He can Every individual does have a talent support the child emotionally the month for thanks— for those who and financially without sleep- serve in the armed forces (Veterans — whether you have discovered it or Day) and for family and friends use it, it is there. What is your talent? ing on her sofa. (Thanksgiving). I encourage you to Do you bring a smile to the people’s It is not your place to give thanks to all these people. Also, hearts when they think of you? Are inform his ex-wife or his pause and give thanks to your many you able to organize chaos? Are you other children about his other blessings that you often take for able to provide support, in time or arrangement. However, we Submitted photo think he is having a romantic granted such as your health, home money or in time of need? Do you A parade member during the 2011 Shepherdstown Parade. inspire others; are you able to care for relationship with the woman and hearth. But in this season of thanks, who is children or the elderly? Can you drive he lives with, and you are his sideline. What you do about most often forgotten? You! Seldom a car safely or fix a broken pipe or does anyone take time to reflect on roof? Can you make a good meal, that is up to you. the impact each individual has on the knit socks or make a toy? These are Dear Annie: I am 17 people and world around them. all things that, if done, affect the peoyears old, and I have a Everyone, in both large and small ple who need them. younger sister who is 13. If you provide information to the Her attitude is awful. I have ways, changes the lives of everyone SHEPHERDSTOWN — More ty potluck party at the Community they meet by using their talents for uninformed, food to the hungry or to drive her to school every than 50 of Shepherdstown’s historic Club, featuring a potluck supper and good or evil. But have you taken time tolerance toward the bigoted, you day, and we always get into families have registered to participate music by Sacred Groove. to consider what impact you have on have shared your talent(s). fights. She constantly critiin the town’s 250th Anniversary ¯ Nov. 10: This Thanksgiving, give thanks not cizes my driving and puts me your loved ones, on the community or Coming Home Parade, which will be 10 a.m. Dedication of a plaque to only to the people around you, but down. She also calls me a lot on the country? held starting a 3 p.m., Nov. 11. If you are thinking that you don’t appreciate who you are and what you the town’s founder, Thomas Shepof names and says hurtful The parade is one of a series of herd, at the Shepherd family gravehave a talent or make an impact, you bring to this world. things. We even got into a events that will be held the weekend yard on New Street. physical fight. of Nov. 9-11 to mark the conclusion 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Open I’ve told my parents that of the town’s year-long 250th house at the old Thomas Shepherd she is rude and I am not P L E A S A N T V I E W O C T O B E R F E S T anniversary celebrations. Grist Mill on High Street. inclined to do anything for It will be focused on descendants and ¯ Nov. 11: her. But my parents won’t representatives of the town’s historic 1 p.m. Model steam engine get involved. They never families, with music provided by fifes demonstration for children and parpunish her, and she gets and drums from the Shepherdstown ents at the Entler Hotel by Nicholas away with everything. In Middle School Band and drummers Rumsey of Richmond, Va., a memfact, they just bought her a from the Jefferson High School Band. ber of the family of steamboat pionew computer. The families participating in the neer James Rumsey. I don’t know what to do parade will include: Banks, Bedinger, 3 p.m. Coming Home Parade, anymore. I can’t wait until I Beltzhoover, Billmyer, Boetler, Buck- German Street. leave for college and won’t les, Byers, Carter, Chapline, Cookus, 4 p.m. Closing ceremony in front have to deal with her. Is that Dandridge, Entler, Fleming, Folk, of McMurran Hall. wrong? What should I do? Hawn, Hedges, Hendricks, Hoge, 5 to 7 p.m. Coming Home Soup — Frustrated Sister Humrickhouse, Knode, Knott, Laffer- Fest at various locations in the town. Dear Frustrated: We ty, Lemen, Link, Lowe, Lucas, Mar7 to 9 p.m. After the Soups Open understand that your little shall, Martin, McKee, McMurran, House with music and refreshments sister is driving you nuts. Morgan, Osbourn, Quigley, Ray, at the town’s historic train station. This is not uncommon with Rickard, Rumsey, Schley, Sheetz, Everyone is invited to all the younger siblings. We sugShepherd, Shindler, Show, Shutt, Skin- events. All are free, but some Soup gest you be the adult. Don’t ner, Snyder, Staley, Swearingen, Fest locations will charge a small fee let her ruffle you. Ignore her Thompson, Turner, Walper, Welshans, or accept donations. barbs and criticisms, which Submitted photo Weiss, Willis, Wyncoop, Yeasley. For more information, go to the are intended to provoke a Other special events scheduled for town’s 250th Anniversary website at response and get your atten- Children played 10 games at Pleasantview Community Center’s October Fest. Local people and businesses donated candy for the event. One the weekend include the following: www.shepherdstown250.com or tion. When you need to game that was a highlight of the fun featured a large pan of cooked ¯ Nov. 9: contact Peter Smith at 304-876vent, talk to your school spaghetti, into which children put their hands in search of a small toy. 6:30 p.m. to midnight: communi- 1139 or pvsmith@frontiernet.net. counselor, best friend, favorite teacher or a sympathetic relative. But please HINTS FROM HELOISE remember that when your THE CLASSIFICATION even yummier when eaten grapefruit spoon for! They clean all the crevices that a lean the bowl slightly on its sister outgrows this immaOF PEPPERS raw, with or without a dip. work well on grapefruits, but potato has. The Food and side, with the paper-towel ture stage, she could Dear Readers: Is a green Another healthy, tasty are perfect for seeding pepDrug Administration recomside at the bottom. The paper become your closest friend. bell pepper the same “fruit” hint: Peppers are a great pers and cucumbers. Section mends simply washing fruits towel will absorb the remainHang in there. as a red bell pepper? Yes! source of vitamins A and C, the meat not only of grapeand vegetables under running ing fat in just a couple of minAvailable in colors of green, and red peppers contain fruit, but also of oranges and water, with no soap or special utes, then I remove and toss — Annie’s Mailbox is orange, red, yellow and even twice as many vitamins as kiwi fruits. Another hint: Use produce wash. To make sure the paper towel. — Mary A., written by Kathy Mitchell the spoon to remove pits the potatoes are clean, you Vancouver, Wash. and Marcy Sugar, longtime purple, these beautiful fruits the green ones and are the (that’s right — it’s a fruit, sweetest-tasting! — Heloise from peaches, apricots and should gently scrub them with editors of the Ann Landers not a vegetable) are available other fruits. — Heloise a vegetable brush. — Heloise FOOD BINDERS column. Please email your year-round. GRAPEFRUIT SPOONS Dear Heloise: I am a partquestions to anniesmailWhen picked while they Dear Heloise: I read your WASHING POTATOES ABSORBING FAT time caterer. Here is a hint I box@comcast.net, or write are green, these peppers are column in the Milwaukee Dear Heloise: If I am bakDear Heloise: I like to use when making crab cakes, to: Annie’s Mailbox, c/o considered “not ripe.” The Post. I have a hint for you and ing potatoes for a crowd, make sure browned, crumbled salmon cakes or other foods Creators Syndicate, 737 your readers that my son tried couldn’t I put them in the meat is completely drained. that list breadcrumbs as an 3rd Street, Hermosa Beach, longer they are left on the plant, the sweeter they and now we use quite often. dishwasher? Would that get First, I do the initial draining. ingredient: I use instant mashed CA 90254. To find out We use a grapefruit spoon to them clean enough? — Mary After a brief time for cooling, potatoes instead. They are a more about Annie’s Mailbox become, and the color changes from green to yelscrape out seeds and insides of I. in Dallas I fold a paper towel into a good binding agent, and no one and read features by other low, orange and then red. peppers instead of knives. — No — just the spray of square and place it at the bot- guesses “potato” as an ingrediCreators Syndicate writers Really! Who knew? Not Geraldine T. in Milwaukee water and high temperature of tom of a clean bowl to one ent. They just wonder how the and cartoonists, visit the me! Not only are they great You’ve discovered one of water won’t clean them. The side. I pour the drained, crum- food was formed so perfectly! Creators Syndicate Web the many things I use a dishwasher water will not bled meat into the bowl and — Brittany S., via email page at www.creators.com. to cook with, but they are

Remembering to give thanks

Shepherdstown gears up for 250th anniversary


FOOD [The Journal]

D7 PAGE

Identifying Diabetes WWW.JOURNAL-NEWS.NET

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

Every 20 seconds someone in the United States is diagnosed with diabetes. In West Virginia there are 229,379 people with diabetes and an estimated 62,162 are at risk for developing the disease. November is National Diabetes Month, a campaign to raise awareness about the importance of setting goals and making a plan to prevent type 2 diabetes. Let’s explore some of the basics about diabetes. What is diabetes? What’s the difference between type 1 and type 2? Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. When you have diabetes, your

SUE FLANAGAN

body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use its own insulin as well as it should. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Diabetes can cause serious health complications including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure and lower-extremity amputations. Diabetes is the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults and it accounts for less than 10 percent of diabetes cases. People with type 1 diabetes must take insulin because their bodies

do not produce it. Type 1 diabetes is an auto-immune disease. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form and the body either does not produce enough insulin or is not able to use it effectively. Some people with type 2 diabetes are able to manage the blood glucose through diet and exercise while others take oral medications or insulin to control the blood glucose. Over time, if it’s not controlled, type 2 diabetes can cause serious health problems like heart disease, stroke and blindness. You may be at risk

for type 2 diabetes if you: ¯ Are overweight ¯ Exercise less than 3 times a week ¯ Are over 45 years old ¯ Have high blood pressure or high cholesterol ¯ Are African-American, Latino, American Indian, Alaska Native, Asian-American or Pacific Islander ¯ Have a parent, brother or sister with diabetes ¯ Have a history of diabetes when you’re pregnant ¯ Gave birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds What are the symptoms? You could have diabetes or pre-diabetes (higher than normal blood glucose numbers but not high enough for a diagnosis) and not know it. Some of the symptoms of diabetes are frequent urination, excessive thirst, unexplained weight loss, tingling or numbness in hands or feet, feeling very tired much

Pork Chops with Maple-Pear Sauce

4 lean, boneless pork loin chops (about 1 lb.) 2 pears, diced (preferable unpeeled) 2 tablespoons maple syrup or pancake syrup (preferably sugarfree) 2 tablespoons Splenda Brown Sugar Blend 1 1/2 teaspoons prepared mustard 1 1/2 teaspoons margarine Pinch ground cloves Non-stick cooking spray Lightly spray a skillet with cooking spray. Sear pork chops in skillet. Meanwhile, in a small saucepan, combine remaining ingredients and cook over medium heat until pears release their juice and mixture is heated through.

Pour sauce over pork chops, cover skillet and simmer on low heat until internal temperature of pork chops reaches 145 degrees F. Remove from heat and let rest for 3 minutes. Alternative preparation method: Brown pork chops and place in oven-safe pan or baking dish. Prepare sauce and pour over pork chops; Bake at 350 degrees F for 15 to 20 minutes, until internal temperature of pork chops is 145 degrees F. Remove pork from oven and let rest for three minutes before serving. Yield: 4 servings Nutrition information per serving: 220 calories; 7g total fat; 2 g saturated fat, 115 mg sodium, 17 g total carbohydrate, 2 g dietary fiber.

of the time, or sores that are slow to heal. People who think they might have diabetes must visit a physician for diagnosis. Can you reduce the risk for developing diabetes? Even small changes — such as losing a small amount of weight and becoming more active — can go a long way in preventing type 2 diabetes, as well as managing the disease. By eating more healthy and controlling your blood pressure and cholesterol, you might lower your chances of getting type 2 diabetes. The West Virginia Diabetes Prevention and Control Program suggests that changes in how you care for your health is a matter of trying and learning. It’s all about choosing a goal and working toward it. Making a plan and taking the first step will help you reach your goal. 1. Think about what is important to your health. What

are you willing and able to do? 2. Decide what your goals are. What changes do you want to make? Choose one goal to work on first. 3. Decide what steps will help you reach your goal. 4. Pick one step to try this week. For more information about prevention of type 2 diabetes and diabetes-related complications, visit your health care provider. West Virginia University Extension Service conducts Dining with Diabetes classes throughout the state. See below for some favorite recipes from that program.

— Sue Flanagan is a WVU Extension agent in Berkeley County with the Families and Health program area. She can be reached at 304-264-1936 or sue.flanagan@mail.wvu.edu or at http://berkeley.ext.wvu.edu/.

Seasoned Roasted Potatoes

2 medium baking potatoes 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 teaspoon parsley flakes 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 3/4 teaspoon paprika 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon dried thyme, crushed 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder Nonstick spray

bowl. Sprinkle over potatoes. Toss to coat. Spread on the prepared baking sheet. Bake uncovered for about 45 minutes, turning occasionally, until browned and tender. Note: You can vary the seasonings, depending on individual tastes and other foods being served. Avoid seasoned salts and rely on herbs for flavor.

Preheat oven to 425 degrees F. Spray a baking sheet with nonstick Yield: 4 servings spray. Cut each potato into biteNutrition Information per serving: size pieces. In a large bowl, toss 130 calories; 3.5 g total fat, 0.5 g potatoes with olive oil. Combine saturated fat, 160 mg sodium, 23 g remaining ingredients in a small total carbohydrates, 3 g dietary fiber.

Sandra Lee urges fans to get involved in storm recovery BY J.M. HIRSCH AP FOOD EDITOR

Food Network star Sandra Lee has a simple plea about superstorm Sandy recovery efforts — don’t get complacent. Though government efforts to help those caught in the path of last week’s epic storm have been tremendous, as have contributions by corporations and individual donors, Lee fears a fallout from all the goodwill and good deeds — people outside the worst-hit areas might assume the work is finished. “Don’t think that everybody else is doing the work or it’s getting done,” Lee — who also happens to be New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s live-in girlfriend — said in a telephone interview Tues-

day. “Don’t think ‘My contribution will be so meaningless and small that it won’t matter.’ That is not the case.” The storm battered several Northeastern states, but hit New Jersey and the New York metropolitan area particularly hard. Lee has been working the phones to arrange corporate donations for New York’s food banks and other charities, including five truckloads of food and emergency supplies from Kmart and Sears. “We’ve been reaching out to everyone. It’s amazing when CEOs of huge corporations just get on the phone and just get it done,” she said. But there also have been disappointments. “There’s

AP photo

Food network personality Sandra Lee unloads donated items for storm victims to a food bank See STORM D8 warehouse in the Bronx borough of New York.

Finding the tastiest choices for food book gifts BY MICHELE KAYAL ASSOCIATED PRESS

It’s that time of year again, when retailers deck their halls, radio stations relentlessly jingle and cookbooks go forth and multiply. The dawn of the holiday season also marks an onslaught from the publishing world — a rush of food books that begins in August and refuses to slow down until every family in America has gifted (and perhaps regifted) at least a dozen. Or maybe it just feels that way. The upshot of all this is that there truly is a food book for everyone on your shopping list. Should you care to go that route, we’ve sussed out some of the best to help streamline at least that leg of your shopping trip. FOR COOKBOOK GEEKS Fancy a sunderland pudding? Ever wonder how to dress a calf’s head? Publisher Andrews McMeel has teamed up with The American

Antiquarian Society to publish reproductions of 100 cookbooks documenting the early American cooking experience. “American Cookery” (Andrews McMeel, $22.99) by Amelia Simmons was originally published in 1796 and is believed to be the first cookbook to document American culinary techniques. It offers a window into those days with recipes for items such as spruce beer and tongue pie set beside page images from the original cookbook. Also part of the series is America’s first Jewish cookbook, “Jewish Cookery Book: On Principles of Economy” (Andrews McMeel, $28.99) by Esther Levy. It originally was published in 1871 and includes recipes for fish balls and frimsel (noodle) soup. Its recipes, menu suggestions and household management tips aimed to help European immigrants adapt to their new country while maintaining their religious heritage.

Both volumes are perfect for the armchair anthropologist in your life. FOR REGULAR GEEKS Does your loved one stand over a pot of boiling water with a thermometer? Wonder why salt makes steak juicy? Muse out loud about why russets make fluffier mashed potatoes than red bliss? We got it covered. “The Science of Good Cooking” (America’s Test Kitchen, $40) by the folks behind Cook’s Illustrated magazine doesn’t just offer “400 recipes engineered for perfection,” it also covers 50 basic concepts explaining why the recipes work. Useful sidebars showcase tips and techniques — use a skillet, not a wok to stir-fry — and charts that check your measurements (a cup of all-purpose flour should weigh 5 ounces) make it a handy reference guide. “Modernist Cuisine at Home” (The Cooking Lab, $140) is even sexier. The laboratory that last year

produced “Modernist Cuisine,” a six-volume encyclopedia of molecular gastronomy by Nathan Myhrvold, has turned its blow torches and sous vide machines on home cooking. It’s a monstrously fun and shockingly practical cookbook that truly lets you get your geek on in the kitchen. Because who knew that a touch of citric acid makes the ultimate grilled cheese? Or that scrambled eggs can be dispensed from a whipping canister and that baking soda helps caramelize vegetables? FOR NOSTALGIA HOUNDS Americans have been hungry for nostalgia, and publishers are happy to feed them. “101 Classic Cookbooks: 501 Classic Recipes” (Rizzoli International Publications, $50) boils down the classic, most iconic cookbooks to 501 recipes, drawing from books that span Fannie Farmer’s 1896 “The Boston Cooking School Cook Book” to Thomas Keller’s 1999 “The French Laundry

Cookbook.” Sneaking in between are recipes such as sole meuniere from Jacques Pepin’s “La Technique,” Bengal red lentils from Julie Sahni’s “Classic Indian Vegetarian and Grain Cooking,” and banana bread from Mark Bittman’s “How to Cook Everything.” Essays about each book and its importance make this an excellent gift for the person who loves cookbooks even more than cooking. There also is the incredibly charming “Handwritten Recipes” (Perigee, $20), a collection of found recipes by bookseller Michael Popek. Tucked between the pages of books brought into his store, Popek found the jots and scribbles of recipes from unknown cooks. In “Handwritten Recipes,” he collects those notes and recipes, assembling a book that is as much lovely artifact as cookbook.

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FOR THE WORLD TRAVELER Love pho, but want to branch out? Charles Phan, the chef behind San Francisco’s famed restaurant The Slanted Door, offers “Vietnamese Home Cooking” (Ten Speed Press, $35), devoted to bringing tamarind, star anise, fish sauce and lemon grass to a kitchen near you. While many of the recipes are a little too “chefy” — who’s going to fillet their own fish for the “simple fish soup”? — they go a long way to introducing the flavors and techniques of the cuisine. Bite-sized steamed rice cakes promise unusual party snacks, and lemon grass chicken could be a feather in your toque. “The Hakka Cookbook: Chinese Soul Food from Around the World” (University of California Press, $39.95) by Linda Lau Anusasananan captures the flavors and stories of an often overlooked Chinese diaspora. Fried eggs and bitter melon, tangy-sweet raw fish salad and chicken stuffed with preserved mustard greens offer new insights to even the savviest fan of Chinese food. Among the steady supply of books on Latin food, three stand out. “Muy Bueno: Three Generations of Authentic Mexican Flavor” (Hippocrene Books, $22.50) by Yvette Marquez-Sharpnack, Veronica Gonzalez-Smith and Evangelina Soza, preserves recipes spanning old world Mexican dishes like pork tamales to fusion creations like scallop and cucumber cocktail. Charming family stories combined with

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richly colorful photos to make this a delightful invitation to cooking. In “The Latin Road Home” (Lake Isle Press, $35), chef Jose Garces traces his culinary journey from his ancestral home of Ecuador through his different influences from Spain to Cuba, Mexico and Peru. Recipes for dishes like red snapper in tomato sauce and his grandmother’s empanadas are woven with thoroughly readable narratives of his life and family, as well as useful information about the regions. “Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America” (W.W. Norton, $45) by Cuban-born chef Maricel Presilla, offers a sweeping, sophisticated history of Latin food that illustrates the diversity of techniques, styles and flavors through 500 recipes. Recipes for foundational adobos and sofritos pave the way for cuitlacoche and jalapeno quesadillas, various pilafs, empanadas and tamales. FOR THE CELEBRITY CHEF JUNKIE Who didn’t love Kevin Gillespie, the tattooed “Top Chef” contestant who worshipped pig and always concocted something homey? His book, “Fire in my Belly” (Andrews McMeel, $40), brings home recipes like Brussels sprouts gratin with heavy cream and mustard and the “one-pot hog supper” with fat back and cracklings. Light it’s not, but delicious? Tickling the other end of the spectrum is “Hero Food” (Andrews McMeel, $35) by New York chef Seamus Mullen. More than 80 recipes

such as caramelized cauliflower with anchovies and duck liver toasts with pickled raisins are part of Mullen’s quest to manage his rheumatoid arthritis with 18 “hero” ingredients like sweet peas, parsley, berries and squash. Despite his motivation, Mullen’s food tastes anything but medicinal. Fans of uber chef Thomas Keller will welcome “Bouchon Bakery” (Artisan Books, $50), featuring 150 recipes from humble shortbread and oatmeal raisin cookies to pistachio madeleines, pain au chocolat, raspberry macaroons and other items from his fabled bakery. FOR THE BAKER Love dessert but hate to fuss? A stout float from “Sinfully Easy Delicious Desserts” (Artisan Books, $25.95) by Alice Medrich is the treat for you. The float is joined by dozens more recipes such as peanut butter pavlova, honey caramelized figs and food processor chocolate mousse that are just as easy. And easily as tasty. “Piece of Cake: Home Baking Made Simple” (Rizzoli, $29.95) by David Muniz and David Lesniak offers more than 120 recipes for classic American treats — think brownies, peanut butter cookies and blueberry muffins. Black and white cheesecake, an honest-togoodness New York crumb cake and cakes from bundts to babkas join the fun. Home-baked pies are the aspiration of many a cook. “A Year of Pies” (Lark, $19.95) by Ashley English offers strawberry, rhubarb and gin-

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The cover of the cookbook, “Bouchon.”

ger hand pies for spring, pumpkin tiramisu pie in fall and pies for all the days in between. Savory pies like curried winter vegetable and galumpkis pie — the pie version of Polish stuffed cabbage — mix things up in the colder months. FOR THE BROWSER Stuff somebody’s stocking with an eight-issue subscription to the just-launched U.S.

edition of Jamie Oliver’s magazine, “Jamie Magazine.” With the motto “Making You a Better Cook,” each issue is jammed with recipes, as well as travel and food stories and stunning photography. Appropriately enough, the magazine’s first U.S. issue is the holiday edition. Subscriptions for $32.95 at http://www.jamiemag.com. Are your loved ones more

the digital sort? Help them bridge the digital divide into the kitchen with “The Epicurious Cookbook” (Clarkson Potter, $27.99), a collection of more than 250 of the topranked recipes from the ubiquitous recipe search site. The recipes are easy, reliable and vetted by the many, many users who have turned the site into an invaluable kitchen reference.

Flaxseed Pancakes Start to finish: 10 minutes Makes 4 cups of mix 2 cups whole-wheat flour 1 cup all-purpose flour 1 cup flax meal

The Mix

2 tablespoons sugar 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon table salt Into a medium bowl, sift together all of the ingredients.

Making the Pancakes

Give the gift of a healthy breakfast Flaxseed pancake and waffle mix and healthy pancakes are shown.

BY SARA MOULTON ASSOCIATED PRESS

As far as I’m concerned, the best holiday gift is one that’s handmade and edible. And if you can make it in big batches on a budget — and have it be healthy — even better. That’s the thinking behind this delicious pancake and waffle mix. Face-to-face with a whiny child on a Sunday morning, too many otherwise accomplished and adventurous home cooks reach for a box of pre-fab pancake mix. That’s a shame, not least because it’s easy to make your own mix, using ingredients of your choice, and to do so in — you guessed it — a jiffy. The food police love to vilify pancakes and waffles as nothing more than carbs and sugar, but these guilty pleasures can be nobler than that. At their base, pancakes and waffles depend on a few key ingredients: flour, salt,

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some that you’re just stunned, stunned, stunned, stunned that they don’t respond. Where is the leadership at these companies?” Mostly, however, she has been impressed by how people have pulled together. “We’re all going to be hit by a disaster and a storm and something in our area. It’s just a matter of time. You saw it in New Orleans. You’re seeing it here,” Lee said. “We all have to help one another when that happens. And that is one of the things you’re seeing. Right now it’s our turn and we’re the ones in need. Next time, it will be our turn to help.”

sugar and leavener. If you swap in whole-wheat flour for at least some of the white flour, add a little flaxseed, slash some of the sugar and top off the finished product with fresh fruit, you’re suddenly looking at a very respectable breakfast. Heck, you even could drizzle a little Grade B maple syrup (my favorite) on top, and it still would be a healthy choice. Using whole-wheat flour in the mix should not be terribly objectionable. Though there are some folks who insist their bread be white because “brown bread tastes yucky,” no one feels that way about pancakes and waffles. And when you toss in some flaxseed, you really amp the recipe’s nutritional value even as you add a subtle but distinctive nuttiness. Flaxseed is showing up more and more frequently on supermarket shelves these days, and you can always find it online. I often add a tablespoon or two of it to my

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breakfast cereal in the morning. Just keep in mind that flaxseed isn’t properly digested unless it is ground. You can buy it pre-ground or grind it yourself in a spice grinder. After you open the package, keep it in the refrigerator or freezer; it tends to go rancid quickly. At holiday time, you can measure the batch into pretty containers — old canning jars are perfect for this purpose — attach a nice handwritten label and recipe with a ribbon and consider it done. The deluxe version? Just add a little package of dried fruit or a tiny bottle of maple syrup. EDITOR’S NOTE: Sara Moulton was executive chef at Gourmet magazine for nearly 25 years, and spent a decade hosting several Food Network shows. She currently stars in public television’s “Sara’s Weeknight Meals” and has written three cookbooks, including “Sara Moulton’s Everyday Family Dinners.”

Start to finish: 10 to 15 minutes Makes 6 large (3 1/2- to 4-inch) or 12 small (1 1/2- to 2-inch) pancakes 2 tablespoons unsalted butter or 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 cup milk 1 large egg 1 1/2 cups flaxseed pancake mix Freshly cut fruit or berries and pure maple syrup, to serve If using butter, in a small saucepan over medium heat, cook the butter until it is light brown in color and has a nutty aroma. If using oil, skip to the next step of the recipe. In a medium bowl, whisk the milk and egg. Add the pancake mix, then mix with

a spoon, stirring just until the ingredients are combined. Stir in the browned butter or oil. Heat a large nonstick skillet brushed with oil or coated with cooking spray over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and ladle either 1/4-cup or 1/8-cup portions of the batter into the pan (depending on whether you want large or small pancakes). Let the pancakes cook for 1 to 2 minutes, or until small bubbles appear on the surface. Flip, then cook for another 1 to 2 minutes, or until golden on the second side. Pancakes can be kept warm in a 200 F oven while remaining batter is cooked. Serve with fruit and maple syrup.

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