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Justin Leonard won for the 12th time in his career by capturing the Stanford St. Jude Championship and placed eighth in the FedExCup standings.

Section

9 ADDitional information


Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Charity: Giving Back...The Heart of the PGA TOUR Making a positive impact on the communities where PGA TOUR tournaments are held and players live is a sure sign that the golf organization’s charitable mission is a continuing success story all around the world. This effort was celebrated in late 2005 when the PGA TOUR and its tournaments reached the “Drive to a Billion” milestone. That cumulative effect, since the first donation in 1938, has reached more than $1.3 billion entering 2009. The forecast is for the second billion-dollar mark to be reached in approximately the next five years. PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour events annually benefit more than 2,000 charities and countless individuals worldwide. Research shows that the majority of the funds raised each year are directly funneled back into the local market, so while there is not an “official charity of the PGA TOUR,” there are many who benefit from the TOUR’s one goal of “Giving Back.” “Thanks to the incredible generosity of the tournaments, players, fans, volunteers and business partners who support the PGA TOUR, the goal of giving back continues to be our main focus,” PGA TOUR Commissioner Tim Finchem said. “We are inspired by the continued enthusiasm for giving that ensures more and more assistance is generated for those in need around the world.” Structure Unlike any other professional sport, the PGA TOUR relies on more than 80,000 volunteers a year to run its events, and nearly all of the 100-plus tournaments are structured as non-profit organizations designed to donate 100 percent of net proceeds to local charities. Beneficiaries include a wide variety of local organizations such as hospitals, youth-development organizations, growth-of-the-game programs and food banks. In addition, military support and fundraising for natural disaster relief are apparent. The beneficiaries include the 2008 Charity of the Year, Whaley Children’s Center in Michigan, which benefits from the PGA TOUR’s Buick Open. Whaley Children’s Center serves abused and neglected children throughout Michigan between the ages of 5 and 17. The Center teaches the children how to succeed as individuals, by providing continuity of care across all programs and supporting them with resources so they can reach their potential. The impact is also made by volunteers such as the 2008 Volunteer of the Year—Joan Smith of the Buick Invitational. Smith has served as a volunteer for nearly 50 years at the PGA TOUR’s San Diego stop and 40 of those years has been in the capacity of chair or co-chair of the Walking Scorers Committee. She is known as “Mrs. Golf” in the San Diego community. Tournaments Tournaments provide the leadership. The FBR Open on the PGA TOUR, the 3M Championship, Toshiba Classic and Walmart First Tee Open at Pebble Beach on the Champions Tour and the Albertsons Boise Open, BMW Charity Pro-Am and Price Cutter Charity Championship on the Nationwide Tour pro-

vided the largest donations to charity in 2008 on each Tour. The FBR Open in Phoenix raised a record $8.65 million in 2008 on the PGA TOUR. In The Presidents Cup, there is no purse, yet revenues are divided into equal shares that the participating players and Captains designate for charities of their choice, totaling more than $17 million in the seven playings of the event. “This heartfelt response year after year is a tribute to the players, tournaments and thousands of volunteers who make PGA TOUR events so successful,” said Ollie Nutt, Chairman of the Tournament Advisory Council. “We look forward to continuing the tradition of making a true difference for organizations and in peoples’ lives in cities where we play.” Players Players also reach out to help considerably through charitable efforts in their home communities and elsewhere. Support of the United States military has been quite evident in recent years. The AT&T National in Bethesda, MD, over the Fourth of July weekend honors the United States military by offering free admission to all military personnel and holding various events around the tournament. Host Tiger Woods pays tribute to his late father, Earl, a Green Beret veteran, by focusing on those who serve our country through various activities. Phil Mickelson began a “Birdies for the Brave” program in 2004 that continues to donate $100 for each birdie and $500 for each eagle he makes in competition and benefits “Homes for Our Troops” and “Special Operations Warrior Foundation.” Numerous other players are affiliated with organizations that assist wounded veterans and their families. Players support amateur golf in various capacities also. Australia’s Aaron Baddeley has sponsored the Aaron Baddeley International Junior Championship in China each December for eight years, with the winning boys and girls earning spots in the Australian men’s and women’s opens. Bubba Watson sponsors the Bubba Watson Invitational, a women’s NCAA Division II golf tournament at his home course in Pace, FL. Fred Funk, who plays on both the PGA TOUR and Champions Tour, has assisted J.T. Townsend, a young man who was paralyzed in a 2004 Jacksonville, FL. Funk, with assistance from the PGA TOUR and THE PLAYERS Championship, has spearheaded fund-raisers, including an annual golf tournament, and given a percentage of his earnings to help Townsend’s family pay for a wheelchair-accessible home that includes other special amenities. The Townsend family moved into the home in late 2006. The players’ wives are also fully involved in giving back. The PGA TOUR Wives Association was a 2008 recipient of one of Golf Magazine’s 10 Innovator Awards for its charitable nature and positive impact on tournament host cities. Since its incorporation in 1988, the PGA TOUR Wives Association, Inc., has supported children’s charities across the country by raising money and giving back much to the game of golf through personal time and monetary contributions.

In the communities where tournaments take place, giving back remains at the heart of the PGA TOUR.

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PGA TOUR

2009 Guide

pgatour.com


Golf 20/20: Vision For the Future In November 2000, golf industry leaders gathered at the World Golf Village to participate in a conference called GOLF 20/20: Vision for the Future, a precedent-setting forum aimed at initiating a collaborative effort to grow the game of golf and secure its future. The spirit of unity was so strong and the commitment to make a difference so universal, the decision was made to address some of the most pressing issues impacting the golf industry on an ongoing basis, through the formation of GOLF 20/20. An initiative of the World Golf Foundation, GOLF 20/20 is a unique collaboration designed to galvanize the industry around strategic initiatives and grass-roots activation to ensure the future vitality of the game of golf. The fundamental principle behind GOLF 20/20 is that golf benefits society and that accelerating the growth of the game and expanding its accessibility will improve the quality of life for those who are introduced to its positive values. Among GOLF 20/20’s many accomplishments during the past six years are the following:

pgatour.com

PGA  TOUR

2009 Guide

9-3

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Economic Impact – In 2006 GOLF 20/20, along with research partner SRI International, developed a template through which states could affordably commission a report on the economic impact of golf within the state, to demonstrate golf’s importance to various public and private constituencies. To date, reports have been completed for Virginia, Ohio, Iowa, Michigan, Minnesota, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Texas and California. Reports are currently underway for Hawaii, North Carolina, New York and Florida. Additionally, early in 2008 GOLF 20/20 released its latest national economic impact report which showed that the U.S. golf economy had grown from $62 billion to $76 billion between 2000 and 2005. At $76 billion, golf is a larger industry in the U.S. than the motion picture and video industries. The report, The 2005 Golf Economy Report, also measured golf’s annual charitable impact at $3.5 billion.

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Program Development – GOLF 20/20 has successfully piloted numerous programs, beginning with Link Up 2 Golf in 2001. This adult player development program now serves as an integral part of the PGA of America’s Play Golf America program. In 2003, GOLF 20/20 created the National School Golf Program, a unique approach to introducing elementary school students to the game through the physical education structure. This program is now under the management of The First Tee. In 2005, GOLF 20/20 established Women’s Golf Week, a unique collaboration of the golf industry aimed at increasing the participation of women in the game. And in 2008, GOLF 20/20 unveiled an industry-wide program to connect adults to the game in a consistent and compelling manner. The new initiative, Get Golf Ready, is designed to introduce beginners to the game in a relaxed, friendly environment and to get them from the lesson tee to the golf course as quickly as possible. GOLF 20/20 expects up to 700 facilities around the country to offer Get Golf Ready programs by the end of 2009.

Joe Steranka ������������������� Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, PGA of America Leigh Bader ��������������������� General Manager, Pine Oaks Golf Course Joe Louis Barrow, Jr. ���� Executive Vice President, World Golf Foundation and Chief Executive Officer, The First Tee Joseph Beditz ������������������ President and Chief Executive Officer, National Golf Foundation Peter Bevacqua �������������� Chief Business Officer, United States Golf Association Gregg Breningmeyer ������ Director of Sales and Marketing, John Deere Golf Bob Carney ���������������������� Senior Vice President and Creative Director, Golf Digest Jorge Cora ����������������������� Chief Financial Officer, PGA TOUR Superstore Cindy Davis ���������������������� President, Nike Golf Steven di Costanzo ��������� President and Founder, Golf Range Association of America/Golf Range Magazine Paul Foley ������������������������ Executive Director, Golf Course Builders Association of America Libba Galloway ��������������� Deputy Commissioner, Ladies Professional Golf Association Stephen Hamblin ������������ Executive Director, American Junior Golf Association Jim Hinckley ������������������� Partner and Chief Executive Officer, Century Golf Partners Trey Holland �������������������� President, National Alliance for Accessible Golf Kevin Holleran ���������������� President, E-Z-GO John Hugghins ���������������� Senior Vice President, TPC Operations, PGA TOUR Mike Hughes ������������������� Chief Executive Officer, National Golf Course Owners Association Resa Kierstein ����������������� Partnership Manager, National Recreation and Park Association Gary Michel ��������������������� Chief Executive Officer, Club Car Jay Mottola ���������������������� Executive Director, Metropolitan Golf Association Jim Nugent ���������������������� Publisher, PGA TOUR Partners Jack Peter ������������������������ Senior Vice President, Chief Operating Officer, World Golf Hall of Fame Chad Ritterbusch ������������ Executive Secretary, American Society of Golf Course Architects Jim Singerling ����������������� Chief Executive Officer, Club Managers Association of America Pam Swensen ����������������� Chief Executive Officer, Executive Women’s Golf Association Page Thompson �������������� President, Golf Channel Phil Tralies ���������������������� Chairman, Club Car Ty Votaw �������������������������� Executive Vice President of Communications and International Affairs, PGA TOUR Mark Woodward ������������ Chief Executive Officer, Golf Course Superintendents Association of America

Section

Research – GOLF 20/20 has undertaken a number of unprecedented research projects, including golf’s largest-ever segmentation study (2001); two studies quantifying golf’s economic impact in the U.S. (2000, 2005); and two studies focusing on golf’s best customers (2005). In 2006, GOLF 20/20, working with SRI International, developed a template for the calculation of the economic impact of golf at the state level, which provides states with an affordable tool to use in a variety of ways.

The GOLF 20/20 Executive Committee:


The First Tee is recognized as a preeminent positive youth development program. It provides young people of all backgrounds an opportunity to develop life-enhancing values such as honesty, confidence, perseverance and judgment through golf and character education. Since its inception in 1997, The First Tee has created a network of over 700 program locations around the world and has a presence in over 2,000 U.S. elementary schools. Over 2.2 million young people have been introduced to the game of golf and its values through The First Tee. In more than 100 school districts across the country, The First Tee National School Program introduces elementary school students to the game of golf and The First Tee Nine Core Values during regular physical education classes. The First Tee provides teachers with developmentally appropriate equipment, training and a comprehensive curriculum designed to teach basic golf skills and etiquette to elementary students. Once their interest is piqued, students are encouraged to pursue the game at The First Tee and other transitional golf opportunities in their community. The PGA TOUR has been instrumental in growing this program in its tournament markets. The First Tee Life Skills Experience is the unique feature that distinguishes The First Tee from many other golf programs and youth initiatives. Through life lessons taught at more than 200 community-based nonprofit Chapters, participants learn the importance of maintaining a positive attitude, how to make decisions by thinking about possible consequences, how to define and set goals and how to transfer the positive values of golf to everyday life. Independent research conducted by the University of Virginia and University of Minnesota provides data-based evidence that participation in The First Tee Life Skills Education Programs positively changes young people’s attitudes and behaviors.

There are many opportunities for participants who excel academically and for those who display leadership skills and the positive core values taught by The First Tee. Teenage participants are eligible for the Walmart First Tee Open at Pebble Beach, an official Champions Tour tournament, that pairs one junior with a Champions Tour player and two amateurs. High school seniors can apply for The First Tee Scholars Program, which offers scholarships to accredited colleges and universities. Leadership forums, life skills academies and other educational opportunities are available to outstanding participants through partnerships with corporations, foundations and individual donors. The First Tee has been successful in creating a broad network of support thanks to its Founding Partners: Augusta National Golf Club, LPGA, PGA of America, PGA TOUR and USGA, and honorary chairman, former President George H.W. Bush. Get involved today and support The First Tee. It’s more than a game! Visit thefirsttee.org for more information.

Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The First Tee

Nine Core Values of The First Tee: Honesty | Integrity | Sportsmanship Respect | Confidence | Responsibility Perseverance | Courtesy | Judgment

9-4

PGA TOUR

2009 Guide

pgatour.com


New Media/PGATOUR.COM The New Media team at the PGA TOUR is responsible for growing new media content and platforms and serving the fan by getting closer to the game through enhanced coverage. New Media businesses, products and coverage can be utilized and seen by fans on the Internet, on-site at tournaments and on the go—anywhere, anytime.

Fantasy The official fantasy games of the PGA TOUR are only at PGATOUR.COM. Games are free, fun and easy to play. Prizes include an ultimate golf vacation. Shop.PGATOUR.COM The official on-line store of the PGA TOUR is a one-stop shop for TOUR-logoed items, the latest equipment and apparel—all at great prices. Other Exciting Products and Content PGATOUR.COM also provides fantasy golf games, a newsletter, depth-ofcourse content and conditions, expanding community and interactive features, ShotLink analysis and more. PGATOUR Network on Sirius XM Satellite Radio The PGA TOUR Network brings you expanded live play-by-play coverage of every event for at least 24 hours per week. The on-site talent team paints a vivid picture of all of the action and makes you feel like you are at the course. Additional programming includes a daily wrap-up show called PGA TOUR Replay, oPINionated with Chris DiMarco and more. PGATOUR Mobile Golf fans with mobile devices can go to mobile.pgatour.com and get live scores, play-by-play stats and more. In 2009, the mobile offerings will continue to expand.

Exclusive Live Scoring Fans worldwide can follow their favorite players in real time. Features allow custom leaderboards, including scorecard information, hole stats and more. Additional Live Coverage PGATOUR.COM complements its exclusive real-time scoring with a variety of additional live tournament coverage. Among the many features available throughout the year are LIVE@ video coverage featuring every golfer in the field playing a specific hole from select tournaments, in-progress early-day video highlights, PGA TOUR Shot Tracker live scoring center, live on-site blogs, a live stream of more than 40 hours of tournament-specific PGA TOUR Network on Sirius XM Radio coverage, as well as on-demand audio/video interviews, post-round podcasts, RSS feeds and more.

Fan Database New Media keeps in touch with fans throughout the season, and the fan database helps keep all their information safe. The TOUR uses collected information to keep fans abreast of TOUR news, local events and special fan offers. New Media even uses fan input for future product feedback. On-Site Fan Enhancements Event Hospitality Network (EHN) uses interactive touch-screen kiosks around the tournament course to create compelling on-course coverage of the event. Find out the live scores, shot charts, which hole your favorite player is on, with whom he is paired and when he tees off. Look for additional on-site fan enhancements in 2009 that will provide video, audio and live scoring via a multimedia handheld device or listen to the PGA TOUR Network on Sirius XM via a personal earpiece radio. Future Stay tuned for more new products and platforms to come for PGA TOUR fan enjoyment.

Comprehensive TOUR Player Information and Stats Get in-depth information, stats and analysis on players and tournaments. Fans can get to know TOUR players better with inside access, and PGATOUR.COM is the authoritative source for coverage of the FedExCup and the PGA TOUR Playoffs for the FedExCup. Fans can follow expanded coverage of ShotLink statistics as well.

pgatour.com

PGA  TOUR

2009 Guide

9-5

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The site is focused on giving fans a rich and immensive on-line experience, and bringing them closer to the game, the players and the highest standard of professional golf.

Tiger Woods PGA TOUR 2009 EA Sports continues to excel with the new version of its top-selling, highly rated simulation video game with the PGA TOUR. In 2009, the game sees the addition of Hank Haney as Swing Coach and expanded GamerNet and on-line features. The Wii platform of the game has All Play mode, which allows players of all ages to compete on a level playing field.

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PGATOUR.com Golf’s most popular web site, PGATOUR.COM, includes exclusive features with real-time leaderboards and scorecards, Shot Tracker (live, fully customizable, and user controlled graphical play-by-play and replay), cutting-edge multimedia, ShotLink data analysis, and live coverage at events that give golf fans a virtual seat to the PGA TOUR season.

Section

International Coverage PGA TOUR content is available internationally via the Internet and mobile markets through partnerships with Golf Digest Online and Sports Marketing Japan in Japan, Setanta in the United Kingdom, SBS in Korea, SINA and Golf Channel China in China and SuperSport in South Africa. The TOUR will continue to expand this translated, localized footprint in 2009.


PGATOURIMAGES.com

Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Your Resource for Official PGA TOUR Photos and Logos The PGA TOUR’s official photography website, pgatourimages.com, presents a broad inventory of digital player and tournament photography taken at all PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and select Nationwide Tour events. Featured are thousands of photos, including headshots and action shots of each active player on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour. Photos of the TPC courses are also available. Logos of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour, Nationwide Tour, their tournaments and the TPC are also downloadable in standard formats suitable for print, Internet and broadcast use. The site was designed for media and commercial use in partnership with Getty Images, the world’s leading sports and entertainment photography source and the Official Photography Provider of the PGA TOUR. Approved media and clients can quickly review and download player and tournament photography. Please log on to pgatourimages.com and follow the instructions. Account information is available from: John Leikness (218) 334-2572 or john.leikness@gettyimages.com For more information on PGA TOUR photography, contact: Caryn Levy (904) 280-2431 or carynlevy@pgatourhq.com Deborah Carrillo (904) 280-2438 or dcarrillo@pgatourhq.com For logo information, contact: John Rice, (904) 280-2436 or jrice@pgatourhq.com

PGA TOUR Links The PGA TOUR Links program is the technology solution that brings together PGA TOUR, Champions Tour, and Nationwide Tour Members, PGA TOUR Staff, Player Managers and Tournament Organizations. The PGA TOUR and its players work together to design a solution that fits their communication needs. Working in conjunction with CDW, the Official Technology Partner of the PGA TOUR, each PGA TOUR and Champions Tour player receives a laptop computer and access to the players’ only intranet site. Through the site, the players can find in one spot all the information necessary to successfully navigate life on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour, and Nationwide Tour. Players are able to view vital PGA TOUR business, tournament information, vote in player elections and end of the year awards and conduct statistical analysis. Recent enhancements include the text messaging of tee times to mobile devices and the automated voice activated commitment hotline available 24/7.

9-6

PGA TOUR

To date, more than 850 players have participated in the PGA TOUR Links program. The players have cited the program as a most efficient form of communication. As the program enters its tenth year, it continues to evolve to meet changing technological advances and player needs. Randall Kato PGA TOUR Links

Chris Moser PGA TOUR Links

Zac Doyle

PGA TOUR Links

2009 Guide

pgatour.com


PGA TOUR Productions PGA TOUR Productions is the Emmy-Award winning television, film and video production company of the PGA TOUR. From concept to completion, PGA TOUR Productions is a full-service, state-of-the-art production facility offering the finest creative solutions for broadcast, cable and interactive media. Having produced programming for ABC, CBS, NBC, ESPN, USA Network, GOLF CHANNEL and Fox Sports Net, PGA TOUR Productions offers the expertise and technology to handle any production need. Boasting HD and SD editing facilities, high-end graphics and animation capabilities, a fullyequipped control room and studio with sound stage, PGA TOUR Productions is the world’s leading golf production company. Network shows have included specials such as “The Best Shot in Golf presented by Metlife,” “Golf & Technology presented by CDW” and “The Science of Golf,” a multi-episode series shot and edited entirely in High Definition.

This year, “Inside the PGA TOUR” will enter its 25th season, continuing its run as golf’s longest-running weekly series. Airing on GOLF CHANNEL, “Inside the PGA TOUR” features players serving as show hosts who offer their own unique perspective into life on TOUR. In addition to its network specials and popular weekly and monthly series, PGA TOUR Productions is an industry leader which also produces award-winning commercial advertising, infomercials and corporate, entertainment and sales videos. PGA TOUR Productions serves a worldwide clientele by producing, in conjunction with the networks, international telecasts of PGA TOUR events. The PGA TOUR International feed serves South and Central America, South Africa, Europe and Asia. Telecasts and other programming are distributed to more than 221 countries, translated into 35 languages and available to more than 200 million homes around the world. PGA TOUR Productions is housed in a 32,000-square-foot digital facility adjacent to the World Golf Hall of Fame, just off Interstate 95 in St. Augustine, FL. Along with the latest in television and communications technology, Productions owns the world’s most extensive golf-footage archive.

Section

pgatour.com

PGA  TOUR

The 2009 TAC Board Members include: Ollie Nutt - Chairman Steve Timms - Vice Chairman Kym Hougham - Past Chairman Eric Baldwin - Director Mark Brazil - Director Brian Goin - Director Scott Henderson - Director Clair Peterson - Director Dan Sullivan - Director Jack Warfield - Director Steve Wilmot - Director

2009 Guide

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Tournament Advisory Council (TAC) continues the work of the entity previously known as the PGA TOUR Tournaments Association (PGATTA). The TAC is structured much the same as the Player Advisory Council (PAC). TAC and key TOUR staff will meet twice yearly for information-sharing purposes, planning for Policy Board and PAC meetings and related matters. The TAC Chairman will attend Board meetings as a non-voting member and will have the opportunity once per year to formally present to the Policy Board issues affecting the Tournament organizations. TAC member tournaments, and their more than 65,000 volunteers, have led the way to the PGA TOUR’s overall contribution of more than $1.3 billion to charity.

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Tournament Advisory Council Ollie Nutt Chairman

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2009 2008 Prize Money Distribution Charts $3,000,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $540,000.00 324,000.00 204,000.00 144,000.00 120,000.00 108,000.00 100,500.00 93,000.00 87,000.00 81,000.00

Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

$4,300,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $774,000.00 464,400.00 292,400.00 206,400.00 172,000.00 154,800.00 144,050.00 133,300.00 124,700.00 116,100.00

$3,500,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $936,000.00 561,600.00 353,600.00 249,600.00 208,000.00 187,200.00 174,200.00 161,200.00 150,800.00 140,400.00

$6,000,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,080,000.00 648,000.00 408,000.00 288,000.00 240,000.00 216,000.00 201,000.00 186,000.00 174,000.00 162,000.00

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Position

9-8

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,296,000.00 777,600.00 489,600.00 345,600.00 288,000.00 259,200.00 241,200.00 223,200.00 208,800.00 194,400.00

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $810,000.00 486,000.00 306,000.00 216,000.00 180,000.00 162,000.00 150,750.00 139,500.00 130,500.00 121,500.00

Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,098,000.00 658,800.00 414,800.00 292,800.00 244,000.00 219,600.00 204,350.00 189,100.00 176,900.00 164,700.00

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,350,000.00 810,000.00 510,000.00 360,000.00 300,000.00 270,000.00 251,250.00 232,500.00 217,500.00 202,500.00

Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $828,000.00 496,800.00 312,800.00 220,800.00 184,000.00 165,600.00 154,100.00 142,600.00 133,400.00 124,200.00

Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

PGA TOUR

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,008,000.00 604,800.00 380,800.00 268,800.00 224,000.00 201,600.00 187,600.00 173,600.00 162,400.00 151,200.00

Prize

Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,134,000.00 680,400.00 428,400.00 302,400.00 252,000.00 226,800.00 211,050.00 195,300.00 182,700.00 170,100.00

Prize

Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,548,000.00 928,800.00 584,800.00 412,800.00 344,000.00 309,600.00 288,100.00 266,600.00 249,400.00 232,200.00

2009 Guide

$738,000.00 442,800.00 278,800.00 196,800.00 164,000.00 147,600.00 137,350.00 127,100.00 118,900.00 110,700.00

Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $918,000.00 550,800.00 346,800.00 244,800.00 204,000.00 183,600.00 170,850.00 158,100.00 147,900.00 137,700.00

$5,700,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,026,000.00 615,600.00 387,600.00 273,600.00 228,000.00 205,200.00 190,950.00 176,700.00 165,300.00 153,900.00

$6,500,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

$8,600,000

$1,530,000.00 918,000.00 578,000.00 408,000.00 340,000.00 306,000.00 284,750.00 263,500.00 246,500.00 229,500.00

Prize

$5,100,000

$6,300,000

$1,116,000.00 669,600.00 421,600.00 297,600.00 248,000.00 223,200.00 207,700.00 192,200.00 179,800.00 167,400.00

Position

Prize $900,000.00 540,000.00 340,000.00 240,000.00 200,000.00 180,000.00 167,500.00 155,000.00 145,000.00 135,000.00

Position

$8,500,000

$4,100,000 Position

$5,600,000

$972,000.00 583,200.00 367,200.00 259,200.00 216,000.00 194,400.00 180,900.00 167,400.00 156,600.00 145,800.00

Position

$720,000.00 432,000.00 272,000.00 192,000.00 160,000.00 144,000.00 134,000.00 124,000.00 116,000.00 108,000.00

Position

$6,200,000

Prize

$5,000,000

$5,400,000

$7,500,000

$666,000.00 399,600.00 251,600.00 177,600.00 148,000.00 133,200.00 123,950.00 114,700.00 107,300.00 99,900.00

Position

$6,100,000

Position

Prize $954,000.00 572,400.00 360,400.00 254,400.00 212,000.00 190,800.00 177,550.00 164,300.00 153,700.00 143,100.00

$4,000,000

Prize

$4,600,000

$5,300,000

$7,200,000

$3,700,000 Position

$4,500,000

$5,200,000

$630,000.00 378,000.00 238,000.00 168,000.00 140,000.00 126,000.00 117,250.00 108,500.00 101,500.00 94,500.00

Position

Prize

Prize $1,170,000.00 702,000.00 442,000.00 312,000.00 260,000.00 234,000.00 217,750.00 201,500.00 188,500.00 175,500.00

$9,500,000 Position

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Prize $1,710,000.00 1,026,000.00 646,000.00 456,000.00 380,000.00 342,000.00 318,250.00 294,500.00 275,500.00 256,500.00

pgatour.com


Regulations – Media The following regulations are to be followed by all members of the media: 1. PGA TOUR retains exclusive media rights (including, but not limited to, broadcast, cable, home video, Internet) to all events on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour. 2. Each credential issued pursuant to PGA TOUR Media Regulations operates as PGA TOUR authorization allowing only the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use certain information gathered pursuant to the credential (including photographs, videotape, etc.). Please note that unless authorized by a separate written PGA TOUR authorization, credentialed individuals and Authorized Outlets therefor may sell or distribute such information only as part of the editorial product delivered to end users and not to other organizations or as part of a separate commercial product; provided, however, this credential restriction does not apply to credentialed media representing established wire and news services whose normal business is to distribute information for editorial product; further provided, however, the foregoing exception shall not apply to video other than video comprised solely of an Authorized Outlet employee/contractor providing commentary or analysis. 3. Each credential authorizes the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use the trademark of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour (as applicable) in the news and editorial coverage of such Tour and the applicable tournament. It does not authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of such trademarks in non-editorial contexts as non-editorial use of such trademarks requires a separate license from the PGA TOUR. Nor does it authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of the tournament trademarks, which trademark use requires authorization from the applicable tournament. 4. A daily decal is necessary to walk inside the gallery ropes. All members of the media with such decal must remain not more than an arm’s length from the ropes, so as to blend into the gallery and appear to be a part of the gallery at all times. 5. Players are not to be distracted during play. Do not interview players or ask them to pose for photographs during their rounds. 6. Do not interview players or ask them to pose for photographs during their practice sessions before a round, except by prior arrangement with the player. 7. If an interview is to be conducted in the practice areas, either the range or the putting green, it must be done by prior arrangement with the player, up against the ropes and not in the middle of the areas where it could be distracting to other players. 8. Do not disturb players at their 18th green and/or scoring tent until after they have checked, signed and returned their scorecards. Media are not allowed in the scoring tent.

The credentialed entity and the Authorized Outlet therefor, including each intended end user thereof, shall jointly and severally indemnify, defend and hold the Event, its host organization and PGA TOUR and their respective officers, agents, representatives, successors and assigns harmless from and against any and all expenses, lawsuits, damages, costs and liabilities (including reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses) incurred by, arising from, or in connection with, any actions of the credentialed entity. The credentialed entity assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game of golf and releases PGA TOUR, Inc.-sanctioned tournaments and competitions and their host sites, title sponsors, host organizations, PGA TOUR, Inc., participating players, and all agents thereof from any and all liabilities resulting from such cases. The holders of the media credential grant permission to PGA TOUR, Inc., to utilize the holders’ images or likenesses incidental to any live or recorded television or other transmission or reproduction in whole or in part of any PGA TOUR event they attend. The terms and conditions of the PGA TOUR Media Regulations are limited to those contained herein. Any additional or different terms or conditions in any form delivered by the credentialed entity or Authorized Outlet are hereby deemed to be material alterations and notice of objection to them and rejection of them is hereby given. The credentialed entity acknowledges and agrees that photographic images of PGA TOUR sanctioned tournaments are available for use outside the scope of these regulations (e.g., commercial, promotional, etc.) from the Official Photographic Services Provider of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour (currently, Getty Images), subject to the applicable rate card and course and player approvals.

9

PGA TOUR MAY REVOKE CREDENTIALS AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING VIOLATIONS OF ANY OF THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS.

Regulations – Radio PGA TOUR retains exclusive media rights (including, but not limited to, broadcast, cable, home video, Internet) to all events on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour. No live or tape-delayed broadcast of any portion of any PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour event is permitted without the prior written consent of PGA TOUR. All radio media are permitted to broadcast highlights coverage of such events only under the following conditions, unless otherwise approved in writing by PGA TOUR: 1. Each credential issued pursuant to PGA TOUR Media Regulations operates as PGA TOUR authorization allowing only the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use certain information gathered pursuant to the credential (including photographs, videotape, etc.). Please note that unless authorized to do by a separate written PGA TOUR authorization, credentialed individuals and Authorized Outlets therefor may sell or distribute such information only as part of the editorial product delivered to end users and not to other organizations or as part of a separate commercial product. 2. Each credential authorizes the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use the trademark of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour (as applicable) in the news and editorial coverage of such Tour and the applicable tournament. It does not authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of such trademarks in non-editorial contexts as non-editorial use of such trademarks requires a separate license from the PGA TOUR. Nor does it authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of the tournament trademarks, which trademark use requires authorization from the applicable tournament. 3. Coverage shall not be in excess of three minutes of highlights per day and may not purport to be live, play-by-play coverage from the course. 4. All highlights coverage must be part of regularly scheduled news programs and may not be broadcast after 48 hours from the conclusion of the applicable tournament. 5. Live coverage or reporting in excess of three minutes per day from a tournament site, including, without limitation, the course, media center, press room and designated interview area, is prohibited without the prior approval of PGA TOUR. 6. Audio and video coverage shall not be made available until that day’s live or tape-delayed coverage by the television network is concluded.

pgatour.com

PGA  TOUR

7. As the exclusive rights holder, PGA TOUR may request copies of any coverage of PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour events. Such coverage will be provided to PGA TOUR upon request (PGA TOUR will pay industry standard copying and shipping costs). 8. The use of golf carts is prohibited at all times. 9. Only personnel with appropriate credentials will be permitted into the media center and locker room areas. 10. Radio broadcasters are not permitted inside the gallery ropes at any time. 11. Broadcasters are not permitted to talk to players during play or after the round until the player has signed his scorecard. 12. Broadcasters shall not sell, distribute or syndicate any highlights coverage to any third party without PGA TOUR’s prior approval. 13. The credentialed entity has rights only with respect to radio broadcast and has no rights with respect to any other media (including, without limitation, audio via the Internet) without obtaining the proper and valid credentials for such media. The credentialed entity and the Authorized Outlet therefor, including each intended end user thereof, shall jointly and severally indemnify, defend and hold the Event, its host organizations and PGA TOUR and their respective officers, agents, representatives, successors and assigns harmless from and against any and all expenses, lawsuits, damages, costs and liabilities (including reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses) incurred by, arising from, or in connection with, any actions of the credentialed entity. The credentialed entity assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game of golf and releases PGA TOUR, Inc.-sanctioned tournaments and competitions and their host sites, title sponsors, host organizations, PGA TOUR, Inc., participating players, and all agents thereof from any and all liabilities resulting from such cases. The holders of the media credential grant permission to PGA TOUR, Inc., to utilize the holders’ images or likenesses incidental to any live or recorded television or other transmission or reproduction in whole or in part of any PGA TOUR event they attend. PGA TOUR MAY REVOKE CREDENTIALS AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING VIOLATIONS OF ANY OF THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS.

2009 Guide

9-9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Tape Recorder Regulations 1. All audio recording device and/or video recorder work should be done in the proximity of the press room, media center and/or designated interview area. 2. Video Recorders are not permitted in the locker room. Audio recording devices are permitted in the locker rooms subject to the following regulations:

Weather Delay Guidelines 1. During weather-delay situations, no one other than players and essential staff will be permitted in the locker room. This means the media are not permitted in the locker room in such situations. However, whenever possible, arrangements will be made to provide players for interviews during such situations. 2. Fully accredited members of the news media will be welcome in the locker room at all other times to carry out their assigned duties. (Note: Cameras and, except as outlined above, tape recorders are not permitted in the locker room.)

Section

Working Press Regulations To avoid embarrassment to you and distraction to the contestants: 1. Do not walk or stand in playing areas. 2. Follow directions of marshals and other officials. 3. Do not interview during play. The leading players each day — and others requested — will be interviewed following their rounds in the Press Room interview area.

• Audio recorded interviews are intended to be one-on-one and not group interviews. • Audio recorded interviews are for reference only and the audio cannot be used for any other purpose. • The reporter must clearly ask a player, and permission must be granted, in order for the audio recording device to be used. • The reporter is responsible for making other players in the vicinity aware that an interview is being recorded. • PGA TOUR staff may designate, depending upon need and availability, an area within the locker room for the purpose of conducting interviews that are recorded. • Use of audio recorded interviews must be limited to the person being interviewed. 3. Audio recording devices and/or video recorders are not permitted within the playing area of the golf course unless written permission has been granted from PGA TOUR.


Regulations – On-Line Services Media credentials will be issued only to personnel on assignment from recognized golf or legitimate news Internet sites or other non-television video media services, as determined by PGA TOUR in its sole discretion. Coverage obtained in accordance with these regulations can only be used on the Authorized Outlet. Individuals representing multiple interests (such as a recognized golf magazine and an Internet site) must agree to be bound by all applicable media regulations.

1. Each credential authorizes the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use the trademark of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour (as applicable) in the news and editorial coverage of such Tour and the applicable tournament. It does not authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of such trademarks in non-editorial contexts as non-editorial use of such trademarks requires a separate license from the PGA TOUR. Nor does it authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of the tournament trademarks, which trademark use requires authorization from the applicable tournament. 2. Coverage must not purport to be live, play-by-play, hole-by-hole or real-time coverage from the course. 3. Audio and video coverage shall be limited to the press room, media center and designated interview area (including any flash photography area by the 18th green), all as determined by PGA TOUR in its sole discretion, and shall not contain video footage or audio call of tournament play. Requests for expanded coverage must be submitted in writing to PGA TOUR for PGA TOUR’s prior approval. 4. Audio or video coverage from PGA TOUR designated areas shall not be in excess of two minutes per day from each Tour (and four minutes total for all three Tours). 5. Audio and video coverage shall not be made available on the Authorized Outlet until that day’s live or tape-delayed coverage by the television network is concluded and shall not be used for any purpose after 24 hours following the conclusion of the applicable round. Under no circumstances shall live audio or video coverage be made available on the Internet. 6. As the exclusive rights holder, PGA TOUR is the absolute owner of all video footage shot and audio recorded at the tournament site (golf action or other footage) during the entire tournament week (i.e., Monday through Sunday or the conclusion of the tournament, if later than Sunday) and may request copies of any footage shot or audio recorded at PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour events. Such footage and audio will be provided electronically to PGA TOUR immediately upon request. 7. All use of video by the Authorized Outlet must be accompanied by a link back to PGATOUR.com. 8. Scoring and statistical information may only appear in the editorial news portion of the Authorized Outlet and may be provided no sooner than 30 minutes after the actual occurrence of the shots, or after the time such information is legally available as public information if sooner than 30 minutes after the actual occurrence of the shots. Scoring and statistical information may not be archived on

The credentialed entity and the Authorized Outlet therefor including each intended end user thereof, shall jointly and severally indemnify, defend and hold the Event, its host organizations and PGA TOUR and their respective officers, agents, representatives, successors and assigns harmless from and against any and all expenses, lawsuits, damages, costs and liabilities (including reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses) incurred by, arising from, or in connection with, any actions of the credentialed entity. The credentialed entity assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game of golf and releases PGA TOUR, Inc.-sanctioned tournaments and competitions and their host sites, title sponsors, host organizations, PGA TOUR, Inc., participating players, and all agents thereof from any and all liabilities resulting from such cases. The holders of the media credential grant permission to PGA TOUR, Inc., to utilize the holders’ images or likenesses incidental to any live or recorded television or other transmission or reproduction in whole or in part of any PGA TOUR event they attend. PGA TOUR MAY REVOKE CREDENTIALS AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING VIOLATIONS OF ANY OF THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS.

Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

PGA TOUR retains exclusive media rights (including but not limited to network, cable, Internet, home video, Internet protocol television, mobile) to all events on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour. No audio or video coverage of the event competition is permitted without the prior written consent of PGA TOUR. All other audio and video coverage must comply with the regulations below. Scores and statistics may be distributed only in accordance with these regulations.

the Authorized Outlet and cannot be used for any purpose after 24 hours following the conclusion of the applicable round unless such information is legally available as public information. 9. No coverage, including, without limitation, scoring information, statistical information, video coverage and audio coverage may be used by, sold, given, distributed or otherwise transferred to any party other than the Authorized Outlet in any manner whatsoever, without the prior written consent of PGA TOUR. The foregoing restriction shall not apply to the distribution of the following by established wire and news services whose normal business is to distribute information to other news organizations so that such other news organizations may distribute the information for editorial product: written stories, photos and audio and video comprised solely of an Authorized Outlet employee/contractor providing commentary or analysis. 10. Photographic images of PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour players may be used on the Authorized Outlet for legitimate news coverage only, and may be used together with news stories during the day’s play, so long as such photographs are not used with other real-time or near-real-time information or sequenced to create a “shot-by-shot” or “hole-by-hole” account of the day’s play, nor may photos be sequenced in such a way as to approximate video. Commercial exploitation of these images without written consent of the players and PGA TOUR is prohibited. No sponsorship or advertising may be used in a manner that implies any association between any advertiser and the PGA TOUR and/or a PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour player. Requests for use of such images to promote the PGA TOUR shall be considered by PGA TOUR on a case by case basis. Where appropriate, the Authorized Outlet shall use reasonable efforts to use photographic likenesses of players and tournament courses containing current sponsors and endorsers. Photo galleries shall be limited to a reasonable number of PGA TOUR photos. 11. The Authorized Outlet has rights only with respect to website media and other TOUR approved nontelevision video media and has no rights with respect to any other media without the prior approval of the PGA TOUR.

Regulations – Print Media credentials will be issued only to personnel on assignment from recognized and accredited publications, as determined by PGA TOUR in its sole discretion. Individuals representing multiple interests (such as a recognized golf magazine and an Internet site) must agree to be bound by all applicable media regulations. PGA TOUR retains exclusive media rights to all events on the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour. 1. Each credential issued pursuant to PGA TOUR Media Regulations operates as PGA TOUR authorization allowing only the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use certain information gathered pursuant to the credential (including photographs, videotape, etc.). Please note that unless authorized to do by a separate written PGA TOUR authorization, credentialed individuals and Authorized Outlets therefor may sell or distribute such information only as part of the editorial product delivered to end users and not to other organizations or as part of a separate commercial product; provided, however, this credential restriction does not apply to credentialed media representing established wire and news services whose normal business is to distribute information to other news organizations so that such other news organizations may distribute the information to various print and broadcast media organizations to use the information for editorial product as though they generated such information directly. 2. Each credential authorizes the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use the trademark of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour (as applicable) in the news and editorial coverage of such Tour and the applicable tournament. It does not authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of such trademarks in non-editorial contexts as non-editorial use of such trademarks requires a separate license from the PGA TOUR. Nor does it authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of the tournament trademarks, which trademark use requires authorization from the applicable tournament. 3. Only personnel with appropriate credentials will be permitted into the media center and locker room areas.

9-10

PGA TOUR

4. Players shall not be interviewed during play or after the round until the player has signed his scorecard. 5. Coverage shall be only for the Authorized Outlet therefor, including each intended end user thereof, and may not be sold or distributed to any other entity or party. 6. The use of golf carts is prohibited at all times. 7. Only personnel with appropriate credentials will be allowed inside the gallery ropes, and they must stay within one arm’s length of the ropes at all times. All support personnel must remain outside the ropes. 8. The credentialed entity has rights only with respect to print publication media and has no rights with respect to any other media without obtaining the proper and valid credentials for such media. The credentialed entity and the Authorized Outlet therefor, including each intended end user thereof, shall jointly and severally indemnify, defend and hold the Event, its host organizations and PGA TOUR and their respective officers, agents, representatives, successors and assigns harmless from and against any and all expenses, lawsuits, damages, costs and liabilities (including reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses) incurred by, arising from, or in connection with, any actions of the credentialed entity. The credentialed entity assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game of golf and releases PGA TOUR, Inc.-sanctioned tournaments and competitions and their host sites, title sponsors, host organizations, PGA TOUR, Inc., participating players, and all agents thereof from any and all liabilities resulting from such cases. The holders of the media credential grant permission to PGA TOUR, Inc., to utilize the holders’ images or likenesses incidental to any live or recorded television or other transmission or reproduction in whole or in part of any PGA TOUR event they attend. PGA TOUR MAY REVOKE CREDENTIALS AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING VIOLATIONS OF ANY OF THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS.

2009 Guide

pgatour.com


Regulations – Photography Photo credentials will be issued only to photographers on assignment from recognized and accredited publications, news services and other organizations approved in advance by the PGA TOUR. Requests for photo credentials must be made by the appropriate Authorized Outlet (i.e., publisher, news agency or organization) and not by the photographer. The credentialed entity has rights only with respect to photography and has no rights with respect to any other media without obtaining the proper and valid credentials for such media. Photographic images of PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour players may be used on the Authorized Outlet for legitimate news coverage only, and may be used together with news stories during the day’s play, so long as such photographs are not used with other real-time or near-real-time information or sequenced to create a “shot-by-shot” or “hole-by-hole” account of the day’s play, nor may photos be sequenced in such a way as to approximate video. Commercial exploitation of these images without written consent of the players and PGA TOUR is prohibited. No sponsorship or advertising may be used in a manner that implies any association between any advertiser and the PGA TOUR and/or a PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour player. Requests for use of such images to promote the PGA TOUR shall be considered by PGA TOUR on a case by case basis. Where appropriate, the Authorized Outlet shall use reasonable efforts to use photographic likenesses of players and tournament courses containing current sponsors and endorsers. Photo galleries shall be limited to a reasonable number of PGA TOUR photos. Credentialed photographers will receive one of two types of photo credentials. A limited number of inside the ropes photo credentials will be issued daily by the PGA TOUR Media Official on site and will permit the wearer access inside the ropes. Photographers who do not have an inside the ropes photo credential must stay outside the gallery ropes but are still required to check in with the on site PGA TOUR Media Official to receive the proper outside the ropes photo credential. Photographic assistants will not be issued photo credentials of any type.

The credentialed entity and the Authorized Outlet therefor including each intended end user thereof, shall jointly and severally indemnify, defend and hold the Event, its host organization and PGA TOUR and their respective officers, agents, representatives, successors and assigns harmless from and against any and all expenses, lawsuits, damages, costs and liabilities (including reasonable attorneys fees and expenses) incurred by, arising from, or in connection with, any actions of the credentialed entity or the use of any photographs other than as set forth in these Photography Regulations. The credentialed entity assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game of golf and releases PGA TOUR, Inc.-sanctioned tournaments and competitions and their host sites, title sponsors, host organizations, PGA TOUR, Inc., participating players, and all agents thereof from any and all liabilities resulting from such cases. The holders of the media credential grant permission to PGA TOUR, Inc., to utilize the holders’ images or likenesses incidental to any live or recorded television or other transmission or reproduction in whole or in part of any PGA TOUR event they attend.

Section

Professional grade cameras and lenses must be used and may be used only by accredited media representatives who have been issued photo credentials, and such use is subject to the following conditions: 1. Each credential issued pursuant to PGA TOUR Media Regulations operates as PGA TOUR authorization allowing only the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use certain information gathered pursuant to the credential (including photographs, videotape, etc.). Please note that unless authorized to do by a separate written PGA TOUR authorization, credentialed individuals and Authorized Outlets therefor may sell or distribute such information only as part of the editorial product delivered to end users and not to other organizations or as part of a separate commercial product; provided, however, this credential restriction does not apply to credentialed media representing established wire and news services whose normal business is to distribute information to other news organizations so that such other news organizations may distribute the information for editorial product.

2. Each credential authorizes the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use the trademark of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour (as applicable) in the news and editorial coverage of such Tour and the applicable tournament. It does not authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of such trademarks in non-editorial contexts as non-editorial use of such trademarks requires a separate license from the PGA TOUR. Nor does it authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of the tournament trademarks, which trademark use requires authorization from the applicable tournament. 3. Photographers with inside the ropes photo credentials must stay within one arm’s length of the ropes at all times. Photographers without inside the ropes photo credentials are not permitted inside the ropes at any time. 4. Photographers are not permitted on the teeing ground, as determined by PGA TOUR. 5. The use of carts is prohibited at all times. 6. Photographers must not position themselves in the line of play. If requested to move by a player, his caddie or an official, the photographer will do so without delay or discussion. 7. No photograph shall be taken until a player has completed his stroke. 8. Players should not be asked to pose during a round. 9. Noise-free equipment must be used at all times. 10. Cameras are not permitted in the scoring tent or in the locker rooms. 11. The credentialed entity has rights only with respect to photography and has no rights with respect to any other media without obtaining the proper and valid credentials for such media.

PGA TOUR MAY REVOKE CREDENTIALS AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING VIOLATIONS OF ANY OF THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS.

9

All television media are permitted to broadcast highlights coverage of such events only under the following conditions unless otherwise approved in writing by PGA TOUR: 1. Each credential issued pursuant to PGA TOUR Media Regulations operates as PGA TOUR authorization allowing only the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use certain information gathered pursuant to the credential (including photographs, videotape, etc.). Please note that unless authorized by a separate written PGA TOUR authorization, credentialed individuals and Authorized Outlets therefor may sell or distribute such information only as part of the editorial product delivered to end users and not to other organizations or as part of a separate commercial product. 2. Each credential authorizes the holder of such credential and the Authorized Outlet therefor to use the trademark of the PGA TOUR, Champions Tour or Nationwide Tour (as applicable) in the news and editorial coverage of such Tour and the applicable tournament. It does not authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of such trademarks in non-editorial contexts as non-editorial use of such trademarks requires a separate license from the PGA TOUR. Nor does it authorize the holder or the Authorized Outlet use of the tournament trademarks, which trademark use requires authorization from the applicable tournament. 3. Televised coverage shall not be in excess of three minutes of highlights daily from each Tour (and six minutes total for all three Tours) and may not purport to be live, play-by-play coverage from the course. Requests for expanded coverage must be submitted in writing to PGA TOUR. 4. All highlights coverage must be part of regularly scheduled news programs. Highlights may not be sold, distributed, syndicated or provided in any manner to any other entity. 5. Highlights from any day’s play may not be broadcast or used for any other purpose after 48 hours from the conclusion of the applicable tournament. 6. No action footage of any day’s play may be broadcast until that day’s live or tape-delayed coverage by the television network is concluded. 7. Live coverage or reporting in excess of three minutes per day from a tournament site, including, without limitation, the course, media center, press room and designated interview area, is prohibited without the prior approval of PGA TOUR. 8. No footage may be used in any commercial manner or sold, distributed, syndicated or provided to any other entity or agency.

pgatour.com

PGA  TOUR

9. As the exclusive rights holder, PGA TOUR is the absolute owner of all footage shot at the tournament site (golf action or other footage) during the entire tournament week (i.e., Monday through Sunday or the conclusion of the tournament, if later than Sunday) and may request copies of any footage shot at PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour events. Such footage will be provided to PGA TOUR upon request (PGA TOUR will pay industry standard copying and shipping costs). 10. The use of golf carts is prohibited at all times. 11. Only personnel with appropriate credentials will be permitted into the media center and locker room areas. 12. Only personnel with appropriate credentials will be allowed inside the gallery ropes, and they must stay within one arm’s length of the ropes at all times. All support personnel must remain outside the ropes. 13. All uses of footage hereunder shall be made with a courtesy credit to PGA TOUR. The credentialed entity and the Authorized Outlet therefor, including each intended end user thereof, shall jointly and severally indemnify, defend and hold the Event, its host organizations and PGA TOUR and their respective officers, agents, representatives, successors and assigns harmless from and against any and all expenses, lawsuits, damages, costs and liabilities (including reasonable attorney’s fees and expenses) incurred by, arising from, or in connection with, any actions of the credentialed entity. The credentialed entity assumes all risk and danger incidental to the game of golf and releases PGA TOUR, Inc.-sanctioned tournaments and competitions and their host sites, title sponsors, host organizations, PGA TOUR, Inc., participating players, and all agents thereof from any and all liabilities resulting from such cases. The holders of the media credential grant permission to PGA TOUR, Inc., to utilize the holders’ images or likenesses incidental to any live or recorded television or other transmission or reproduction in whole or in part of any PGA TOUR event they attend. PGA TOUR MAY REVOKE CREDENTIALS AT ANY TIME FOR ANY REASON INCLUDING VIOLATIONS OF ANY OF THE FOREGOING REGULATIONS.

2009 Guide

9-11

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Regulations – Television


Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

TPC Network The PGA TOUR’s TPC Network has maintained a reputation for operating high-quality clubs since its inception 27 years ago. The TPC Network continues to grow, with more than 29 facilities currently open or under construction. TPCs encompass all forms of golf-related operations—resort facilities, corporate/private membership clubs and daily-fee courses. PGA TOUR Golf Course Properties, Inc. is able to match the type of facility with the demands of each market in which a club operates. The Network represents the highest standard in the golf-operations industry, commensurate with the members of the organization it represents, the players of the PGA TOUR. Each TPC embodies the trademark of excellence first established with the flagship TPC Sawgrass, which opened its world-famous PLAYERS Stadium Course in the fall of 1980 in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL. This commitment to overall excellence serves as the foundation for the Network’s overall success. The TPC Network was born through former PGA TOUR Commissioner Deane Beman’s desire to provide TOUR players with quality golf courses that also would offer spectators enhanced viewing areas. Beman also reasoned that development of quality facilities would alleviate the TOUR’s dependency on the television dollar while providing rent-free venues for tournaments. The savings in rent, in turn, would generate both increased purses and greater charitable contributions by the tournaments held at TPCs. TPC Sawgrass was the first TPC to hold a PGA TOUR event, becoming the permanent home of THE PLAYERS Championship in 1982. In 2008, 16 tournaments were conducted at TPC clubs, bringing the total number of PGA TOUR, Champions Tour and Nationwide Tour events held at TPC facilities to 279. The TPC Sawgrass PLAYERS Stadium Course was completely refurbished in 2006, with the fairways redone and the greens rebuilt to cre-

ate “fast, firm and fair” playing conditions in time for the 2007 PLAYERS Championship. Many of the top golf-course architects are connected with TPC projects, including Pete Dye, Tom Fazio, Arnold Palmer, Jack Nicklaus, Gary Player, Arthur Hills, Jay Morrish, Tom Weiskopf, Greg Norman, Bob Von Hagge and D.A. Weibring. TPC Boston, which opened in 2002, was the fourth TPC course designed by Palmer Course Design Co. Weiskopf designed his second TPC course for TPC Craig Ranch near Dallas, TX, which opened in the fall of 2004. Moreover, in recognizing the importance of player input for tournament courses, TOUR members have served as design consultants, working closely with the lead architect. Hal Sutton, for instance, served as the player design consultant on TPC Treviso Bay (Naples, FL), which opened in 2008, while Steve Elkington was the player consultant and Kelly Gibson the associate player consultant working with architect Pete Dye on TPC Louisiana in New Orleans, which opened in April 2004. TPC San Antonio is scheduled to open in 2010 and will be a 36-hole facility. Pete Dye and Greg Norman will be the architects, and Sergio Garcia and Bruce Lietzke will be the player consultants of the course. TPCs are passionate about giving back. On a national level, TPCs do this by conducting fundraising events benefiting six military home front groups as part of PGA TOUR Charities’ “Birdies for the Brave” military outreach program; providing honorary TPC memberships to wounded soldiers through the TOUR’s Adopted Wounded Soldier program. On a local level, TPCs conduct fundraising for a wide variety of causes and charitable organizations through the TOUR’s Adopt-A-Charity program. TPCs also give back through environmentally responsible agronomic practices that preserve wildlife habitats and protect natural resources.

T P C N e t w o rk o f Clubs

Club/Year Opened 1.

General Manager

Architect Consultant Tournament

TPC Boston/2002 Brad Williams Arnold Palmer/ Brad Faxon # Norton, MA Gil Hanse#

2. TPC Craig Ranch/2004 Todd Harbour Tom Weiskopf D.A. Weibring Dallas, TX 3.

TPC Deere Run/2000 Ian Nicoll D.A. Weibring/DSI* — Silvis, IL

4. TPC Jasna Polana/1998 John Buser Gary Player — Princeton, NJ

Deutsche Bank Championship (PGA TOUR) Former host of the Nationwide Tour Championship at TPC Craig Ranch (Nationwide Tour) John Deere Classic (PGA TOUR) Former host of the Instinet Classic (Champions Tour)

5.

TPC Las Vegas/1996 Dan Hammell Bobby Weed/DSI* Raymond Floyd Las Vegas, NV

Former host of the Frys.com Open (2001-2007)

6.

TPC Louisiana/2004 Luke Farabaugh Pete Dye Steve Elkington New Orleans, LA Kelly Gibson (Assoc.)

Zurich Classic of New Orleans (PGA TOUR)

7. TPC Potomac/1986 Mike Sullivan Ault, Clark & Ed Sneed Potomac, MD Associates/DSI* # 8.

Former host of the Booz Allen Classic (PGA TOUR)

TPC River Highlands/1984 Bill Whaley Bobby Weed Howard Twitty Travelers Championship Cromwell, CT Roger Maltbie (PGA TOUR)

9. TPC River’s Bend/2001 Chris Wood Arnold Palmer — Maineville, OH 10. TPC San Antonio/2010 San Antonio, TX (36 holes)

Former host of the Kroger Classic (Champions Tour)

Jimmy Terry Pete Dye (AT&T Canyons) Bruce Lietzke Valero Texas Open (Dir. of Business Development) Greg Norman (AT&T Oaks) Sergio Garcia AT&T Oaks (beginning in 2010)

11. TPC San Francisco Bay/2007 Jody Brothers David McLay Kidd —

Stonebrae Classic (Nationwide Tour)

12. TPC Sawgrass/1980 Bill Hughes Pete Dye Jerry Pate THE PLAYERS Championship Ponte Vedra Beach, FL THE PLAYERS Stadium (PGA TOUR) Dye’s Valley Former host of Senior Players Pete Dye/Bobby Weed Championship (Champions Tour) Key: *PGA TOUR Design Services, Inc. # Course renovations

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2009 Guide

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TPC Network (cont.) Club/Year Opened

General Manager

Architect Consultant Tournament

13. TPC Scottsdale/1986 Bill Grove Stadium Course Jim Colbert/ Scottsdale, AZ Jay Morrish/Tom Weiskopf Howard Twitty Champions Course Randy Heckenkemper#

FBR Open (PGA TOUR)

14. TPC Southwind/1988 Blane Merritt Ron Prichard Memphis, TN

Stanford St. Jude Championship (PGA TOUR)

Hubert Green/ Fuzzy Zoeller

15. TPC Sugarloaf/1997 Vic Aliprando Greg Norman — Duluth, GA

Former host of the AT&T Classic (PGA TOUR)

16. TPC Summerlin/1991 Chuck Bombard DSI* Fuzzy Zoeller Las Vegas, NV

Justin Timberlake Shriners Hospitals for Children Open (PGA TOUR)

17. TPC Treviso Bay/2008 Bill Delayo Arthur Hills Hal Sutton The Ace Group Classic Naples, FL (Champions Tour) 18. TPC Twin Cities/2000 Alan Cull Arnold Palmer Tom Lehman Blaine, MN

3M Championship (Champions Tour)

19. TPC Wakefield Plantation/2000 Kirk Deneke Hale Irwin — The Rex Hospital Open Raleigh, NC (Nationwide Tour)

Tournament Players Courses (Licensed Facilities — 10)

4.

TPC Michigan (1990) Brad Williams Jack Nicklaus — Dearborn, MI

Ben Crenshaw Byron Nelson

5. TPC Myrtle Beach (1999) Tom Fazio Lanny Wadkins Murrell’s Inlet, SC

HP Byron Nelson Championship (PGA TOUR) Former host of the Ford Senior Players Championship Former host of the Senior Tour Championship

6.

TPC Piper Glen (1988) Arnold Palmer — Charlotte, NC

Former host of the Home Depot Invitational

7.

TPC Prestancia (1985) Ron Garl Mike Souchak Sarasota, FL Von Hagge & Devlin

Former host of the American Express Invitational

8.

TPC Snoqualmie Ridge (1999) Jack Nicklaus — Snoqualmie Ridge, WA

Boeing Classic (Champions Tour)

9.

TPC Tampa Bay (1991) Brady Boyd DSI* Chi Chi Rodriguez Outback Steakhouse Pro-Am Lutz, FL Champions Tour)

10. TPC Valencia (2003) Valencia, CA

DSI* Mark O’Meara

Key: *PGA TOUR Design Services, Inc. # Course renovations

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PGA  TOUR

2009 Guide

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

TPC Four Seasons Resort (1982) Jay Morrish (Las Colinas) Cottonwood Valley, Irving, TX

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3.

Section

1. TPC Cancun (2010) Tom Fazio Nick Price TBD Cancun, Mexico (36 holes) Nick Price 2. TPC Eagle Trace (1983) Brian Bartolec Arthur Hills — National Qualifying Tournament Coral Springs, FL (Champions Tour)


Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

ShotLink ShotLink is a revolutionary platform for collecting and disseminating scoring and statistical data on every shot by every player in real-time during every tournament round. This data asset creates improved live coverage and more meaningful analysis. The new data creates great potential to enhance entertainment and image of the sport across all platforms. The development of ShotLink started in 1997 when the TOUR decided to update its current scoring system, which was based on 1987 technology. The TOUR conducted an extensive review process to formulate its strategy for the development and implementation of ShotLink. ShotLink was introduced during the summer of 2001 and represents the TOUR’s scoring system for the future. The System was enhanced in 2006 with the addition of a radar solution that accurately collects club head speed, ball speed, launch angle and tracks the entire flight of the ball. This solution is being installed on one tee each week. In 2007 a state-of -the-art set of LED scoreboards were introduced at THE PLAYERS Championship. They are powered by ShotLink and leverage the DiamondVision technology of Mitsubishi Electric, the Official Large Outdoor Video Display Provider of the PGA TOUR. This fan enhancement brings new information and insight to the fan in full color, including: leaderboards, leader updates, player bio, highlight videos, player performance metrics and shot location information. CDW became the official technology partner of the PGA TOUR and Champions Tour in 2008 and immediately helped the TOUR upgrade the ShotLink system by improving server management, wireless communication and on-site data communications. ShotLink powers real time scoring and player tracking via SHOT TRACKER on www.pgatour.com. Additionally ShotLink provides real time information to over 50 syndicated clients who use the data in a variety of manners including world wide dissemination and publication. The accumulation, packaging and presentation of expanded shot and course information provide the basis for numerous fan enhancements. Current uses of ShotLink data include: • Enhanced graphics and statistics in television broadcasts—over 2,500 incremental broadcast mentions and graphics are aired annually due to the ShotLink system • Expanded information and statistics (over 450 year to date and event statistics) for use by media • Powering on-site and PGATOUR.COM tournament leaderboards • Providing on-site media and hospitality access to live tournament information • In addition to current uses, ShotLink provides unlimited potential to develop fan enhancements and products over the next several years, including: • Enhanced and interactive television • Internet, PC and console game enhancements • Enhanced live data coverage and distance-related statistics information on PGATOUR.COM

• On-site fan enhancements that include wireless data, audio and video solutions, Kiosk applications for tournament patrons through Tournament Tracker • Powering mobile.pgatour.com, the PGA TOUR’s wireless application for use on PDAs and cell phones • Analysis of how each golf course is played to assist in course setup and in design changes • Increased data mining to create more interesting entertainment on PGATOUR.COM • Powered the Emmy Award-winning TOURCast application on PGATOURCOM, which launched in 2003, and as since has been replaced by SHOT TRACKER Besides fan enhancements, ShotLink creates an ongoing historical archive of statistical information. This information is available to players through a sophisticated extranet application - PGA TOUR Links. The ShotLink data is collected by volunteers utilizing a combination of handheld devices and laser range finders. Each week a team of approximately 350 volunteers dedicate approximately three man years of effort to perform this data collection. In the course of the entire season, more than 10,000 volunteers contribute to the success of this program. For examples of ShotLink analysis from the 2008 season, see Section 2 as follows: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Toughest/easiest holes in 2008. Page 2-7 Toughest/easiest Par 3s in 2008. Page 2-9 Toughest/easiest Par 4s in 2008. Page 2-11 Toughest/easiest 1st holes in 2008. Page 2-13 Toughest/easiest 18th holes in 2008. Page 2-15 Par 4s/Par 5s with most eagles in 2008. Page 2-18 Shortest/longest Par 3s in 2008. Page 2-20 Longest/shortest Par 4s in 2008. 2-38 Longest/shortest Par 5s in 2008. 2-40 Holes with the longest driving distance. 2-49 Par 4s with toughest/easiest fairways. 2-51 Par 5s with toughest/easiest fairways. 2-54 Toughest/easiest Par 3s to hit in regulation. 2-56 Toughest/easiest Par 4s to hit in regualtion. 2-60 Toughest/easiest Par 5s to hit in regulation. 2-82 Holes with the most one-putts/three putts on TOUR. 2-84 Longest/shortest courses in 2008. Page 2-94 Courses with the shortest/longest driving distance. Page 2-99 Toughest/easiest courses on TOUR. Page 2-116 Toughest/easiest Par 5s in 2008. Page 2-124 Courses with toughest/easiest Par 3s. Page 2-129 Courses with the toughest/easiest Par 4s. Page 22-146 Courses with the toughest/easiest Par 5s. Page 2-148 Courses with the fewest/most total birides. Page 2-158

PGA TOUR Wives Association PGA TOUR Wives Association, Inc. is a Florida not-for-profit corporation organized to render support for and provide assistance to needy children and their families through the means of charitable events. The Association is comprised of the wives of professional golfers on the PGA TOUR and Nationwide Tour, as well as individuals and corporations that support the PGA TOUR Wives Association, Inc.’s many charitable endeavors. Since its incorporation in 1988, the PGA TOUR Wives Association, Inc. has supported children’s charities across the country by raising money and has given back to the game of golf through personal time and monetary contributions. In addition to fundraising, members participate in Volunteer Service Projects, performing a myriad of services ranging from Habitat for Humanity builds to cooking in soup kitchens to playing with hospitalized children in communities where tournaments are held.

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PGA TOUR

The PGA TOUR Wives Association, Inc. conducts numerous fundraisers to support its charities. These include memorabilia auctions, tasting events, concerts and other activities. In 2008, GOLF Magazine named the PGA TOUR Wives Association as the recipient of one of 10 Innovator Awards, under the category “The Providers,” for its charitable nature and positive impact on PGA TOUR host cities. The Association’s favorite (and longest-running) fundraiser is the biennial TOUR Wives Golf Classic, a nine-hole tournament where the wives play golf and their husbands caddie. The TOUR Wives Golf Classic, first played in 1987, has been held at different courses around the country. While its membership varies from year to year, the commitment of the PGA TOUR Wives Association, Inc. to making a difference in the lives of needy children stands strong. The Association’s dedicated members, past and present, have reached deep into their resources to balance the demands of family, work and travel and have given generously of themselves to realize their ideals. For information regarding the PGA TOUR Wives Association, please see their website at www.pgatourwives.org or contact Sara Moores at the PGA TOUR.

2009 Guide

pgatour.com


Weather Guidelines Every effort will be made to finish each round as scheduled by Sunday. The first priority is always the competition and completion of 72 holes. In an effort to achieve this objective by Sunday, 36 holes may be played on Sunday following a reduction of the field to the score which has the closest number of professionals to 60. If an equal number of professionals are at scores above and below the 60th position, the higher score will be used. If conditions exist which prevent 72 holes from being completed by Sunday, play will always be extended to Monday if golf-course conditions and the weather forecast permit. Play on Monday could include 36 holes. If conditions exist which make the completion of 72 holes impossible, the next priority is to complete 54 holes; thereby the winner is credited with an official victory. Again, play in this situation will always be extended to Monday if conditions and weather permit.

If conditions exist which make the completion of 54 holes impossible, the next priority is to complete 36 holes; thereby players receive official money, although the winner is credited with an unofficial victory. Again, play in this situation may be extended to Monday. In making decisions to extend play beyond Sunday or to reduce the tournament to fewer than 72 holes due to inclement weather, the on-site Tournament Director discusses the situation and conditions with a number of parties, including the host organization, title sponsor, host site (general manager and/or golf-course superintendent), on-site weather forecaster, television representatives and the other members of the Rules Committee. Players typically have not been included in these discussions as the TOUR believes it is inappropriate for the Rules Committee to discuss matters directly affecting the competition with contestants.

World Golf Foundation

CEO, World Golf Foundation

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PGA  TOUR

2009 Guide

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Steve Mona

9

In 2008, the Foundation also announced that in addition to an ongoing focus on its three primary initiatives (World Golf Hall of Fame, The First Tee, GOLF 20/20), the organization would broaden its scope to initiate strategic dialogue in areas of common interest that impact golf on a global basis. Among others, the areas of Global Communications, Research and Public Affairs and the development of a unified Anti-Doping Policy for the sport have become part of the World Golf Foundation’s focus. The World Golf Hall of Fame (wgv.com) is the ultimate destination for the celebration and recognition of golf’s greatest players and contributors, men and women. The institution stands as an inspiration to golfers and fans throughout the world. Its annual induction ceremony honors new members each year on the grounds of the museum. The First Tee (thefirsttee.org) is now widely recognized as a preeminent positive youth development organization. Its mission is to impact the lives of young people by providing learning facilities and educational programs that promote character development and life-enhancing values through the game of golf. Since its inception in 1997, The First Tee has established nearly 700 program locations in 48 states and four international locations. It has introduced the game of golf and its values to more than 2.2 million participants and students. Former President George Bush serves as honorary chairman. GOLF 20/20 (golf2020.com) is a unique industry collaboration to grow the game of golf and secure its future. The mission, which was initiated in 1999, is to align the golf industry behind a plan that addresses the future of golf in a strategic manner, with an emphasis on accelerating growth and participation, and creating new avenues of access into the game. In November, 2008, GOLF 20/20 unveiled a new adult player development program, Get Golf Ready, which will be rolled out in 2009 to several hundred facilities across the U.S., with a three-year goal of 3,000 participating facilities.

Section

The World Golf Foundation is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization based in St. Augustine, FL at World Golf Village, home of the World Golf Hall of Fame and the national headquarters of The First Tee and GOLF 20/20. Established in 1994 to unite the golf industry and those who love the game, the World Golf Foundation supports initiatives that promote, enhance the growth of and provide access to the game of golf worldwide, while preserving golf’s traditional values and passing them on to others. The seven organizations that comprise the Executive Committee of the Foundation Board are represented by their respective chief executive, as follows: Jim Armstrong, Executive Director of Augusta National Golf Club; Carolyn Bivens, Commissioner of the LPGA; Peter Dawson, Chief Executive of The R&A; David Fay, Executive Director of the United States Golf Association; Tim Finchem, Commissioner of the PGA TOUR; George O’Grady, Executive Director of the European Tour; and Joe Steranka, Chief Executive Officer of the PGA of America. Peter Dawson of The R&A serves as 2009 Chairman of the Board, with the role of Chairman rotating on an annual basis between members of the Board’s Executive Committee. In March, 2008, Steve Mona was named as the World Golf Foundation’s first-ever Chief Executive Officer. Mona, 51, joined the organization after having previously served since 1993 as the CEO of the Golf Course Superintendents Association of America. He has been actively involved with the World Golf Foundation and its initiatives over the past decade, serving on the World Golf Hall of Fame Advisory Board and The First Tee Advisory Committee since 1998 and the GOLF 20/20 Executive Board since 1999.


Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

PGA TOUR Anti-Doping Program The objective of the PGA TOUR’s Anti-Doping Program is to aggressively deter the use of any prohibited substance. The key elements of the program include player outreach and education, prohibited substances and methods, therapeutic use exemptions, testing protocol and procedure, and guidelines governing sanctions and program administration. A summary of each of these elements follows.

The TOUR takes significant steps to ensure that the confidentiality, security and integrity of the entire process is preserved for the membership. To implement the testing process, the TOUR has engaged the National Center for Drug Free Sport (Drug Free Sport). Individuals employed by Drug Free Sport are specifically trained to ensure a confidential and professional testing experience.

Player Outreach and Education All PGA TOUR players receive an Anti-Doping Program Manual that is updated annually. The manual contains significant detail about all aspects of the Program. Information about the Program is posted on player-access websites. Players also have 24-hour-a-day confidential access to medical and program advisors who can respond to any questions relating to specific substances, medications or testing procedures. Anti-Doping staff and medical experts will be on site at several tour stops during the 2009 FedExCup schedule to answer any questions players may have about the Program.

Drug Free Sport assists in the player education program in addition to conducting the actual testing. Drug Free Sport also provides drug testing or education services for the national Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), National Basketball Association (NBA), National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and hundreds of colleges and universities.

Prohibited Substances The PGA TOUR and the other member organizations of the World Golf Foundation collaborated to create a Model Prohibited Substances and Methods List that was first announced in September 2007. The list includes: • Anabolic Agents (e.g., steroids) • Hormones and Related Substances (e.g., human growth hormone, testosterone, EPO) • Agents with Anti-Estrogenic Activity (to artificially increase testosterone level) • Diuretics and other masking Agents • Stimulants (e.g. Ritalin) • Narcotics • Cannabinoids • Beta Blockers • Enhancement of Oxygen Transfer (blood doping) • Chemical and Physical Manipulation (tampering with a sample) Therapeutic Use Exemptions The TOUR’s Anti-Doping Program includes a process for players to apply to receive a Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) to use a banned substance if there is a legitimate medical need as determined by the TOUR’s medical committee. This TUE medical committee is chaired by the TOUR’s anti-doping Medical Advisor, Tom Hospel, M.D. Dr. Hospel is Board Certified in Sports Medicine, has served as the team physician for The Ohio State University and practices medicine with the Medical Advisor for the NFL Anti-Doping Program. The TUE medical committee also includes a number of other highly regarded physicians from various medical disciplines.

Sanctions Players who have been tested will be notified of the results by the TOUR Program Administrator. If it is determined that a player committed a violation of the Anti-Doping Program, the player will be notified of the violation and the sanction. Players will have an opportunity to appeal a sanction at a hearing to be held by the Commissioner or his designee. Under the program, the TOUR has the authority to impose a variety of sanctions, which may include: disqualification, ineligibility for up to one year for a first violation, up to five years for a second violation, and up to a lifetime ban for multiple violations, and fines up to $500,000. In addition, for drugs of abuse (marijuana, certain narcotics, cocaine), the Commissioner will have the discretion to require treatment and rehabilitation in lieu of or in addition to other sanctions. For any player who fails a test and is issued sanctions, the TOUR will disclose that the player violated the TOUR’s Anti-Doping Program and will report the penalty. Program Administration The Program will be handled through the TOUR’s Office of the General Counsel led by Rick Anderson, Executive Vice President and Chief Legal Officer. Allison Keller, Executive Director, Anti-Doping Program, will be the Program Administrator. The TOUR engages outside policy and medical experts to assist in the administration of the program, including player education programs and the testing process. The TOUR has worked closely with Richard Young, one of the world’s foremost anti-doping experts and the principal draftsman of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA ) Code. Young has served on the WADA Board since 2004.

Testing Protocol As with the overall Anti-Doping Program, the TOUR’s primary objective with its testing protocol is to have a credible process that will aggressively and effectively deter the use of any prohibited substance. Under the terms of the program, the TOUR has the authority to test players at any time or place. All testing will be without prior notice. Testing done at tournament sites may be conducted both on practice/pro-am days and before or after competitive rounds. There is not a stated minimum or maximum number of times a year that an individual player may be tested.

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2009 Guide

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World Golf Hall of Fame Open since 1998, the World Golf Hall of Fame’s mission is to honor and celebrate golf’s greatest players and contributors. Supported by the world’s leading golf organizations, the Hall of Fame combines historic artifacts and personal memorabilia with interactive exhibits to tell the stories of the Hall of Fame members and the history of the game. The Hall of Fame is located at World Golf Village in St. Augustine, FL. Hall of Fame Induction Process Each year, the World Golf Hall of Fame welcomes a new class of members during an Induction Ceremony that airs on the Golf Channel. The 2009 Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will take place on Monday, November 16. There are five opportunities for a player or contributor to be inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame: PGA TOUR/Champions Tour ballot, International ballot, LPGA Point System, Lifetime Achievement and Veterans categories. Various criteria is set up for players to be eligible for the PGA TOUR/ Champions Tour and International ballots, including an age requirement of at least 40 years old and a career performance that includes a substantial amount of regular tournament victories and majors. The LPGA Point System requires a player to be an active member of the LPGA Tour for 10 years and to have won either an LPGA major tournament, Vare Trophy or Rolex Player of the Year honors, plus a number of other tournament victories.

While displaying varied artifacts from nearly every aspect of Hope’s life of more than a century, the exhibit features a walk through Hope’s “majors,” highlighting artifacts that represent some of the most important achievements in his life. “Bob Hope: Shanks for the Memory” is the latest in a series of Hall of Fame member-focused exhibitions developed by the Hall of Fame. Other members that have been featured include Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, Bobby Jones, Arnold Palmer, Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus. Founding Partner As sole founding partner of World Golf Hall of Fame, The First Tee and World Golf Village, Shell Oil Company provides financial support for the organization’s charitable initiatives. Contact Information Jane Fader Director of Communications 904-940-4009 For more information about the World Golf Hall of Fame, visit the Web site at wgv.com.

The Hall of Fame members’ stories are referenced throughout the museum, though their true home is in the center of the museum, Shell Hall, named for the Hall of Fame’s founding partner, Shell Oil Company. An extraordinary “Wall of Fame” donning hand-crafted bronze relief plaques of each member extends an entire wall, representing the current 126 members. As a fitting tribute to the highest achievement in golf, significant tournament trophies, including men’s and women’s majors, are artfully displayed in the Hall of Fame Tower. Though perhaps the museum’s true treasure trove is the Member Locker Room exhibit, which showcases more than 2,000 artifacts from Hall of Fame members around the world. Guests have the opportunity to sink a long putt on a modern tournament-style putting green under the lights and cameras of a Shell’s Wonderful World of Golf match and video is featured throughout the museum, including a theater offering great championship moment highlights. Inductee Exhibits and More Each year the Hall of Fame showcases the stories and supporting memorabilia from the current year’s class of inductees. On display from the 2008 Class are exhibitions for Sir Bob Charles, Pete Dye, Denny Shute, Carol Semple Thompson, Herbert Warren Wind and Craig Wood.

pgatour.com

PGA  TOUR

2009 Guide

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

The Museum Guests of the World Golf Hall of Fame are greeted with the fascinating and comprehensive tale of golf’s history and its development from the cradle in Scotland through its growth to the far reaches of the world. An exhibit in this area focuses on the role of The R&A, the history of The Open Championship, golf’s longest-running major, and The Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews.

Naturally, the exhibition looks at the many ways Hope championed the game of golf, including the development and hosting of the PGA TOUR’s Bob Hope Chrysler Classic, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2009.

9

Any professional or amateur player whose playing career concluded at least 30 years ago is eligible for selection through the Veterans Category. The World Golf Foundation’s Board of Directors also determines those persons selected for this category each year.

“Bob Hope: Shanks for the Memory” Offering the largest collection of Bob Hope memorabilia ever placed on public display in a single exhibition, “Bob Hope: Shanks for the Memory” features rich storytelling alongside hundreds of artifacts and more than 600 photos placed throughout a variety of set pieces designed to reflect the different eras and locations significant to Hope’s life, including England, Cleveland, New York, Hollywood, Palm Springs, Washington, D.C. and sites of USO shows around the world.

Section

Nominations for Lifetime Achievement are made by the International Voting Body Members. This category is designed for those whose primary role in the game has come from outside the playing arena. The World Golf Foundation’s Board of Directors decides this category each year.

Through the first part of 2009, the Hall of Fame is featuring a special display on member Vijay Singh, winner of the 2008 FedExCup. The display includes significant items from his PGA TOUR Playoffs victories and crowning moment following play in THE TOUR Championship.


World Golf Hall of Fame Members (by year)

Section

9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in St. Augustine, FL Class of 2008 Sir Bob Charles Pete Dye Denny Shute

Carol Semple Thompson Herbert Warren Wind Craig Wood

Class of 2007 Joe Carr Hubert Green Curtis Strange

Kel Nagle Se Ri Pak Charles Blair Macdonald

Class of 2006 Mark McCormack Vijay Singh Larry Nelson Marilynn Smith Henry Picard

Class of 2004 Isao Aoki Charlie Sifford Tom Kite Marlene Stewart Streit Class of 2003 Leo Diegel Hisako “Chako” Higuchi Nick Price Annika Sorenstam Class of 2002 Tommy Bolt Tony Jacklin Marlene Hagge Bernhard Langer Ben Crenshaw Harvey Penick

Class of 2000 Deane Beman Neil Coles Beth Daniel John Jacobs Class of 1999 Amy Alcott Seve Ballesteros Class of 1998 Nick Faldo

Sir Michael Bonallack Judy Rankin Juli Inkster Jack Burke Jr. Lloyd Mangrum

Johnny Miller

Class of 2001 Judy Bell Allan Robertson Donna Caponi Karsten Solheim Greg Norman Payne Stewart

Class of 2005 Bernard Darwin Willie Park, Sr. Alister MacKenzie Karrie Webb Ayako Okamoto

Via the former World Golf Hall of Fame in Pinehurst, NC Willie Anderson (1975) Tommy Armour (1976) John Ball (1977) Severiano Ballesteros (1999) Jim Barnes (1989) Patty Berg (1974) Julius Boros (1982) Pat Bradley (1991) James Braid (1976) William C. Campbell (1990) Dorothy Campbell Hurd Howe (1978) JoAnne Carner (1985) Billy Casper (1978) Harry Cooper (1992) Fred Corcoran (1975) Henry Cotton (1980) Bing Crosby (1978) Jimmy Demaret (1983) Roberto De Vicenzo (1989)

Joseph C. Dey (1975) Chick Evans (1975) Raymond Floyd (1989) Herb Graffis (1977) Ralph Guldahl (1981) Walter Hagen (1974) Bob Harlow (1988) Sandra Haynie (1977) Harold Hilton (1978) Ben Hogan (1974) Bob Hope (1983) Hale Irwin (1992) Betty Jameson (1974) Robert Trent Jones, Sr. (1987) Robert Tyre Jones, Jr. (1974) Betsy King (1995) Lawson Little (1980) Gene Littler (1990) Bobby Locke (1977)

Nancy Lopez (1989) Carol Mann (1977) Cary Middlecoff (1986) Tom Morris, Jr. (1975) Tom Morris, Sr. (1976) Byron Nelson (1974) Jack Nicklaus (1974) Francis Ouimet (1974) Arnold Palmer (1974) Gary Player (1974) Betsy Rawls (1987) Clifford Roberts (1978) Chi Chi Rodriguez (1992) Donald Ross (1977) Paul Runyan (1990) Gene Sarazen (1974) Patty Sheehan (1993) Dinah Shore (1994) Horton Smith (1990)

Sam Snead (1974) Louise Suggs (1979) J. H. Taylor (1975) Peter Thomson (1988) Jerry Travers (1976) Walter Travis (1979) Lee Trevino (1981) Richard Tufts (1992) Harry Vardon (1974) Glenna Collette Vare (1975) Tom Watson (1988) Joyce Wethered (1975) Kathy Whitworth (1982) Mickey Wright (1976) Babe Zaharias (1974)

World Golf Hall of Fame Supporting Organizations American Junior Golf Association American Society of Golf Course Architects Asian Tour Augusta National Golf Club Champions Tour Champions Tour Tournament Association Club Managers Association of America Golf Course Builders Association of America Golf Course Superintendents Association of America Golf Writers Association of America International Association of Golf Administrators Japan Golf Tour Organization Ladies Professional Golf Association

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PGA TOUR

LPGA Tournament Sponsors Association National Golf Course Owners Association National Golf Foundation Nationwide Tour PGA of America The European Tour PGA TOUR PGA of Australia PGA TOUR Tournament Advisory Council Royal Canadian Golf Association Sunshine Tour The R&A United States Golf Association

2009 Guide

pgatour.com


World Golf Hall of Fame Members Includes induction year, in brackets, birthplace and birth and death dates, in parentheses:

Amy Alcott [1999] Kansas City, Missouri (Feb. 22, 1956- ) Captured the 1973 USGA Girls Junior as an amateur. Turned pro in 1975 and claimed 29 LPGA titles including five major championships. Willie Anderson [1975] North Berwick, Scotland (Oct. 21, 1879-Oct. 25, 1910) Emigrated to U.S. at 15 and dominated early American golf. Won U.S. Open four times between 1901-1905. Isao Aoki [2004] Abiko, Chiba, Japan (Aug. 31, 1942- ) First Japanese player to triumph on the PGA TOUR. Owns 73 titles worldwide on six Tours. Hole-out for eagle won him the 1983 Hawaiian Open. Tommy Armour [1976] Edinburgh, Scotland (Sept. 24, 1894-Sept. 12, 1968) One of golf’s most respected instructors and players. Won the U.S. Open, Western Open, PGA Championship and the British Open. Nicknamed the “Silver Scot.” John Ball [1977] Hoylake, England (Dec. 24, 1861-Dec. 2 1940) Considered England’s greatest amateur. Compiled eight British Amateur titles. Became the first Englishman and amateur to win the British Open.

Deane Beman [2000] Washington, D.C. (April 22, 1938- ) PGA TOUR Commissioner 1974-1994. Created Champions Tour, Nationwide Tour and stadium golf concept. Won two U.S. Amateurs, a British Amateur and four PGA TOUR events. Patty Berg [1974] Minneapolis, Minnesota (Feb. 3, 1918-Sept. 10, 2006) Claimed 28 amateur titles and won the first U.S. Women’s Open. 60 career wins including LPGA-record 15 majors. An original LPGA founder. Tommy Bolt [2002] Haworth, Oklahoma (March 31, 1916-Aug. 30, 2008 ) Won 1958 U.S. Open at age 40. Captured 12 senior titles in the U.S. and Australia. A Champions Tour founding member. Well known for personality and flair. Sir Michael Bonallack [2000] Chigwell, Essex, England (Dec. 31, 1934- ) Former Secretary of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. Won five British Amateurs and five English Amateurs between 1961 and 1970. Competed in nine Walker Cups.

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PGA  TOUR

Jack Burke, Jr. [2000] Fort Worth, Texas (Jan. 29, 1923- ) Five-time U.S. Ryder Cup member. Captured 17 career titles, including 1956 Masters and PGA Championship. Won four straight tournaments in 1952. William Campbell [1990] Huntington, West Virginia (May 5, 1923- ) Qualified for 37 U.S. Amateurs, winning in 1964. Two-time U.S. Senior Amateur champion. Eight-time Walker Cup member. USGA President 1982-85. Donna Caponi [2001] Detroit, Michigan (Jan. 29, 1945- ) First win came at 1969 U.S. Women’s Open. 24 LPGA titles include four majors. Won 10 times in two years beginning in 1980. JoAnne Gunderson Carner [1985] Kirkland, Washington (April 4, 1939- ) Owns more than 40 career victories. Won five U.S. Women’s Amateurs and two U.S. Women’s Opens. Vare Trophy winner 1981-1983. Three-time LPGA Player of the Year. Joe Carr [2007] Inchicore, Ireland (Feb. 22, 1922-June 3, 2004) First Irishman inducted into the Hall of Fame. Winner of three British Amateurs and 37 additional championships in Ireland. Played in 10 Walker Cups and is a past captain of the Royal & Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. Billy Casper [1978] San Diego, California (June 24, 1931- ) Winner of 60 titles, including three PGA TOUR majors. Claimed five Vardon Trophies. Eight-time Ryder Cup member. Won 1966 U.S. Open playoff after seven-shot comeback. Sir Bob Charles (2008) Carterton, New Zealand (March 14, 1936- ) Won more than 75 tournaments around the world on five continents, including the 1963 British Open. Was the first left-hander to win a major, to win on the PGA TOUR and to be inducted into the Hall of Fame. Neil Coles [2000] London, England (Sept. 26, 1934- ) Claimed 22 PGA European Tour victories and twice led its money list. Eighttime Ryder Cup member. Pioneered formation of the PGA European Tour. Harry Cooper [1992] Leatherhead, England (Aug. 4, 1904-Oct. 17, 2000) “Lighthorse Harry” won 31 professional tournaments from 1926-1942. Won nine times in 1937. Winner of first Vardon Trophy.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Judy Bell [2001] Wichita, Kansas (Sept. 23, 1936- ) First woman elected USGA President. Member of USGA Women’s and Executive Committees. Impressive amateur record included three straight Kansas State Amateurs.

James Braid [1976] Earlsferry, Fifeshire, Scotland (Feb. 6, 1870-Nov. 27, 1950) Member of The Great Triumvirate with Harry Vardon and J.H. Taylor. Won five British Opens in 10 years. Known as Britain’s professional match-play champion.

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Jim Barnes [1989] Lelant, Cornwall, England (April 8, 1886-May 24, 1966) Englishman came to the U.S. at age 19. Won era’s major tournaments at least once between 1916-1925: Western Open, PGA Championship, U.S. Open and the British Open.

Pat Bradley [1991] Westford, Massachusetts (March 24, 1951- ) Amassed 31 career LPGA victories including six majors. Winner of career Grand Slam, two Player of the Year Awards and two Vare Trophies.

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Severiano Ballesteros [1999] Pedrena, Spain (April 9, 1957- ) Won first of three British Opens at age 22. Added a pair of Masters titles in 1980 and 1983. Played on eight Ryder Cup teams.

Julius Boros [1982] Fairfield, Connecticut (March 3, 1920-May 28, 1994) Won two U.S. Opens and, at age 48, PGA Championship. Named PGA Player of the Year in 1952.


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9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

World Golf Hall of Fame Members (cont.) Fred Corcoran [1975] Cambridge, Massachusetts (April 4, 1905-June 23, 1977) Instrumental in forming the LPGA Tour, World Cup and Golf Writers Association of America. PGA Tournament manager from 1936-1947. More than doubled the number of Tour events.

Nick Faldo [1998] Welwyn Garden City, Hertfordshire, England (July 18, 1957- ) Won more than 40 worldwide tournaments, including three British Opens and three Masters. Competed in 11 Ryder Cups. First international player named PGA of America Player of the Year.

Henry Cotton [1980] Holmes Chapel, Cheshire, England (Jan. 28, 1907-Dec. 22, 1987) Dominated European professional golf from mid-1930s to early-1950s. Captured 14 national championships in that span, including three British Opens.

Raymond Floyd [1989] Fort Bragg, North Carolina (Sept. 4, 1942- ) Owner of more than 35 combined PGA TOUR and Champions Tour titles. Won 1986 U.S. Open at age 43 to claim fourth major.

Ben Crenshaw [2002] Austin, Texas (Jan. 11, 1952- ) Compiled 17 PGA TOUR victories, including two Masters. Captained victorious 1999 U.S. Ryder Cup team. Won three straight individual NCAA crowns at University of Texas. World Golf Hall of Fame Members (cont.) Bing Crosby [1978] Tacoma, Washington (May 2, 1904-Oct. 14, 1977) Crooner’s golf interest began as pre-teen caddie. Formed 1937 pro-am at Pebble Beach. “The Clam Bake” remains a top PGA TOUR event.

Herb Graffis [1977] Logansport, Indiana (May 31, 1893-Feb. 13, 1989) Journalist contributed widely to golf’s growth. Founding member of the Golf Writers Association of America and co-formed National Golf Foundation.

Beth Daniel [1999] Charleston, South Carolina (Oct. 14, 1956- ) Counts 1990 LPGA Championship among 32 LPGA titles. Claimed Player of the Year and Vare Trophy on three occasions. U.S. Women’s Amateur champ in 1975 and 1977. Bernard Darwin [2005] Downe, Kent, England (Sept. 7, 1876-Oct. 18, 1961) Credited with inventing daily golf writing. Covered golf for The Times of London (1907-53) and Country Life (1907-61). Respectable playing resume includes Walker Cup and British Amateur appearances. Jimmy Demaret [1983] Houston, Texas (May 24, 1910-Dec. 28, 1983) Colorful and popular golf figure won 1940 Masters after becoming a nightclub singer. Added Green Jackets in 1947 and 1950 following action in Navy during WW II. Roberto De Vicenzo [1989] Buenos Aires, Argentina (April 14, 1923- ) Turned pro at 15 and won 231 tournaments worldwide. Has eight PGA TOUR titles and the 1967 British Open. Won inaugural U.S. Senior Open. Joseph C. Dey [1975] Norfolk, Virginia (Nov. 17, 1907-March 3, 1991) USGA’s Executive Secretary for 34 years and the first PGA TOUR Commissioner. Second American to captain at the R&A. Leo Diegel [2003] Detroit, Michigan (April 27, 1899-May 8, 1951) Member of first four Ryder Cup teams from 1927-1933. Won consecutive PGA Championships in 1928 and 1929. 29 career titles include four Canadian Opens. Pete Dye (2008) Urbana, Ohio (December 29, 1925- ) Considered one of the most influential golf-course architects in the game’s history. Designs include THE PLAYERS Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass, Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course, Crooked Stick and Whistling Straits. Chick Evans [1975] Indianapolis, Indiana (July 8, 1890-Nov. 6, 1979) First player to win U.S. Open and U.S. Amateur in same year (1916). Played U.S. Amateur regularly from 1907-1962, winning twice. Established Evans Scholars Foundation for caddies, affiliated with Western Open.

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PGA TOUR

Hubert Green [2007] Birmingham, Alabama (Dec. 28, 1946- ) One of the top PGA TOUR players of the 1970s, claiming 16 of his 19 wins in that decade. Career was highlighted by wins at the 1977 U.S. Open and 1985 PGA Championship and three Ryder Cup appearances. Ralph Guldahl [1981] Dallas, Texas (Nov. 22, 1911-June 11, 1987) Among few players to win successive U.S. Opens (1937-1938). Also won three consecutive Western Opens and the 1939 Masters. Walter Hagen [1974] Rochester, New York (Dec. 21, 1892-Oct. 5, 1969) First professional to make a living playing golf. Captained first six American Ryder Cup teams. Won two U.S. Opens, four British Opens and five PGAs. Marlene Bauer Hagge [2002] Eureka, South Dakota (Feb. 16, 1934- ) Founding member of the LPGA. Claimed first USGA Girls Junior in 1949. Youngest player to win an LPGA event. Resume includes 25 professional victories. Bob Harlow [1988] Newburyport, Massachusetts (Oct. 21, 1899-Nov. 15, 1954) Founded Golf World. Managed Walter Hagen and Joe Kirkwood and arranged exhibitions for both. Served as PGA tournament manager from 1930-1935. Sandra Haynie [1977] Fort Worth, Texas (June 4, 1943- ) Won 39 tournaments in 16 years, including the U.S. Women’s Open and the LPGA Championship in 1974. Captured the 1958 and 1959 Texas Women’s Amateur. Hisako “Chako” Higuchi [2003] Kawagoe City, Saitama Prefecture, Japan (Oct. 13, 1945- ) Charter member of the LPGA of Japan. Counts 1977 LPGA Championship among her 72 worldwide victories. One of Japan’s most successful athletes. Harold Hilton [1978] West Kirby, England (Jan. 14, 1869-March 5, 1942) Four-time British Amateur champion and two-time British Open winner. First Englishman to win the U.S. Amateur in 1911. Ben Hogan [1974] Dublin, Texas (Aug. 13, 1912-July 29, 1997) Claimed three majors prior to life-threatening auto accident in 1949. Returned to win three U.S. Opens, two Masters and a British Open. Owns 64 titles worldwide. Bob Hope [1983] Eltham, England (May 29, 1903-July 27, 2003) Revered personality united golf, entertainment and politics. This Presidential playing partner’s namesake tournament was among first to make significant charitable donations.

2009 Guide

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World Golf Hall of Fame Members (cont.) Dorothy Campbell Hurd Howe [1978] Edinburgh, Scotland (March 24, 1883-March 20, 1945) Winner of more than 750 matches worldwide. Won British Ladies Championship twice and U.S. Women’s Amateur three times.

Gene Littler [1990] San Diego, California (July 21, 1930- ) First PGA win came in 1954 as amateur. 37 total career titles. Won 1953 U.S. Amateur and 1961 U.S. Open.

Juli Inkster [2000] Santa Cruz, California (June 24, 1960- ) Career includes more than 30 LPGA wins, including six majors. Won three consecutive U.S. Women’s Amateurs. Competed on 1982 U.S. Curtis Cup Team.

Bobby Locke [1977] Germiston, Transvaal, South Africa (Nov. 20, 1917-March 9, 1987) Won both South African Amateur and Open by age 18. Captured four British Opens between 1949 and 1957. Retired with more than 80 victories worldwide.

Hale Irwin [1992] Joplin, Missouri (June 3, 1945- ) Claimed three U.S. Opens and 17 other PGA TOUR titles. Dominated Champions Tour 1997-99, winning 21 times, and is the Champions Tour’s alltime victories leader. Won 1967 NCAA Championship. Tony Jacklin [2002] Scunthorpe, England (July 7, 1944- ) Won 1969 British Open. 1970 U.S. Open saw him become first British player to win event in 50 years. Captained victorious Ryder Cup teams in 1985, 1987 and 1989. John Jacobs [2000] Lindrick, Yorkshire, England (March 14, 1925- ) Co-founder of the PGA European Tour. Played on 1955 Ryder Cup Team. Was captain in 1979 and 1981. Pioneer of Europe’s approach to modern game.

Betsy King [1995] Reading, Pennsylvania (Aug. 13, 1955- ) 34 career victories, including six majors. Won three tournaments in 1984 and was leading money winner and Player of the Year. Tom Kite [2004] Austin, Texas (Dec. 9, 1949- ) Won 18 PGA TOUR titles and 1992 U.S. Open. Played in seven Ryder Cups and captained 1997 U.S. Team. Two-time Vardon Trophy winner. Co-NCAA champ in 1972. Bernhard Langer [2002] Anhausen, Germany (Aug. 27, 1957- ) Most accomplished German golfer with more than 50 worldwide victories. Two-time Masters winner. Won German National Open record 12 times. Competed in 10 Ryder Cups. Lawson Little [1980] Newport, Rhode Island (June 23, 1910-Feb. 1, 1968) Captured both U.S. and British Amateurs in 1934 and ‘35. Won seven events as a pro, including 1940 U.S. Open.

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PGA  TOUR

Lloyd Mangrum [1998] Trenton, Texas (Aug. 1, 1914-Nov. 17, 1973) Captured more than 50 titles, including 1946 U.S. Open. Four-time Ryder Cup member and once a captain. Won Vardon Trophy in 1951 and 1953. Carol Mann [1977] Buffalo, New York (Feb. 3, 1941- ) Earned 38 career victories with two majors. Amassed 10 titles and won Vare Trophy in 1968. Only player to make Women’s Western Open first LPGA title. Former LPGA President. Mark McCormack [2006] Chicago, Illinois (Nov. 6, 1930-May 16, 2003) Founder of IMG, once considered “The Most Powerful Man in Sports.” McCormack represented The Big Three (Arnold Palmer, Gary Player and Jack Nicklaus), started the Official World Golf Ranking and created the World Match Play Championship. Cary Middlecoff [1986] Halls, Tennessee (Jan. 6, 1921-Sept. 1, 1998) First amateur to win the North and South Open. 37 career victories included 1949 and 1956 U.S. Open and 1955 Masters. Johnny Miller [1998] San Francisco, California (April 29, 1947- ) Dominated international golf in 1970s. Won 20 tournaments in six years. Final- round 63 secured 1973 U.S. Open. Won 1976 British Open and totaled 25 PGA TOUR titles. Tom Morris, Jr. [1975] St. Andrews, Scotland (April 20, 1851-Dec. 25, 1875) Won first tournament by age 16. Won first British Open at age 18 in 1868. Only player to claim four consecutive British Opens. Tom Morris, Sr. [1976] St. Andrews, Scotland (June 16, 1821-May 24, 1908) Most revered figure in Scottish golf history. Career greens keeper captured four British Opens. Designed legendary courses Lahinch, Muirfield and Royal County Down.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Bobby Jones [1974] Atlanta, Georgia (March 17, 1902-Dec. 18, 1971) Won 1930 Grand Slam, then promptly retired from competitive golf. His five U.S. Amateurs, four U.S. Opens, three British Opens and British Amateur came in eight years. Established Augusta National Golf Club and the Masters.

Alister MacKenzie [2005] The Orchard, Normanton, England (Aug. 30, 1870-Jan. 6, 1934) Architect of many famed courses including Augusta National, Cypress Point, Royal Melbourne and Lahinch. His 1920 treatise Golf Architecture codified 13 features of an ideal golf course.

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Robert Trent Jones, Sr. [1987] Ince, Lancanshire, England (June 20, 1906-June 14, 2000) Most prolific golf-course architect of modern era. Notable courses include Peachtree, Spyglass Hill, Firestone South, Sotogrande and the New Course at Ballybunion.

Charles Blair Macdonald [2007] Niagara Falls, Ontario, Canada (Nov. 14, 1855-April 21, 1939) Considered the father of organized golf in the U.S. Helped found the United States Golf Association and built the first 18-hole golf course in the U.S. near Chicago. Coined the term “golf architect” and also designed the National Golf Links of America. Winner of the inaugural U.S. Amateur in 1895.

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Betty Jameson [1998] Norman, Oklahoma (May 19, 1919- ) Winner of Southern Amateur, two U.S. Women’s Amateurs and two Western Amateurs. Captured 1942 Western Open and 1947 U.S. Women’s Open as amateur. LPGA founder.

Nancy Lopez [1989] Torrance, California (Jan. 6, 1957- ) Won nine times in rookie year, including five consecutive. Named Rookie of the Year and Player of the Year in 1978. Amassed more than 50 career victories.


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9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

World Golf Hall of Fame Members (cont.) Kel Nagle [2007] North Sydney, Australia (Dec. 21, 1920- ) Winner of more than 60 tournaments in Australia. Has also won in Europe, North America and Asia and is most well known for his 1960 British Open win at St. Andrews.

Henry Picard [2006] Plymouth, Massachusetts (Nov. 28, 1906-April 30, 1997) Picard’s more than two dozen PGA TOUR victories put him in the top 25 alltime. Winner of the 1938 Masters Tournament and 1939 PGA Championship. Leading money winner in 1939.

Byron Nelson [1974] Long Branch, Texas (Feb. 4, 1912- Sept. 26, 2006) Best remembered for 1945 record season, when he won 19 tournaments, including 11 consecutively. 52 career titles include two Masters, two PGAs and a U.S. Open.

Gary Player [1974] Johannesburg, South Africa (Nov. 1, 1935- ) Victories number more than 120 worldwide. Winner of career Grand Slam. Rigorous fitness program helped him win in five different decades. Global ambassador for golf.

Larry Nelson [2006] Fort Payne, Alabama (Sept. 10, 1947- ) Winner of nearly 30 PGA TOUR and Champions Tour events combined. Major championship victories include 1983 U.S. Open, 1981 and 1987 PGA Championships. Was undefeated (9-0-0) in the first two of his three Ryder Cup appearances.

Nick Price [2003] Durban, South Africa (Jan. 28, 1957- ) Dominated international golf in the early 1990s. Has more than 40 tournament wins worldwide.1994 season saw him win six times, including the British Open and PGA Championship.

Jack Nicklaus [1974] Columbus, Ohio (Jan. 21, 1940- ) Arguably best golfer of modern era. Amassed 20 major championship victories (pro and amateur). Has more than 100 victories around the world. One of five players to win career Grand Slam. Greg Norman [2001] Mt. Isa, Queensland, Australia (Feb.10, 1955- ) Winner of three Arnold Palmer Awards and three Vardon Trophies. Owns nearly 90 titles worldwide. British Open winner in 1986 and 1993. Ayako Okamoto [2005] Hiroshima, Japan (April 2, 1951- ) Compiled 62 worldwide titles, including 44 on the LPGA of Japan and 17 on the LPGA Tour. First international player to win LPGA Player of the Year Award (1987). Francis Ouimet [1974] Brookline, Massachusetts (May 8, 1893-Sept. 2, 1967) Brought golf to new levels in America. Former caddie defeated heralded British professionals Harry Vardon and Ted Ray at 1913 U.S. Open. Two-time U.S. Amateur champ. Se Ri Pak [2007] Daejeon, South Korea (Sept. 28, 1977- ) First South Korean inducted into the Hall of Fame. Winner of two dozen LPGA titles and five major championships. One of only two LPGA players to win two majors in her rookie year. Arnold Palmer [1974] Latrobe, Pennsylvania (Sept. 10, 1929- ) Game’s most charismatic player. Generated unprecedented interest in the game. 80-plus professional victories include four Masters, two British Opens and a U.S. Open. Willie Park, Sr. [2005] Wallyford, Scotland (June 30, 1833-July 25, 1903) Winner of four British Opens, including the first one in 1860. Equally noted for his Challenge Match performances against Old Tom Morris. Prodigious driver and skilled putter, he was also an instrumental ball and club maker. Harvey Penick [2002] Austin, Texas (Oct. 23, 1904-April 2, 1995) One of game’s greatest teachers. Pupils included Tom Kite, Ben Crenshaw and Kathy Whitworth. Led University of Texas to 20 Southwest Conference titles and 19 individual crowns.

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Judy Rankin [2000] St. Louis, Missouri (Feb. 18, 1945- ) Winner of 26 LPGA events. Two-time Player of the Year and three-time Vare Trophy winner. Former LPGA President and U.S. Solheim Cup captain. Betsy Rawls [1987] Spartanburg, South Carolina (May 4, 1928- ) Counts eight majors among 55 career LPGA victories. First player to win U.S. Women’s Open four times. Claimed 1959 Vare Trophy. Former LPGA President. Clifford Roberts [1978] Morning Sun, Iowa (March 6, 1894-Sept. 29, 1977) Co-founded Augusta National Golf Club. Chairman of the Masters from its 1934 inception until his death in 1977. Allan Robertson [2001] St. Andrews, Scotland (Sept. 11, 1815-Sept. 1, 1859) Credited as game’s first professional. First to break 80 on The Old Course at St. Andrews, shooting a 79 in 1858. Known as a premier feather ball maker. Chi Chi Rodriguez [1992] Rio Pledras, Puerto Rico (Oct. 23, 1935- ) Owns more than 30 career titles. Two-time Byron Nelson Award winner as Champions Tour scoring leader. Arnold Palmer Award winner in 1987. Donald Ross [1977] Dornoch, Scotland (Nov. 23, 1872-April 26, 1948) Premier golf course architect in America during early 20th century. Directed over 500 design projects, including Pinehurst No. 2, Oak Hill, Inverness and Oakland Hills. Paul Runyan [1990] Hot Springs, Arkansas (July 12, 1908-March 17, 2002) Won over 50 professional tournaments, including 16 in two years. Leading money winner in 1933 and 1934. Two-time PGA Championship winner. Gene Sarazen [1974] Harrison, New York (Feb. 27, 1902-May 3, 1999) First golfer to win all four major championships. Has seven majors in all. Remembered for 1935 Masters win that featured double-eagle on No. 15. Invented sand wedge. Patty Sheehan [1993] Middlebury, Vermont (Oct. 27, 1956- ) First to capture the U.S. and British Women’s Opens in same year. Won 35 tournaments, including six majors. 1983 Player of the Year. Winner of 1984 Vare Trophy.

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World Golf Hall of Fame Members (cont.) Dinah Shore [1994] Winchester, Tennessee (Feb. 29, 1916-Feb. 24, 1994) Famed entertainer became celebrity host of the Colgate-Dinah Shore Winners Circle. Her support of women’s golf was critical to LPGA Tour’s growth. Denny Shute (2008) Cleveland, Ohio (October 25, 1904-May 13, 1974) Three-time major champion who added back-to-back PGA Championships (1936-37) to his 1933 British Open title. Career includes 15 PGA TOUR victories and appearances on three Ryder Cup teams.

Curtis Strange [2007] Norfolk, Virginia (Jan. 30, 1955- ) Great amateur player who went on to capture consecutive U.S. Opens in 1988 and 1989. Owns 17 PGA TOUR titles and was the first player to surpass the $1-million mark in a single season (1988). Played in five Ryder Cups. Louise Suggs [1979] Lithia Springs, Georgia (Sept. 7, 1923- ) 50 professional victories include two U.S. Women’s Opens, one LPGA Championship and four Titleholders. LPGA Founder and former President. J. H. Taylor [1975] Northam, North Devon, England (March 18, 1871-Feb. 10, 1963) Member of “Great Triumvirate” that dominated golf at the turn of the 20th century. Five-time British Open winner. Founded first professional golfers’ association.

Vijay Singh [2006] Lautoka, Fiji (Feb.22, 1963- ) Record-setting 2004 season saw him win nine times, set a PGA TOUR record for season earnings and became world’s No. 1-ranked player. Counts three major championships among his more than 30 TOUR titles.

Carol Semple Thompson (2008) Sewickley, Pennsylvania (October 27, 1948- ) Career amateur owns seven individual USGA titles and is one of only five golfers to ever win three different USGA championships. Competed in more than 100 USGA championships and was a stalwart on U.S. Curtis Cup teams.

Horton Smith [1990] Springfield, Missouri (May 22, 1908-Oct. 15, 1963) Burst onto professional golf scene in 1929, winning eight times and finishing second four times. Claimed two Masters titles, including inaugural 1934 tournament.

Peter Thomson [1998] Melbourne, Australia (Aug. 23, 1929- ) Captured five British Opens between 1954 and 1965. Won 11 Champions Tour titles and 1988 British Seniors Championship. Three-time International Team Presidents Cup captain.

Marilynn Smith [2006] Topeka, Kansas (April 12, 1929- ) LPGA co-founder and former LPGA President. Conducted more than 4,000 golf clinics internationally and organized first women’s senior professional tournament. Playing career includes 21 LPGA victories, including two majors.

Jerry Travers [1976] New York, New York (May 19, 1887-March 29, 1951) From 1906-1915, won five Metropolitan Opens, four U.S. Amateurs and was second amateur to win U.S. Open.

Annika Sörenstam [2003] Stockholm, Sweden (Oct. 10, 1970- ) Won more than 60 LPGA titles, including 11 in 2002. Captured career Grand Slam in 2003. Multiple Player of the Year and Vare Trophy winner. Shot a 59 in 2001. Payne Stewart [2001] Springfield, Missouri (Jan. 30, 1957-Oct. 25, 1999) Won 11 PGA TOUR events and 18 victories worldwide. Claimed the 1989 PGA Championship and the 1991 and 1999 U.S. Opens. Five-time U.S. Ryder Cup member. Marlene Stewart Streit [2004] Cereal, Alberta, Canada (March 9, 1934- ) Only golfer to have won Australian, British, Canadian and U.S. Women’s Amateur championships. Owns 11 Canadian Ladies Open Amateurs, nine Canadian Ladies Close Amateurs.

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PGA  TOUR

Lee Trevino [1981] Dallas, Texas (Dec. 1, 1939- ) Career victories totaled nearly 80, including six majors. Played on six Ryder Cups. Champions Tour career saw him win 29 times, three Jack Nicklaus Trophies, two Arnold Palmer Awards. Richard Tufts [1992] Medford, Massachusetts (March 16, 1896-Dec. 17, 1980) Managed Pinehurst Resort from 1930s to 1960s. Helped introduce modern handicap system, standardized course setup and worked to unify the Rules of Golf. Harry Vardon [1974] Grouville, Isle of Jersey, England (May 9, 1870-March 20, 1937) Revolutionized and dominated the game for 25 years. Won a record six British Opens and a U.S. Open. Popularized the overlapping Vardon Grip. Glenna Collett Vare [1975] New Haven, Connecticut (June 20, 1903-Feb. 3, 1989) Won unprecedented six U.S. Women’s Amateurs between 1922 and 1935. Represented U.S. on six Curtis Cup teams. LPGA’s Vare Trophy named for her. Tom Watson [1988] Kansas City, Missouri (Sept. 4, 1949- ) Player of the Year four consecutive years. Has 31 PGA TOUR victories, five British Opens, two Masters and a U.S. Open, where he had a dramatic chip-in at No. 17 at Pebble Beach.

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

Karsten Solheim [2001] Bergen, Norway (Sept. 15, 1911-Feb. 16, 2000) Initially known for PING putter. Developed concepts of heel-toe weighting and perimeter weighting. Founded The Solheim Cup to advance international women’s golf.

Walter Travis [1979] Malden, Victoria, Australia (Jan. 10, 1862-July 31, 1927) Three-time U.S. Amateur champ and six-time medalist. First foreigner to capture the British Amateur. Founder and editor of American Golfer.

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Sam Snead [1974] Hot Springs, Virginia (May 27, 1912-May 23, 2002) PGA TOUR’s career victory leader with 82 victories. Winner of three PGA Championships and Masters and one British Open. Eight-time Ryder Cup member.

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Charlie Sifford [2004] Charlotte, North Carolina (June 2, 1922- ) First African-American to play full time on PGA TOUR, winning twice. Claimed 1975 Senior PGA Championship. Original member of the Champions Tour in 1980.


Karrie Webb [2005] Queensland, Australia (Dec. 21, 1974- ) Counts seven majors among nearly three dozen LPGA titles. Youngest winner of the LPGA career grand slam. First LPGA player to surpass $1 million in single- season earnings.

Craig Wood (2008) Lake Placid, New York (November 18, 1901-May 8, 1968) Craig Wood was the first golfer to win the Masters and U.S. Open in the same year (1941). Nicknamed “The Blond Bomber,” the long-hitting Wood won 21 PGA TOUR titles and played on three Ryder Cup teams.

Joyce Wethered [1975] Devon, England (Nov. 17, 1901-Nov. 18, 1997) Dominated women’s golf in Britain in the 1920s. Won five consecutive English Championships and four British Ladies Championships.

Mickey Wright [1976] San Diego, California (Feb. 14, 1935- ) Amassed 82 career LPGA victories, including 10 in 1961 and 13 in 1963. Winner of four U.S. Women’s Opens. Won five Vare Trophies.

Kathy Whitworth [1982] Monohans, Texas (Sept. 27, 1939- ) Record 88 LPGA titles, including six majors. Dominated LPGA in late 1960s and early 1970s. Awards include seven Players of the Year and Vare Trophies.

Mildred “Babe” Didrikson Zaharias [1974] Port Arthur, Texas (June 26, 1914-Sept. 27, 1956) Olympic gold medalist turned exclusively to golf in 1934. Won 1946 U.S. Women’s Amateur and three U.S. Women’s Opens.

Herbert Warren Wind (2008) Brockton, Massachusetts (August 11, 1916-May 30, 2005) America’s “Poet Laureate” of Golf, Wind covered the sport elegantly for decades for The New Yorker and Sports Illustrated. Coined the term “Amen Corner” for holes 11-13 at Augusta National and wrote many significant books including The Story of American Golf.

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9

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

World Golf Hall of Fame Members (cont.)

(L-R) 2008 inductees Craig Wood, Herbert Warren Wind, Carol Semple Thompson, Pete Dye, Denny Shute and Sir Bob Charles

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2009 Guide

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World Golf Village PGA TOUR Spa Laterra is located at the King & Bear at World Golf Village and offers a range of golf-enhancement spa services and fitness programs. The full-service spa, part of the Laterra resort community, offers signature treatments and full, half and multi-day packages. Dining options along the Walk of Champions include Murray Bros. Caddyshack, the flagship restaurant of actor-golfer Bill Murray and his brothers. PGA TOUR STOP, one of the largest golf stores in the country, anchors the retail area of World Golf Village. Also along the Walk of Champions, which is a half-mile track featuring engraved Hall of Fame member signatures in granite, guests can attempt to hit a ball 132 yards to the Challenge Hole’s island green. Accommodations at World Golf Village include the flagship Renaissance Resort, which recently underwent a multi-million dollar renovation that featured a complete remodeling of all guest rooms and suites, dramatic changes to the resort’s lobby atrium, remodeling of the restaurant and bar, new lighting throughout the public spaces and enhancements to the resort’s adjoining convention center. Grande Villas at World Golf Village, a Bluegreen Vacation Club resort, offers country club vacation homes that overlook the 17th and 18th holes of Slammer & Squire golf course. Laterra Resort & Spa offers 72 well-appointed condominiums with immediate access to the adjacent PGA TOUR Spa. The Neighborhoods of World Golf Village offer distinctive residential communities that blend world-class amenities with the convenience of shopping, healthcare, entertainment, first-rate schools and incredible golf. Each neighborhood offers individual amenities such as pools and recreational facilities. For more information about planning a vacation to World Golf Village, call 1-800-WGV-GOLF or visit wgv.com.

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The World Golf Hall of Fame is located at World Golf Village, a 6,300-acre golf resort and residential community located 10 minutes northwest of historic St. Augustine, FL, and 30 minutes south of Jacksonville. Named one of the “Top 75 Golf Resorts” in the United States by Golf Digest, World Golf Village draws guests from all over the United States and from around the world, offering a wide variety of recreational, entertainment, corporate meeting and residential options. As the centerpiece of the Village, the World Golf Hall of Fame honors and celebrates the game’s greatest players and contributors. The Hall of Fame features personal memorabilia and special exhibits highlighting its members, as well as historical and interactive displays that enable visitors to see and experience some of golf’s most exciting aspects. Part of the Hall of Fame experience includes a round on the 18-hole natural grass putting course and a film at the adjacent IMAX® Theater, which offers a variety of films that are both educational and entertaining on an 80-foot-wide by 6-story-high screen. World Golf Village championship golf courses include King & Bear, the only course co-designed by World Golf Hall of Fame members Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus, and the Slammer & Squire, built by Bobby Weed with design consultants Sam Snead and Gene Sarazen, also World Golf Hall of Fame members. Both courses, which have hosted 10 nationally televised broadcasts, combine challenging obstacles with playability for all levels of golfers. The PGA TOUR Golf Academy offers private lessons, clinics and golf schools by top-rated instructors who involve three teaching and video analysis systems into the lessons.

9 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

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PGA  TOUR

2009 Guide

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2009 PGA TOUR OFFICIAL MEDIA GUIDE - Section 9: Additional Information