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Kingussie High School

Senior Course Choice S4 to S6 in Session

2014 - 2015

1


LIST OF CONTENTS

White section

Page No.

Introduction for Parents & Guardians

2/4

The New Qualifications

5/6

Alternative Provision in the Senior Phase

7/8

Recent School Leavers Speak Out

9/10

Qualifications and Careers - Who Can Help ?

11

Support for Pupils

12

Homework Policy

13

Option Information & Choices for 2014-2015

14/15

Senior Choice Option Form

16

Future Planning

17

Colour section SUBJECTS EVERYONE TAKES In S4: English, Maths, PE, RMPS, SE (The majority in S5/6 continue with English & Maths but not all.) OPTION GROUP 1 :

Maths (3-6), Administration (4/5), Biology (5), Design & Manufacture (4/5), Hospitality (4/5), Art & History (6)

Pink

Red

OPTION GROUP 2 :

English (3-6), Music (4/5), Physics (4/5), PE (4-6), Rural Skills (4/5), Travel & Tourism (4/5), Administration (5/6), Biology (6) Blue

OPTION GROUP 3 :

Art (4/5), Biology (4/5), Graphic Communication (4/5) Health & Well-being (4/5), History (4/5), Practical Craft (4) Spanish (4/5), Business Management (5/6), Chemistry (6), PE (6)

Yellow

Chemistry (4/5), Engineering Science (4/5), Geography (4/5) Hospitality (SfW), Modern Studies (4/5), PE (4/5), Psychology (5) Sport & Recreation (4/5), Physics (6), Product Design (6)

Green

English (3-6), Business Management (4/5), Chemistry (4/5), History (4/5), Physics (4/5), French (6), Graphic Com. (6)

White

Maths (3-6), Biology (4), French (4/5), Hospitality (SfW), Practical Craft (4), Geography (6), Modern Studies (6), Music (6)

Gold

OPTION GROUP 4 :

OPTION GROUP 5 :

OPTION GROUP 6:

Employability and ASDAN Award along with Construction Skills and Photography are set in the column to suit the maximum number of pupils. This is also true for Gaidhlig (4-6).

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PROGRESSION

QUALIFICATION

POSITIVE DESTINATION 3


Introduction for Parents & Guardians Choice of Subjects for Senior Phase, especially New Fourth Year (S4) Our Third Year pupils are now approaching the end of their common courses designed to give a broad general education for their first three years of secondary school. They now have to choose a more specialised curriculum resulting in qualifications through the new National Level 3, 4 and 5 awards, and in some cases a National 6 or Higher. This introductory booklet is written initially for the pupils but we hope, of course, that you will be able to join with them in discussing its contents. Current S4 & S5 students should have a clearer idea as to their progression, but the new qualifications make it easier to go back and pick up subjects not previously studied or taken in S4 or S5. Why Are Qualifications Changing? Curriculum for Excellence is the Scottish Government‟s plan to introduce a new way of learning into schools and colleges. CfE, as it is known, is designed to equip young people with the skills and knowledge they need to succeed in the 21st century. National 3 (or Access 3) and National 4 qualifications will be assessed in the school and presentations awarded on the basis of the evidence collected and submitted from the pupils‟ work over the year. This evidence is moderated (checked) by the SQA to ensure there are even standards across Scotland. National 3 equates to the Foundation Level from Standard Grade Exams, while National 4s would approximate to a General Level pass in the previous system. There are no grades within these levels. National 5 courses contain elements assessed in the school, but the qualification is dependent on performance in a nationally conducted exam or assignment which is marked externally by SQA. These awards will be graded A-D, and would be the equivalent of a Credit or Intermediate 2 level. The Higher (National 6) remains the main standard for college and university entry with Advanced Highers (N7) a very useful platform prior to university studies.

Decision Time The decisions which we soon have to make will begin to shape your son or daughter's future and will fix

their school subjects for next session, so we would all wish to give careful consideration to the choices involved. In preparation for this, S3-5 classes will be going through their Option Choice course in Social Education classes with input from the Careers Advisor. Pupils will, meantime, be interviewed individually by their Guidance teacher; and at the end of the choice process we will send you a letter confirming your young person‟s choice of subjects. The Future & Career Choice Although it may be much too early to be choosing a career, pupils are being asked in Social Education classes to consider their individual strengths and interests, and also the career areas which might attract

them, to help with decisions on subject choice. There are excellent websites that give good careers information and support in career planning. Any crossroads in life can lead to doubt and stress. Remember that unless a future career is obvious, options are best kept open. The best qualifications that can be achieved in a broad range of subjects will always keep doors open for the future. 4


Help & Information We hope that your son or daughter will be able to discuss all of these with you as we go along. With quite a lot of information coming your way at this time, you may find it helpful to consider it gradually over the next two weeks. In general, subject preferences should be made on the basis of each pupil's performance, level of interest and commitment, with career or Higher/Further Education intentions also in mind. At this stage, the best advice is probably to go for as broad a range of subjects as possible, thereby giving a sound basis upon which to select subjects at the next choice stage (towards the end of S4 & S5). It is very important that the choices made now in S4 tie in with aspirations for suitable qualifications to be undertaken in S5 and possibly S6. You should have received a letter telling you how to make appointments for the S5/6 Parents' Evening on Wednesday 12th March, at which subject teachers will be available for discussion. Current S4 pupils will receive a full subject report during the week beginning 17th March, giving a clear guide to the current level of study and possible routes for progression. I hope that you will find these preparations useful in helping us all to make the best decisions at this important time. Should there be any specific queries which the booklet is unable to answer, please do not hesitate to contact the school directly (details below), either by e-mail, in writing or by telephone.

Contact Details: Mr O Bray (Head Teacher) Mr K Reid (DHT Curriculum) Mr I Adamson (DHT Pupil Support) Your Child’s Guidance Teacher: Mrs Duthie or Mr Deans E-mail:

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Kingussie High School Ruthven Road Kingussie PH21 1ES Phone: 01540661475 kingussie.high@highland.gov.uk


Information for Pupils, Parents & Guardians

National Qualifications What is a National Qualification? The majority of pupils should have achieved a National 4 or 5 qualifications in their chosen subjects by the end of S4. Some may not be able to cope with this in all their subjects and so presentation for a National (or Access 3) qualification may be appropriate at this stage. Progression in S5 and S6 from N4 to N5 or from N5 to Higher (N6) is the target for many. Some individuals may go straight to Higher (N6) in S4, while Advanced Higher will be appropriate choice for some in S6. How will I learn? You will learn as you have been doing in First through to Third Year, but at a higher level. You will need

to work actively and find out things for yourself using worksheets, books, video recordings, computers, and so on. All the time you will be learning skills which will help you to solve problems, rather than just memorising facts. You will often work in groups, or in pairs, learning to co-operate with other pupils in finding answers to problems; but of course you will still have to work on your own some of the time.

What qualifications will I get? Evidence collected throughout the session will indicate whether you have achieved a National 4 pass and, if you have surpassed this level, whether you will be presented for a National 5 exam in the subject at the end of S4 or at Higher or Advanced Higher in S5 and S6. Level

Grades

Access or National 3

Pass/Fail

National 4

Pass/Fail

National 5

A to D

National 6 (Higher)

A to D

National 7 (Adv. Higher) A to D

As you can see, there is a wide range which is geared to accommodate all levels of abilities at many stages. Performance in S4 will indicate the appropriate course for you in S5, i.e. If you have achieved a grade A/B in National 5 English you will move on to Higher (National 6) in S5. Or, if you have completed your Level 4 in S4 you will move on to National 5 in S5, etc. Who decides my results? For Levels up to National 4, the assessments are conducted within the school. Moderation or checking

by the Scottish Qualification Authority will ensure even standards across the country. For National 5-7, your final examinations in May are marked by SQA externally appointed markers. Remember many courses have internal components which are included in your final grade. It is important to work well over the year and not just at the exam times. All these grades are then combined by the Qualifications Authority to give your final result. 6


How are the results worked out?

Courses will continue to contain work which is assessed and marked throughout the year by teachers as it is at present. For example, teachers will continue to mark assessments such as PE performance and English listening and talking assessments. These are „Units‟ of work which are marked as pass or fail in all National Qualifications. Individual subjects up to National 4 levels will not be graded but marked overall by pass or fail. If a learner fails an end of year assessment/exam, they will receive credit for what they have achieved at that level. This is similar to what currently happens with a number of our qualifications. At National 5, Higher (Nat 6) and Advanced Higher (Nat 7) the end of course exam will be graded as A to D.

If a learner fails this assessment, they will receive credit for the „Units‟ they have achieved at this level. Again, this is similar to what has happened with Intermediate and Higher assessments in the past.

It doesn't sound too difficult - maybe I could get a really good pass if I put in a real last-minute swot? Couldn't be more wrong! You have to work all the time, and are being assessed by your teacher all the time. Enquiring, problem solving and many other activities are going on in class throughout your

course, and you can't pick up a book and simply catch up that way. That's why it's important not to miss parts of the course through avoidable absence - some of the work simply can't be done again, or covered easily at home.

Can my parents help? Yes! Show them the skills you are learning and discuss your courses with them. Ask them to help you with things you are learning - they will be very interested to see how different school now is compared to their own school days. They may help you to arrange a quiet area with a suitable writing surface for study and homework and they'll help you to remember all the important deadlines you will have to meet during the next session.

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Alternative Provision in the Senior Phase As part of our emerging curriculum we are offering a number of alternative options for young people in the senior phase. This includes working extensively with our partners. Some of these opportunities are listed below. An alternative last year at school If you think you are going into your last year of school (regardless of whether it is S4, S5 or S6) we offer an alternative model if you definitely don‟t want to go to university and if you think the normal column structure is unsuitable for you. In this alternative model you will work with us to ensure that you have reached your potential in Maths and English (normally achieving a National 4 or National 5 Award), you will take part in the Inverness College Vocational Pathways Programme (see below), complete one of our Skills for Work awards delivered through our partners (normally Travel and Tourism or Rural Skills) and do regular certificated work based learning (work experience) with a number of local employers. If you are interested in this alternative provision then please see you guidance teacher. Please note that students may need to contribute to their own travel costs to work experience locations and that access to the alternative programme will be assessed on an individual basis. Vocational Pathways Programme (VPP) In partnership with Inverness College UHI we offer a range of Vocational Skills for Work Course at National 4 and National 5. These courses involve being out of school on a Friday and travelling to Inverness. We prefer students to take part in the VPP as part of an alternative provision (please see above) in their last year of school – however we also make exceptions for other students depending on circumstance. The following courses are of offer:  Automotive Skills (National 4)  Energy (National 5)  Construction Crafts (National 4)  Uniformed and Emergency Services (National 5)  Early Education & Childcare (National 4/5)  Performing Engineering Operations (National 4/ 5)  Hairdressing (National 4)  Hairdressing (National 5)  Professional Cookery (NPA at level 4)  Beauty (Introduction course) Any student interested in VPP should discuss what is available and how to apply with their Guidance teacher. Places on the VPP are not guaranteed and students must apply for a place (in the same way that they would apply to go to college). Applying is a useful exercise in itself for students. Pre-Apprentice Training (Engineering) In partnership with Inverness College and Hydrasun (Engineering Company) this is an opportunity for young people in their last year of school to carry out pre-apprenticeship training and gain a Level 2 SVQ in Performing Engineering Operations (PEO). The Level 2 SVQ in Performing Engineering Operations includes National 5 Units on Statutory Regulations and Organisational Safety Requirements, Working Efficiently and Effectively in Engineering, Using and Communicating Technical Information, Mechanical Engineering Drawings using a CAD System, Preparing and Using Lathes for Turning Operations, Preparing and Proving CNC Machine Tool Programs, Preparing and Using CNC Turning Machines and Preparing and Using CNC Milling Machines. Satisfactory completion of all these units will lead to the Level 2 SVQ. The course also includes work experience at Hydrasun. On successful completion of the course, students will be given a guaranteed interview for a full time funded Hydrasun apprenticeship. If students are unsuccessful at the Hydrasun interview they will have automatic entry to a follow up (Level 6 Course) at the college. If you are interested in this alternative provision then please see you guidance teacher.

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Distance Learning (& Saturday morning) Highers – Normally available to S6 only In partnership with Inverness College UHI we also offer a range of Highers via distance learning (and attendance at College on a number of Saturday‟s). These are Highers are ones that we cannot offer in school due to the specialist nature of the staff required. They include:  Higher Sociology  Higher Media  Higher Early Education  Higher Human Biology Each course is delivered online through a virtual learning platform with on-going support from college lecturing staff and support from school mentors. Pupils are expected to dedicate 6 hours of study to the course each week, reading course materials and relevant text book sections, undertaking online exercises and posting responses to tasks and exercises in the discussion board. Students are also required to attend regular Saturday workshops for group work, tutorials and assessments. For a student to gain success in an on-line Higher they need to be incredibly self-motivated, which is why we normally insist they are in S6. We will of course accept requests from other year groups in exceptional circumstances. Any students interested in On-line Highers should speak to their Guidance teacher. Open University Modules – Available in S6 only As part of our efforts to help prepare young people with the skills to go to University we have partnered with the Open University to offer a range of distance learning university modules where students in S6 can opt into a module in parallel with their normal subjects at the school. Places on these courses are not guaranteed and students must apply for a place in the same way that they would apply to go to University. Applying is a useful exercise in itself for students. The Modules are equivalent to a module at SCQF Level 7 (Advanced Higher). A broad range of modules is available including those shown below: Subject Area Business and Management Environment Health and Social Care Law Science

Module Title Introduction to bookkeeping and accounting, Introduction to financial service, The frozen planet Understanding the autism spectrum An introduction to law in contemporary Scotland Maths for science Scientific investigations The frozen planet Living without oil: chemistry for sustainable development Galaxies, stars and planets Volcanoes, Earthquakes and Tsunamis Molecules, medicines and drugs: a chemical story

NOTE: Module entry requirements vary between units. Other units are available but there is a cost involved.

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EXAMPLES OF SOME RECENT SCHOOL LEAVERS It is very difficult to consider a job or career and be certain that it will suit you, especially when you do not really know what particular jobs involve. To help you imagine what might be involved, here are descriptions of their jobs/training courses by five people who left school recently. Note: The individuals involved refer to previous qualifications. An approximate conversion: Standard Grade:

Foundation – National 3 : General – National 4 : Credit – National 5

National Qualifications: Intermediate 1 – National 4 : Intermediate 2 – National 5 : Higher – National 6

Ian - a Trainee Bricklayer I am 16. I have to learn the correct technique of laying bricks and gain a good general knowledge of house building, pipe laying, concrete preparations, etc. I do this by working with the qualified men and paying close attention. To get this job, I had first to pass a test arranged at school by the Construction Skills organisation. This showed that I had an aptitude to do construction work. I was lucky that a local building firm was prepared to take me on as a Modern Apprentice. I have a full-time job and I'm paid the going rate for a trainee bricklayer. I also have to attend college from time to time, usually for a block of four weeks. I enjoy this aspect of Modern Apprentice training. Good things about my job are - I hope that when I am qualified, in another two years, I will be able to earn good money; I am working outside - I could never work in a factory; moving around - we work on several sites in different towns. And you're always working with your mates, and the crack is good. The worst thing is you can be paid off in bad weather, or when nobody's building homes.

Mary - a Business Studies Student I am doing a National Certificate course in Office Studies at Inverness College. It's a one-year course, and it's hard work, but I'm enjoying it. I decided to leave school at the end of S4 - I had eight 'S' Grades, four of them at level 3 - but I didn't think that staying on at school was the thing for me. By coming to college, I can really work at the subject which interests me most - Business Studies and if I do well, I plan to continue next year to hopefully gain further qualifications in the area of Business Administration.

One of the things that I like most about Inverness is the fact that I can live at home and travel each day. I have to get the bus early each morning, but it's quite nice to come home each evening to

home cooking. All in all, I'm glad I left school when I did. It's got me started on a course of study which I like, and I'm looking forward to a good job in an office, or in management, when I finish.

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James - a Medical Student I am in my second year studying medicine at Aberdeen University. To secure a place, I had to achieve five Highers, AAAAB, at first sitting - repeating Highers to upgrade is not favoured because the competition for places is so intense. But, in fact, hopes of a place studying Medicine at university depend on what is achieved at Standard Grade - Credit level is required, most especially in Sciences, Maths and English, so it's important to work hard in all subjects right from the beginning in order to ensure that you get “on track� for the more demanding work in S5/6.You also have to demonstrate aptitude and commitment for Medicine in you university application. Hopefully at the end of another four years of study I will qualify with an MB ChB Degree.

Kirsty - an Engineering Student I count myself as very lucky to have got a place in Engineering at Strathclyde University. I managed to get 5 'H' Grade passes - AABBC - and was really pleased to get in here because Strathclyde has an excellent reputation for engineering, and competition to get in is stiff. I remember someone telling me that you have to start working hard as soon as you start any course, and that's true, especially in S4, because you mostly need to get good grades in order to get into Higher classes, and you need good Highers for university.

I'm really enjoying student life. I live in the student village, which has excellent facilities, and the social life is good. It took a while to get used to the system of work - you are really left on your own, and you have to be responsible for your own studying. Now I'm into the way of things, I'm really enjoying it, and hoping to get a good job at the end of it, when I graduate in four years' time.

Jane - a Hotel Receptionist I am 17, and I work in a big local hotel. When I was younger, I thought that all you needed to be a receptionist was a friendly smile and a good speaking voice for the phone. But they have a complicated booking and accounting system here, and I had to go to Inverness College for a year to learn about these, and about other jobs I'd have to do. To get on the course I needed a minimum of 3 Standard Grade subjects at 3 or above.

You need to have your wits about you on this job - all sorts of situations can arise, and you are the person in the front line dealing with them. That's really why I like it: it's not dull, and I manage to get on well with most people, even the awkward ones.

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WHERE CAN I FIND OUT MORE ABOUT QUALIFICATIONS AND CAREERS? Obviously you will need help and advice when you are considering a career and the necessary qualifications. It's important to be realistic in target setting. Here are some sources of help available to you: 1

Guidance Staff: Mrs Duthie & Mr Deans Mr Bray, Mr Reid, Mr Adamson and Mrs Deans will also be able to help.

2

The Librarian Mrs Topping can help you with all the Careers Information in the library, and of course your subject teachers!

3

The Careers Advisor, Gillian Clark, visits the school most Fridays to support pupils. She may also attend Parents' Meetings in order to speak with interested parents. In your Fourth Year, she will work with Social Education classes and individuals will then have the opportunity to request an interview with her. Senior pupils can arrange appointments in S5 and S6 to check on college, university and job opportunities and required qualifications.

4

The notice-board outside the library has a Careers section; get into the habit of looking at it from time to time. Information about local job opportunities are also advertised in the daily notes when we know about them.

5

Universities and Colleges hold "Open Days". In Fifth Year you will be advised when these are happening, and can visit one or two.

6

Newspapers and magazines advertise careers.

7

Subject teachers: remember all teachers have attended University or College. Speak to them; for example, if you're thinking about a qualification in science, speak to one of the Science staff.

8

Friends and relatives are also a useful source of information; for example, if you are thinking about a job in a bank and one of your dad's or mum's friends works in a bank, try and speak to him or her to get a first-hand description of the job.

The more effort you put into finding out about qualifications and careers, the more beneficial it will be to you. Don't be afraid to ask for help or advice.

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SUPPORT AT ALL LEVELS Learning Support The Support for Learning Department supports pupils with Additional Support Needs, including Specific Learning Difficulties, in the following ways: -

by providing advice on course choices from the S3 Option Choice stage, in consultation with Guidance staff, parents, subject teachers, and, where relevant, the Educational Psychologist;

-

by supporting pupils a) in mainstream classes, where relevant and possible and b) in the Learning Base where extra support is provided for National course work, in consultation with subject teachers;

-

by providing information and advice on materials, methods etc. to subject teachers, with regard to pupils with Additional Support Needs, including Specific Learning Difficulties;

-

by liaising with subject teachers and Guidance staff in monitoring the progress of pupils with Additional Support Needs;

-

by working towards National level or Access level courses in English and Maths with individual /small groups of pupils, in the Learning Base, when circumstances are such that a pupil(s) cannot cope with the pace/level of mainstream work;

-

by carrying out all necessary steps to ensure that pupils who require Special Assessment Arrangements in SQA assessments, have those arrangements organised for them;

-

by ensuring that pupils who require special arrangements, have the opportunity to practise with these arrangements;

-

by providing access to technology for National Course Investigations, Folios and the like, e.g. PCs in the Learning Support Department, laptop computers for classroom use, dictaphone for audio work;

-

by providing the opportunity for pupils who spend time in the Learning Base, to learn and get practice with word processing skills which can be used in their work.

Where participation in the full range of National Level courses in mainstream is not appropriate, such pupils benefit from the support provided in the Learning Base for the National Level courses which they are following. Where relevant or necessary, this work is combined with suitable Life Skills courses.

Where attainment at National Level 3/4 may be considered doubtful, Access courses at relevant levels may be introduced to meet individual needs.

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THE IMPORTANCE OF HOME LEARNING There may, naturally, be a gradual increase in the amount of homework issued in senior phase compared to S1-3, although this will vary from subject to subject depending upon topics being studied at any given time, and the level at which the pupil is being presented. Several departments have made particular mention of homework in the next section of this booklet in an attempt to explain the various forms it can take in relation to individual subjects. Included below is information taken from our school policy - Homework - Guide for Parents (currently under review) which seeks to explain the purposes of homework and suggest why it is regarded as such an important aspect of certificate courses. Although under review, it does not alter the fact that homework is very important in all aspects of learning. Homework is an essential part of academic work in school. It can also be fun and provide parents with an opportunity to interact with their child‟s learning. Pupils in all years can expect to have homework, i.e. work to learn, an exercise or piece of investigative work to complete, or a more formal written exercise. Homework is an essential part of education in Kingussie High School. The purposes are to:  

Complete, extend, practise or revise classwork Allow pupils and teachers to see how well pupils are understanding their work Inform parents regarding course content and progress, and involve parents on appropriate occasions

We normally give at least one week‟s notice of major written homework (except for routine, almost daily items and a revision of work done in class). We ask departments to issue the minimum essential homework in the brief period prior to examinations. This enables pupils to plan their own revision in consultation with subject teachers. The amount of homework increases a pupil progresses through the school with most, naturally, associated with studies for National Level assessments and examinations. Homework works best when pupils, parents and teachers work together for the benefit of the pupil. By senior school, the pupil should be taking full responsibility for organizing and planning homework. On the way to doing so, parents are asked to:a) b) c) d) e)

Arrange a warm, quiet place suitable for doing homework that is away from distractions such as TV Give encouragement and support Chat about homework diaries and deadlines with your child – with sensitivity of course ! If requested by the teacher, the homework is countersigned by the parent or guardian. Contact Guidance Staff if a problem arises.

The secret of successful homework lies of course in planning. We issue a Homework Diary free to all pupils at the beginning of each year. This should be carried by pupils every day – teachers expect them. If lost, like a jotter, it must be replaced – £1 from Guidance Staff. Pupils can use their diary to plan their homework and negotiate with staff to distribute homework so that there is less chance of „pile-ups‟ or over-hastily done tasks. To enable pupils in senior phase to plan their studies and exam revision systematically over the whole session, and to inform parents of what is involved, departments issue their students with a plan of critical deadlines for the main SQA items and other pieces of work. Regular, planned homework sessions appear to suit most pupils.

It cannot be over-emphasised that much of the SQA assessment at the end of National Courses depends on homework completed during the session. Likewise, it is expected that all pupils taking any given course will complete the required homework on time and to the best of their ability. 14


OPTION CHOICES Provisional option groups for 2014-2015 are shown below so that you can consider possible choices. By around April we will confirm the list of subjects we can offer you. Kingussie High School offers courses, some of which are School-based, most of which lead you to the national level assessment and qualifications as described in the previous pages. In addition to English, Maths and PE, RMPS (Religious & Moral and Philosophical Studies) and SE, the option groups are designed so that pupils satisfy the guidelines about maintaining a broad, general education at Kingussie High School without over specialisation in any one area of the curriculum. This means a suggested maximum (especially in S4) from the column choices of 2 Science subjects, 2 Technical subjects, a Modern Language, 2 Creative & Aesthetic subjects (Art, Music, PE), 2 Social Subjects and so forth. In this way pupil options can be structured to ensure a continued broad general education. As you will appreciate, formation of classes will go ahead wherever possible but of course has to depend on pupil numbers and on qualified staff being available at suitable times.

Option Sheet 2014-2015 All S4 pupils study English & Maths at the appropriate level. Core Physical Education has a national entitlement of 2 periods per week, while Social Education and Religious and Moral Education are included for all S4 along with the PE. All are asked choose one subject from each of the groups below. New S6 may select subjects in five out of the six columns. The same subject (AT DIFFERENT LEVELS) appear in different columns – check the appropriate level for you. Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

Maths 3 - 6 Administration 4/5 Biology 5 Design & Manufacture 4/5 Biology 5 Hospitality 4/5 Art 6 History 6

RED SECTION

English 3-6 Music 4/5 Physical Education 4/5/6 Physics 4/5 Rural Skills 4/5 Travel & Tourism 4/5 Administration 5/6 Biology 6

BLUE SECTION

Art 4/5 Biology 4/5 Graphic Communication 4/5 Health & Well-being 4/5 History 4/5 Practical Craft 4 Spanish 4/5 Business Management 5/6 Chemistry 6 Physical Education 6

YELLOW SECTION

Chemistry 4/5 Engineering Science 4/5

GREEN SECTION 15


Col. 4 cont.

Geography 4/5 Hospitality 5-Skills for Work Modern Studies 4/5 Physical Education 4/5 Psychology 5 Sport & Recreation 4/5 – S5/6 Only Physics 6 Product Design 6

Column 5

English 3-6 Business Management 4/5 Chemistry 4/5 History 4/5 Physics 4/5 French 6 Graphic Communication 6

Column 6

WHITE SECTION

Maths 3-6 Biology 4 French 4/5 Hospitality 5-Skills for Work Practical Craft 4 Geography 6 Modern Studies 6 Music 6

GOLD SECTION

Employability and ASDAN Award along with Construction Skills and Photography are set in the column to suit the maximum number of pupils. This is also true for Gaidhlig. Advanced Highers (N7) are placed in a column appropriate to the circumstances – this may be at the same time as the Higher class, in a column which best suits the students or in a mixture of periods. This very much depends on staff availability and student demand.

Note: S4 pupils in Columns 1 and 6 will be taking PE, RMPS and SE for 1 of these periods – therefore a 4 period a week column for National 4 & 5 courses.

Option forms must be returned by Wednesday March 26th – late submissions may affect your possible placement in a subject where there is an oversubscription of requests compared to the maximum class size. If you have a problem, discuss it with your Guidance Teacher – don’t just leave it to chance! YOUR FUTURE – YOUR INTERESTS – YOUR JOB

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INTO the SENIOR PHASE - Session 2014/15 Name: ………………………………………………………………….

Reg. Class (current): …………………

It's now time to get down to deciding your choices for S4-6. Please read the information in the options booklet and below carefully. What to do next:• think about which subjects you may wish to take on into next session. • think about job/career/college/university - what are you really aiming for ? • talk to your Guidance teacher - ask about talking with the Careers Adviser if you are really unsure about what to do next. • talk with your teachers and ask for their advice and comments about what you are thinking of doing. • talk to your parents/guardian asap ! • Complete all the optional sections and sign your name at the foot of the page. Please ask your parent/guardian to counter-sign the form before you return it.

Choose one from each column below* and then return this form to your Guidance Teacher no later than Wednesday 26 March 2014

New S4 and S5 must have 6 columns filled – * New S6 can opt for just five

Column 1

Column 2

Column 3

Column 4

:

N6 = Higher, N7 = Advanced Higher

Column 5

Column 6

Maths 3-4

English 3/4

Art 4/5

Chemistry 4/5

English 3/4

Maths 3-4

Maths 5

English 5

Biology 4/5

English 5

Maths 5

Administration 4/5 Biology 5

Music 4/5

Graph Com. 4/5 Health & WB 4/5 History 4/5

Engineering Science 4/5 Geography 4/5

Business Man. 4/5 Chemistry 4/5

Biology 4 French 4/5

History 4/5

Hospitality 5

Design & Manufacture 4/5 Hospitality 4/5 Maths 6

Physics 4/5 PE 4/5 Rural Skills 4/5

Hospitality 5 (Skills for Work)

Practical Craft 4 Spanish 4/5

Modern Studies 4/5 PE 4/5

Physics 4/5

Psychology 5

English 6

Practical Craft 4 Maths 6

(Higher)

(Higher)

French 6

Geography 6

(Skills for Work)

Business Man. 5/6 (Inc. Higher) Chemistry 6

Sport & Rec. 4/5 Physics 6

(Higher)

(Higher)

History 6

Travel & Tourism 4/5 Administration 5/6 (Inc. Higher) Biology 6

Graph Com. 6

(Higher)

(Higher)

(Higher)

(Higher)

(Higher)

English 6

PE 6

(Higher)

(Higher)

Product Design 6 (Higher)

Modern Studies 6 (Higher) Music 6

(Higher)

Art 6 (Higher)

(Higher)

PE 6 (Higher)

Employability & ASDAN : Photography : Construction Skills, Gaidhlig (Levels 4-6) and Psychology (Level 6) act as „floaters‟ – column to suit majority of pupil choices. Open Learning @ N6 (Higher), N7 (AH) may be available on request. Notes: Column preference for options like Gaidhlig or AH courses:

Signed: …………………………………………. Guidance Teacher Pupil: ……………………………… Parent/Guardian: ………………………….. 17

PTO if required


The Future - Into S5 or S6 Session 2015-16 We are currently developing the „new lookâ€&#x; curriculum, but it is difficult to predict the level and the nature of the staffing which will be available to us by the session starting in August 2015. All pupils entering S4/5 at this stage should be able to find the subject of their choice at the appropriate level for them, but there is always the possibility that a clash will occur. This is nothing new! In a school of this size, there are occasional difficulties for some students in matching their subject choices. As in the past, it may be necessary for an individual to look at their S5 and S6 together as a unit to obtain the qualifications they would wish for in their preferred subjects. It is important that students look to the future and try to plan which qualifications will best suit them in their future life and the ones that allow the progression to obtain the qualifications which will allow them to reach the desired positive destination.

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SUBJECTS EVERYONE TAKES Religious, Moral and Philosophical Studies The new look curriculum has given us the opportunity to re-think the delivery of RMPS and link this very clearly with issues relating to global citizenship – an important theme across the school. This session, all S4-6 pupils will have ‘whole school time’ which will include weekly assemblies with guest speakers on matters of religion and morality, especially where there is a connection to current and topical news stories.

Social Education The Social Education programme follows Regional guidelines and aims to promote the personal and social development of our pupils by providing information and developing skills in areas such as Leadership Skills, Study, Health, Careers, Citizenship, Work Experience, and Job-seeking.

CORE PE Two periods per week of physical activity for all S4 pupils. In S5 and S6 this becomes optional with the variety of PE courses on offer.

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English Purpose and aims of National 3, National 4, National 5 and Higher English Why English? Being able to read, speak and write well in English is the key to success in many aspects of life and work. Skills in English are important in many school/college /university subjects and essential in many occupations. This course provides you with purposeful reading, writing, talking and listening. These activities enable you to enjoy English Literature and Language in prose, poetry, drama and media.

These Courses aim to enable learners to develop the ability to: • • • • •

listen, talk, read and write, as appropriate to purpose, audience and context. understand, analyse and evaluate texts, as appropriate to purpose and audience in the contexts of literature, language and media. create and produce texts, as appropriate to purpose, audience and context. plan and research, integrating and applying language skills as appropriate to purpose, audience and context . apply knowledge of language.

National 3 Course structure & conditions of award This Course is made up of three mandatory Units. Unit 1 Understanding Language (National 3) The purpose of this Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop listening and reading skills in the contexts of literature, language and media. Learners develop the skills needed to understand, analyse and evaluate simple texts. Unit 2 Producing Language (National 3) The purpose of this Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in familiar contexts. Learners develop the skills needed to produce simple texts in both written and oral forms. Unit 3 Literacy (National 3) The purpose of this Unit is to develop the learners’ reading, writing, listening and talking skills in a variety of forms relevant for learning, life and work. Learners develop the ability to understand simple ideas and information presented orally and in writing. Learners develop the ability to communicate ideas and information orally and in writing with technical accuracy. All assessed pieces of work for this unit must be undertaken independently and without teacher assistance. Conditions of award: To achieve the National 3 English Course, learners must pass all of the required Units. National 3 Courses are internally assessed and are graded as a pass or a fail. 20


National 4 Entry to the course: At the discretion of the English Department and the school but you would be expected to have obtained a pass at National 3 English or successfully completed any coursework and assessments set by the English Department in S.3. Course structure & conditions of award This Course is made up of four mandatory Units. Unit 1 Analysis and Evaluation (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop listening and reading skills in the contexts of literature, language and media. Learners develop the skills needed to understand, analyse and evaluate straightforward texts. Unit 2 Creation and Production (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in familiar contexts. Learners develop the skills needed to create and produce straightforward texts in both written and oral forms. Unit 3 Literacy (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to develop the learners’ reading, writing, listening and talking skills in a variety of forms relevant for learning, life and work. Learners develop the ability to understand straightforward ideas and information presented orally and in writing. Learners also develop the ability to communicate ideas and information orally and in writing with technical accuracy. All assessed pieces of work for this unit must be undertaken independently and without teacher assistance. Unit 4 Added Value Unit: English Assignment (National 4) The purpose of this Added Value Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to apply their language skills to investigate and report on a chosen topic. Reporting the chosen topic will cover writing, reading, talking and listening. Conditions of award To achieve the National 4 English Course, learners must pass all of the required Units, including the Added Value Unit. National 4 Courses are internally assessed and are graded as a pass or a fail.

National 5 Entry to the Course: While entry is at the discretion of the English Department and the school, students are expected to have shown the ability to complete coursework, homework and assessments in S3 to a high standard. Alternatively students may have attained a good pass at National 4 or a B or above at Intermediate 1. Even if the National 4 result is a pass, where the majority of work in S4 has been at a lower level, the Department reserves the right to advise the student to select a more appropriate course or option. Effort and attitude during S3 or during the National 4 course, along with performance in the Literacy Unit and achievement in the other mandatory Units, will determine whether a student should be attempting National 5. It is sometimes more appropriate to gain National 5 English over the space of two years, by taking Units in S5 and then sit the exam in S6. 21


Course structure & conditions of award This Course is made up of two mandatory Units and an external exam. Unit 1 Analysis and Evaluation (National 5) The purpose of this Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop listening and reading skills in the contexts of literature, language and media. Learners develop the skills needed to understand, analyse and evaluate detailed texts. The texts studied must include Scottish texts. Unit 2 Creation and Production (National 5) The purpose of this Unit is to provide learners with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in a range of contexts. Learners develop the skills needed to create and produce detailed texts in both written and oral forms. Conditions of award To gain the award of the Course, the learner must pass both of the Units as well as the Course assessment. Course assessment (exam) structure Component 1 Reading question paper: 70 marks (out of a total of 100 marks.) This is 70% of the overall marks for the Course assessment. This question paper has two Sections. Section 1 Titled ‘Reading for Understanding, Analysis, and Evaluation’ will have 30 marks. This assessment will involve learners answering questions to show reading skills in understanding, analysis and evaluation to one unseen non-fiction text. Section 2 Titled ‘Critical Reading’ will have 40 marks. This Section has two Parts. Part 1 Learners will apply their understanding, analysis and evaluation skills to previously studied Scottish texts from the specified list. An extract from each writer will be provided. Candidates will select an extract and answer questions. Part 2 Learners will apply their understanding, analysis and evaluation skills to previously studied texts from the following contexts: drama, prose, poetry, film and TV, or language by selecting one question and writing one critical essay. In each part, learners must cover a different genre. Twenty marks will be awarded for each of the two parts. Component 2 Portfolio of Writing: 30 marks – The portfolio will comprise the production by learners of two pieces of extended writing. One text will be broadly creative and the other broadly discursive. Fifteen marks will be awarded for each essay or piece of writing.

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HIGHER Entry to the Course: While entry is at the discretion of the school, following research from the Scottish Qualifications Authority, students must have attained an A or B award at National 5 or a B or above at Intermediate 2. Even if the National 5/Intermediate 2 result is a B, where the majority of the work in S4 or S5 has been at a lower level, the Department reserves the right to advise the student to attempt a more appropriate course. It is sometimes more appropriate to attempt to gain Higher English over the space of two years by taking the National 5 course in S5 and then the Higher course in S6. A pupil who obtains a C or a D at National 5 or Intermediate 2 will be expected follow the National 5 Course with a view to achieving an A or B award at that level before progressing to Higher. Assessment Internal Assessment Arrangements for internal assessment of these two units will be as follows. An indication of timeallocation is given. Language Study One assessment of Close Reading (1 hour), done under controlled conditions. One assessment of Writing (on-going within the unit) which will consist of one essay of at least 650 words (and a maximum of 1300 words) from expressive, creative or report genre. Literary Study One assessment of Textual Analysis (45 minutes), done under controlled conditions (based on a previously unseen text (prose, poetry or drama) which may or may not be Scottish). Writing Folio This will consist of two essays done under controlled conditions. One will be of a broadly creative nature (for example, a reflective or imaginative piece) and one of a broadly discursive nature (for example, an argumentative essay or a report). Each piece (with the exception of poetry) must be at least 650 words and no more than 1300 words in length. This Folio must be completed and ready to send away to the SQA by the end of March. External Assessment External assessment will consist of examination papers and the submission of folio material. There will be two examination papers. The first paper, entitled “Close Reading”, will contain two passages, and have a time allocation of 1 hour 45 minutes. The second paper, entitled “Critical Essay”, will require candidates to answer two Critical Essay questions, and have a time allocation of 1 hour 30 minutes. Examinations will continue to be “closed book” (i.e. without access to texts).

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Mathematics Aims Mathematics is important in everyday life, allowing us to make sense of the world around us and to manage our lives. Using mathematics enables us to model real-life situations and make connections and informed predictions. It equips us with the skills we need to interpret and analyse information, simplify and solve problems, assess risk and make informed decisions. National 4 and National 5 Mathematics The Courses aim to: • motivate and challenge learners by enabling them to select and apply straightforward mathematical techniques in a variety of mathematical and real-life situations • develop confidence in the subject and a positive attitude towards further study in mathematics • enable the use of numerical data and abstract terms and develop the idea of generalisation • allow learners to interpret, communicate and manage information in mathematical form; skills which are vital to scientific and technological research and development • develop the learner’s skills in using mathematical language and to explore straightforward as well as more complex mathematical ideas • develop skills relevant to learning, life and work in an engaging and enjoyable way Lifeskills Mathematics For some pupils it would be more appropriate for them to follow National 3, 4 or 5 Lifeskills Mathematics. These courses develop confidence in being able to handle mathematical processes and information in a range of real-life contexts. The courses also enable learners to make informed decisions based on data presented in a variety of forms. The mathematical skills within the courses are underpinned by numeracy and are designed to develop learners’ skills in mathematical reasoning relevant to learning, life and work. HIGHER Purpose The aim of this course is to build upon and extend students’ mathematical learning in the areas of algebra, geometry and trigonometry and to introduce students to elementary calculus. Mathematics 1 (H) and Mathematics 2 (H) and Mathematics 3 (H) are progressive units. Recommended Entry While entry is at the discretion of the school, students would normally be expected to have attained an Intermediate 2 grade A or National 5 grade A or B. Course Details 24


The course is made up of three 40 hour units plus 40 hours flexible time. Unit – Title, Length and Brief Description Mathematics 1 (H) 40 hours This unit includes the gradient and equation of the straight line, sketching and identifying related functions and graphics, composite functions, solution of trigonometric equations, basic differentiation and recurrence relationships. Mathematics 2 (H) 40 hours The content of this unit covers quadratic theory and the Remainder Theorem, basic integration, use of the addition formulae in trigonometry and the equation of a circle and tangency. Mathematics 3 (H) 40 hours Mathematics 3 (H) contains vectors in three dimension and the scalar product, further differentiation and integration, properties of exponential and logarithmic functions and further trigonometric relations. Assessment This course is assessed by a combination of internal assessment by the teacher and an external examination set and marked by the Scottish Qualifications Authority. Progression Successful completion of this course may lead to Advanced Higher Mathematics.

MATHEMATICS: ADVANCED HIGHER While entry to the course is at the teacher’s discretion, students would normally be expected to have attained a good pass in their Higher Mathematics (A or B). The advanced Higher course is excellent preparation for students who either wish to follow a Mathematics course at University or a course which has a high Maths content e.g. Physics or Engineering. The course consists of 3 units and topics include Further Calculus, Complex Numbers and Matrix Algebra to name just a few.

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COLUMN 1 For Mathematics National 3-6 See previous pages

Administration & IT National 4 The purpose of this Course is to develop learners’ administrative and IT skills and to enable them to contribute to the effective functioning of organisations. The Course aims to enable learners to:    

develop a basic understanding of administration in the workplace and key legislation affecting employees develop an appreciation of good customer care develop IT skills and use them to perform straightforward administrative tasks acquire organisational skills in the context of organising and supporting small-scale events

The Course contains a significant practical component and uses real-life contexts, making it relevant to the world of work, developing IT skills in an administration-related context.

National 5 The purpose of this Course is to develop learners’ administrative and IT skills and to enable them to contribute to the effective functioning of organisations in administrative positions. The Course aims to enable learners to:    

develop an understanding of administration in the workplace and key legislation affecting both organisations and employees develop an understanding of good customer care and its benefits to organisations develop IT skills and use them to perform administrative tasks acquire organisational skills in the context of organising and supporting events

The Course contains a significant practical component and uses real-life contexts, making it relevant to the world of work, developing IT skills in an administration-related context, enabling learners to work towards industry standard in IT in an administration-related context.

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Biology Biology, the study of living things, plays a crucial role in our everyday existence and is an increasingly important subject in the modern world. Recent scientific advances have made this varied subject more exciting and relevant than ever. Skills needed: The study of biology requires a complete commitment to detailed learning across a wide variety of topics. It suits candidates who have an independent approach to studying, are confident using their literacy skills and recalling facts. See the SQA Biology webpages for more information: www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/45723.html

National 5 Unit Content Cell Biology 

Cell structure, transport across cell membranes, producing new cells, DNA and the production of proteins, proteins and enzymes, genetic engineering, photosynthesis and respiration.

Multicellular Organisms 

Cells, tissues and organs, stem cells and meristems, control and communication, reproduction, variation and inheritance

Life on Earth 

Biodiversity and the distribution of life, energy in ecosystems, sampling techniques and measurement of abiotic and biotic factors, adaptation, natural selection and the evolution of species and human impact on the environment

Entry Requirements   

National 5 Biology course recommendation from S3 Or National 4 Biology qualification and a pass in the National 4 Exam Or Recommendation of PT Science

SQA Assessment All unit assessments (experimental report, research report and written tests) must be passed to gain the qualification. The grade awarded (A – D) is determined by an Assignment Report and a Final Exam.

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Hospitality Practical Cookery National Level 5 This course which is practical and experimental in nature, develops a range of cookery skills and food preparation techniques as well as planning, organisational and time management skills in hospitality-related contexts. Through its emphasis on safety and hygiene it will ingrain in learners the ability to follow safe and hygienic practices in all cookery contexts. It also develops the thinking skills of remembering, understanding and applying aspects of numeracy.

The content of the course goes into more depth than areas covered in national level 4 and comprises of three mandatory units: 1 2 3

Cookery Skills, Techniques and Processes (National 5) Understanding and Using ingredients (National 5) Organisational Skills for Cooking (National 5)

The candidate will also have to pass a practical course assessment which is graded.

National Level 4 This course is designed for those who are interested in food and cooking and who enjoy being creative with food. It also develops their organisational skills which are very important in a variety of contexts. This course prepares learners for life in terms of how to prepare and cook food for themselves and others. The content of the course enables learners to:     

Use a range of cookery skills, food preparation techniques and cookery processes when following recipes. Select and using ingredients to produce and garnish or decorate dishes. Develop an understanding of ingredients and their uses and an awareness of responsible sourcing. Develop an awareness of current dietary advice relating to the use of ingredients. Work safely and hygienically

The course comprises of the following four mandatory units: 1 2 3 4

Cookery Skills, Techniques and Processes (National 4) Understanding and Using ingredients (National 4) Organisational Skills for Cooking (National 4) Producing a Meal (National 4)

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ART AND DESIGN HIGHER The Creative Industries are a massive part of the worldwide economy and offer a huge range of career prospects including; fine artist; architect; drafter; architectural renderer; landscape architect; urban planner; product designer; jewellery designer; fashion designer; fabric designer; interior designer; decorator; furniture designer; stained glass artist; graphic designer; package designer; layout artist; art copy writer; freelance illustrator; children’s book illustrator; fashion illustrator; scientific illustrator; arts administration; gallery installer; staff/ artist liaison; mural artist; painting restorer; art buyer; art critic; art historian; art librarian; art educator; artist in residence; art therapist; tattoo artist; beautician; hairdresser; museum curator; museum director; museum educational staff; museum exhibition designer; fine art photographer; photojournalist; wedding /events photographer; website designer; audio visual designer (presentations); graphic designer; film animator; film maker; cinematographer; museum exhibition designer; display designer; conceptual artist While the Art and Design courses offered in school can never cover all of these areas they do teach learners transferrable skills useful to all of the above including; drawing, general visual awareness, compositional awareness, colour awareness, use of material, use of a variety of techniques, the balance between function and aesthetics, target audience awareness, research technique, presentation technique, working to a design brief, how to still be creative whilst working within confines etc.

HIGHER (& ADVANCED HIGHER) These courses aim to provide all S5/6 students with the opportunity to study Art and Design at a level appropriate to their ability/experience. The appropriate entry levels are as follows: COURSE

ENTRY LEVEL

HIGHER National 5 ADVANCED HIGHER Higher Art N.B. If students have not done Art and Design in S4/5 the entry level will be at the discretion of the Head of Department following discussion with the student.

HIGHER Course Components This course is made up of 3 units. EXPRESSIVE ACTIVITY eg Portrait or Still Life (Practical) DESIGN ACTIVITY

eg Graphic Design or Jewellery Design,

ART & DESIGN STUDIES

The study of the work artists and designers working in areas (Written) related to the students own practical work.

Assessment Proportion of marks for the course. COURSE

PRACTICAL

WRITTEN

Higher

73%

27% 30


History HIGHER Course Aims History is the perfect subject if you are interested in past events and people, bringing the past to life and learning more about Scottish and world cultures. This course allows us to understand events better, how they link to the present day, why our world is the way it is and, to understand better how events have shaped Scotland’s society and culture. Learning about the history and culture of Scotland allows you to prepare for your place in a diverse and inclusive Scotland. You will also develop your ability to understand complex sources; form purposeful arguments and research topics of interest to a higher level. Content Higher History will cover three units over the year. Germany We study: the growth of nationalism in the Germanic states; how the obstacles against 1815 -1939 nationalism were overcome; the unification of Germany by 1871; the rise of the Nazi party and how the Nazis maintained power in pre-war Germany. Britain We study: how Britain developed into a Modern Economy; how women won greater 1851 - 1928 political equality by 1928; the Liberals and the successes and failures of the welfare state and the effectiveness of Labour social welfare reforms. Migration We study: population movement which led to social and economic change; the main and Empire reasons why Scots migrated and emigrated; how immigrants to Scotland were treated; the 1830 - 1939 impact that Scots had on the development of the British Empire and the effects that migration and Empire had on Scotland. Learning and Teaching Approaches We will use different learning techniques and activities during this course. You can expect to carry out independent research, give presentations, complete creative tasks, use the internet, work with others, watch documentaries and carry out classwork. We will also continue to think about our learning, reflect on successes, make plans for improvement and keep working towards new goals. Assessment Higher History will involve unit assessments for each of the three parts of the course. The assessments will test both knowledge and understanding, as well as source analysis skills. These will be scheduled when you are ready and you can re-sit the assessments. These assessments are mandatory in order to sit the final exam. You will work towards researching and producing an individual assignment on a topic of your choice from the course. This will be done with plenty of support and with a combination of classwork and homework. This assignment will be written up under exam conditions and is externally marked by the SQA. This is worth a third of your final grade. Finally, you will sit an exam at the end of the year and this is worth two thirds of your final grade. The exam paper includes a mix of extended responses and source analysis questions. The paper lasts for 2 hours and 20 minutes. Higher History really tests your ability to successfully communicate an argument in writing and understand complex sources. 31


COLUMN 2 For English National 3-6 See insert before column 1

MUSIC National 4 and National 5 These courses will offer students the opportunity to study music through three main strands – primarily performing but also listening and composing. Throughout the session students will develop a technique on two instruments or one instrument and voice. They must be committed to practice at home on a regular basis. For the listening element of the course, pupils will study a wide range of genres of music and aspects of this will link to the composing element of the course. Performing Skills Performing on two instruments or one instrument or voice, both at a minimum of or grade 3 (National 5) 60 marks Listening Question Paper 40 marks Assessment • •

Performing Skills (N4 and 5) Pupils will be recorded regularly to gather a folio of evidence of the progression in performing. Added Value Unit: The National 5 external exam is conducted by a visiting examiner in February/March. Pupils have to prepare an 8 minute performance on 2 instruments. National 4 pupils prepare the same length of programme and this is recorded under exam conditions. Listening : For National 5 pupils, this is assessed through a Question Paper during the May/June SQA exams as well as a series of end of unit assessments. National 4 pupils are required to sit several shorter listening exams throughout the year. Composing: This is a folio prepared by pupils at all levels displaying their ability to compose short pieces of music in a variety of styles.

Recommended Entry Pupils who have not studied Music previously or have not sat external board exams may be considered for National 4 or 5 depending on their practical ability and motivation. Int 2/H depending on their practical ability and motivation – this can be negotiated with the Department. Progression Successful completion of the course may lead to: •

Higher/Advanced Higher Music

A Music related course at College/University 32


Physics Through learning in physics, learners develop their interest in and understanding of the Universe. They engage in a wide range of investigative tasks, which allows them to develop important skills to become creative, inventive and enterprising, in a world where the skills and knowledge developed by physics are needed across all sectors of society. Skills needed: The study of physics requires the ability to imagine abstract concepts and the determination to understand theory that is sometimes challenging. It is suited to candidates who are confident with their mathematical skills and good at explaining ideas. See the SQA webpages for more information: www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/45729.html

National 4 Unit Content Dynamics and Space 

Speed and acceleration, relationships between forces, motion and energy, satellites and space

Electricity and Energy 

Generation of electricity, electrical power, electromagnetism, practical electrical and electronic circuits, kinetic theory of gases

Waves and Radiation 

Wave characteristics, sound, electromagnetic spectrum and nuclear radiation

Entry Requirements 

National 4 Physics course recommendation from S3 Or  Recommendation of PT Science SQA Assessment: All unit assessments (experimental report, research report and written tests) and an Added Value project report must be passed to gain the qualification.

National 5 Unit Content Dynamics and Space  Scalars and vectors, kinematics, Newton’s Laws, space exploration and cosmology Electricity and Energy  Electric circuits, Ohm’s Law, electronics, energy conservation, temperature, specific heat capacity and the gas laws Waves and Radiation  Wave properties, refraction, dosimetry and nuclear reactions Entry Requirements  National 5 Physics course recommendation from S3 Or  National 4 Physics qualification and a pass in the National 4 Exam Or  Recommendation of PT Science SQA Assessment All unit assessments (experimental report, research report and written tests) must be passed to gain the qualification. The grade awarded (A – D) is determined by an Assignment Report and a Final Exam. 33


Physical Education National 5 Aims of the course: The main purpose of the course is to develop and demonstrate movement and performance skills in physical activities. By engaging in practical activities, learners can demonstrate initiative, decision making and problem-solving. The central theme of the course is to develop approaches to enhance performance through monitoring and evaluation. The course is made up of the 2 units and course assessment stated and explained below. To achieve National 5 Pupils must pass Units 1 and 2 and then the course assessment is graded A-D and marked externally. Unit 1: Performance Skills: The aim of this unit is to develop learners’ ability to perform in physical activities by allowing them to acquire a comprehensive range of movement and performance skills. They will learn to select, use and demonstrate these skills. To be presented for National 5 pupils must be at National 5 level in 2 practical activities. Unit 2: Factors impacting on Performance: The aim of this unit is to develop learners’ knowledge and understanding of the factors that impact on performance in physical activities. Learners will consider the effects of mental, emotional, social and physical factors on performance. Although some elements of this unit are completed in practical there will be classroom based sessions as there currently are in Higher. Course Assessment: Performance and Portfolio: Performance is marked out of 60. It is based on your performance in one activity on a one off basis but marks are also awarded for planning and preparing for the activity as well as evaluating your performance after the activity. The portfolio that pupils complete is marked out of 40 and sent away to the SQA for marking. The main purpose of the portfolio is to provide evidence of the process involved in planning for personal performance development.

National 4 Aims of the Course: The main purpose of the Course is to develop, demonstrate and improve practical and performance skills in physical activities. The Course also provides an opportunity to support the way that individual attitudes, values and behaviours are formed. By engaging in practical activities pupils can demonstrate initiative, decision making and problem solving. Pupils will learn about the impact on their performance of physical, mental, emotional and social factors. The course is made up of the 3 units below: Unit 1: Performance Skills: This unit is designed to improve your level of performance, in a number of Physical activities/sport. (You will be assessed through 2)

34


Unit 2: Factors Impacting on Performance This unit explores factors which impact on engagement and performance in physical activities. You will investigate how you can develop your performance in one physical activity through the development of 3 main areas - application of skills, improved fitness and ability to apply tactics and strategies. You will reflect on and monitor your progress. Although some elements of this unit are completed in practical there will be classroom based sessions as there currently are in Higher. Unit 3: Physical Education: Performance In this unit you will have the opportunity to apply your skills and knowledge previously gained to further improve your performance in 1 activity. The (Added value unit) is the pupil’s opportunity to prepare for and carry out a performance in a physical activity looking not only at performance but also planning, preparation and evaluation. To achieve National 4, learners must pass all of the Units, including the Added Value Unit. The course as other National 4 courses are, is internally assessed on a Pass/Fail basis.

HIGHER Purpose This course will offer students the opportunity to study, participate and train regularly at a challenging and rewarding level. It is an ideal course for those students who are motivated by a physical challenge and would relish the opportunity to better their physical fitness and understanding of how to improve performance. Performance element is the central theme of the course where students will be engaged in experiential studies that are focused on improving performance in three different activities and areas. Pupils will study three areas of analysis covering three different activities. Preparation of the body studied through football/shinty/hockey, skills and techniques through badminton and structures and strategies through basketball. Course Structure The course comprises two mandatory units: Physical Education: Performance The teacher internally assesses this in performance-based lessons. Pupils will be marked out of 20 on their two best activities. The performance mark is worth 40% of the students’ final grade. Physical Education: Analysis and Development of Performance This unit is assessed externally and is based on a written exam in May. The unit makes up 60% of the students’ final mark. Recommended Entry Due to the demanding practical nature of the subject, particularly at Higher level, entry to the course is still at the discretion of the PE department. However, students would normally be expected to have attained at least one of the following: • • •

An A or B at National 5 Other relevant prior experience in physical education, including experience gained from extracurricular activities done with school or in their own time. Pupils are also expected to have a reasonably good level of general fitness before starting the course.

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Rural Skills National 4 Course outline The Course is one of a range of National Courses known as Skills for Work Courses. This Course has been designed to provide a broad basis for progression into further education and training in the land-based sector. It allows candidates to begin to develop some of the basic practical skills necessary to work in most of these disciplines as well as an opportunity to explore the very diverse employment prospects that exist. The course units will be:  Land-based Industries: an introduction Candidates will be given the opportunity to investigate the nature of some of the very diverse industries of the land-based industries and also to examine some of the job opportunities of the sector.  Estate Maintenance: an introduction Candidates will become familiar with a range of hand tools and be given an opportunity to participate in a range of 'handyman tasks' which are common to many of the land based industries from plumbing repairs to fence repairs.  Employability Skills in the Land-based Industries Candidates will be given the opportunity to develop some of the employability skills considered important in the land-based sector such as good time-keeping, attendance, good team working and safety awareness. Evidence for this unit should be generated through practical activities carried out in the rest of the course.  Crop Production: an introduction Candidates who choose the plant route will be given the opportunity to learn the basic skills required to produce a crop from seed to harvest. This Unit can be delivered in the context of horticulture (both edible and non-edible), agriculture, or tree nurseries for forestry.  Soft Landscaping: an introduction Candidates who choose the plant route will be given the opportunity to learn the basic skills of caring for plants including weed control, pest control, fertilising and pruning. This Unit can be delivered in the context of countryside or estate management, or landscape horticulture. Optional Units might include: Animal Husbandry: an introduction Animal Handling: an Introduction Course assessment There is no external assessment for this Course. To achieve the Course award the candidate must successfully achieve all the Units which make up the Course. Assessment objectives Assessment is aimed at addressing the technical knowledge, skills and understanding associated with a range of land-based industries at National 3 level. In particular assessment will focus on:   

practical vocational skills skills for employment in a land-based industry context safe working practice Placements, visits, work experience Partnership agreements with employers will enable candidates to carry out the wide range of practical activities required in the Course in a simulated commercial environment. It may be possible to run the National Progression Award (National 5 level) in Rural Skills in the school. 36


Travel and Tourism National 4/5 Travel and Tourism is a truly dynamic and important part of any economy. Both the national and local economy relies heavily upon the travel and tourism industry. Therefore those with the knowledge and desire to work in this field are becoming more and more desirable to future employers. This course will allow learners to develop:  Skills to become effective job-seekers and employees  Skills to deal effectively with all aspects of customer care and customer service in travel and tourism  The product knowledge and skills to deal effectively with customer enquiries in relation to travel and tourism in Scotland, the rest of the UK and worldwide. Content The course for both National 4 and National 5 consists of the following 4 Units:  Customer Service  Scotland  Employability  UK and Worldwide. Work Experience As this is a Skills for Work course, work experience will be a compulsory element. This will allow pupils to gain invaluable experience in a work place environment, reinforcing classroom learning as well as developing and enhancing key employability skills. This will be conducted in the local area and pupils will be expected to adhere to both Kingussie High School’s and their employer’s strict standards. This work experience will also include a pass/fail assessment conducted by either the employer or a teacher visit depending on the work involved. Assessment Approaches The course will be assessed on a pass/fail basis. In order to pass, pupils will be assessed on their ability to produce evidence of the required outcomes for each unit. This will be conducted as a portfolio approach which could consist of written work, posters, talks and work experience.

Administration & IT HIGHER The key purpose of this Course is to develop learners’ advanced administrative and IT skills and, ultimately, to enable them to contribute to the effective functioning of organisations in supervisory administrative positions. The Course aims to enable learners to:  

develop knowledge and understanding of administration in the workplace and its importance develop a range of advanced IT skills for processing and managing information

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 

develop a range of skills to communicate complex information effectively, making appropriate use of IT acquire skills in managing the organisation of events

The broad structure of the Course meets its purpose and aims, which are addressed by the three Units it comprises. The Course is a blend of applied, experiential learning and related theory and uses real-life contexts, which makes it relevant to the world of work. Its uniqueness lies in enabling learners to work towards industry standards in IT in an administration-related context. While the skills, knowledge and understanding it develops reflect current administrative practice, the Course is sufficiently flexible to take account of emerging technologies, and this will ensure its continuing currency and relevance.

For National 5 Administration & IT See Column 1

Biology Higher Unit Content Cell Biology  Cell structure in relation to function, photosynthesis, energy release, synthesis and release of proteins, cellular response in animals and plants. Genetics and Adaptation  Variation, selection and speciation, animal and plant adaptations. Control and Regulation 

The control of growth and development, physiological homeostasis, population dynamics.

Entry requirements 

National 5 Biology qualification with a Grade A or B Or  Intermediate 2 Biology qualification with a Grade A or B Or  Recommendation of PT Science Note: Due to the literacy demands of the course, a qualification in English at Intermediate 2 / National 5 level is also recommended. SQA Assessment All unit assessments must be passed, including the NAB tests and experimental reports (LO3). The grade awarded (A – D) is determined by a Final Exam. 38


39


COLUMN 3

Art and Design National 4/5 The Creative Industries are a massive part of the worldwide economy and offer a huge range of career prospects including; fine artist, architect, drafter, architectural renderer, landscape architect, urban planner, product designer, jewellery designer, fashion designer, fabric designer, interior designer, decorator, furniture designer, stained glass artist, graphic designer, package designer, layout artist, art copy writer, freelance illustrator, children’s book illustrator,fashion illustrator, scientific illustrator, arts administration, gallery installer, staff/ artist liaison, mural artist, painting restorer, art buyer, art critic, art historian, art librarian, art educator, artist in residence, art therapist, tattoo artist, beautician, hairdresser, museum curator, museumdirector, museum educational staff, museum exhibition designer, fine art photographer, photojournalist, wedding /events photographer, website designer, audio visual designer (presentations), graphic designer, film animator, film maker, cinematographer, display designer, conceptual artist

While the Art and Design courses offered in school can never cover all of these areas they do teach learners transferrable skills useful to all of the above including; drawing, general visual awareness, compositional awareness, colour awareness, use of material, use of a variety of techniques, the balance between function and aesthetics, target audience awareness, research technique, presentation technique, working to a design brief, how to still be creative whilst working within confines etc. Pupils will do one Expressive unit (e.g. still life, portraiture) and one Design unit (e.g. graphics, jewellery). In these they experiment with a wide range of approaches and techniques. They will also study and make direct connections between the work of artists and designers and their own work. This will be in the form of practical exercises and short written responses, rather than lengthy essays. The course is open to all pupils that have been doing Art & Design broad general education up to the end of S3and those that have done a National 4 in S4. All pupils will do broadly the same course but some will have a target level of National 4 and some will have a target level of National 5. For those that go forward for presentation at National 4 all of the work will be internally assessed on a pass/fail basis. For those that go forward for presentation at National 5 Units 1 and 2 will be internally assessed on a pass/fail basis, but the final mark and grading is externally assessed.

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National 4

National 5

Course Structure: Units and Added Value Unit

Course Structure: Units and Course Assessment

Unit 1  Art and Design: Expressive Activity 1) Describe the things that have influenced and inspired artists and their work 2) Produce creative ideas for expressive art work

Unit 1  Art and Design: Expressive Activity 1) Analyse the factors influencing artists and practice 2) Produce creative development ideas for expressive artwork

Unit 2  Art and Design: Design Activity 1) Describe the things that have inspired and influenced designers and their work 2) Produce creative design ideas and development work in response to a given design brief

Unit 2  Art and Design: Design Activity 1) Analyse the factors influencing designers and design practice 2) Produce creative design ideas and development work for a design brief and Course Assessment:

and Added Value Unit  Art and Design Practical Activity 1) Produce a piece of expressive art in response to a theme or stimuli 2) Produce a piece of design work in response to a design brief

 Portfolio (practical work that further develops work produced in Units 1 & 2).This will include a piece of expressive art, and a piece of design work . 160 marks  Question Paper(written exam) 40 marks  Total 200 marks (all externally assessed)

Progression Those that achieve National 4 may then go forward for presentation at National 5 Those that achieve National 5 may then go forward for presentation at Higher

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Biology Biology, the study of living things, plays a crucial role in our everyday existence and is an increasingly important subject in the modern world. Recent scientific advances have made this varied subject more exciting and relevant than ever. Skills needed: The study of biology requires a complete commitment to detailed learning across a wide variety of topics. It suits candidates who have an independent approach to studying, are confident using their literacy skills and recalling facts. See the SQA Biology webpages for more information: www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/45723.html

National 4 Unit Content Cell Biology 

Cell division and its role in growth and repair, DNA, genes and chromosomes, therapeutic use of cells, properties of enzymes and use in industries, properties of microorganisms

Multicellular Organisms 

sexual and asexual reproduction and their importance for survival of species, propagating and growing plants, commercial use of plants, genetic information, growth and development of different organisms

Life on Earth 

How animal and plants species depend on each other, impact of population growth and natural hazards on biodiversity

Entry Requirements  

National 4 Biology course recommendation from S3 Or Recommendation of PT Science

SQA Assessment: All unit assessments (experimental report, research report and written tests) and an Added Value project report must be passed to gain the qualification.

For Biology National 5 See column 1

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Health Activities Purpose This course will offer students the opportunity to gain knowledge and experiential learning of how to maintain a healthy lifestyle during and beyond their school years. The course will be entirely practically based with a mixture of practical performance in Physical Education and one period of Home Economics. They will experience a broad range of different activities ranging from traditional sports such as shinty, football, basketball and badminton as well as more fitness based and alternative activities such as circuits, boxercise, dance, spinning, dodge ball and ultimate frisbee. Pupils will also gain practical knowledge and experience of how to plan and put into practice a healthy lifestyle.

History National 4/5 Course Aims History is the perfect subject if you are interested in past events and people, bringing the past to life and learning more about Scottish and world cultures. This course allows us to understand events better, how they link to the present day, why our world is the way it is and, in particular to understand better how they have shaped Scotland’s society and culture. Content National level History will explore the Atlantic Slave Trade, Britain’s role in this trade, a slave’s life and, the impact it had on the countries involved. We will then look at World War One from a Scottish perspective; how the war started and ended; life for Scottish soldiers on the front and, life at home in Scotland. Finally, we study the USA between 1850 and 1880 focusing on how America was settled and the impact; the issue of slavery, causes of the Civil War and after. Learning and Teaching Approaches We will use lots of different learning techniques and activities during this course. You can expect to carry out independent research, give presentations, complete creative tasks, use the internet, work with others, watch documentaries and carry out classwork. We will also continue to think about our learning, reflect on successes, make plans for improvement and keep working towards new goals. Assessment National History at all levels will involve unit assessments for each of the three parts of the course. These will be scheduled when you are ready and you can re-sit the assessments. There will be plenty of support working towards these assessments. In addition, you will work towards researching and producing an individual assignment on a topic of your choice from the course. This will be done with plenty of support and, with a mix of classwork and homework. National History at levels three and four do not involve a final exam. These courses are based around smaller assessments throughout the year, being able to show your skills in different ways, working independently and being able to make part of the course personal to you. However, students at National four level will be given some exam style work and practise so that progression to National five level will be easier.

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National History at level five will have the same elements of continuous assessment for units and the assignment, the main difference being that the assignment will be written up under exam conditions and marked by the SQA. Furthermore, National five level also involves a final exam.

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Spanish Benefits of studying Spanish With 329 million native speakers, Spanish ranks as the world’s No.2 language in terms of how many people speak it as their first language (Chinese being No.1). Studying Spanish contributes towards the development of literacy skills by providing pupils with opportunities to read, listen, talk and write in Spanish and to reflect on how this relates to English. The Courses provide pupils with the opportunity to develop skills in reading, listening, talking and writing, which are essential for learning, work and life; develop understanding of how language works; use different media effectively for learning and communication; and use language to communicate ideas and information. The Courses offer pupils opportunities to develop and extend a wide range of skills. In particular, the Course aims to enable pupils to develop the ability to: - read, listen, talk and write in Spanish - understand and use Spanish - apply knowledge and understanding of Spanish Entry While entry is at the discretion of the school, pupils would normally have sustained a high level of interest and attainment throughout the 3 years of Broad General Education in their study of French.

National 4 Course Structure This Course is made up of three mandatory Units. Spanish: Understanding Language (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop reading and listening skills in Spanish and to develop their knowledge of straightforward language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Spanish: Using Language (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in Spanish, and to develop their knowledge of straightforward language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Added Value Unit: Spanish: Assignment (National 4) The purpose of this Added Value Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to apply their language skills to investigate a chosen topic in a familiar context in the modern language. Progression National 4 can lead on to National 5 level.

National 5 Course structure This Course is made up of two mandatory Units. Spanish: Understanding Language The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop reading and listening skills in Spanish, and to develop their knowledge and understanding of detailed language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Spanish: Using Language The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in Spanish, and to develop their knowledge and use of detailed language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Pupils will take an external exam in the skills of Reading, Listening and Writing. Pupils will also undertake a Speaking Performance Assessment, which will be internally assessed but externally moderated. 46


Business Management National 5 The purpose of the Course is to highlight ways in which organisations operate and the steps they take to achieve their goals. This purpose will be achieved through combining practical and theoretical aspects of business learning through the use of real-life business contexts. The skills, knowledge and understanding gained are embedded in current business practice and theory, and reflect the integrated nature of organisations, their functions, and their decision-making processes. A main feature of this Course is the development of enterprising skills and employability skills. Learners will be able to understand and make use of business information to interpret and report on overall business performance in a range of contexts. The Course therefore includes the study of organisations in the private, public and voluntary sectors. The Course explores the important impact businesses have on everyday life, and therefore gives learners experiences which are topical. It develops skills for learning, life and work that will be of instant use in the workplace. It supports personal financial awareness through improving learners’ knowledge of financial management in a business context. Learners will be given the opportunity to be involved in activities which are challenging, motivating and inspiring. The Course aims to enable learners to develop:      

knowledge and understanding of the ways in which society relies on business to satisfy our needs an insight into the systems organisations use to ensure customers’ needs are met enterprising skills and attributes by providing them with opportunities to explore realistic business situations financial awareness through a business context an insight into how organisations organise their resources for maximum efficiency and improve their overall performance an awareness of how external influences impact on organisations

Higher Business Management This Course will build on the skills, knowledge and understanding gained in National 5 Business Management or, for some learners, can act as an entry to the study of business.

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Chemistry HIGHER Unit Content Chemical changes and structure 

Controlling reaction rate, periodicity, structure and bonding, intermolecular forces

Nature’s Chemistry 

Esters, fats, oils, proteins, chemistry of cooking, oxidation of food, soaps, detergents, emulsions, fragrances, skin care

Chemistry in Society 

Getting the most from reactants, equilibria, chemical energy, oxidizing or reducing agents, chemical analysis,

Entry requirements   

National 5 Chemistry qualification with a Grade A or B Or Intermediate 2 Chemistry qualification with a Grade A or B Or Recommendation of PT Science

Note: Due to the numeracy demands of the course, a qualification in Mathematics at Intermediate 2 / National 5 level is also recommended. SQA Assessment All unit assessments must be passed, including research reports and written tests. The grade awarded (A – D) is determined by an Assignment Report and a Final Exam.

For Physical Education Higher please see Column 2

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COLUMN 4

Chemistry Chemistry, the study of matter and its interactions, contributes essential knowledge and understanding across all aspects of our lives. Chemistry explains the links between the particulate nature of matter and the macroscopic properties of the world. Chemistry research and development is essential for the introduction of new products and the chemical industry is a major contributor to the economy of the country. The purpose of the course is to develop learners’ curiosity, interest and enthusiasm for chemistry in a range of contexts. Skills needed: The study of chemistry requires logical problem solving skills, the determination to understand sometimes complex ideas and the ability to work safely in a laboratory. It is suited to candidates who are good at explaining concepts and are confident with their numeracy skills. See the SQA webpages for more information:

www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/45720.html

National 4 Unit Content Chemical Changes and Structure  Rates of reaction, acids and bases, chemical equations, atomic structure and bonding related to properties of materials Nature’s Chemistry  Fossil fuels, renewable energy sources, carbohydrates and consumer products, using plants in the development of products associated with everyday life Chemistry in Society  Metal and alloys, plastics and new materials, fertilisers, the formation of elements, chemical analysis for monitoring the environment Entry Requirements  National 4 Chemistry course recommendation from S3 OR  Recommendation of PT Science SQA Assessment: All unit assessments (experimental report, research report and written tests) and an Added Value project report must be passed to gain the qualification.

National 5 Unit Content Chemical Changes and Structure  Average rates of reaction, neutralisation reactions, balanced chemical equations, mole concept, formulae and reaction quantities, bonding and chemical properties of materials Nature’s Chemistry  Alkanes and alkenes, cycloalkanes, straight chain alcohols, carboxylic acids, everyday consumer products, fuels Chemistry in Society  Bonding in plastics, processes used to manufacture fertilisers, nuclear radiation, chemical analysis techniques used for monitoring the environment. Entry Requirements  

National 5 Chemistry course recommendation from S3 OR National 4 Chemistry qualification and a pass in the National 4 Exam OR 49




Recommendation of PT Science

SQA Assessment All unit assessments (experimental report, research report and written tests) must be passed to gain the qualification. The grade awarded (A – D) is determined by an Assignment Report and a Final Exam.

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Geography Aims The course aims to encourage an understanding of and an interest in both physical and human geography. Examples are studied from Scotland, Europe and the World. We aim also to develop an enquiring mind, initiative and a sense of responsibility towards the environment.

Content The Units of study include: Landscapes (2 chosen from Rivers, and Glaciated uplands OR Coasts and Limestone) Urban studies in EMDCs and ELDCs, Rural studies (Traditional and Modern farming methods in EMDCs and ELDCs) Environmental hazards (Tropical Storms, Earthquakes and Volcanic Eruptions) Development and Health (World Trade, Disease in EMDCs and ELDCs)

Learning and Teaching Approaches Geography lessons are varied and include activities such as looking at maps and diagrams, mapping software, using DVD documentaries, film clips, individual and group work, PowerPoint presentations, pupil internet research examining relevant websites and revision exercises. As part of our coursework we partake in fieldwork in both a rural and an urban setting.

Homework Pupils will receive regular homework. This might involve finishing off class work, revising for assessments or undertaking research into investigation work.

Assessment Approaches Assessment will take place both formally and informally throughout the course. As well as formative assessment pupils will also be assessed at the end of each unit. Some questions will test knowledge of the subject, others will test the skills developed during the unit. Assessment of N3 and N4 is internal. At N5 there is also an SQA external examination which tests knowledge and understanding and skills across all 3 units, in timed conditions.

Value Added Unit There will also be a Value Added Unit which allows pupils to extend and apply their knowledge through completing a piece of coursework. In Nat 3/4 this is marked internally. In Nat 5 it is written up under exam conditions and marked by SQA.

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Skills for Work Course Hospitality National 5 There are no specific entry requirements for this course. Pupils will be expected to wear appropriate clothing. Protective clothing will be supplied. Summary of the course content: The course provides a broad, experiential introduction to hospitality professions. The focus is on experiencing the professional kitchen and restaurant; learning about the different roles and responsibilities in hospitality professions and beginning to develop vocational skills and knowledge. Practical experience of working in a realistic working environment is included. Skills involved in preparing, cooking, presenting and serving food and drinks are developed, and working front of house is included. The Course content places emphasis throughout all Units on the employability skills and attitudes which will help to prepare candidates for the workplace.

Modern Studies National 4/5 Course Aims Modern Studies is a study of the modern world, and is of obvious relevance to pupils preparing for life after school. The course aims to equip young people with an understanding of world events and how they affect us. In addition, Modern Studies helps pupils to develop useful skills for life e.g. forming and defending opinions, detecting exaggeration and bias, developing confidence in discussion and debate, and researching and reporting on an issue of interest. Content We will learn about the political system in Britain and how this affects us in Scotland. We will explore the issues surrounding crime, the law and how crime impacts on peopleâ€&#x;s lives in the UK. Finally, we will study how the USA is run, about issues like immigration and how the USA affects our lives as a world power. We will also develop investigation skills, making judgements about issues and, using sources to look for bias, make choices and make conclusions. Learning and Teaching Approaches We will do all of this through a variety of activities like carrying out internet research, watching documentaries and films, giving presentations, creative tasks, classroom work and working with others. We will take a particular interest in the news and current events. We will also reflect on work and skills and, keep planning and working towards improvement. 53


Assessment National Modern Studies at all levels will involve unit assessments for each of the three parts of the course. These will be scheduled when you are ready and you can re-sit the assessments. There will be plenty of support working towards these assessments. In addition, you will work towards researching and producing an individual assignment on a topic of your choice from the course. This will be done with plenty of support and, with a mix of classwork and homework. National Modern Studies at levels three and four do not involve a final exam. These courses are based around smaller unit assessments throughout the year, being able to show your skills in different ways, working independently and being able to make part of the course personal to you. However, students at National four level will be given some exam style work and practise so that progression to National five level will be easier. National Modern Studies at level five will have the same elements of continuous assessment for units and the assignment, the main difference being that the assignment will be written up under exam conditions and marked by the SQA. Furthermore, National five level also involves a final exam.

For Physical Education National 4/5 see Column 2

PSYCHOLOGY National 5 Welcome to the fascinating world of Psychology. This Course is designed to introduce learners to Psychology as the scientific study of human behaviour. Learners will develop knowledge and understanding of psychological explanations for human behaviour and develop research skills used in practical psychological research. What is this subject about? Psychology draws on the Health and Well Being and Social Studies curriculum areas to develop an understanding of the mind and human behaviour. The National 5 course encompasses a Social Behaviour Unit including the study of Conformity and an Individual Behaviour unit including the study of Sleep and Dreams. The Course aims to enable learners to develop: • their knowledge and understanding of psychological concepts, theories, approaches and terminology and use thinking skills when explaining and applying knowledge and understanding of Psychology • awareness of the role of research evidence in explaining human behaviour • basic investigation skills to select, organise and interpret information • awareness of ethical and scientific standards in psychological research • basic communication and numeracy skills in psychology 54


Psychology is uniquely placed to achieve outcomes in the area of Health and Wellbeing and has potential to promote the development of thinking, emotional and social skills. These are transferable skills of value in both personal and professional contexts and it is intended that the course promotes these skills through the use of interactive teaching methods, group activities, individual presentations and film clips as well as personal study and reflection. Recommended entry: A level of maturity and independent thought are required as the course work focuses on acquiring the literacy skills essential to understanding the subject. Students should also be prepared to take responsibility for their own learning and contribute to discussion. Previous success at National 5 in English or Social Subjects would be most relevant. This course is a good introduction to the study of Psychology at University or College level. Many courses such as childcare, business, teaching, health professions and beauty therapy promote Psychology as part of the course.

Sport and Recreation National 5 – SKILLS FOR WORK (S5/6 only) Course Outline/Purpose The National 5 Sport and Recreation Course provides a basis for progression into further education and training/employment in the Sports and Recreation sector. The Course will enable candidates to develop the general and practical skills, knowledge and understanding and employability skills and attitudes needed in the sector. Candidates will also have the opportunity to work under supervision in an appropriate sport and recreation environment such as the Badenoch Centre. The Course content covers the main practical activities involved in carrying out a supportive role in sport and recreation environments – sourcing information about career pathways, identifying and reviewing skills and experiences; assisting with planning, setting up and delivering activity sessions; dealing effectively and courteously with clients; assisting with emergency procedures; assisting with setting up, dismantling and checking equipment and resources; helping to plan and review a training programme, and establishing good practice in identifying and reviewing goals. Please note that this course is limited to 12 pupils due to facilities available to deliver each unit. Course Structure This Course is at Intermediate 2 level and consists of four mandatory Units: one 60 hour Unit, two 40 hour Units and one 20 hour Unit. Assist with a Component of Activity Sessions (Intermediate 2) 1.5 Unit credit Employment Opportunities in the Sport and Recreation Industry (Intermediate 2) 1 Unit credit Assist with Fitness Programming (Intermediate 2) 1 Unit credit Assist with Daily Centre Duties (Intermediate 2) 0.5 Unit credit General aims of the Course: ● ● ● ● ● ●

Allow candidates to experience vocationally related learning Provide candidates with a broad introduction to the sport and recreation sector Encourage candidates to foster a good work ethic, including time-keeping and positive, responsible attitude Provide opportunities to develop a range of Core Skills in a realistic setting Encourage candidates to take responsibility for their own learning and development Facilitate progression to further education and/or training 55

a


Physics Higher Unit Content Our Dynamic Universe 

Equations of motion, forces, energy, power, collisions, explosions, gravitation, special relativity, Doppler Effect, Hubble’s Law, Big Bang Theory

Particles and Waves 

The Standard Model, charged particles, nuclear reactions, waveparticle duality, diffraction, interference, refraction, spectra

Electricity 

Monitoring and measuring AC, electrical circuits, internal resistance, capacitors, semiconductors, p-n junctions

Entry requirements   

National 5 Physics qualification with a Grade A or B Or Intermediate 2 Physics qualification with a Grade A or B Or Recommendation of PT Science

Note: Due to the numeracy demands of the course, a qualification in Mathematics at Intermediate 2 / National 5 level is also recommended. SQA Assessment All unit assessments must be passed, including research reports and written tests. The grade awarded (A – D) is determined by an Assignment Report and a Final Exam.

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Product Design HIGHER Purpose To foster understanding of the process of designing and of the factors which influence designs in a commercial context. It will enhance the student’s knowledge of industrial manufacturing processes and materials while increasing awareness of economic considerations and the social implications of design and manufacture. It offers the opportunity for students to develop skills in designing related to the industrial context. This exciting course should provide experience, knowledge, understanding and skills, which are transferable to a range of careers as well as contributing to general education, useful life skills and personal development. The nature of this course provides an analytical approach to project work that would be useful in any aspect of further and higher education. In addition the course serves to develop all four areas of technological capability. Recommended Entry While entry is at the discretion of the school, students would normally be expected to have attained: • Design and Manufacture at National 5 (A-C) • Art and Design at National 5 (A-C) • Graphic Communication at National 5. (A-C) Course Details Three mandatory units of 40 hours. A Design Assignment must also be produced which is produced prior to the Easter Break. The topic for this is provided by the SQA in January of that year. Unit – Title, Length and Brief Description Design Analysis (H) 40 hours • Evaluate a commercial product • Establish a design specification Both of the above are taught through a design activity Developing Design Proposals (H) 40 hours • Produce a design proposal • Use graphic techniques during the production of a design proposal • Use modelling techniques during the production of a design proposal All of the above are taught through a design activity Manufacturing Products (H) 40 hours • • •

Explain why particular materials are used for the manufacture of commercial products Explain why particular processes and systems are used for the manufacture of commercial products Produce an orthographic drawing suitable for use in the manufacture of a given product. 57


COLUMN 5 For English National 3-6 See insert before Column 1 For History National 4/5 See Column 3

Business Management National 4 The purpose of the Course is to develop learners’ understanding of the way in which businesses operate in the current dynamic, changing, competitive and economic environments, and to encourage enterprising attitudes. The Course aims to enable learners to develop:     

knowledge and understanding of business concepts in a range of contexts awareness of the processes and procedures businesses use to ensure customers’ needs are met enterprising skills, and adopt enterprising attributes, by participating in practical activities in realistic business situations financial awareness through a business context an insight into the impact of the economy on businesses and our daily lives, thus gaining economic awareness

The use of practical activities and theoretical concepts, in real-life contexts, will offer learners opportunities to be involved in learning that is designed to inspire, challenge and motivate them, as well as giving them an insight into the steps businesses take to become and remain competitive and successful. A main feature of this Course is the development of enterprise and employability skills; learners will gain a better understanding of the personal qualities and attributes required of people involved in business. This will be facilitated through activities which demonstrate understanding of risk taking and decision making, thereby enabling learners to cope more easily in our rapidly changing business environments. The knowledge gained of financial and economic situations, through a business context, can be applied to personal living so that learners can manage their own personal financial affairs with confidence, and gain a better understanding of the impact of economic issues on their lives.

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National 5 Business Management The purpose of the Course is to highlight ways in which organisations operate and the steps they take to achieve their goals. This purpose will be achieved through combining practical and theoretical aspects of business learning through the use of real-life business contexts. The skills, knowledge and understanding gained are embedded in current business practice and theory, and reflect the integrated nature of organisations, their functions, and their decision-making processes. A main feature of this Course is the development of enterprising skills and employability skills. Learners will be able to understand and make use of business information to interpret and report on overall business performance in a range of contexts. The Course therefore includes the study of organisations in the private, public and voluntary sectors. The Course explores the important impact businesses have on everyday life, and therefore gives learners experiences which are topical. It develops skills for learning, life and work that will be of instant use in the workplace. It supports personal financial awareness through improving learners’ knowledge of financial management in a business context. Learners will be given the opportunity to be involved in activities which are challenging, motivating and inspiring. The Course aims to enable learners to develop:      

knowledge and understanding of the ways in which society relies on business to satisfy our needs an insight into the systems organisations use to ensure customers’ needs are met enterprising skills and attributes by providing them with opportunities to explore realistic business situations financial awareness through a business context an insight into how organisations organise their resources for maximum efficiency and improve their overall performance an awareness of how external influences impact on organisations

For Chemistry National 4/5 See Column 4 For History National 4/5 See Column 3 For Physics National 4/5 See Column 2 59


French HIGHER Purpose This is a course for pupils who want to further develop their knowledge of the French language. It will allow pupils to build on the skills acquired in earlier stages of French Language learning. The course enables learners to read, listen, talk and write in French and to understand and use French. Pupils also develop language skills of translation, and apply knowledge and understanding of the French language. The Course offers pupils the opportunity to develop detailed and complex language skills in the meaningful real-life contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Recommended Entry While entry is at the discretion of the school, pupils would normally be expected to have attained National 5 French. Course structure This Course is made up of two mandatory Units. French: Understanding Language (Higher) The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop and extend reading and listening skills in the modern language, and to develop their knowledge and understanding of detailed and complex language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. French: Using Language (Higher) The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop and extend talking and writing skills in the modern language, and to develop their knowledge and use of detailed and complex language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. A good pass at Higher can lead to Advanced Higher. Both these qualifications will enable the pupil to pursue foreign language study in a variety of ways: - continued study at university - interact with speakers of the language in an employment context - draw on acquired knowledge of language to learn another language - use acquired skills for personal enjoyment through the media of television, films, magazines and the internet - supplement of study of other subjects at university

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COLUMN 6 For Mathematics National 3-6 See insert before Column 1 For Biology National 4 See Column 3 For Skills for Work Course Hospitality See Column 4 For Practical Craft National 4 See Column 3

French Benefits of studying French There are currently 67.8 million people with French as their first language, and it is spoken in 60 countries around the world. In the current challenging market, knowledge of a foreign language is attractive to employers in the light of greater mobility within the European Community and beyond, and given the international nature of trade and industry. Also, more locally, pupils need to remember that tourism is a big source of employment in our area and employers are seeking adaptable communicators. Nowadays, cultural empathy is important not just for the international manager but also the shop-assistant. Learning a foreign language enables pupils to build up an insight into the life of another country and increase their opportunities and confidence to travel abroad. It also has great value both practically and vocationally. Many university courses require students to have a qualification in a language as part of their general entrance requirements for admission. Pupils can also choose to continue their study of this language at university, either alone or as an additional subject in courses such as business, engineering, law, to name but a few. Those who decide to study for a degree in languages are recruited by many different kinds of companies and organisations where they can then undertake more specific professional training.

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The Courses offer pupils opportunities to develop and extend a wide range of skills and in particular, to enable them to develop the ability to: -

read, listen, talk and write in a modern language understand and use a modern language apply knowledge and understanding of a modern language

Entry While entry is at the discretion of the school, pupils would normally have sustained a high level of interest and attainment throughout the 3 years of Broad General Education in their study of French.

National 5 Course structure This Course is made up of two mandatory Units. French: Understanding Language The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop reading and listening skills in the modern language, and to develop their knowledge and understanding of detailed language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. French: Using Language The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in the modern language, and to develop their knowledge and understanding of detailed language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Pupils will take an external exam in the skills of Reading, Listening and Writing. Pupils will also undertake a Speaking Performance Assessment, which will be internally assessed but externally moderated. Progression A good pass at National 5 can lead to Higher.

National 4 Course Structure This Course is made up of three mandatory Units. French : Understanding Language (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop reading and listening skills in French and to develop their knowledge of straightforward language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. French: Using Language (National 4) The purpose of this Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to develop talking and writing skills in French, and to develop their knowledge of straightforward language in the contexts of society, learning, employability, and culture. Added Value Unit: French: Assignment (National 4) The purpose of this Added Value Unit is to provide pupils with the opportunity to apply their language skills to investigate a chosen topic in a familiar context in the modern language. Progression National 4 can lead on to National 5 level.

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GEOGRAPHY NATIONAL 6 Purpose The Higher Geography Course develops learners’ understanding of our changing world and its human and physical processes in local, national, international and global study contexts. Opportunities for practical activities including fieldwork are encouraged, so that learners can interact with their environment. Recommended Entry Entry to this Course is at the discretion of the centre. However, learners would normally be expected to have attained the skills, knowledge and understanding required by the following or equivalent qualifications and/or experience:  National 5 Geography Course or relevant component Units

Unit – Title and Brief Description Geography: Physical Environments (Higher) In this Unit, learners will develop and apply geographical skills and techniques in the context of physical environments. Learners will develop mapping skills in geographical contexts. Learners will develop and apply knowledge and understanding of the complex processes and interactions at work within physical environments on a local, regional and global scale. Key topics include: atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. Geography: Human Environments (Higher) In this Unit, learners will develop and apply geographic skills and techniques in the context of human environments. Learners will develop research skills in geographical contexts. Learners will develop and apply knowledge and understanding of the complex processes and interactions at work within urban and rural environments and the management of urban and rural land use change in developed and developing countries. Key topics include: population, rural land use change and management, urban change and management. Geography: Global Issues (Higher) In this Unit, learners will develop and apply geographical skills and techniques in the context of global geographical issues. Learners will develop skills of numerical and graphical analysis in geographical contexts. Learners will develop and apply knowledge and understanding of complex global geographical issues which demonstrate the interaction of physical and human environments and the strategies adopted in the management of these issues. Key topics include: river basin management, development and health, global climate change, trade, aid and geopolitics, energy. Assignment The assignment will give learners an opportunity to demonstrate the following higher-order cognitive skills, knowledge and understanding: identifying a geographical topic or issue: carrying out research, which should include fieldwork where possible and/or maps : collecting a range of information relevant to the topic or issue : processing a range of information gathered from fieldwork and/or other forms of geographic research : evaluating, analysing and synthesising information from a range of sources : drawing on detailed knowledge and understanding of the topic or issue studied reaching a well-supported conclusion supported by a range of evidence on a: geographical topic or issue : communicating information using appropriate geographical conventions

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Modern Studies Course Aims Modern Studies is a study of the modern world, and is of obvious relevance to pupils preparing for life after school. The course aims to develop a deeper understanding of world events and how they affect us and, how to analyse and make judgements about major issues today. Pupils also increase their appreciation of the importance of participating in a democratic society. In addition, Modern Studies helps pupils to develop invaluable life skills: forming and defending judgements; assessing degrees of exaggeration and bias; coming to well supported conclusions; developing confidence in discussion and debate, and researching and reporting on an issue of interest. Content Higher Modern Studies will cover three units over the year. Democracy in We study: devolved government within the UK; the UK within the EU; the role and function Scotland and the of political representatives; the balance of power between the executive and legislature; United Kingdom voting systems and behaviour and, the ways in which citizens can inform political decisionmaking. Social Inequality in We study: evidence of social inequality in the UK; the impact this has on certain groups; the United Kingdom causes of inequality and, how effective attempts are to tackle it. A study of a major We study: the political system of a world power, opportunities to participate and the extent world power; China of democracy there; social and economic issues of a world power and the effectiveness of or the USA government responses; the role of a world power in international organisations and an evaluation of their international influence and power. Learning and Teaching Approaches We will use different learning techniques and activities during this course. You can expect to carry out independent research, give presentations, complete creative tasks, use the internet, work with others, watch documentaries and carry out classwork. We will also continue to think about our learning, reflect on successes, make plans for improvement and keep working towards new goals. Assessment Higher Modern Studies will involve unit assessments for each of the three parts of the course. The assessments will test both knowledge and understanding and, source analysis skills. These will be scheduled when you are ready and you can re-sit the assessments. These assessments are mandatory in order to sit the final exam. You will work towards researching and producing an individual assignment on a topic of your choice from the course. This will be done with plenty of support and, with a mix of classwork and homework. This assignment will be written up under exam conditions and is externally marked by the SQA. This is worth 30% of your final grade. Finally, you will sit an exam at the end of the year and this is worth 70% of your final grade. The exam paper includes a mix of short responses, source based questions and a longer essay style response. Higher Modern Studies really tests your ability to communicate well in writing and understand complex sources which can often be numerical. 65


MUSIC Higher and Advanced Higher These courses will offer students the opportunity to study music through three main strands – primarily performing but also listening and composing. Throughout the session students will develop a technique on two instruments or one instrument and voice. They must be committed to practice at home on a regular basis. For the listening element of the course, pupils will study a wide range of genres of music and aspects of this will link to the composing element of the course. Performing Skills Performing on two instruments or one instrument or voice, both at a minimum of grade 4 (Higher) and grade 5 (Advanced Higher) 60 marks Listening Question Paper

40 marks

Assessment 

 

Performing: The February prelim is the main internal exam. The external exam is conducted by a visiting examiner in February/March. Pupils following the Higher course are expected to prepare a programme of music which lasts 10 minutes on instrument 1 and 5 minutes on instrument 2. For Advanced Higher, pupils need to prepare a 15 minute programme for instrument 1 and a 10 minute programme for instrument 2. Listening : This is assessed through a Question Paper during the May/June SQA exams as well as a series of internal unit assessments. Composing: This is assessed by pupils producing a folio of work for both levels.

Recommended Entry Higher: A National 5 level award in Music. Pupils who have not studied Music previously or have not sat external board exams may be considered for exams based on their practical ability, previous music tuition and motivation – this can be negotiated with the Department.

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Gàidhlig Gàidhlig is alive and well in Kingussie High School. Gàidhlig is hugely important as part of Scotland’s identity, heritage and culture but also locally given Badenoch’s important links with amongst many things, shinty. Pupils are in a very fortunate position in being able to be bilingual. Various studies over recent years have proven the advantages which this has in a whole number of areas. Over the years pupils have progressed from S1 through to S5 with a number of pupils continuing on to S6 and gaining Advanced Higher qualifications in Gàidhlig. In over 16 years, very few pupils have decided not to continue with their Gàidhlig studies. A number of former pupils have gone on to be employed in Gàidhlig related jobs such as teaching, media and childcare. Under Curriculum for Excellence, pupils follow the Broad General Education in S1 – S3. In the senior phase, pupils who opt to study Gàidhlig have a choice of National Courses, Higher and Advanced Higher. The courses draw on a broad variety of contexts such as holidays, sport, hobbies, war, health and wellbeing, work and the local area. Pupils will also study short novels, short stories, poetry and media texts. Pupils’ breadth of language is developed along with their accuracy in spelling and grammar. A range of skills are also developed. In addition to talking, listening, reading and writing pupils also develop critical and analytical skills, presentational devices, ICT skills, research techniques, organisational skills, independent learning, responsibility and the confidence to use the language in a range of contexts. At National 3 and 4 the course is assessed internally and there is no external examination. Work is continuously assessed and goes forward towards the final overall course award. Pupils cover a number of units and complete different outcomes within them building up a complete record of their coursework in the form of a performance folio. All work must be submitted and units passed in order to gain a course award. The course at National 5 covers the same format of units however there is an external examination which must be passed in order to gain a course award. This consists of a reading and writing paper; where candidates answer close reading questions on a given text and write a response to a piece of literature studied during the course and a listening paper where candidates answer questions on a spoken text. In addition, at all levels candidates will also complete an assignment which is a short research project on a Gaelic related topic. At Higher and Advanced Higher, more independence and responsibility is expected of pupils to contribute to how they organise their learning with project work and independent research. Courses build on the skills developed in previous years and follow much the same structure as National courses with different units which are assessed internally and which must be passed before the overall course award can be gained. All courses are part of a hierarchical system of progression which allows learners to progress through the range of qualifications. Entry to courses and progression is subject to achievement and work done in 67


previous levels of qualifications. These new qualifications are also externally verified to ensure validity and consistent standards. All courses are taught through the medium of Gaelic. Pupils are expected to show commitment to their work and to give of their best so prescribing to the school motto ‘gu dichiollach’. Pupils are encouraged to borrow and read books from the class library and to use BBC Alba as a medium for enhancing a range of skills to provide an awareness and understanding of current issues related to Gaelic as a language and culture. Homework is a necessary and very important element of the course. Pupils are expected to revise vocabulary and grammar covered within lessons but homework can also involve finishing class work and essay writing. Pupils have a homework diary and a personal learning log and they are expected to become more independent in their organisation of time and their learning. To learn any language and to be able to communicate and use it day to day is an advantage to anyone no matter if they have little direct desire to go on to Gàidhlig related employment not least as regards the interdisciplinary connections which can be made in helping with other subject areas. Learning Gàidhlig, through the medium of Gàidhlig allows pupils to achieve this – cleachd i no caill i.

Construction Skills Any pupils interested in Construction Skills please see Mr Wink in the Technology Department.

ASDAN & Employability Awards These awards are designed to develop a wide range of key skills including • • • •

improving own learning and performance working with others problem solving ICT

ASDAN AWARD The ASDAN award can be achieved at three different Levels: Bronze Silver and Gold These programmes allow students to develop a range of skills that will be helpful both in the workplace and in independent living. Pupils are able to choose and complete various challenges and provide evidence of these in individual learning logs. A wide variety of topics can be chosen from sport and leisure, community involvement, expressive arts, home management and cooking, the environment and health and survival. The emphasis is on an individual programme to suit the learner’s interests. Employability Award The Employability Award is an introduction to the world of work for those who are unsure about how to gain and sustain employment. The course focuses on generic employability skills, to enable a successful move into the job market. Pupils will develop skills and attitudes which will be applicable across all areas of employment. 68


It would be hoped to offer work experience placements of interest as part of this course.

Photography LEVEL 4/ 5 NPA (National Progression Award) Photography is a massive industry that serves the interests of professionals and amateurs alike. It is a hugely useful skill for anyone working in any area of the visual arts and design, from fashion designers, to fine artists, to architects. Studying photography could be a stepping stone to a huge variety of careers where it is used directly . e.g.; fine art photographer, photojournalist, fashion photographer, wedding /events photographer, website designer, audio visual designer (presentations),graphic designer, film animator ,film maker, cinematographer, museum exhibition designer, display designer concept artist – video games, film These courses will serve as an introduction to the wonderful world of photography and photographic technique, including composition, lighting, aperture settings, timing settings, iso settings etc. They will also look at image adjustment and manipulation. Students will learn from looking at the work of other great photographers. The school has some digital SLR cameras through which these techniques can be taught, but learners should also have their own camera (even a phone camera ) on which personal projects can be undertaken. The National Progression Award in Photography at both SCQF level 4 and SCQF level 5 consists of 4 mandatory units. Understanding Photography Photographing People Photographing Places Working with Photographs All learners will follow broadly the same course and their level of presentation will be dependent on the work they produce. For both level 4 and level 5, all of the work will be internally assessed on a pass/fail basis. NPA Photography level 4 The NPA Photography at SCQF level 4 provides a foundation level of study that will reflect the personal and social development needs of the learner. The units are aimed at promoting self-confidence, selfdevelopment, and learner interests to promote positive progression routes. NPA Photography level 5 The NPA Photography at SCQF level 5 will build on the foundation skills at level 4 and prepare learners to understand more advanced skills and techniques. It will promote a progression route into the new NC Photography Group Award at SCQF Level 6 or other relevant skills for work and creative digital media programmes, e.g. the new NC Introduction to Creative Industries Group Award at SCQF Level and Higher Photography. 5.1.1 NPA in Photography (SCQF level 4) Unit title Mandatory (4 SQA credits required) Understanding Photography Photographing People Photographing Places Working with Photographs

Code

SQA credit value

SCQF level

SCQF credit points

H28S 10 H28V 10 H28W 10 H28T 10

1 1 1 1

4 4 4 4

6 6 6 6

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Advanced Higher Art and Design This course offers the student further specialisation in the areas of their choice. They will have one main area of study worth two thirds of the overall mark and another supporting area of study worth one third of the overall mark. There are various combinations available but most commonly students would do either of the following; MAIN - Design Enquiry (practical) plus SUPPORTING- Design Study(written) or MAIN - Expressive Enquiry (practical) plus SUPPORTING - Expressive Study(written)

Advanced Higher French Recommended Entry A good pass at Higher level. Purpose Study of French at Advanced Higher will allow the student to develop further levels of fluency in areas established at Higher and beyond. The value of an award at this level as an ancillary skill to a wide range of degree courses should not be underestimated. Course Structure The course consists of one mandatory unit and one optional unit. Mandatory Unit: LANGUAGE In this unit you will study  Topical issues and Current affairs  Personal and Social issues  Environmental Issues Option 1: READING/VIEWING In this unit you will study one film and/or book in depth plus a further book or a background topic. Option 2: LANGUAGE IN WORK: similar to Higher but some form of work experience will be required.

Psychology National 6 This is offered as an on line learning course by Inverness College. An extremely conscientious approach is required to meet deadlines and attend up to 8 Saturday workshops. The aims are similar to National 5 but with a higher emphasis on the Research Investigation component.

Scottish Baccalaureate in Science This qualification is available to S6 pupils who have Higher Grades in Science and Maths. The associated interdisciplinary project is conducted independently by pupils. More information can be found at www.sqa.org.uk/sqa/35858.html or see Mr Nisbet.

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The Sciences: Advanced Higher The Advanced Higher in each of the sciences is the natural progression for those students who have achieved a good pass at Higher level and intend to pursue a science-based course in tertiary education. The availability of these courses depends on student demand and staffing availability so it is important that students who may be interested discuss this with their teacher at the earliest opportunity. We would like to update the course descriptions for all of the National courses and Highers. Please see the attached documents. Descriptions for the Scottish Baccalareate in Science and all Advanced Highers remain almost the same as the previous year: please state an A or B pass at Higher Bio/ Chem /Physics as the entry requirement for Advanced Higher Bio / Chem / Phys. Also, a Higher Maths qualification is required for Advanced Higher Physics.

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KHS Senior Course Choice Booklet 2014-2015