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JANUARY–MARCH 2012

STARTING JANUARY 2012, Performers include:

Spoken Word

Jewish Book Week: Henry Goodman on Ulysses Umberto Eco Jonathan Safran Foer

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER  www.gemmalatimer.com

and many more...

WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012

Banquet of Books SIMON SCHAMA AT Jewish Book Week

SIMON SCHAMA – JEWISH BOOK WEEK  |  BRAHMS UNWRAPPED  |  NEW ZEALAND IN LONDON

Academy of St Martin in the Fields Aurora Orchestra with Maxim Rysanov The Sixteen Natalie Clein Gould Piano Trio Orion Quartet Schubert Ensemble Philip Dukes Katya Apekisheva Charles Owen Mikhail Rudy Ivo Varbanov

music+art+restaurants

Classical

Brahms Unwrapped Dante Quartet: Britten New Zealand in London

Contemporary

A Cappella Festival Manu Delago

Jazz

Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson

Comedy

Tim Minchin Lady Garden YOUR FREE COPY

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03

Welcome to the SPRING 2012 season at Kings Place! Welcome to the 2012 season at Kings Place, which sees the launch of Brahms Unwrapped, a year-long celebration of the composer’s finest chamber music featuring a host of illustrious musicians and ensembles. Find out why they love to perform his music so much on pp26–29. Our cover star, Simon Schama, will be on the stage of Hall One to launch another exciting new arrival: Jewish Book Week is 60 years old this year and marks the occasion by moving to its new home, here in Kings Place. Umberto Eco, Eva Hoffman, Dave Schneider, Henry Goodman, David Aaronovitch and Howard Jacobson are just some of those appearing in this unique literary feast. We look forward to building

a long-term relationship with this august institution (see pp30–35). Another new resident to Kings Place is the Australian comedian, composer, actor and musician extraordinaire Tim Minchin, who has found that vital ‘room of one’s own’ in a studio in our basement. He will be Artist-in-Residence from 2012: find out what he has in mind in the interview on p8. On the antipodean theme, we’re delighted to host a mini-festival by the New Zealand String Quartet with an array of friends, including baritone Jonathan Lemalu. This promises to be a fascinating exploration of contemporary New Zealand music and literature

by one of that nation’s top performing groups. No London venue can remain untouched by the Olympics in 2012, so look out for the Tennyson event by Poet in the City (27 February) and the Cultural Olympiad weekend run by the Academy of St Martin in the Fields (3 March). Two ‘British’ golds will be the Dante Quartet’s Great Britten! series and the Orchestra of St John’s concerts of English string music (see pp46–47).

Peter Millican, CEO

COVER: SIMON SCHAMA © Rolf Marriott/BBC

CONTRIBUTORS

Rod Biss, who writes on the New Zealand Quartet’s series New Worlds, New Perspectives at Kings Place (pp38–40), has worked in music publishing in both London and New Zealand. He is a music journalist writing for a number of journals including the New Zealand Listener.

Vanessa Friedman, who pays tribute to the fashion photography of Chris Moore (p42), has been fashion editor of the Financial Times since 2003. Previously, she was Features Director for the launch of UK InStyle. She is also the author of Pucci (Taschen, 2010).

Celebrated actor Henry Goodman is a familiar figure on stage and screen, recently appearing as Sir Humphrey Appleby in Yes, Prime Minister. He writes on the inspiration Joyce’s Ulysses gave him as a Jewish lad in the East End of London (p34). He appears with Howard Jacobson at Jewish Book Week.

Sebastian Scotney, who writes on Soweto Kinch, Alex Wilson and Jay Phelps (p36), set up the influential LondonJazz website. He reviews for JazzFM, allaboutjazz.com and Arts Industry. He is also Chair of Trustees at Rosetta Life and an Honorary Associate of the Royal Academy of Music.


CLASSICAL

FOLK

SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS 12 Inside design  A new series of talks curated by art publisher Laurence King 31 A BANQUET OF BOOKS Jewish Book Week arrives at Kings Place 32 the (jewish) history boy Simon Schama (above) traces his intellectual journey through Western art to his current project, a history of the Jews 34 EAST END ODYSSEY Henry Goodman on the impact of Joyceʼs Ulysses on an East End Jewish boy

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS 10 Visions in black and white Pascal Rogé plays Debussy 11 Singing the Swingle Way A Cappella Festival returns 11 The London Guitar Festival 26 BRAHMS UNWRAPPED Stephen Johnson and a host of performers introduce a new year-long series 38 THE isle IS full of noises The New Zealand String Quartet lay on a feast of Kiwi music, as Rod Biss discovers 46 forever england? Bayan Northcott asks what gives music from Elgar to Britten its English quality?

FOLK HIGHLIGHTS 14 Roy Bailey and Tony Benn Legendary socialist doubleact join Martin Simpsonʼs exciting mini-festival, Purpose and Grace

REGULARS

03 WELCOME 06 TICKET INFORMATION 07 PLANNING YOUR WEEK 08 HIGHLIGHTS 26 FEATURES

49 LISTINGS 51 JANUARY 58 FEBRUARY 68 MARCH

15 D  onʼt box her in! Colin Irwin meets the uncategorisable Ruth Theodore, whoʼs coming to Kings Place to perform with Nancy Wallace and Jason Steel

Soweto Kinch © BENJAMIN AMURE

Ruth Theodore © SUPPLIED PHOTO

DMITRY SITKOVETSKY © J HENRY FAIR

SIMON SCHAMA © SUPPLIED PHOTO

SPOKEN WORD

JAZZ JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS 16 Twoʼs Company Nikki Iles and Kate Williams 17 Light the Blue Touch Paper Colin Town returns with his radical new band 17 Kit Downes comes back 36 Exploring trio Soweto Kinch, Jay Phelps and Alex Wilson take turns to lead in an intriguing jazz mini-series. Sebastian Scotney investigates. 20 GLOBAL GET-TOGETHER The Global Music Foundation open a new jazz course in Kings Place this Easter (see Interact).

50 ART LISTINGS 78 CALENDAR 82 Q&A with Bellatrix, aka Belle Ehresmann of The Boxettes

WHAT’S ON JANUARY– MARCH 2012


CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS 18 Birthday Bashes  Ensemble Bash and Chroma re-wrote the rulebook for contemporary music ensembles. Tim RutherfordJohnson cheers them on 19 Meet the hang man Helen Wallace meets Manu Delago, the worldʼs first ʻhangʼ virtuoso and discovers more about this fascinating new instrument 82 Q&A: BELLATRIX The Boxettesʼ founder and world champion beat-boxer reveals all

COMEDY

Manu Delago © Pawel Szewczyk

ISABELLA BLOW WITH LOBSTER HAT BY PHILIP TREACY © CHRIS MOORE

LADY GARDEN © IDIL SUKAN

BELLATRIX © TOM GRIFFITHS 2010

CONTEMPORARY

ART

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS 8 Genius in the House Musical comedian extraordinaire, Tim Minchin, has found refuge in a basement studio at Kings Place. He reveals his plans as Artist-in-Residence 9 Itʼs a Gardenerʼs World Camille Ucan introduces her Lady Garden troupe, dubbed ʻthe funniest women in Britainʼ

LISTINGS

ART HIGHLIGHTS 22 New Harmonies Pangolin hosts a new exhibition of work by highlyregarded female sculptors Almuth Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer, who reveal different approaches to form and materials 42 KING OF THE CATWALK Vanessa Friedman pays tribute to photographer Chris Moore, who has been capturing the catwalk for more than 40 years, as an exhibition of his work opens at Kings Place Gallery in December 2011

LISTINGS 49 Listings 50 Art Listings 78 Calendar 24 FOOD & DRINK HIGHLIGHTS Dinner Parties with a Difference  Jenny Linford samples one of Rotundaʼs lively and informative supper clubs, the new restaurant craze in London 20 INTERACT The Global Music Foundation open a new jazz course at Kings Place this Easter

EDITORIAL TEAM Publisher Kings Place Music Foundation Contact +44 (0) 20 7520 1440 mag@kingsplace.co.uk www.kingsplace.co.uk

Editor-in-Chief Helen Wallace

Art Direction Ana Acosta

Editorial Team Lindsay Garfoot Michael Green Janie Nicholas Emrah Tokalaç

Picture Research Sunita Sharma-Gibson Proofreading Susannah Howe Print Wyndeham Roche

Thanks to Peter Millican, Jen Mitchell, Tanya Cracknell, Chris Nye, Zoë Jeyes, Sally Pembroke, Holly Thomas, Andrew McIntosh, Hervé Bournas, Joanie Magill, Isaac Robson, Rowan Powell

© Kings Place 2011-2012 All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of Kings Place is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at the time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Kings Place.


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

TICKET INFORMATION www.kingsplace.co.uk Box Office 020 7520 1490

your journey We are located a short walk from King’s Cross and St Pancras Stations. Our main entrance is on York Way.

Public Transport

Visit www.tfl.gov.uk to help plan your journey, or call London Travel Information 020 7222 1234.

BOOKING

Tickets for all performances from £9.50 online The online ticket prices are shown in the listings. Please add £2 to the online ticket price if booking by other methods.

ONLINE

www.kingsplace.co.uk Secure online booking 24 hours a day.

Hall One

Choose your exact seating location pick your seat: BOOK NOW

or opt for the Online Savers option online savers: BOOK NOW

You are guaranteed a seat. Its location will be allocated by the Box Office. £9.50 Online Savers can only be purchased online and are subject to availability. Tickets may be collected at any time during the hour before the performance.

Hall Two

All seating is unreserved, some events may be standing only. £9.50 Online Savers can only be purchased online and are subject to availability.

ST PANCRAS ROOM

All seating is unreserved, some events may be standing only.

BY Phone & in Person

020 7520 1490 Mon–Sat: 12–8pm, Sun 12–7pm (Closed Bank Holidays) Opening hours may vary – please check the website for the most up-to-date information.

BY Post

Kings Place Box Office 90 York Way, London N1 9AG

Groups

Buy 8 or more tickets and save 20%. Group discounts are only available directly through the Box Office and exclude Online Savers.

Parking

NCP Car Park – Pancras Road. Visit www.ncp.co.uk or call 0845 050 7080 for further details.

access

Kings Place aims to be accessible to all, and the venue offers suitable seating for  wheelchair users. Please inform us of any access requirements when booking. There is an induction loop at the Box Office to assist those with hearing aids. An infrared system is installed in Halls One and Two, with hearing advancement headsets for audience members who do not use a hearing aid. Neck loops are available to use with hearing aids switched to  the ‘T’ position. All areas of Kings Place are  accessible to those with Guide & Hearing Dogs.

SPRING 2012 SPECIAL OFFERS

Available for the following events: Brahms Unwrapped London A Cappella Festival Purpose & Grace Celebrating Debussy Jewish Book Week London Chamber Music Series Please check www.kingsplace. co.uk for additional offers.

kings place hall one ©  keith paisley

TICKETS

06 TICKETS


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January—March 2012

PlanNING YOUR

Week

PLANning YOUR WEEK 07

Weekly Focus  Wednesday/THURSDAY–Saturday each week A collaborative mix of artists, curators, organisations and producers presenting an exciting series of events

See Listings p49 for details or go to

www.kingsplace.co.uk

A NEATLY EFFECTIVE IDEA OF INVITING DIFFERENT MUSICIANS TO PLAN WEEKLY THEMED CONCERTS... THE GUARDIAN

THURSDAYS FRIDAYS

SATURDAYS SUNDAYS

CONTEMPORARY

COMEDY

JAZZ

CLASSICAL

MONDAYS

FOLK

MONDAYS

SPOKEN WORD

Regular NIGHTS


08 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

Genius in the House… Described as ‘divinely musically gifted’, ‘a lyricist of diabolical ingenuity’, and ‘unabashedly offensive’, Tim Minchin ‘ is to musical comedy what Charles Darwin was to evolution’ (Time Out). As his musical Matilda opens in the West End, the Australian composer, actor and comedian moves into a studio at Kings Place, to become our very own Artist-in-Residence. How did your life as a musician start? I had a few piano lessons when I was a kid, but quit at about 11 or 12. I started developing my dubious style in my teens, just learning chords and playing with my brother. I’ve always learnt by writing – the more I wrote songs, the further I stretched myself as a muso. How did comedy come into it – or was it the other way round? Music very much came first. I was writing songs from 12 or 13, and first wrote music for theatre at 17. In my late twenties I started performing cabaret shows focusing on my satirical stuff, and after a while, I realised that my audiences were laughing quite a lot! So I called it comedy, and that’s when things got good. At 10 years old, what did you imagine you would be doing when you grew up? A farmer. Who are your musical heroes – both comic and serious? I don’t really have musical

heroes. I love music, but don’t obsess over stuff. Conversely, if I had to list songwriters and composers I admire, I would need all day. But, y’know... Ray Davies (The Kink), Lennon and McCartney, The Rolling Stones, Ben Folds, Mozart, Bach, Sondheim, early Lloyd-Webber, The Scissor Sisters, Herbie Hancock, Louis Armstrong, Hendrix. I never really watched comedy before I started doing it, and certainly wasn’t a musical comedy fan. Weird, I know. Your musical Matilda has been a huge success: did you know you could pull that off? I didn’t! But I’m a great lover of Dahl, and I guess I feel I can write songs that make people laugh and songs that make people cry, so I was reasonably confident. The success of Matilda (so far) can be attributed to a lot of hard work by a lot of brilliant people... not least of all Dennis Kelly, who did the nearly impossible in creating a great script adaptation, and director Matthew Warchus, who kept Dennis and me in check and on task.

it’s a huge luxury to have a room of one’s own, hopefully I’ll write some stuff now I have somewhere to hIDE What do you want to do more of/less of? I want to write more musicals, and get back to a little bit of acting. I love variety and I like things that scare me. I want to do more exercise and less eating. You’re to be Artist-in-Residence at Kings Place. What will that mean for you – how do you see it evolving? I think it means I’ll drink a lot more good coffee. Hopefully I’ll also write some stuff. It’s a huge luxury to have a room of one’s own, and one that I have only just discovered. Ideally over the next year or two there’ll be plenty of time for me to write 9 til 5. I love going

to work in the mornings like a normal person – something I’d never really done until Matilda. I’m not entirely sure what I’m writing next – maybe a new musical, maybe a (non-comic) album, maybe a film, maybe, eventually, another solo show. The main thing is that I have somewhere to hide, and Kings Place is perfect. And there’s that beautiful concert hall if I ever want to do an intimate gig…

Tim will be involved in the Off with their Heads! programme in the Summer 2012 season. For more information, please register for our e-newsletter.


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January—March 2012

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS

Highs and Lows ? The lows: emptying 300 tins of corned beef and washing them out in the bath. The highs: finding 13 little girls to play mini versions of us. They were amazing and were a brilliant warm-up act for us! Where will Lady Garden be in a year’s time – in your dreams? We’ll persuade a billionaire to let us live in a Downton Abbey-style mansion where we write sketches, lip sync to Cliff Richard songs, drink coke floats and work on becoming a Spice Girls tribute act.

IT’S A GARDENER’S WORLD Sublime sketch troupe Lady Garden make their debut at Kings Place this March. Lady Gardener Camille Ucan introduces her colleagues, dubbed ‘Britain’s funniest women’ (Daily Mail), to Helen Wallace.

THURSDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 26 January

Impropera’s Night o’ Tartan

2 FEBRUARY

Miranda Hennessy & Friends + Dregs

9 FEBRUARY

Tony Law: Go Mr Tony Go!

16 FEBRUARY

Gong in 60 Seconds

1 MARCH

The Fix presents Raybot

TIM MINCHIN © JAMES PENLIDIS | LADY GARDEN © IDIL SUKAN

8 MARCH

The Beta Males: The Train Job + Max and Ivan are… Holmes and Watson

15 MARCH

Gong in 60 Seconds!

22 MARCH

Impropera: Spring is Sprung!

29 MARCH

Lady Garden & Friends

HIGHLIGHTS COMEDY

Who are you? Lady Garden are Hannah Dodd, Beattie Edmondson, Rose Johnson, Eleanor Thom and me, Camille Ucan. After meeting at the University of Manchester and becoming involved in student comedy nights, we took a sketch show up to the Edinburgh Festival in 2008. Since then we’ve toured the country, picking up a few awards. This year we appeared in Uptown Downstairs Abbey for Comic Relief. Watch our sketches on BBC online NOW!

can they let us know because we can no longer make a successful human pyramid…

Why did a sextet turn into a quintet? We all did drama degrees (so we had a lot of spare time). We did some comedy together, decided we liked it and carried on. We lost our sixth member Jess in Hull. She went backstage to pick up a forgotten prop and never reappeared. If anyone’s seen her

If you were an animal or a plant, what would it be? We are great believers in divvy and surreal. We also like unhinged and dark. Most of all we aim to make each other laugh, and hope that the fun spreads like a vicious virus amongst the audience. Like worse than flu. But funny. If we were a plant we’d be poison ivy.

Why the name – need I ask? When we first started we had a huge list of names (including Granny Left The Iron On or GLTIO – which sounds like a union and probably wouldn’t have caught on). We finally chose Lady Garden. We like that some people don’t know its double meaning – they just ask what our favourite flowers are…

Favourite review? ‘I didn’t really know what was going on, I completely lost it when they started to do an inexplicable routine with puppets.’ Worst-ever heckle… Glastonbury. We LOVE telling people we gigged at the coolest festival ever, though we actually played to a small crowd in a HUGE tent where one particular drunk joker shouted out ‘You’re rubbish’ and then ran round to the other side and shouted ‘And racist!’ We can assure you we are not racist. Maybe rubbish. But in a funny way. Any heroes or heroines ? Julia Davis (Nighty Night is a favourite), Tina Fey, Stuart Lee, Caroline Aherne, Eddie Izzard. And we love to watch The League of Gentlemen, Curb Your Enthusiasm, The Thick of It, Mighty Boosh and a bit of good old Fawlty Towers. What can we expect of your Kings Place gig? We’ve all promised to think of at least one brand-new joke. Plus we’ll invite some of our favourite sketch, stand-up and character acts to come along and make you laugh very loudly.

Off with their Heads! Lady Garden 29 March See Listings p76 for details

09


10 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

VISIONS IN BLACK AND WHITE Pascal Rogé is just one of a host of great pianists appearing at Kings Place in the Spring season, writes Helen Wallace

Celebrating Debussy with Pascal & Ami Rogé 16 & 17 February Brahms Unwrapped: Mikhail Rudy 21 January Imogen Cooper 23 March See Listings pp62–63, p55 and p75

CLASSICAL

Pascal & Ami Rogé

The spring season at Kings Place is studded with star pianists from around the world. First among them, the peerless Pascal Rogé, described as ‘the archetypal master of French pianism’. He and his partner Ami celebrate Debussy’s 150th birthday with two scintillating concerts, exploring early and late works (16, 17 February). Known for his supple, luminous, idiomatic performances of Debussy, Rogé has recently re-recorded and radically enriched his interpretation of the complete works on the Onyx label. His sense of freedom and spontaneity is rooted in his intense familiarity, as he himself has described: ‘I’d say that Schumann, Brahms and Beethoven are the gods in music, and Poulenc, Fauré and Debussy are my friends. I just find it easier to cope with friends than gods! French music is my language…’ Each programme will include works for four hands: in the first there’s the enchanting Petite Suite, many a pianist’s introduction to the composer, followed by a tumultuous four-hand arrangement of La Mer, while in the second we encounter the extraordinary En blanc et noir and highly atmospheric Epigraphes antiques. Solo repertoire includes Images Book 2 and, in the second concert, six Preludes and the composer’s visionary, ultra-modern last work, Elégie, written in the midst of the First World War when he was dying of cancer. Rogé says of performing the Preludes: ‘I can’t conceive what the listener can enjoy, compared to the voluptuous delight of creating all those sounds, perfumes, colours… Sometimes I even feel guilty about experiencing so much pleasure in public. It’s almost indecent!’ Pleasure of a very different sort is on offer in the first of Mikhail Rudy’s recitals for Brahms Unwrapped. He’ll perform the magnificent Schumann and Handel Variations on 21 January, of which he’s said, ‘It was my first love. It was like finding an encyclopaedia, a treasury of music history and culture.’ Last but not least, don’t miss a chance to hear the inimitable Imogen Cooper on 23 March in an all-Schubert programme including the Four Impromptus and the Sonata in D, D850, which opens a week-long Schubert celebration on BBC Radio 3.

HIGHLIGHTS

The voluptuous delight I take in creating those sounds, perfumes, colours –…it’s almost indecent! Pascal Rogé

Claude Debussy


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HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

January—March 2012

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS 31 DECEMBER & 1 JANUARY

New Year Concerts Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment plays Vivaldi’s Four Seasons

5 & 6 JANUARY

English String Music

Vasari Singers

PASCAL & AMI ROGÉ © NICK GRANITO | CLAUDE DEBUSSY © TULLY POTTER COLLECTION | VASARI SINGERS © Sim Canetty-Clarke | IMOGEN COOPER © SUSSIE AHLBURG

Singing the Swingle way The Swingle Singers lead another vintage A Cappella Festival this January. Due to popular demand, the Festival is now firmly established in the Kings Place calendar, and 2012 kicks off with a glittering line-up. The series opens on 12 January with the Vasari Singers joined by the Swingle Singers, followed by the World Champion beatboxer Bellatrix and her Boxettes (see back page feature p82) and a rare visit from off-the-wall Nordic comedy rock group FORK. The Cottontown Chorus represent the best of British barbershop, while the London Vocal Project showcases major talent on London’s jazz scene, and Cadence gives us a slick Canadian twist on that theme. Don’t miss three lively vocal workshops during the weekend, or the grand finale starring Euphonism and the pioneering Swingle Singers themselves. London A Cappella Festival 12–14 January See Listings pp52–53 for details

Orchestra of St John’s John Lubbock conductor with John Pierce tenor (5 Jan) Iris Korfker soprano (6 Jan)

12–14 JANUARY

London A Cappella Festival Vasari Singers (12 Jan) Swingles & Friends (14 Jan)

19–21 JANUARY

Brahms Unwrapped Week 1 Schubert Ensemble Brahms & the Alto (19 Jan) Endymion Brahms’s Quintets (20 Jan) Mikhail Rudy plays Brahms: Handel & Schumann Variations (21 Jan)

1–4 FEBRUARY

Great Britten!

with Dante Quartet & Friends

Nights in the gardens of Spain… The London Guitar Festival features some special guests from Spain this spring, including exquisite guitar-piano duo Hermanos Cuenca, who will perform Rodrigo’s famous Concierto de Aranjuez and works by Albéniz, and exciting young talent Fernando Espí who has swept the board at several international competitions in recent years. Spanish-themed music

by Bizet and Falla will also feature in the concert given by the virtuosic Vida Guitar Quartet. Uniquely, this festival will boast the very first London International Guitar Competition for all guitarists under the age of 30 (10 March). To find out more email info@igf.org.uk London Guitar Festival in the Spring 8–10 March See Listings pp70–71

Britten and Ovid (1 Feb) Britten’s Cello Suites (2 Feb) Robin Michael cello Britten and Bridge (3 Feb) Britten and Purcell (4 Feb) with pre-concert talk: Birth of a Masterpiece with David Matthews

16 & 17 FEBRUARY

Celebrating Debussy with Pascal & Ami Rogé

The Young Debussy (16 Feb) The Late Debussy (17 Feb)

1–3 MARCH

Brahms Unwrapped Week 2

8 JANUARY

Sacconi Quartet 10thAnniversary Concert

15 JANUARY

Youth and Maturity: Brahms’s Music for Piano & Viola (1 Mar) Charles Owen piano Philip Dukes viola

Philippe Graffin (violin), Henri Demarquette (cello) & Daniel Blumenthal (piano)

Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble – Brahms String Sextets (2 Mar)

22 JANUARY

Academy of St Martin in the Fields – Brahms’s Second Serenade (3 Mar)

8–10 MARCH

London Guitar Festival in the Spring Vida Guitar Quartet (8 Mar) Spanish Guitar Night with Dúo Hermanos Cuenca + Fernando Espí (9 Mar) London International Guitar Competition Final (10 Mar)

23 MARCH

Imogen Cooper plays Schubert Allegretto in C minor, D915 Four Impromptus, D899 Piano Sonata in D, D850

26–31 MARCH

New Zealand at Kings Place Eight Colours New Zealand String Quartet Jonathan Lemalu bass-baritone Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Jack Body, Gao Ping and Tan Dun (29 Mar) Death and the Maiden New Zealand String Quartet Madeleine Pierard soprano Schubert, Michael Norris and Ross Harris (30 Mar)

Imogen Cooper

SUNDAYS, 6.30pm HALL ONE

Spiritual Journeys New Zealand String Quartet Richard Nunns Taonga Puoro Beethoven, John Psathas and Gillian Karawe Whitehead (31 Mar)

Chilingirian Quartet & Valeria Resjan (piano) The Romantic Piano Quintets – 1

29 JANUARY Trio Goya

5 FEBRUARY

Turner Ensemble

12 FEBRUARY

Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets – Concert 6

19 FEBRUARY

ALSO PART OF JEWISH BOOK WEEK Shaham-Erez-Wallfisch Piano Trio

26 FEBRUARY

Sarah-Jane Bradley (viola) & Anthony Hewitt (piano)

4 MARCH

Rosamunde Trio

11 MARCH

Tippett Quartet

18 MARCH

Turner Ensemble in collaboration with the Royal Academy of Music & Trinity College of Music

25 MARCH

Vicky Yannoula & Jakob Fichert Piano Duo

1 APRIL

Chilingirian Quartet & Sofya Gulyak (piano): The Romantic Piano Quintets – 2

11


12 HIGHLIGHTS

mark twenty years in the business, and in recognition of the opening of University of the Arts London Central Saint Martin’s just around the corner from Kings Place, King is launching the new series of talks by leading figures in the world of art and design. There will be one or two speakers a season, and first up (16 January) is the celebrated architect Thomas Heatherwick, designer of the innovative Seed Cathedral at the Shanghai Expo 2010, the East Beach Café in Littlehampton and B of the Bang, the extraordinary sculpture outside the City of Manchester Stadium. ‘Thomas Heatherwick is one

Climb Inside Design Creative arts publisher Laurence King is launching a series of talks at Kings Place by leading figures in the world of design. Helen Wallace found out more.

of the most interesting architects and designers around at the moment,’ says King. ‘His work is so original: he combines incredible technological ingenuity with the ability to make his designs aesthetically extraordinary. He’s a one-off genius – I don’t think anyone could exactly follow him. And he doesn’t give a large number of talks, so this is quite a rare opportunity for students and interested members of the public to find out more.’ The second talk (12 March) will be by the design consultancy Graphic Thought Facility, who have worked for everyone from Marks & Spencer, the Victoria and Albert Museum and Design Museum to the Frieze Art Fair and Shakespeare’s Globe, but are perhaps most celebrated for their innovative gallery brochures. King is a great admirer: ‘What Graphic Thought Facility have done with designs, particularly in the area of art, is remarkable. Clear, thoughtful, innovative but not just of the moment – their work will look stylish and interesting in 30 years’ time. Again, they don’t widely discuss their ideas. Perhaps the most interesting things they’ve done have been the catalogues for the Gagosian and Design Museum, that’s what has attracted the design community: there, they’ve been allowed to be more radical and experimental.’

SPOKEN WORD

‘We want revelatory talks, startling discoveries, good speakers,’ says Laurence King of his new series of talks at Kings Place, from his elegant headquarters in City Road. His eponymous publishing company is a world leader in the creative arts, boasting such design student essentials as A World History of Art by Hugh Honour and John Fleming and David Watkin’s History of Western Architecture as well as the more personal and quirky Nina Chakrabarti’s popular My Wonderful World of Fashion, and How to be a Graphic Designer Without Losing Your Soul by Adrian Shaughnessy. To

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

HIGHLIGHTS

Product design was ‘it’ in the 1980s, Graphic design in the 1990s, the last decade saw fashion as the growth area. Now it’s contemporary art

Graphic Thought Facility design for Gagosian Gallery Lichtenstein Girls 2008


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

January—March 2012

Heatherwick combines incredible technological ingenuity with the ability to make his designs aesthetically extraordinary

MONDAYS, 7pm – HALL ONE 16 JANUARY

Thomas Heatherwick lecturing on his award-winning projects in architecture, urban infrastructure & furniture design

23 JANUARY

Reading the Riots with Paul Lewis

30 JANUARY

ALSO PART OF JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Alain de Botton

East Beach Cafe © Andy Stagg | UK Pavilion © Iwan Baan

East Beach Café

King is keen to point out that the talks at Kings Place are not commercial book launches: ‘Our association with Kings Place gives us the opportunity to create a series of events that are not commercial, but should be of great interest to the wider artistic community. We’re particularly interested in students; we want to make exciting events for young people and to make them as inexpensive as possible.’ Looking back over twenty years in publishing he can now see how different aspects of design have had their moment in the spotlight: ‘Product design was “it” in the 1980s, graphic design reached beyond its confines in the 1990s, the last decade has seen fashion as the major growth area. But now I think it’s contemporary art. I don’t just mean what is available at the Tate or high-end galleries, but the whole world of contemporary art enterprise.’ So his current preoccupation is to create contemporary art books which ‘abandon the distinction between high art and low art, blur the line between graphics, illustration and fine art. For example we recently published a book called Microworlds which focused on the use of small figures to create set pieces. You have the Chapman brothers doing huge elaborate scenes, next door to other, unknown, even amateur, artists doing very inventive, clever, thoughtful things with figures too.’ Books, he explains, that are simply compilations of pictures don’t sell these days as so many of the images are on the internet – ‘A book’s got to work a lot harder now; we’ve yet to develop enhanced, digital forms of our books, but it will come. The principles of good design have not changed, though attention spans have reduced.’ Words on Monday: Thomas Heatherwick 16 January Words on Monday: Graphic Thought Facility 12 March See Listings p54 and p72 for details

6 FEBRUARY

The Sebald Lecture

Sean O’Brien: ‘Making the Crossing: the Poet as Translator’ Exterior (above) and interior – Seed Cathedral at the Shanghai Expo 2010

13 FEBRUARY

Foyles Literary Lecture 20 FEBRUARY

Time for Tennyson The spotlight will be on Alfred, Lord Tennyson in Olympic year – the rousing words ‘To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield’ from his poem Ulysses were chosen to be engraved on a permanent installation in the Olympic Village. Poet in the City takes this opportunity to celebrate the poet of The Charge of the Light Brigade and other high-Victorian masterworks beloved of old and young alike. Join well-known actors and Tennyson experts on 27 February, Hall One 7pm.

Words on Monday: Tennyson ‘To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield’ 27 February. See Listings p68 for details

ALSO PART OF JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The Poetry of Bob Dylan 27 FEBRUARY

Tennyson: ‘To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield’ 5 MARCH

What’s Religion? with Karen Armstrong

12 MARCH

Graphic Thought Facility in conversation

19 MARCH

Forward into the 21st century presented by William Sieghart

26 MARCH

ALSO PART OF NEW ZEALAND AT KINGS PLACE

New Worlds: New Perspectives

featuring Fleur Adcock, Bill Manhire & Tusiata Avia

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14 HIGHLIGHTS

January—March 2012

Curator Martin Simpson has invited the veteran double act of politician Tony Benn and singer Roy Bailey to his series in February

People still do a double take when they see Tony Benn billed at a music event, as they will for Martin Simpson’s Purpose and Grace series at Kings Place. Yet in Roy Bailey, the former Labour minister long ago found not only a kindred spirit but an artistic outlet for the extraordinary fund of entertaining anecdotes that accompany his encyclopaedic knowledge of our political history. Bailey is himself something of a legend, with a 50-year career as one of the British folk world’s best-loved singers (in 2000 he was awarded an MBE, which he later returned in protest at the government’s foreign policy). A colourful personality as well as a magnificent vocalist, Bailey is described by his old compadre Benn as ‘the greatest socialist folk singer of his generation’. They make an incorrigible double act. Benn, the great orator, regales the audience with quotations and tales of radical figures such as revolutionary Tom Paine and suffragette Emily Davison and when he pauses for breath, Bailey trawls through his own extensive repertoire to sing something that illustrates the eternal truths in Benn’s engaging oratory. ‘The arts have a larger part to play in political life than is normally recognised,’ says Benn, who first encountered his old friend in Burford in 1976 at a commemorative event marking the death of three Leveller soldiers shot for refusing to fight for Cromwell in Ireland. ‘Our programme is what people have said about injustice for hundreds of years… it encourages the audience to feel that nothing is lost forever.’ Originally basing their show The Writing On The Wall on Benn’s book, they’ve performed together since 1990, winning the Best Live Act gong at the BBC Folk Awards in 2003, both clearly enjoying the natural chemistry between them immensely. ‘Tony’s words are funny and his readings are very powerful and when you add music and songs people are engaged on another level,’ says Bailey. With a combined age of 162, Benn and Bailey prove that despite the folk world’s impressive recent surge of exciting young talent, seasoned veterans still set the standards... as a closer look at Simpson’s Purpose and Grace programme proves. Other attractions include Chris Wood, Simpson himself, June Tabor and Dick Gaughan, all key figures from the first wave of the folk revival who, after four decades as professional performers, remain at the top of their game. Youth doesn’t always rule. Colin Irwin Purpose and Grace curated by Martin Simpson and Alan Bearman. 8–11 February. See Listings pp60–61 for details

FOLK

Purpose and Grace

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

HIGHLIGHTS

roy bailey is the greatest socialist folk singer of his generation TONY benn

Tony Benn and Roy Bailey


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2012

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

IF I needed a bus fare I’d play in the street for half an hour and earn IT these characters so I don’t have to reveal too much. And then I bring in astronomy. I read a lot of science books…

FRIDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 20 JANUARY

Alternative Burns Night with Babelfish 27 JANUARY

Listen to Britain: Folk Music & Film with The Memory Band 3 FEBRUARY

RM Hubbert & Friends 10 FEBRUARY

ALSO PART OF PURPOSE & GRACE

Ruth Theodore Band + Nancy Wallace & Jason Steel 17 FEBRUARY

Breabach

24 FEBRUARY

Alex Highton 2 MARCH

Southern Tenant Folk Union 9 MARCH

ROY BAILEY, TONY BENN, RUTH THEODORE © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

ALSO PART OF LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL IN THE SPRING

David Gibb & Elly Lucas 16 MARCH

Martin Carthy 23 MARCH

Annbjørg Lien Band 30 MARCH

Jack Cheshire

Ruth Theodore

DON’T BOX HER IN! Ruth Theodore defies all categorisation, as Colin Irwin discovered when he talked to the brilliantly unpredictable artist, who comes to Kings Place in February with Nancy Wallace and Jason Steel. Among the most acclaimed and intriguing in the new wave of British folk musicians are three artists appearing at Kings Place in February – Nancy Wallace, Jason Steel and Ruth Theodore. Raised in a folk-loving family, Nancy Wallace nevertheless had a circuitous journey through pop, world music and hard rock before rediscovering folk via the Memory Band and her superb solo album Old Stories. Her occasional collaborator Yorkshireman Jason Steel is an inventive guitarist, banjo player, singer and arranger, who also has an outstanding solo album under his belt, Fire Begot Ash. Ruth Theodore is different again, defying all attempts to categorise the surreal lyricism and quirky style of her brilliantly unpredictable second album, White Holes Of Mole Hills.

Reviewers love your White Holes Of Mole Hills album but never know how to describe it – how would you describe it? Oh… difficult easy listening… Are you still proud of it? Yes. I put a lot of time and effort into it. When I listen to the first album, Worm Food, I just think… oh do shut up… but I really like White Holes. It reflects a significant time in my life – quite a sad one – and I really empathise with the way I was feeling when I wrote those songs. Your lyrics are rather, er, unusual, with lots of astronomical themes. What are the songs about? I’m not sure even I know what some of them are about! They are autobiographical but I have a fear of being too honest so I invent

Your band is an unusual line-up too, with clarinet and cello… I’m going to change it for the next album to keep things fresh. I want a French horn and an oboe and viola and drums and bass. You don’t often hear French horn and oboe because they’re quite demanding, but I really love Stravinsky and Prokofiev and there’s a lot of that sort of thing in their music. You cut your teeth busking, didn’t you? If I needed the bus fare to go somewhere I’d play in the street for half an hour and earn £2.50. I busked a bit when I came to London but as I got older I was more self-conscious about it. I’d have old ladies coming up saying, ‘Are you going to spend that on drugs?’. You’re on a bill at Kings Place with Nancy Wallace and Jason Steel – do you feel part of the new folk generation? I do feel folk is where the roots of it all are and I feel really comfortable in it – it’s a nice world, though I do sometimes still feel on the edge of it. If I have to be in a box I’d rather be in a folk box than a singersongwriter box. There is an element of folkie storytelling in what I do… but I’d never write anything to fit in with a label on a box.

Folk Union: Ruth Theodore Band, Nancy Wallace and Jason Steel 10 February See Listings p61 for details

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16 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

TWO’S COMPANY... Jazz piano duo extraordinaire, Nikki Iles and Kate Williams have proved to be telepathic collaborators. Sebastian Scotney welcomes their visit to The Base in February Kate Williams and Nikki Iles have a lot in common. The two pianistcomposers teach at the same university, and share the same birthday, in May. And their work together as a two-piano duo, still in its early stages, is already revealing affinities between them which run far and deep. Their first duo booking was a shortish set in the Pizza Express Dean Street’s Two Steinway festival in April 2011, broadcast by Radio 3. ‘We only did five numbers, but had the definite feeling we were just getting going,’ says Iles. Keith Loxam, who produced that radio broadcast recalls: ‘What I particularly remember is the level of cohesion, the sheer quality of the listening, their ability to anticipate what the other might do.’

My interview with the two players, at Kate Williams’ home in West London, was like eavesdropping on a seamless conversation. Iles: ‘One of the things I love about Kate’s work is as a writer, her awareness of harmony and texture.’ Williams: ‘Thank you! I haven’t had much opportunity to hear other pianists play my tunes. Nikki immediately made my tune Pelagic feel substantial, but also open, colourful, sonorous.’ Williams: ‘I’m excited, I’ll be bringing a couple of new tunes to be premiered at Kings Place.’ Iles: ‘So will I!’ Both musicians singled out a key influence, saxophonist Stan Sulzmann. Iles first knew him as a teacher: ‘Yes, he never tells you

how to play, he just lets you grow.’ Williams: ‘In my band Stan is always encouraging without saying too much or imposing his opinion.’ They also discuss pianist John Taylor, a major inspiration for both of them, and whose music they’ll be including in their set at Kings Place. For Iles, ‘Seeing him live is inspiring,’ while Williams adds: ‘You recognise that touch straight away.’ How, I ask, do they manage to stay out of each other’s octave? ‘We find that we cross over, we blend, it works naturally,’ says Williams: ‘We duck and dive, adapt, work on the hoof.’ The Base: Nikki Iles and Kate Williams 11 February See Listings p61 for details

we cross over, we blend, we duck and dive, we work on the hoof.


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2012

HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

SATURDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 7 JANUARY

Jiri Slavik/Fred Thomas Duo + Benoît Delbecq 21 JANUARY

Simon Harris & Trio Manouche 28 JANUARY

Benet McLean 4 FEBRUARY

Light the Blue Touch Paper...

Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3 presents...

Kit Downes in concert

11 FEBRUARY

Nikki Iles & Kate Williams Piano Duo

Colin Towns brings his new band to Kings Place

18 FEBRUARY

Marius Neset: Golden Xplosion 3 MARCH

NIkKI ILES & KATE WILLIAMS © TIM DICKESON | BLUE TOUCH PAPER © ROB o’CONNOR | KIT DOWNES © EMILE HOLBA

Aimua Eghobamien 10 MARCH

Blue Touch Paper 17 MARCH

Barb Jungr ‘Strung Out’: Take Me to the River 24 MARCH

Mike Gibbs with the Hans Koller Ensemble celebrating Gil Evans’ music and influence

31 MARCH

Tom Hewson’s Treehouse

Catch the Kit There’ll be two opportunities to hear one of the UK’s most dynamic young pianists, Kit Downes, at Kings Place in Spring 2012. He’ll be here on 4 February for a Radio 3 New Generation session with drummers James Maddren and Seb Rochford, and back on 8 April as part of a triple bill in the Global Music Foundation series, also featuring Frank Harrison and Bruce Barth. The Base: Kit Downes 4 February Global Music Foundation 8 April See Listings p59 and Interact Highlights p20–21

Colin Towns brings a new six-piece band to Kings Place in March, packed with talent and experience: Blue Touch Paper, playing in Hall Two, will not only be making their UK debut but celebrating the British launch of their first CD, Stand Well Back. Colin Towns is a successful and versatile musician. He has written the scores for over 300 feature films and TV dramas, his credits including Cadfael and Our Friends in the North. He was a rock musician and co-composer with Ian Gillan, and is now Composer-in-Residence with Hamburg’s NDR Big Band. Towns has been looking forward to getting this Anglo-German unit on the road for a couple of years, and describes Blue Touch Paper as: ‘challenging, electronic, looking forward; madly exciting, but also using space and melody.’ The German press has called the album ‘one of the surprises of the year’ and a ‘firework of inspiration’. Stand well back. The Base: Colin Towns and Blue Touch Paper 10 March. See Listings p71

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Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

MONDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO

Tim Rutherford-Johnson celebrates the anniversaries of two very special groups: percussion wizards ensemblebash and the ever-colourful Chroma.

16 JANUARY

ensemblebash@20 part 1: Minimum Maximum 23 JANUARY

Manu Delago & Living Room in London 30 JANUARY

Tom Arthurs & Not Applicable 6 FEBRUARY

Phil Minton & Guests 13 FEBRUARY

Zubin Kanga: Piano Inside/Out 20 FEBRUARY

CHROMA Ensemble celebrating 15 years of new work

27 FEBRUARY

Harold’s Sound: Harold Budd, Simon Fisher Turner & Daniel Biro A tribute to the sound of the Fender Rhodes electric piano

5 MARCH

NONCLASSICAL

presented by Gabriel Prokofiev & Richard Lannoy

12 MARCH

EXAUDI: Exposure 2012 19 MARCH

Miriam Kramer & Will Dutta: Post-Minimal 26 MARCH

ALSO PART OF NEW ZEALAND AT KINGS PLACE

The Body Electric

In an age of cuts, any anniversary of a contemporary music ensemble is to be celebrated, and in 2012 Kings Place’s Out Hear series is marking two significant milestones. Speaking to members of the percussion quartet ensemblebash (20 this year) and the chamber orchestra CHROMA (15) you sense that the secret to their longevity has been a commitment to finding new audiences for contemporary music without compromising on musical integrity. In the 1990s that was still an unusual attitude. ‘We were part of a new wave that started to take the audience seriously,’ says Chris Brannick of ensemblebash. The courage to set out alone was required. Their iconoclastic approach, drawing on the spirit of Ghanaian social drumming, set them up for a lot of criticism, but over two decades they have changed British perceptions not only of percussion music (commissioning many works along the way) but of classical concerts in general. ‘One of the best compliments is when someone says that they “liked the show” – and it is a show, not a concert. The visual side matters to us,’ says Brannick. Clarinettist Stuart King founded CHROMA as a young graduate, realising that the initiative lay with him. The 13-strong lineup’s first concert incorporated a collection of bronze sculptures, and this mixing of art forms has become a signature. ‘The idea from the start was that it would be great to work with artists from other disciplines.’ They

currently work with Tête à Tête opera as well as Whitechapel Art Gallery and Pallant House Gallery. And although contemporary music was also part of that vision, King prides himself on the fact that the group’s reputation is built just as much on the friendliness of its members. If the personal relationships are strong an attachment to the music will follow – ‘people can see that you are a human being’. Among CHROMA’s many commitments outside London a favourite is a biennial trip to Shetland, organising projects with schoolchildren who would otherwise have practically no access to new music. Although the groups have given opportunities to a cohort of British composers, it’s their no fuss, no drama approach to contemporary music-making that may be their real legacy. Out Hear: ensemblebash 16 January Out Hear: Chroma 20 February See Listings p54 and p66 for details

CONTEMPORARY

Birthday Bashes

HIGHLIGHTS

we put on a show, not a concert, the visual side matters


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

MANU the hang man What’s it like to be the world’s leading performer on a brand-new instrument? Helen Wallace met the Austrian Hang player Manu Delago, who comes to Out Hear in January.

January—March 2012

The Hang was only invented in 2000: how did you become a virtuoso? My father is a composer and arranger, always on the look out for new sounds. He found the Hang on the internet and ordered one. I picked it up and started experimenting; it was so new, so strange. I bought my own instrument and slowly built up a collection.

jazz bands. Then I went to the Guildhall School to study jazz drumming, and Trinity College to do composition. The Hang gave me more confidence: there are thousands of good drummers here, but I was the only one doing this! I took it to piano teachers and gained ideas from them. I’ve spent a lot of time with rhythm but not so much with melody.

Can anyone buy a Hang and learn how to play it? Hangs are made by PANart, a small workshop in Berne. Each one is individually made and they cost about £1k. There’s a waiting list. You rest it on your lap or a stand and play with hands and fingers, not mallets. You have to be creatively involved with it because there’s no music for it.

Your YouTube video of Mono Desir has become a global hit: has that been good for you? I created a simple four-minute Hang solo in 2007, recorded myself on a cheap video camera, did a bad editing job, posted it up on YouTube and it went global. At one time it was No. 26 in the whole YouTube chart! It’s been used on an advert for Nurofen, and 20 or 30 other people have remixed it. But the video has brought me so many gigs, I didn’t mind it going out for free. My collaboration with Björk came from her seeing that video...

Why did it inspire you to become a composer? It inspired me with its very interesting sound, magical and rare: there’s such variety, it can sound more like a harp than a percussion instrument, or you can play percussively, so it’s a little like an Indian tabla, you can bend some notes, turn it around and it sounds like a gong or a bell-like instrument. But the fact that there was no music was the biggest provocation: it needed music.

ENSEMBLEBASH © NICK WHITE | MANU DELAGO © SPawel Szewczyk

What were your ambitions before you became a Hang player? I studied classical percussion in Austria, and I played drum kit in lots of rock and

The hang’s sound is magical and rare: it can be like a harp or you can play it like an Indian tabla

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

Which is how you came to be part of Björk’s Biophilia album and live show? Yes. She was working on the Virus track for her new album and wanted the Hang sound in her arrangement. I took the song and created a part and flew out to Iceland to work on the recording. When she realised I played drums too she asked me to be one of the two musicians on stage for Biophilia’s live show, playing xylosynths, marimba and other percussion. Now we’re on tour for the best part of a year. How did your group Living Room in London come about? I met Tom Norris, co-leader of the LSO second violins, when he was recording as a singer-songwriter in Austria. His producer introduced us and I ended up playing on his album. Later, in London, he brought along a string trio to my duo with clarinettist Christoph Pepe Auer, and it became Living Room in London. We all write music and commission other composers – there’ll be premieres by Peter Wiegold, Dave Ibbett and Milton Mermikides in our gig. We keep it as broad as possible, from Mozart to the Beatles.

Out Hear: Manu Delago with Living Room in London 23 January See Listings p56 for details

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20 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

INTERACT

A Global Get-Together This Easter, Kings Place will play host to a unique international jazz course, which combines intensive teaching with star-studded public concerts and free foyer events. Helen Wallace learnt more from drummer and director Stephen Keogh. remarkably during a course. Many of our students are at music college or have been in the past. But I would advise anyone looking for a gentle jazz-themed holiday not to apply – we have great fun but expect everyone to work!’ He says the sheer intensity and quality of teaching (six hours per day) will give students a ‘total immersion’ in music with activities including instrumental classes, master classes, performance opportunities, supervised rehearsals, group workshops and ensemble sessions. Add to this choir, Samba, pulse training, ear training, coordination and movement, and numerous opportunities to play with fellow students and staff, and it’s clear why this is a course with a difference. As Venezuelan jazz pianist Edward Simon put it, ‘It’s such a rounded, holistic experience... it makes you a complete musician.’ Keogh points out that fundamental aspects of musicianship, such as pulse and rhythm, often get overlooked at college when students are focused on virtuoso instrumental technique. ‘Sometimes all the fun in music-making has been bashed out of students, it’s become a dry, mechanical exercise. Discipline is vital, but the result of all the work should be joyous and we find people rediscover that joy on these courses.’ As one pianist alumnus remarked, ‘It’s given me back my love of music’. Having run courses all over Europe, the UK and in China, Stephen Keogh’s thrilled to come to Kings Place: ‘It’s a dream come true to be able to run a course in London, one of the great music centres of the world, and this is one of the most exciting venues in the city.’ Please contact Stephen Keogh with any questions about applying: stephen@globalmusicfoundation.org

Global Music Foundation Course 6–9 April See the GMF website and the next issue of What’s On guide for free foyer events, workshops and concerts.

HIGHLIGHTS

PHOTOS © MELODY AND IAN MCLAREN

‘Not so much a school as a celebration’, is how one participant described a Global Music Foundation jazz course. And for the first-ever GMF course at Kings Place, over Easter 2012, director Stephen Keogh is determined to make the whole building buzz: ‘We’ll have free foyer events where anyone can come along and learn Samba, bring their kids to the children’s concert or listen in to some great vocal performances.’ Then there are the impressive evening concerts followed by late-night jamming sessions at Pizza Express in Dean Street, for which everyone’s welcome to pile in too. For the intensive four-day course, Keogh has assembled an exceptional faculty. Joining Jason Rebello, Deborah Brown, Jim Mullen, Peter King, Davide Petrocca, Kit Downes, Bruce Barth, Jean Toussaint, Frank Harrison and Darragh Morgan are Guillermo Rozenthuler, who explores the body and vocalisation, Keogh himself leading pulse training, Pete Churchill leading vocal ensembles, and Francesco Petreni doing Samba workshops. As legendary saxophonist (and GMF teacher) Scott Hamilton commented: ‘The faculty here consists of the people I’d meet on gigs rather than those you’d find just in a music school.’ But though they may be big names on the international circuit, Keogh is keen to point out their other qualities: ‘I would say that this group of people are not only great musicians and teachers, but wonderful human beings, devoted to their craft and to sharing insights. I’ve been working with them for over twenty years, and they are so generous with their time and knowledge, they are inspirational.’ With such a stellar cast, who is qualified to join the course, I ask? ‘We are open to anyone over 17 who is really serious about music and wants to develop all areas of their musicianship. We don’t audition: we’re looking for those with the right attitude, not those with particular qualifications. We’ve had people with quite basic skills on an instrument develop


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

January—March 2012 Clockwise from top: Stephen Keogh, Francesco Petreni, Guillermo Rozenthuler, Arnie Somogyi, Felix Gibbons and Deborah Brown leading GMF students in various workshops

INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS 14 JANUARY

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Purely A Cappella

Singing workshops led by the Swingle Singers. Open to enthusiastic singers and choirs of all ages and abilities. Voice Camp with the Swingle Singers Hall Two 11am Improvisation with Pete Churchill Hall Two 12.30pm Introduction to Live Looping with FreePlay Duo Hall Two 3.30pm

11 FEBRUARY

PURPOSE AND GRACE

Folk Music Workshops

it’s such a rounded, holistic experience, it makes you a complete musician

Guitar Workshop with Martin Simpson St Pancras Room 1pm Creating Harmony: Singing Workshop with Fay Hield Limehouse Room 2pm Guitar Workshop with Sam Carter & Ewan McLennan St Pancras Room 3.30pm

12 FEBRUARY

SPRING 2012

NATIONAL YOUTH JAZZ COLLECTIVE

NYJC Young Musicians Programme

Workshops, jam sessions and performance opportunities for school-aged young jazz musicians Led by Issie Barratt and Percy Pursglove, the NYCJ young musicians programme focuses on small group improvisation in streamed groups designed to support all levels of ability. Each Sunday workshop ends with an informal concert given to the students’ families and friends. Sundays 10am – 6pm 8 Jan, 18 Mar, 6 May, July (date TBC) Hall Two 4.30pm – Performance for friends and family Cost for the programme: £20 a session. A bursary scheme is available for young people in receipt of benefits. NYJC also offers a CPD programme for teachers on the same dates. Cost for the CPD programme is £40 a session. Concessions available. For further information, visit kingsplace.co.uk/interact/interact-events

Piano-Yoga® with GéNIA

The NYJC can also support and assess Arts Award candidates.

Award-winning pianist GéNIA’s groundbreaking piano method available in this one-day retreat for pianists of advancedbeginner to advanced level wishing to improve their technique.

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Limehouse Room 10.30am–5.30pm

3 March

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Brahms Study Day – 1 Part 1 – Tracking Brahms’s Life with Michael Musgrave (Juilliard School of Music) Part 2 – Brahms and the Third Reich with Erik Levi (Royal Holloway, University of London) St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm; Lunch break; 2pm–4.30pm

10 March

LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL IN THE SPRING

Guitar Workshops

Classical Solo Guitar Masterclass with Fernando Espí St Pancras Room 9.30am Classical Guitar Ensemble Masterclass with Vida Guitar Quartet St Pancras Room 12pm

SPRING 2012

Brahms Unwrapped Outreach Projects with Academy of St Martin in the Fields As part of their Brahms Unwrapped week, the Academy are working with young people from Islington on two Olympic projects. Islington teenagers come together to form the Creative Orchestra to re-imagine classical repertoire with Academy musicians through performance practice, composition and improvisation, culminating in a performance at Kings Place. The musical baton is passed between five Islington schools on Musical Torch, with Brahms igniting the opening flame. A phrase from Brahms’s music will inspire young people to compose their own piece of music. A phrase from this piece will inspire the next school and so the musical relay continues to Kings Place, culminating in a performance in Hall Two with the Academy’s players.

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January—March 2012

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

ART

NEW HARMONIES In March 2012 Pangolin London will hold a joint exhibition of sculpture and works on paper by two highly regarded female sculptors, Almuth Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer, writes Alexandra Darby.

HIGHLIGHTS

Making sculpture is a very physical activity and one which involves most of the senses Charlotte Mayer

Almuth Tebbenhoff Empty Spheres Bronze, Edition of 4


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2012

HIGHLIGHTS ART

ART HIGHLIGHTS 2 DECEMBER – 10 FEBRUARY Kings Place Gallery

Portraits of Central Saint Martins by Janet Lance Hughes 2 DECEMBER – 10 FEBRUARY Kings Place Gallery

Chris Moore: Catwalking 11 JANUARY – 3 MARCH Pangolin London

’50s & ’60s British Sculpture Show Left: Almuth Tebbenhoff Yellow, Painted steel Above: Charlotte Mayer Scintilla, Bronze, Edition of 8

18 JANUARY – 23 JANUARY Pangolin London exhibiting at

London Art Fair at the 2012 London Art Fair at the Islington Business Design Centre (Stand G48)

14 FEBRUARY – 23 MARCH

SCULPTURE PHOTOS © Pangolin London/Steve Russell

Kings Place Gallery

Almuth Tebbenhoff has never been afraid to experiment with new processes or materials. Born in Germany and originally trained as a ceramicist, Tebbenhoff is known for her work in clay, wood, bronze, stone and steel. Though she focuses on sculpture, she often uses drawing as a method to feed concepts into her unique and colourful creations. She says: ‘The concerns are similar, whichever material I use: balancing opposing forces and creating new harmonies. I find inspiration in the natural world around me and in astronomical space. Because it is so incomprehensibly vast, I make small models that are abstractions of my feelings: about love, life, death, sex, soul, God, art, myself... all this whilst being sucked by gravity on to a spinning ball, hurtling through space at 66,000 mph.’ Almuth Tebbenhoff’s earlier pieces were often monochrome and geometric, but more recently her work has developed a much freer mode of expression. She continues to explore the abstract but is now enjoying a bolder use of space and it will be interesting to see how this is brought into the new work that will be on show for the first time in the exhibition. Both Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer draw their ideas from the natural world though their methods of making their art vary greatly; in contrast to Tebbenhoff’s use of drawing as a starting point, Mayer prefers to work directly from found objects in her studio. Mayer was born in Prague in 1929 but settled in London to study at Goldsmiths School of Art and later the Royal College of Art. As an

artist she has said she has been inspired by the various architectural forms around her but it is evident now that nature, both physically and conceptually, also influences and integrates itself into her three-dimensional forms. About her work she says: ‘Most of my sculptures have been cast in bronze or are fabricated in stainless steel. However the original works were made from materials found in the studio or in the countryside. They may be tree trunks, leaves, stalks of umbellifera, balsa scantlings, and wax. Each material offers new ways of working and contributes to the realisation of the theme in mind. The making of sculpture is, for me, an adventurous business: a very physical activity and one which involves most of the senses.’ Mayer’s use of complex and challenging constructions, organic surfaces and her tireless attention to detail makes her pieces instantly recognisable; her many public, private and corporate commissions worldwide are evidence of her success. Both artists are valued members of the Royal British Society of Sculptors and have also exhibited at the Cass Foundation sculpture park in Goodwood; just small tributes to the high regard in which they both stand. They have previously shown together in exhibitions such as Fe2 05 at the Myles Meehan Gallery and Women Make Sculpture at Pangolin London last Spring.

Norman Cornish: The Early Years Paintings and Drawings Norman Cornish Children Playing

14 MARCH – 5 MAY Pangolin London

Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff

TALKING ART 23 JANUARY Frida Kahlo

13 FEBRUARY

Pangolin Show: Focus on the Venice Biennale

27 FEBRUARY Pangolin London: Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff 14 March – 5 May See Art Listings p50 for details

Venus – the Goddess of Love in Art

19 MARCH Manet

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24 HIGHLIGHTS

January—March 2012

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HIGHLIGHTS

DINNER PARTIES WITH A DIFFERENCE Supper Clubs have taken London by storm, but few are as imaginative and convivial as those run by Kings Place’s own Rotunda Restaurant, discovers Jenny Linford

Visitors to Kings Place are accustomed to unusual sights in the building, but even so, the spectacle of a whole sheep’s carcass lying on a wooden block in the foyer one summer’s evening attracted a number of curious glances. As it turned out, this striking display was not a new art installation, but the start of one of the Rotunda Restaurant’s Supper Clubs, showcasing the restaurant’s very special relationship with the farm which supplies its meat. The supper club phenomenon has taken London by storm. What began as a cult, underground food scene, with people opening up their homes to offer meals to strangers, has become enormously popular, and Rotunda is tapping into this trend with a series of successful Supper Clubs. ‘As a new restaurant in the area we’re trying to build up loyal, local support,’ explains Green and Fortune’s CEO John Nugent. ‘Being in an artistic and

cultural building like Kings Place, it’s almost an extension of the artistic programme to have Supper Clubs here. There’s always something interesting going on – be it in the Gallery, Hall One, the Rotunda, wherever. It seemed a very easy fit to put the two together.’ The recipe for Rotunda’s Supper Clubs is to offer a dash of knowledge with a generous amount of food, wine and sociability. ‘We like our Supper Clubs to to be a teaching experience, but not in a dull way,’ says Rotunda Restaurant’s vivacious Manager, Liz Reece. ‘We want people to come out of any of our events having learnt a little bit more about a subject they were interested in, whether it’s meat or wine.’ The wine tasting Supper Clubs have been a great hit. ‘We do them in conjunction with Swig who supply our wines. They’re a great band of people to do wine tastings with as they’re really unpretentious about it all. You get


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Supper clubs are almost an extension of the artistic programme in a building like Kings Place

Rotunda Supper ClubS

14 FEBRUARY 6.30pm

Valentine’s Evening 20 MARCH 6.30pm

Champagne Dinner 1 MAY 6.30pm

Cheese & Wine 26 JUNE 6.30pm

Lamb Dinner

17 JULY 6.30pm

Wine Tasting 11 SEP 6.30pm

Wine Tasting 16 OCT 6.30pm

Game Dinner

27 NOV 6.30pm

Beef Dinner

January—March 2012

ten wines to taste, you’re encouraged to have a good glug while they talk about them. Everyone swallows at our wine tastings!’ she laughs. ‘Then people come through and have a fourcourse dinner in which we match some of the wines with our food.’ The Supper Clubs also offer Rotunda a chance to highlight the restaurant’s own Northumbrian farm which supplies them with their beef and lamb. Each year sees two The Farmer, The Butcher, The Chef supper club events: one on lamb and one on beef. Farmer Ian Scott travels down from Northumberland to take part in the event, speaking with an impressive conviction about the way he rears his livestock. ‘This is the first spring lamb off our farm,’ he declares at the Lamb Supper Club held in late June. ‘In London you’ll get spring lambs in February. They’ll have been reared in sheds. My animals are born indoors, then a few days later they’re outside on the grass, reared as naturally as you can get it.’ Next comes a deft display of butchery on the lamb’s carcass by butcher Daz (Daryl Roach) – aptly named as his knife skills are, indeed, dazzling – while Head Chef Ian Green explains the cuts of meat and their uses in the restaurant. Having watched with fascination, the supper club participants crowd in to ask questions and examine the cuts of meat. There’s a buzz of conversation and comments: ‘I can’t believe how fast he was. It looked so easy,’ exclaims one amazed lady. The customers then make their way into the restaurant to tuck into a four-course meal featuring meat from the farm. When it comes to devising the menus for the meat events, Green likes to ‘let the meat do the talking. The quality and the depth of flavour mean that you don’t have to do a lot to it. The way Ian farms, the animal is treated with respect from the moment it’s born and we show respect in our kitchen by the way we put it on the plate.’ The social aspect of the Supper Clubs is an important part of the evening. Several of Rotunda’s regular customers come along, with bookings ranging from single people or couples to groups of 10, 20 or 30. ‘What was interesting about our salsa club,’ Reece observes, ‘is that, after sharing the dancing class experience, everyone ended up sitting on one long table, even though they had booked separately. The communal tables break the ice and are better for networking. We want to take people in that direction.’

HIGHLIGHTS FOOD & DRINK

Reece is looking forward to the new programme of Supper Clubs, which, in addition to lamb and beef, will focus on cheese and wine, game and champagne. ‘We’re proud of our farm, our wines and we want to share our passion without being too pretentious or pompous about it. The Supper Clubs give all of us – the management, the chefs, the floor staff – a chance to talk to people, break down those barriers, have a chat, ask questions. It’s just great fun.’ Rotunda Supper Clubs (see box left) Reservations 020 7014 2840, or enquiries@rotundabarandrestaurant.co.uk A video on the Spring Lamb supper and news of future events can be found on www.rotundabarandrestaurant.co.uk

STOP PRESS Rotunda Wine List wins award Next time you’re in the building, check out the unique wine list at Rotunda, which has just won the Chairman’s Award from Imbibe, the UK’s leading publication for wine and drinks professionals. The judges deemed that Rotunda’s list, selectively sourced from interesting, small producers, ‘is an awful lot of fun. It’s easy to get through, well presented, and the tasting notes are, at times, works of genius...’

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26 CLASSICAL

January—March 2012

Brahms: The Confidential Giant? As a year-long celebration of Brahms’s chamber music, Brahms Unwrapped, opens, Stephen Johnson argues that it was only in this intimate medium that the composer was fully able to realise his symphonic ambitions.

‘Too much beer and beard’ was the verdict of the French composer Paul Dukas. Even amongst those of us who love Brahms, there will be plenty who recognise the outline of Dukas’s portrait. Central to the popular conception of Brahms are the orchestral works: particularly the four symphonies and four concertos. And the image they convey is of somebody who thinks, and feels, ‘big’. A typical Brahms theme needs space to present itself, and considerably more to develop. Not for Brahms, it seems, the motivic lightning-flash that famously shocks Beethoven’s Fifth into action. The limbs are long, the breaths deep, and the sound… Brahms’s orchestral textures have been compared to luxurious, thick-pile carpets, even on one occasion to a rich game soup. It all seems to fit so snugly with photographs of the older composer: the generously upholstered frame and, above all, that patrician beard – the triumph of time and painstaking topiary. But as one gets to know Brahms better, the image begins to blur and to change. Brahms’s output is indeed big, but with increasing familiarity the sense of physical ‘bigness’ retreats. In quantity the orchestral works and the German Requiem are more than counterbalanced by the songs (over 200), the solo piano compositions and the chamber works. But it isn’t just the quantity; Brahms poured out great chamber works, Lieder and solo piano pieces at a time when it was the fashion to think big: Wagnerian music-drama, Lisztian tone poems, Brucknerian symphonies. Compared with his greatest

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January—March 2012

brahms is almost unique in the amount of time and energy he devoted to intimate forms

contemporaries, Brahms is almost unique in the amount of time and energy he devoted to intimate forms and small forces. It’s quite true that Brahms’s mentor and father figure Robert Schumann famously described the composer’s first two piano sonatas as ‘veiled symphonies’. And listening to the beginning of the Op. 1 Sonata it’s hard to miss the sense of a young man aiming way beyond the confines of the 19th-century salon. But then there are times in the later orchestral works where you may conclude Schumann’s image needs turning round: that the symphonies are really veiled chamber or solo piano pieces, or songs. The opening of the Fourth Symphony, for instance, is notoriously hard to ‘start’ in concert, but arranged for piano it simply flows into being; and isn’t the cellos’ accompaniment really left-hand piano writing transformed into Johannes Brahms

JOHANNES BRHAMS – ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER / WWW.GEMMALATIMER.COM

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CLASSICAL BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

orchestral terms? The chamber-like quality of the Second Piano Concerto’s Andante has often been remarked upon, especially its long, tender cello solo; and at the heart of the movement is an astonishingly Lied-like passage for hushed clarinets and piano – striking that Brahms should make this especially confidential moment the expressive heart of the concerto. Indeed you could argue that it is only in the chamber works – away from the pressures and expectations of the large 19th-century concert hall – that Brahms is able to be the symphonic thinker he really wants to be. Impressive as the Second Piano Concerto’s scherzo is, it’s a lumbering Leviathan compared to the demonic Beethovenian dances of the Piano Quintet or the F-A-E Scherzo of 1853. Delivered from the need to demonstrate his post-Beethoven symphonic credentials at the start of a work, Brahms can allow the first String Sextet, the first Violin Sonata or the Clarinet Quintet to sing their way into being, then absorb these ideas into the bloodstream of a substantial musical argument without the least sense of compulsion. Granted, as with the Op. 1 Piano Sonata, Brahms occasionally seems to expect more of a chamber ensemble than it can actually give. The opening of the Second String Quintet again seems to be straining for orchestral ‘bigness’. But orchestrating this music would be a travesty: something vital would be lost – perhaps that very sense of poignant, all-too-human striving. Against that we have the unforgettably apt sound-scale and tonal palette of the Horn Trio (which haunted György Ligeti over a century later), the Clarinet Quintet and the two luscious string sextets; or take the delicious violin-piano role-swapping in the first movement of the first Violin Sonata. In each case, it’s once heard never forgotten. And repeatedly the feeling arises that the more Brahms narrows his focus, the more the intensity rises – that, as his devotee Schoenberg put it, ‘concentration is expansion’. Is there anything more heartbreakingly intense, more self-revealing, than the piano Intermezzos, Op. 118 No. 6 and Op. 119 No. 1? Fascinatingly, the former – the Andante, largo e mesto in E flat minor – started life as a sketch for a symphonic slow movement, but, with time Brahms changed his mind. Did he realise that such an acutely personal idea needed the medium, the manner of address, that suited him best of all?

Brahms Unwrapped Weeks 1–3 See Listings pp54–55, 68–69, 72–73 See www.kingsplace.co.uk/brahms-unwrapped for full year’s details.

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CLASSICAL BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

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January—March 2012

in their own words Nine musicians appearing in Brahms Unwrapped share their enthusiasm for the composer’s chamber music and highlight some of their favourite works

Nick Collon conductor

I always approach Brahms’s orchestral pieces through my love of his chamber music: in some ways this was a bigger influence on me than his symphonies. As a young violist, I adored playing the quartets, sonatas, sextets, quintets – I just couldn’t get enough of it! – and I think the experience of being inside those pieces has given me an insight into some vital aspects of conducting Brahms. There’s a need to feel the push and pull of cross-rhythms, to find a rubato coming from within the orchestra rather than imposing it as a conductor. We know that Brahms wanted elasticity and clarity from his comments on conductors of the time.

Maxim Rysanov violist

Brahms had a tremendous feeling for the sonority of the viola, and the way in which he wrote for it is very comfortable. A great deal of the repertoire that comes down to us is also clarinet repertoire. I prefer the clarinet sonatas on the viola – of course! – but for a good reason. There’s so much passion in Brahms’s music, I feel that on the viola I can create the texture, the power and can use vibrato for this very expressive music, whereas the clarinet sound is smoother and purer. Brahms is extremely important for violists, for so many chamber pieces. I’ve played the violin sonatas and I would be happy to play the cello sonatas!

I always think of brahms’s chamber music orchestrally NATALIE CLEIN

Dmitry Sitkovetsky violinist

The violin sonatas form the pinnacle of the Romantic repertoire for violin and piano. If you want to be immersed in the world of fantastic emotions, noble spirit, heart-onsleeve passion then listen to these beautiful, subtle but intense pieces. You could experience the entire universe in just one evening! These are masterpieces, there is not one bar you could live without. Joachim’s invaluable contribution is evident: these sonatas are so well written for the violin.

Natalie Clein cellist

The first Cello Sonata is a wonderfully atmospheric work, perfectly suited to the timbre of the instrument, inhabiting a sensual, melancholy world. The cello line interweaves with the piano, grumbling away in the bass, only shining in the alto and tenor register for brief periods. The first movement is expansive; Brahms always said he didn’t like his works played too fast. I love the fleeting scherzo with its unusual trio, which is harmonically very progressive, and then the fugue finale

is a really exciting tour de force. In a way the whole sonata should be thought of in one emotional sweep, with no breaks between the movements. The Sonata No. 2 was inspired by Robert Hausmann who must have been quite a virtuoso: you have to leap across the cello! It was written by Lake Thun and you can imagine the mountains. I always think of Brahms’s music orchestrally – I think that’s how he conceived everything, and then put it under the microscope. As I’m playing I’ll be thinking, here’s the oboe, here’s the double bass line…


NICHOLAS COLLON © RUTH CRAFER | DMITRY SITKOVETSKY © J HENRY FAIR | MAXIM RYSANOV © IRINA PODUSHKO | NATALIE CLEIN © SUSSIE AHLBURG | RODERICK WILLIAMS © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | KATYA APEKISHEVA & CHARLES OWEN © JACK LIEBECK | MIKHAIL RUDY © SUPPLIED PHOTO | PHIL VENABLES © AMY K WALKER

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January—March 2012

CLASSICAL BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

He was essentially writing for himself, freed from all rules, all obligations MIKHAIL RUDY

Roderick Williams baritone

Brahms’s music sounds essentially vocallyinspired: he writes such beautiful, long phrases, seamless, lyrical melodies, whether for voice or clarinet, violin or piano. Thinking of all those dark colours, his predilection for the ‘alto’ voice in his chamber music, his fondness for the viola, the cello, the horn, it’s not surprising that his song repertoire is so rewarding for baritones. There must have been something about this lower timbre which inspired him: he understood how to tap into its richness. In Die schöne Magelone we encounter the extravagantly inventive young composer trying out all sorts of techniques.

Mikhail Rudy pianist

I come from a small, provincial Ukrainian town and had never heard any Brahms when I discovered the Handel Variations at 15: I was overwhelmed, they were my first love. It was like finding an encyclopaedia, a treasury of music history and culture. For me, they’re a continuation of Bach’s Goldberg Variations and Beethoven’s Diabelli. This was the piece with which I entered into the Moscow Conservatoire, so it has an important place in my life. It provided the impetus for me to discover the symphonies and the Requiem via piano arrangements, it opened the door on all

his works – and it culminates in that great fugue, one of my favourite ever! For me the late pieces from Op. 76 to Op. 119 form a complete cycle, rather like a volume of poems. In this ‘cycle’ he was essentially writing for himself, freed from all rules, all obligations. The mood is nostalgic... the silences are as important as the notes: they come from silence, and go to silence, sometimes singing, sometimes just whispering. In the final set of Op.119 pieces the harmonic language is becoming very daring, spectral and free floating. It should be as if the audience is eavesdropping on a private performance: Hall One will be ideal.

Charles Owen & Katya Apekisheva pianists

Brahms’s four-hand piano music comes out of Classical tradition, but there’s a larger dramatic range, wild moods, and rich, almost orchestral textures, which mustn’t be played too heavily. It was through the medium of the piano duet that many 19th-century music lovers encountered Brahms’s orchestral music; much as we would now listen to a recording of a work, they would devour Brahms’s symphonies, concertos, quintets and even the Requiem at home in piano arrangements. It’s fascinating to see what happens when Brahms the severe northern intellectual arrives in Vienna, and hears the street music, gypsy bands, café quartets, and, most importantly, the waltzes. You can trace the dance from Schubert’s Ländler, to the more urban, sophisticated waltz of Johann Strauss, and then Brahms comes along and gives it a smile, warmth and charm. Throughout Brahms’s music you hear the tint of Hungarian folk song and gypsy dance emerging in the most unexpected places: it’s one of the most delightful finger-prints on his music.

Phil Venables Endymion

brahms comes along and gives the waltz a smile, warmth & charm Charles Owen

Musicians love Brahms’s music for its extreme Romanticism: they can let rip, pour everything into their performances. Most people know the symphonies, but the chamber music is conceived on just as grand a scale. The String Quintet No. 2 in G began life as sketches for a fifth symphony, so you could say this is a symphony in miniature: you can tell it’s been heard as something bigger, so you can make a big, meaty, sound and fill the hall, which is fabulous.

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January—March 2012

A Banquet of Books

Jewish Book Week celebrates its 60th birthday with a move to Kings Place. Director Geraldine D’Amico reflects on its origins and remarkable evolution into one of London’s key literary feasts.

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JEWISH BOOK WEEK ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM  |  GERALDINE D'AMICO © GERRY TEMPLE

30 JEWISH BOOK WEEK


LINDA GRANT © CHARLIE HOPKINSON | Deborah Lipstadt © EMORY UNIVERSITY | CLAUDE LANZMANN © HÉLIE GALLIMARD | RON ARAD © JOHN DAVIS | MARCUS DU SAUTOY © Niall McDiarmid | JONATHAN SAFRAN FOER © PETER RIGAUD HOWARD JACOBSON © JENNY JACOBSON | EVA HOFFMAN © EVA COLLINS | UMBERTO ECO © LEA CRESPI / LUZPHOTO | ANNE SEBBA, DAVID SCHNEIDER, JACQUELINE ROSE © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

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Boyd Tonkin, literary editor of The Independent, called Jewish Book Week ‘the capital’s richest annual banquet of writers and ideas’. In 2012 the festival is celebrating its 60th anniversary and is delighted to be moving to its new home, here at Kings Place. Over the years, JBW has presented an array of remarkable speakers from diverse backgrounds, from Monica Ali, Yehuda Amichai, Martin Amis, Christopher Hitchens, Eric Hobsbawm, Julia Kristeva and Amos Oz to Harold Pinter, Chaim Potok, Mordechai Richler, Salman Rushdie, George Steiner and Arnold Wesker… A forum for enlightened and intelligent discussion, the festival eschews unfruitful confrontations yet is not afraid to address thorny issues. Most importantly, there’s no need to be Jewish to speak, attend or enjoy Jewish Book Week. Sixty years ago the literary scene was very different. Only the Cheltenham Festival existed. Independent booksellers and libraries shaped the public’s reading. There was no Waterstones, no Amazon, even television was a rare commodity. Yet the Jewish community experienced the need to create an event that would ‘stimulate and encourage the reading of books on Judaism and on every aspect of Jewish thought, life, history, and literature’ so that the widest Jewish public would become ‘conscious of the vital importance of books’. The Jewish Chronicle leader writer at the time referred to the competing attractions of cinema, radio and television but argued that ‘no generation in Jewry which neglects the basic importance of the book can hope to survive. The book retains a unique significance as an everlasting emblem of the Jewish way of life.’ What distinguished George Webber’s first Jewish Book Week in 1952 was its avowed hope and intention to be a national, annual event, and so it has turned out to be. In the intervening years, JBW has evolved exponentially. It has grown into a major festival staging some 60 events over nine days. Its predominant themes – identity, memory, anti-semitism, Israel, the Holocaust, religion, literature, humour – are re-examined and reinvented by each writer in succession. London’s finest literary festival is finally on the map. Come and join in the celebrations!

Jewish Book Week  18–26 February curated by Geraldine D’Amico and Mekella Broomberg See Listings pp64–67 for details

January—March 2012

SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK HIGHLIGHTS

Linda Grant joins Zygmunt

Anne Sebba explores the

Deborah Lipstadt speaks

18 February – 7.30pm

19 February – 11am

19 February – 8pm

Claude Lanzmann, known for his magisterial film Shoah, launches his autobiography, The Patagonian Hare, and talks about his life, his work and his passions.

Ron Arad talks about his passion for marrying unconventional forms or materials with unexpected functions, and about the sources of his unbridled creativity.

Marcus du Sautoy converses with Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks on belief and scepticism, faith and doubt, open-mindedness and intolerance.

21 February – 8.30pm

22 February – 7pm

22 February – 8.30pm

David Schneider presents a short history of the Jews and the Olympics including 4x400m Yiddish cursing and Talmudic gymnastics. Entirely made up by Schneider!

Jonathan Safran Foer invites Jeffrey Goldberg and Maureen Kendler to discuss the recent edition of the Hagaddah that tells the story of the Jews’ exodus from Egypt.

Jacqueline Rose offers a

23 February – 8.30pm

25 February – 7.30pm

26 February – 11am

Howard Jacobson and Henry Goodman revisit James Joyce's iconic Ulysses, which, the former thinks, is ʻthe greatest novel of the 20th century’.

Eva Hoffman interviews Aharon Umberto Eco talks to David Appelfeld about his novel Blooms of Darkness, an unlikely love story between an 11-year-old boy and the prostitute hiding him from the Nazis.

Aaronovitch about his latest novel, The Prague Cemetery, which brings together Jesuits, Freemasons, secret services and more.

26 February – 3.30pm

26 February – 5pm

26 February – 8pm

Bauman and Simon Schama to remember, debate and look to the future of the festival on its 60thanniversary gala.

abdication crisis and its central figure Wallis Simpson, the glamorous and vilified divorcée who nearly became queen of England.

to Anthony Julius about the Adolf Eichmann trial 50 years after the Lt-Colonel’s capture in Argentina in 1960.

radical re-reading of the Dreyfus affair through the lens of Proust, in dialogue with Freud, to interpret political struggle in the Middle East.

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SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

January—March 2012

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The (Jewish) History Boy Simon Schama joins the panel to open Jewish Book Week. Leo Robson delves into his Cricklewood roots and hears why he now feels ready to embark on a Jewish history.

Time has been good to Simon Schama, turning him from the bearded, bespectacled, precociously middle-aged figure preserved on old book-jackets to the beaming, boyish 66-year-old whose image we cannot escape – but wouldnʼt wish to. Dressed in a partly unbuttoned collarless shirt, and sipping black tea (a milk shortage rather than a lifestyle choice), this picture of ease and health recalls his earliest encounters with ‘the flesh-and-blood imperfections of humanity’, as revealed in the Old Testament. The man who has done as much as anyone in the last quarter-century to make the writing of history a form of storytelling, grew up reading Biblical narrative not as ‘theology’ or ‘revelation’, but as ‘outrageous ripping yarns’, full of ‘weird turns’. Schama’s upbringing, in London and Essex, bequeathed him a talent for performance. His father, who was ‘very sporadically successful’ as a businessman, had always wanted to be an actor and continued to put on amateur performances – ‘rather wonderfully’, his son says. As a schoolboy, at Haberdasher Aske’s in ‘raw, gritty, grungeling Cricklewood’, he spent time with his classmates and boys from neighbouring schools (including the Saatchi brothers), eating in the Beefery in Willesden Green, and generally behaving – someone recently recalled – like ‘a loudmouth’: ‘Guilty as charged!’ Schama started at Cambridge in 1963, after a year abroad during which he spent time on a kibbutz, an experience ‘brutal in its solemnity’. The North-West London lad found the atmosphere ‘very goyish, very tweedy, very rugger-playing’. Jews, Australians and ‘the occasional stray American’ would stick together, he says, united

by the sense (false, he now thinks) that their attitudes were more ‘cosmopolitan’ than people ‘who had had the misfortune to go to Harrow’. As a Cambridge undergraduate, Schama thought of history ‘as an encounter with people radically unlike me, in time but also in place’. He was firmly convinced that his gifts were best exercised on alien subject matter (the Dutch Republic, the French Revolution), but he kept up with Jewish history ‘in a very lay way’, reading the work of such philosophers as Gershom Scholem and Martin Buber. How lay is that really? (At another point in the interview, he describes himself, more realistically, as ‘a voracious reader of this material in a number of languages’.) Then, in the mid-70s, dismayed by the lack of Jewish history on the Cambridge syllabus, he started to hold an optional seminar, in collaboration with a fellow ‘baby don’, Nicholas de Lange. And it was this quiet activity that prompted a call from Victor Rothschild, who needed someone to look over an archive housed in Haifa pertaining to Rothschild activity in 19th-century Palestine. The archive proved to be ‘an absolute goldmine’, but Schama disliked the book he ended up writing, Two Rothschilds and the Land of Israel, and the whole experience left him wary of Jewish history. But surely these peculiar and unrepeatable circumstances have little to do with the practice of Jewish history per se? ‘It’s true. I conflate them a bit. Did I go on doing the seminar with Nicholas? I did.’ And over the years, he found himself ‘sneaking’ Jewish history into his work. Indeed, he seemed to write about it more when it wasn't strictly relevant. The chapter on Mark Rothko in The Power of Art has very little about Judaism in it, but he devoted a page of The American

He saw the narratives of the Old Testament as outrageous ripping yarns


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January—March 2012

SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

He hung out at the Willesden Green Beefery being a loudmouth – ‘Guilty as charged!'

Future: A History to the British writer Israel Zangwill, the first person to use ‘melting pot’ to mean (in Schama’s words) ‘the assimilating transformation of prospective citizens’. In the BBC series A History of Britain he was sure to give plenty of attention to both the expulsion of the Jews in 1290 and their readmission in 1656. Now he is making a more direct approach to the subject, and in no small or modest way. After a two-part series about Shakespeare, Schama’s next project will be a five-part history of the Jews, along with a book. His interest in painting will feed into the project, though not quite directly. The history of Western art, in which he is expert, contains few Jewish names. ‘It’s the wrong criterion’, he says, before referring to the enormous amount of work done anonymously. As for the idea that Jews are people of words, this was based on an understanding that the term ‘graven images’, in the Second Commandment, was intended to cover painting as well as idols and sculpture; but this understanding was by no means universally shared. ‘The Hebrew tradition of the Middle Ages is gloriously illustrated and depicted’, he says, ‘I’m learning about it all the time.’ When the series was suggested by the BBC, Schama suddenly realised that his old fears about Jewish history had disappeared, and that he was ready, even eager to write about his own people. Why does he think that is? ‘Well, lots has changed’, he says. He talks about the disappearance of the Zionism he knew growing up, and suggests that living in New York may have played a role. ‘Or maybe it’s to do with my mother dying, liberating me from what she might think of it. I’m a Jewish boy in the end.’ Jewish Book Week: 60 Years On with Simon Schama, Linda Grant and Zygmunt Bauman 18 February See Listings p64 for details

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January—March 2012

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An East End Odyssey

The imaginative transformation of everyday life is the purpose of art. For me it is also the art of purpose in everyday life. That’s why I’m an actor. The book which encapsulated both for me is Ulysses by James Joyce. Imagination is the key. It quite simply transformed my sense of literature as art, and gave shape to my youthful yearning to be an artist. Not just as a career, but as a creative originator. At best, an actor’s most credible claim to be a creator is as the interpreter of a writer’s true originality. I have never subscribed to this limited view. We actors should create with ourselves: serve the writer, director, yes, but not run from the freedom and uniqueness of being the instrument and player in one person. An actor must have a vocabulary of aspiration. Ulysses shaped my vocabulary and liberated my aspiration. It did so and, importantly, does so still, via the great tool of interior monologue. By revealing the duty I have to be deeply honest in the harnessing and reshaping of my own experience of the world, sacred and profane. Its young poet Stephen Dedalus in his Hamlet-like debate with himself and his situation grapples with how to resolve tensions: ‘Whose Stephen am I, sexually, culturally, religiously, politically ... am I mine or theirs?’ If true artistic achievement is built on selectivity and mastery, not just unfiltered expression, then an actor has, like Ulysses

NOTES HENRY & LETTERS GOODMAN ILLUSTRATION © Hugo © HARDIE Glendinning / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM | HENRY GOODMAN (AGED 20) © JOHN VERE BROWN

Celebrated actor Henry Goodman will join novelist Howard Jacobson to discuss the character of Bloom in James Joyces’s Ulysses. Here Goodman recalls how Ulysses inspired him to forge his own identity as a young Jewish man in the East End of London.


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My River Liffey was the Thames, my Martello tower a rat-infested theatre NEAR Toynbee Hall, Commercial Street

January—March 2012

Stephen Dedalus, to select from within himself what is relevant, master himself, not relying only on strengths, but nurturing courage to reveal weakness, fragility, uncertainty as well as enjoying the easily shared bravado of one’s assets, whether in looks or intuition or mental fluency. I aspire to span the spectrum from peacock to priest, from show-off to shaman. I learned such high ideals from James Joyce. I wanted to engage with issues, express something unique and valuable. From this conflict of dual service ­­– of being a servant of the playwrights, the community expectations or the duty to my own voice – Ulysses liberated me . I learnt, as Dedalus learns, that I am not a passer-by. I should stop (aged 16) feeling an intruder in the London of the ’60s and ’70s. I first met Stephen in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, when he challenged me to ‘forge in the smithy of my soul’ not an ‘uncreated conscience’ but the unformed young Jewish East-End expressive actor. It provoked a self-appointed adventure. I had to care first about myself enough to take risks... to break from home, travel within and without. In Ulysses, Joyce transforms the metropolis into his hero’s Mediterranean, the streets of Dublin are the isles of temptation and frustration for his Odysseus. Remarkably to me, his wandering hero, Bloom, is a Jewish outsider, the mentor, wise man, the deeply powerful weak man, the cuckold, married-out Jew, saviour to the troubled Hamlet, Stephen Dedalus. My journey started in less exotic locations, as I wandered the Jewish East End of London of the ’60s and ’70s… then ventured to the foreign, tempting islands of Hampstead, the City, Westminster, Camden Town, sitting secretly mumbling ‘Our Father’ in the rear pews of churches, so as to explore the host Christian religion in all its myriad manifestations. The liberation of Bloom’s coping philosophy, in amidst a cacophony of city calls, gave me centredness in a time of Cold War Nihilism, soaked in Sartre, Camus, of gently mocking anti-Semitism (as Bloom encounters), early feminism, my father’s mental illness, post-War tramps and warm community spirit in spite of cold, fog, charity clothes handouts. Real, wonderful people transformed opportunity, but Joyce transformed my mind. He gave me a taste of language as music, made me go to the top of tower

SPOKEN WORD JEWISH BOOK WEEK

blocks to scribble poetry. Through Bloom, Joyce celebrates the marvellous within the mundane, the significance of the seemingly insignificant. I started to do just that. By transferring in the book ten years’ travel to eighteen hours – a day and half the night – he wondrously reveals the poetry of metropolitan life in a grey city. My ship was the No. 5 bus; my River Liffey, the Thames, where we washed away our Jewish sins on the Day of Atonement; my library, the Whitechapel library; my cafe, the Wimpy Bar, greasy spoons and pubs of Aldgate East, Petticoat Lane. My Martello tower – a ratinfested theatre building near Toynbee Hall, Commercial Street; my Catholic Church was split between two competing synagogues... the warm embrace of Rabbi Lionel Blue’s progressive, fun, liberal synagogue at the Oxford and St George’s Youth Club, where my sweet-voiced sister sang in a mixed women-welcoming choir, its melodies stolen from Brahms, Mahler, Beethoven and melded with melismatic Yiddish and Hebrew songs into plangent prayers. It was a club where my twin brother and I became like Joyce himself, singing athletes. All this opposed to the Orthodox synagogue in ironically named Christian Street, with its onion and black breadeating conservative Bar Mitzvah teachers, where I was bribed, with a few bob, to attend early morning prayers to make up a quorum of ten old men, at 6 am every day. Then there was my music, musicals I directed and acted in aged 16, and concert party productions with the East End community. All this co-existed within the host culture, the other – tantalisingly unavailable – other... Englishness. Imaginative exile, Joyce taught me in Ulysses, is a state of mind that is a first step towards reconnecting with and finding affection for all that presses in on us as city dwellers: home, religion, friends, culture. With Howard Jacobson’s witty essay on Joyce’s Jewishry and masochism, and lovely Irish actress Dervla Kirwan as Molly Bloom, we will celebrate in readings and ‘live interior monologue’ the wonder of Ulysses on this happy combined anniversary, the 90th of its publication and 60th of Jewish Book Week.

Jewish Book Week: Henry Goodman & Howard Jacobson Ulysses Revisited 26 February See Listings p67 for details

35


36 JAZZ

January—March 2012

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

In January, Soweto Kinch, Jay Phelps and Alex Wilson all take turns to lead in a three-night extravaganza: eXplorations. Sebastian Scotney catches up with three very different talents.

acclaimed as highlights of those festivals. Kinch may have started to connect with a large international audience, but his subject matter remains rooted in the communities he knows in Birmingham. This grounding is important to him. His narratives – animated by humour and swashbuckling wordplay – deal with the work-a-day struggles of ordinary people. He takes on the ‘new slavery’, a world of call-centres, loan sharks and bailiffs. Kinch has followed imperatives like these with such determination that his recent successes feel like a personal vindication. While influential figures in music have told him that, sooner or later, either his saxophone or his rapping will have to go, he’s insisted that both are indispensable to him. His depth of knowledge of the heritage of both forms is dauntingly complete. He has, after all, held a saxophone in his hands since the age of nine, and been rapping seriously since he was eleven or twelve. Kinch’s premiere will take place on the second of a three-night series of concerts, in which musicians and bandleaders – first Jay

Pat Metheny said democracy is impossible in a band. eXplorations series will put that theory to the test NOTES & LETTERS ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM

London will get its first glimpse of something completely new during eXplorations, a collaborative mini-series featuring Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson. Soweto Kinch will be giving The Legend of Mike Smith its first outing in the capital. ‘It’s my next major album and touring project,’ says the Birmingham-based saxophonist and rapper. ‘It follows the story of Mike Smith, as he battles with the Seven Deadly Sins (‘Greed’, ‘Lust’, ‘Envy’ and so on) in lyrical form, drawing on Dante and Marlowe’s Doctor Faustus.’ This will be Kinch’s first appearance at Kings Place, and it feels long overdue, not least because his career has progressed by such leaps and bounds in the past year. His most recent album, The New Emancipation (2010), his first to be self-produced, has, true to its name, given him ‘the creative freedom to make the statements that I want to’. But The New Emancipation has done more than that: ‘It has also seen me round the world,’ says Kinch. His appearances at the National Arts Festival in Grahamstown in South Africa and at Elbjazz in Hamburg have both been


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2012

SOWETO KINCH © BENJAMIN AMURE | JAY PHELPS © PROPER RECORDS | ALEX WILSON © MICHAEL VALENTINE

Clockwise from left: Soweto Kinch, Jay Phelps and Alex Wilson

EXPLORATIONS 26 January Jay Phelps 27 January Soweto Kinch 28 January Alex Wilson

JAZZ EXPLORATIONS

Phelps on Thursday, then Kinch on Friday, and finally Alex Wilson on Saturday – will each showcase new work, leading their own bands. Then there’s an interesting twist: as each programme progresses, the evening’s leader will involve both of the other musicians as his sidemen. These sessions are thus designed to embody fascinating contrasts in leadership styles, and result in lessons on how to make things work in music, in real time, in front of a live audience. Pat Metheny said recently that ‘democracy is impossible’ in this context. The eXplorations series will put that particular theory to the test. Each of the three musicians is decidedly looking forward to meshing with the other two, and learning from the experience. Jay Phelps already knows Kinch as a bandleader from touring – ‘He knows what he wants, he makes sure his machine is well-oiled’ – and both Phelps and Alex Wilson are musicians who have developed their own, significant voices through leading bands. Phelps, the youngest of the three, will direct a four-part suite called Movements for the Modern Artist, whose emotional heart is a dark ballad entitled ‘My Uncertainty’, inspired by Duke Ellington. It’s now ten years since Alex Wilson won the Rising Star award at the first-ever BBC Jazz Awards. Soweto Kinch says of him: ‘Alex is great fun to play with – I remember our performances together in Jazz Jamaica. He really understands the percussive and rhythmical possibilities of the piano. The qualities in his playing he’s picked up by being steeped in Cuban and West African music are unique.’ The main work which Wilson will present in eXplorations is a Suite for piano, string quartet and kora (originally commissioned by Harrogate Festival). He’s also looking forward to bringing his new trio to Kings Place again, partnered with fiery but sensitive drummer Frank Tontoh and Italian-born bassist – also a specialist in West African music – Davide Mantovani. For Wilson the habits of leading are now ingrained, to the point that he can no longer remember at what precise point in his late teens he started running his own jazz or salsa band. But he’s happily anticipating the two nights when he can hand over that responsibility. ‘Yeah, I get to concentrate on the keyboard rather than having to think of a hundred things at once,’ he chuckles.

eXplorations: Alex Wilson, Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch 26–28 January See Listings pp56–57 for details

37


38 CLASSICAL

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January—March 2012

New Zealand performers? Kiri Te Kanawa or Hayley Westenra might spring to mind. Or Jonathan Lemalu, Ana James and Marie Te Hapuku, a new generation of opera singers all forging careers abroad. But New Zealand music? Is there any? Fortunately, the answer is an emphatic yes, and none are more devoted to bringing it to a wider audience than the New Zealand String Quartet. This group have style. The way they dress, the way they play standing, the way they connect with an audience; listeners can expect to hear playing of dedication and diamond-like clarity. They’ve been in existence for 25 years and have carved out a unique role, reaching out to a younger, broader audience for chamber music, playing the standard classics and acting as passionate advocates for contemporary music from both New Zealand and abroad. I want to describe them as musical missionaries; first violinist Helene Pohl laughs at the thought, yet she agrees. ‘We are everybody’s quartet here’, she says, ‘and we do feel that we have a mission to share great music from all eras – to bring chamber music to as many people as possible.’ And to win friends for New Zealand music all around the globe. Most of the New Zealand music they play is recent or commissioned for them; they work with young composers at the New Zealand

New Zealanders know they are all immigrants and All have brought cultures with them

School of Music in Wellington where they are Quartet-in-Residence. ‘We love the individuality of our composers’, says Pohl. ‘What stands out is how unfettered they are; they feel free to do what they want.’ I asked how they selected the programmes for Kings Place and she admits that they had chosen from ‘a growing list of favourites’. There is also the newly commissioned work from Gao Ping, Three Poems by Mu Xin, that they and bass-baritone Jonathan Lemalu will premiere in London. At the same time they wanted to ensure that there was a point of connection with the classic works they’re also performing.

New Zealanders know they are all immigrants or descended from immigrants, some from centuries ago, others, like Gao Ping, very recent. All have brought cultures with them. In the early years of the 20th century that culture was predominantly British, and it wasn’t until 1940 that we tried to break free from it. Douglas Lilburn, born in 1915 on a North Island farm, studied at the Royal College in London with Vaughan Williams. From the time of his return to New Zealand in 1939 his compositions and his teaching all stressed the need for a distinctive New Zealand voice. He looked to the emptiness of the land and the mountain landscape for inspiration. He was part of a group of artists and writers of his period who saw the development of our own musical, poetic and artistic character as essential. The Labour Government of the time had also seen the value of the arts in society and in 1948 established the National Orchestra, while in 1950 a Federation of Chamber Music Societies was formed. But performances of New Zealand music were still rare and in 1966, partly because of that, Lilburn established New Zealand’s first electronic music studio at Victoria University. He died in 2001 and is now regarded as our musical father figure. ‘Lilburn argued for a New Zealand identity distinct from the musical preoccupations of the

NEW ZEALAND STRING QUARTET © MAARTEN HOLL

The New Zealand String Quartet leads an enticing feast of New Zealand music and discussion at Kings Place in March. Kiwi cultural commentator Rod Biss surveys the menu.


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January—March 2012

CLASSICAL New ZEALAND AT KINGS PLACE

New Zealand String Quartet

NEW ZEALAND AT KINGS PLACE 26 March New Worlds: New Perspectives Also part of Words on Monday

The Body Electric Also part of Out Hear

29 March Eight Colours 30 March Death and the Maiden 31 March Spiritual Journeys with Pre-Concert Talk: ‘Maori Instruments’ Richard Nunns

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CLASSICAL New ZEALAND at kings place

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

Bass-Baritone Jonathan Lemalu

European post-war avant-garde,’ says Michael Norris, composer of Exitus, which the quartet will play, and curator of the Out Hear event The Body Electric. But he believes the younger composers, John Croft, John Coulter, Alexandra Hay, Dugal McKinnon and himself, all of whom will be heard in The Body Electric are ‘more interested in personal engagement with space, memory and body, [seeking] a more urban interpretation of the landscape’. Nonetheless Lilburn would have been intrigued by this new music with its electroacoustic sounds and visuals, along with the virtuoso clarinet playing of Richard Haynes. But for Gillian Karawe Whitehead, who has both Maori and Pakeha (European) ancestry, the landscape, the past, and a New Zealand musical voice are still of great importance. She told me that she ‘wanted to create a language that had more to do with nonEuropean or imagined pre-European sound from the natural

Top: Richard Nunns with one of his Maori instruments Above: composer Gillian Karawe Whitehead Below: a Maori gourd instrument, the hue puru hau

Nunns has breathed life back into the beautiful Maori instruments (Taonga Puoro) made from shells, carved from whalebone, hard wood and stone

sounds of wind and forest and water’. Crucial to this ‘language’ is the research and performing skill of Richard Nunns, who will be playing with the quartet. Nunns is a musician, historian and passionate enthusiast for the beautiful Maori instruments (Taonga Puoro) made from shells and carved from whalebone, hard wood and stone

that he has helped bring back to life. He has inspired Whitehead and other New Zealand composers to incorporate their sounds into their scores. Some of the instruments are flute-like, some once lulled children to sleep, others evoked birds, others helped to catch the birds. There are also gourds, a symbol of peace, which Whitehead has used in Hineputehue, she says ‘in the context of wishing for peace in the depths of a forest’. In her recent music Whitehead has created what is the most distinctly New Zealand musical language of all by exploring those aspects that Lilburn had been most wary of, our indigenous music and the Taonga Puoro. Much of composer Jack Body’s music reflects his interest in Asian cultures, however in his Three Transcriptions, he casts his net even wider, to China, Madagascar and Bulgaria, for folk and dance melodies which he has transcribed with light-hearted flair for string quartet. These three pieces have become a classic of the New Zealand repertoire. Ross Harris was the first director, after Lilburn, of what became known as the Lilburn Electroacoustic Studio. He has written a wide range of music in many different genres but in recent years has moved away from electroacoustic music and has written four symphonies, a violin concerto and the song cycle The Abiding Tides, all of which have engaged with a broader non-specialist audience. In a recent Californian radio series devoted to Harris’s music, Jim Svejda described him as ‘one of the best, most accomplished and imaginative composers working anywhere in the world today.’ The quartet’s manager Elizabeth Kerr has been shaping these New Worlds: New Perspectives programmes with writers and composers since 2009. As an ex-Chief Executive of New Zealand’s Arts Council (Creative New Zealand), this is a project that concerns her deeply. ‘We are trying to open a door to contemporary New Zealand; to give a picture of the country which is not quite the one that many people in the UK have. We’re now well aware of our location in the Asia-Pacific region.’ And no, we’re not all sheep farmers or sportsmen. Like Pohl, she emphasises the multiplicity of influences and voices to be heard in our music. ‘We look outwards!’

New Zealand at Kings Place: Journeys and encounters in new and traditional chamber music with the New Zealand String Quartet and friends. 26–31 March See Listings pp76–77 for details

JONATHAN LEMALU © SUSSIE AHLBURG | RICHARD NUNNS © TIM CUFF | GILLIAN KARAWE WHITEHEAD © GARETH WATKINS

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PHILIP SHEPPARD (UNKLE, JEFF BUCKLEY, JARVIS COCKER).....................CELLo

P ip E as t o p ( L on d on S infonietta ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . h o rn

G u y P ra t t ( P ink F loy d , R o x y M usic ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . b ass

E lspe t h H ans o n ( B on d ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V i o lin

M ar k N ear y ( T h e Hours , Ba x ter Drury ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . pedal s t eel g u i t a R

J u lia Th o rn t o n ( B ryan F erry, S olus 3 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . harp and perc u ssi o n

P e t er G regs o n ( I mo g en Heap, Gabriel P rokofiev ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . cell o

D avid L e P age ( C amera O bscura , S ub way P iran h as ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi o lin

G e o f f D u gm o re ( K illin g J oke , R o d S te wart ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . dr u ms

P e t e F u rniss ( I mpropera ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . reeds


42 ART

January—March 2012

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

January—March 2012

ART CHRIS MOORE Catwalking

Catwalking As a new exhibition of Chris Moore’s Place fashion photography comes to Kings an reflects Gallery, fashion writer Vanessa Friedm t man. on the extraordinary career of a modes

Hussein Chalayan

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ART CHRIS MOORE Catwalking

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

Counterclockwise from top: Chris Moore; Boudicca Spring/ Summer; Isabella Blow with Lobster Hat by Philip Treacy; Erin O’Connor (Alexander McQueen, Autumn/Winter 1999)

For as long as I have been chronicling fashion, Chris Moore has been there, with his scraggly beard and wire-rimmed glasses, camera at hand, the sage of the photographers’ mosh pit, the Walker Evans of the runway. In a world of pushing and shoving and scrambling and hard-earned six-inch-square spots, he is an oasis of calm, which is not to say he isn’t as dedicated to getting the best picture as the next guy. Indeed, he has been dedicated for so long (over 50 years) that when I first arrived at the Financial Times eight years ago and started asking around as to who was the best runway snapper, the responses came back like an echo in a canyon: ‘Chris Moore’; ‘Call Chris Moore’; ‘You need Chris Moore.’ Looking back, I feel immensely grateful I was smart enough to take the advice of the crowd. Because Chris’s photos make what I write come alive; they give it the visual expression that is a key dimension when it comes to any discussion of clothes. Words can only get you so far without pictures, and good pictures can be worth their width in column inches. Even more, Chris has the uncanny ability to take the right picture at just the right time. He doesn’t miss anything, which, when you are packed

If I was a social historian and I looked at these pictures, I would think I had found my Rosetta Stone

in like sardines on bleachers with heavy equipment for over an hour, is a relatively super-human feat. It is, however, a great luxury for all who work with him, because it means that no matter what you choose to write about – no matter how obscure the detail or how idiosyncratic the dress – you can be absolutely secure in the knowledge he will have caught it. The entire show world is open to you, because he will have recorded it.

As a result, his archive is much more than a photographer’s file room; it is an archaeological treasure trove containing the modern history – from Courrèges to Christopher Kane – of an industry in the process of becoming. And, because fashion is so much about the reflection of the world around it, in Chris’s backroom is preserved a record of one aspect of our time: of how women felt about themselves, and how they dealt with their changing socio-economicpolitical circumstances, as expressed in clothing. If I was a social historian and I looked at these pictures, I would think I had found my Rosetta Stone. If I were a runway photographer just starting out, I would think I had found a role model. But as I am a journalist, I look at these pictures and simply see the unique eye of a man I am honoured to call a friend. Walker Evans once said his dream was to take pictures that were ‘literate, authoritative, transcendent’. Chris Moore has done that. Kings Place Gallery: Chris Moore Catwalking Exhibition  2 December – 10 February 2012 See Art Listings p50 for details

CHRIS MOORE © CATWALKING.COM, ‘ONE TIME ONLY’ PUBLICATION | ALL OTHER PHOTOS (INCL. PREVIOUS PAGE) © CHRIS MOORE

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January—March 2012

ART CHRIS MOORE Catwalking

Givenchy by McQueen

45


46 CLASSICAL

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January—March 2012

FOREVER ENGLAND?

ENGLISH MUSIC 5 & 6 JANUARY English String Music with Orchestra of St John’s / Lubbock

Benjamin Britten

1–4 FEBRUARY Great Britten! with Dante Quartet & Friends

Put an arrangement of The Girl with Flaxen Hair into a programme with Vaughan Williams’s The Lark Ascending and The Banks of Green Willow by George Butterworth, and how many, who did not know their Debussy Préludes, would realise that its composer was French? Put Frank Bridge’s uncompromising String Quartet No. 3 into a concert of 20th-century AustroGerman chamber music and few innocent ears would guess that its composer hailed from Brighton. The Englishness of English music is no simple matter. Not least, there is the little issue of whether it ought to be referred to as British. But its most identifiable feature has been the use of folksong, and the English folk-song tradition is, or rather was, distinct from that of Wales or Scotland. And all the composers featured in this series were undeniably born in England. What they all inherited was a somewhat downbeat view of musical history which held that, although England had, just once, led musical Europe back in the era of John Dunstaple in the early 15th century, its composers ever after had tended to depend on finding further, idiosyncratic possibilities in styles and genres

NOTES & LETTERS ILLUSTRATION © HARDIE / WWW.HARDIEILLUSTRATOR.COM

With the Dante Quartet’s Great Britten! programme and a series on English String Music coming to Kings Place this Spring, Bayan Northcott asks what gives English music its unique identity.


BENJAMIN BRITTEN (1946) © GEORGE RODGER/GETTY IMAGES | MICHAEL TIPPETT © Erich Auerbach/Getty Images | FRANK BRIDGE © THE TULLY POTTER COLLECTION | RALPH VAUGHAN WILLIAMS © Lebrecht Music & Arts

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

already well worked on the Continent. So the Elizabethans naturalised the Italian madrigal; Purcell submitted his English idiom to refinements from Italy and France. By the 19th century, this had lapsed into an assumption that no English composer could hope to match the great masters of the AustroGerman tradition. Of course a true English master did eventually emerge in the person of Edward Elgar, yet his style was almost entirely drawn from Mendelssohn, Schumann, Wagner and Brahms; and when asked if he ever used folk song, he retorted – doubtless thinking of the popularity of Pomp and Circumstance  No. 1 – ‘I am folk song!’ It took the middleEuropean ears of Hans Keller to detect what was distinctively English about Elgar’s music: the unconscious use of folk-like pentatonic scale patterns in his melodies. Meanwhile, the position of Vaughan Williams, Holst and others who sought in the 1900s to draw a truly English tradition from folk song was equally paradoxical. Vaughan Williams, after all, had completed his training under Max Bruch in Berlin and with Ravel in Paris, while Holst was influenced by Wagner, Stravinsky and, at least in passing, by Schoenberg. And the modal textures they drew from folk melody were comparable with what Debussy and Ravel were doing in France, and Bartók and Kodály in Hungary. In any case, their enterprise was driven less by pastoral nostalgia than by an urge to evolve a ‘People’s Music’ after William Morris’s socialist ideals of Art for All – a strain of social commitment that was to continue in Michael Tippett’s communal music-making at Morley College during the Second World War and in Benjamin Britten’s cult of localism at Aldeburgh in what he called the ‘semi-socialist Britain’ of the following decades. But the more immediate impact of the social-folkloric movement, between the two world wars, was to recast the old English/ Continental divide in a new guise as a divide between the (English) cult of the amateur and the ‘clever’ (Cosmopolitan) professional. Vaughan Williams was specifically thinking of Frank Bridge when he witheringly referred in a letter to the ‘abyss of mere professionalism’. Bridge, trained under the fearsome Charles Villiers Stanford, had emerged as a brilliant all-round professional who drew his influences from such un-English and radical sources as Fauré, Scriabin and Berg. It would be hard to find a more sharply contrasted treatment of vernacular material than that between Vaughan Williams’s nostalgic Five Variants of ‘Dives and Lazarus’ and Bridge’s dazzling miniatures Sir Roger de Coverley and Cherry Ripe. Listening to the latter, one hears immediately where

January—March 2012

CLASSICAL GREAT BRITTEN!

Frank Bridge

Michael Tippett

The achievement of Tippett and Britten was to create a fresh English synthesis drawing on the Elizabethans, Purcell and Holst

Bridge’s brilliant young pupil Britten got his expertise in writing for strings, both orchestrally and in the original quartets and other instrumental pieces in which he sought to emulate Bridge’s intensive cultivation of chamber music. It was in the light of Bridge’s consecrated professionalism that, while Britten continued to value the ‘unstrained’ quality of amateur music-making, he refused to countenance amateurish standards, whereas Vaughan Williams was apt to remark that he liked bad performances providing they were heartfelt. Still, he was generous enough to concede that

Ralph Vaughan Williams

Britten’s more sophisticated arrangements of folk songs might be a valid approach for a new age. The lasting achievement of the young Tippett and Britten was to create a fresh English synthesis largely free of folklorism, by drawing on the Elizabethans, Purcell and the more progressive side of Holst, and supplementing them, in Tippett’s case, with influences of Bartók and Hindemith, and in Britten’s, with Stravinsky, Mahler, even Copland – a new synthesis exemplified in Tippett’s vital string orchestra pieces and Britten’s inspired Serenade for tenor, horn and strings. Against an international background in which the Austro-German hegemony has long since lapsed, and subsequent Continental avantgarde claims to the cutting edge have dissolved into the stylistic free-for-all of postmodernism, the integrity with which a succession of English masters tackled and balanced such issues as tradition versus innovation, aesthetics versus social conscience, localism versus internationalism, resounds ever more meaningfully in their music.

English String Music: Orchestra of St John’s 5 & 6 January Great Britten! with the Dante Quartet and Friends 1–4 February See Listings p51 and pp58–59 for details

47


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LISTINGS 50 51 58 68 78

ART LISTINGS JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH CALENDAR

In the following pages, you will find details of our fantastic Spring 2012 Season. From classical, jazz, folk and world music concerts to spoken word and comedy nights, with so many events to choose from and tickets going very quickly, book early to secure your seats!

BOOK NOW ONLINE SAVERS £9.50 www.kingsplace.co.uk Box Office: 020 7520 1490

See ‘Manu Delago with Living Room in London’  p19 and p56 Photo: Manu Delago © Pawel Szewczyk


ART LISTINGS

50 ART LISTINGS

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January – March 2012

Hussein Chalayan © Chris Moore

Gareth Pugh by Janet Lance Hughes

2 Dec – 10 Feb KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Portraits of Central Saint Martins by Janet Lance Hughes ART Janet Lance Hughes’ exhibition celebrates the arrival of Central Saint Martins at the Granary Building at Kings Cross with a collection of portrait paintings of CSM’s illustrious alumni and staff. Janet’s subjects are contemporaries at large in the world of British arts and industry who include among others, Sir Anthony Caro, Hussein Chalayan, Colin Firth, Geraldine James, Simon Callow, Sir Terence Conran and Sir James Dyson.  Proceeds from the sale of portraits will go towards student support.

2 Dec – 10 Feb

Givenchy by McQueen © Chris Moore

the spectacularly theatrical events staged by Hussein Chalayan and Alexander McQueen. In 2000, he launched www.catwalking.com, the successful online photographic library which has become the first port of call for all major fashion and broadsheet titles during the fashion week circuits. This exhibition celebrates Moore’s remarkable career with a collection of his iconic images.

11 Jan – 3 Mar PANGOLIN LONDON

’50s & ’60s British Sculpture Show Art Using the 60th anniversary of the 1952 Venice Biennale as inspiration, Pangolin London will be exhibiting some of the most influential sculptors from the 1950s and 1960s.

KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Chris Moore: Catwalking

18 Jan – 23 Jan

ART

PANGOLIN LONDON

Dubbed the ‘King of the Catwalk’ by the fashion industry, photographer Chris Moore has captured images of every conceivable catwalk show from the ateliers of Paris Couture in the sixties with Yves Saint Laurent, Pierre Cardin and Courrèges to

London Art Fair Art Pangolin London will be exhibiting at the 2012 London Art Fair at the Islington Business Design Centre (Stand G48).

Norman Cornish Man at Bar Reading

Charlotte Mayer Scintilla Bronze, Edition of 8

14 Feb – 23 Mar

14 Mar – 5 May

KINGS PLACE GALLERY

PANGOLIN LONDON

Norman Cornish: The Early Years

Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff

Paintings and Drawings

Art

Art

In March 2012 Pangolin London will hold a joint exhibition of sculpture and works on paper by two highly regarded and diverse female sculptors: Almuth Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer.

The story of Cornish’s prodigious career as an artist who converted his experience as a miner into compelling imagery has become justly famous. As the mining industry recedes into history, however, the real context of his life and art grows ever more elusive. The Spennymoor pit at which he started his working life at the age of 14, the notorious Dean and Chapter Colliery was known as ‘The Butcher’s Shop’. Describing in his autobiography his descent to the coal-face on his first day at work, Cornish writes of being ‘dropped into a man-made world’ where he ‘was to learn that the dangers of gas, stone falls, the darkness and the restricted space, were all to shape these men into industrial gladiators’. For the next 33 years, in a career spent largely underground, he recorded the life of the pit where his ‘marras’ risked their lives every day. In his scenes of their ‘civilian’ life, miners are shown walking to work in the dawn, the pit-head gantry resembling another Calvary. As for his repertoire of pub interiors, they are bathed in an amber glow, the colour of brown ale, while the local chip van also looms large as a meeting point – for food, and for gossip.

OPENING TIMES Pangolin London Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm Mondays by appointment Closed 24 Dec 2011 – 2 Jan 2012 FREE admission 020 7520 1480 www.pangolinlondon.com

Kings Place Gallery Monday – Friday, 10am – 6pm, Saturday – Sunday, 12pm – 6pm Closed 24 Dec 2011 – 2 Jan 2012 FREE admission 020 7520 1485 www.kingsplacegallery.co.uk

GARETH PUGH BY JANET LANCE HUGHES © CHARLIE WHEELER | HUSSEIN CHALAYAN , GIVENCHY BY MCQUEEN © chRIS MOORE | Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff © Pangolin London/Steve Russell

Almuth Tebbenhoff Yellow Painted steel


This Week’s Focus ENGLISH STRING MUSIC ORCHESTRA OF ST JOHN’S

January

ENGLISH STRING MUSIC

Sunday 1 January

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH BLACKWELL’S MUSIC

From Bridge to Vaughan Williams

NEW YEAR AT KINGS PLACE

Orchestra of St John’s

Vivaldi’s Four Seasons

Bridge Cherry Ripe Britten Les Illuminations, Op. 18 Britten Folk Songs (selection) Vaughan Williams Prelude on Rhosymedre Five Variants of Dives and Lazarus

5 & 6 JANUARY

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Vivaldi The Four Seasons, Op. 8 Nos 1–4 [interleaved with] Handel Aria from Giulio Cesare Telemann Suite in G, Burlesque de Quixotte Telemann Kanarienvogel-Kantate Matthew Rose bass Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment Kati Debretzeni violin / director CLASSICAL See out the Old and in the New with the Kings Place debut of Vivaldi’s much-loved work The Four Seasons, heading up a delightful programme with a dash of Telemann and Handel thrown in for good measure! Performed by players from Kings Place residents the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. A must-do holiday treat. Hall One 1pm Earlier performance at 6pm on 31 Dec (Requires separate tickets) £16.50 £21.50 £29.50 £34.50 Premium Seats £39.50 Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 5 January ENGLISH STRING MUSIC

From Elgar to Tippett Orchestra of St John’s Frank Bridge

Brook Green, Cherry Ripe, Dives and Lazarus: a serenade of English string music, from Elgar to Tippett FRANK BRIDGE © THE TULLY POTTER COLLECTION

LISTINGS 51

January 2012

John Lubbock directs the Orchestra of St John’s in two delectable programmes of English string music, featuring Serenades by both Elgar and Britten, the latter’s dazzling Les Illuminations and folk song arrangements, paired with works by Holst and V Williams, not to mention Bridge’s ingenious Cherry Ripe and Tippett’s Little String Music.

Bridge Sir Roger de Coverley Britten Serenade for tenor, horn & strings, Op. 31 Britten Folk Songs (selection) Elgar Serenade for strings in E minor, Op. 20 Holst Brook Green Suite (1933) Tippett Little Music for strings John Pierce tenor Orchestra of St John’s John Lubbock conductor CLASSICAL The Orchestra of St John’s perform a programme which explores 20th-century English string music, including Elgar’s suave Serenade for strings, Holst’s Brook Green Suite, Bridge’s Sir Roger de Coverley and Tippett’s bracing Little String Music – not to mention Britten’s radical Serenade for tenor, horn & strings forming a centrepiece. Hall One 7.30pm

See Feature on English Music pp46–47

£13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

Friday 6 January

Iris Korfker soprano Orchestra of St John’s John Lubbock conductor CLASSICAL The OSJ’s second programme contrasts Vaughan Williams’s luminous treatment of the folk song Dives and Lazarus with Britten’s arresting folk song arrangements and his early masterpiece Les IIlluminations. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

SATURday 7 January THE BASE

Jiri Slavik/Fred Thomas Duo + Benoît Delbecq JAZZ F-IRE Collective invites Kammer Klang to curate an evening of jazz inspired by contemporary classical repertoire. Parisian Benoît Delbecq (piano) and F-IRE Collective’s Jiri Slavik /Fred Thomas (bass/ piano) present in separate sets their own work and improvisations influenced by Ligeti, Messiaen and more. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

SUNday 8 January LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Sacconi Quartet 10th-Anniversary Concert Haydn String Quartet in G, Op. 77 No. 1 Bartók String Quartet No. 3 (1926) Schubert String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D810 Death and the Maiden CLASSICAL Join us to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the superb Sacconi Quartet, with Bartók’s extended single-movement quartet, some late Haydn and Schubert’s dramatic piece. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

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52 LISTINGS

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January 2012

This Week’s Focus LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Curated by SWINGLE SINGERS & IKON ARTS MANAGEMENT

Vasari Singers

12 – 14 JANUARY

with special guests The Swingle Singers

Thursday 12 January

Swingle Singers

CLASSICAL Under the patronage of Ward Swingle of Swingle Singers fame, the Vasari Singers are one of the UK’s leading chamber choirs. They have a reputation for excellence and versatility, both in live performance and recordings. Directed by Jeremy Backhouse, they perform a wide range of repertoire with passion and sensitivity to exacting standards and considerable press acclaim. They are joined on stage by special guests the Swingle Singers. ‘One of the finest small choral groups of our time’ Gramophone Hall One 7pm (Lasts ~60-mins) £12.50 £15.50 £18.50 £21.50 Saver Seats £9.50 | Festival Pass £84

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

The Boxettes with support act Cadenza

From beatboxing to barbershop, SOULFUL JAZZ TO GLAM-ROCK, New talent to supergroups – all vocal life is here!

Friday 13 January LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Cadence JAZZ With an infectious energy, sophisticated harmonies and a good measure of wild stage antics, this cool Canadian Rat Pack will perform a programme of innovative jazz arrangements, genre-hopping covers and eclectic originals to thrill its audience, proving the human voice has no limits. Hall One 7pm (Lasts ~60-mins) £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Saver Seats £9.50 | Festival Pass £84

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

CONTEMPORARY

FORK

After their sell-out performance at last year’s festival, we’re delighted to welcome back British beatbox phenomenon Bellatrix and her super-talented female vocalists Yvette, Alyusha, Neo and Kate. With soulful grooves, blistering beats and hip-hop vibe, these five extraordinary young women mesmerise and inspire with their unique vocal talents. The Boxettes have built up a fearsome reputation, playing at some of the UK’s finest venues and festivals, including the QEH, Ministry of Sound and Glastonbury. The evening begins with a 15-minute performance by Cadenza (Voice Festival UK 2011 winners).

This Scandinavian rock show reinvents a cappella! FORK fuse world-class vocals, comedy, extravagant fashion and groundbreaking sounds. Performing rock and pop covers, they combine everything from pumping baselines to rock guitar riffs in a magnificent show. After their sensational run at Edinburgh Fringe 2011 and countless rave reviews, we are delighted to welcome FORK for their London debut. This is a must-see! ‘Now’s the time to bow down at the altar of four-strong a cappella group FORK.’ **** Metro

Hall One 9pm (Lasts ~60-mins)

Hall One 9pm (Lasts ~60-mins)

£12.50 £15.50 £18.50 £21.50 Saver Seats £9.50 | Festival Pass £84

£13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Saver Seats £9.50 | Festival Pass £84

By popular demand, the Swingle Singers return to lead a fabulous line-up for the third London A Cappella Festival. It’s a showcase for exciting international talent: this year we welcome the stunning beatboxing Boxettes, the Nordic vocal ‘glam-rock’ group FORK, the Canadian Rat Pack Cadence, and the world-famous Swingle Singers. See Q&A Bellatrix on London A Cappella Festival p82

Cadence

The Boxettes

CONTEMPORARY


January 2012

Vasari Singers

LISTINGS 53 LISTINGS

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Fork

THE BOXETTES © SHANNON MIKHAIL LOBO | FORK © MATTI NÄRÄNEN / DROL2PHOTO | VASARI SINGERS © SIM CANETTY-CLARKE | SWINGLE SINGERS, CADENCE, COTTONTOWN CHORUS, LONDON VOCAL PROJECT © SUPPLIED PHOTOS | PHILIPPE GRAFFIN © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA

Cottontown Chorus

London Vocal Project

Saturday 14 January LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Free Foyer Events INTERACT Come and hear some of the UK’s best beatbox, gospel, barbershop, choral and jazz talents. Audience participation mandatory! Concert Level Foyer – All Day FREE

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Purely A Cappella Workshops INTERACT Following on from last year’s sell-out workshop day, enthusiastic singers and choirs of all ages and abilities are invited to join members of the Swingle Singers and others in a series of workshops on various aspects of singing and a cappella performance. Early booking is a must! Workshop 1: Voice Camp with the Swingle Singers Workshop 2: Improvisation with Pete Churchill Workshop 3: Introduction to Live Looping with FreePlay Duo Workshop 1 – Hall Two 11am Workshop 2 – Hall Two 12.30pm Workshop 3 – Hall Two 3.30pm (Each workshop lasts ~60-mins) £9.50 each, or book all 3 for £21 Saturday Pass £48 | Festival Pass £84

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Cottontown Chorus

London Vocal Project

with Crossfire

with support act FreePlay Duo

CONTEMPORARY

CONTEMPORARY

British Barbershop at its best. The award-  winning 56-strong Cottontown Chorus steal the hearts of their audiences with winning medleys that have put them at the top of their game (2008 BBC Radio 3 Adult Choir of the Year, BABS UK champions, amongst other impressive accolades). The chaps recently became an internet sensation with their hilarious arrangement of Queen’s Fat Bottomed Girls. Not to be missed! They will be joined on stage by BABS UK quartet champions Crossfire.

Directed by Pete Churchill, the London Vocal Project showcases the finest new talent on London’s jazz scene. Rooted in gospel and groove music, this leading contemporary jazz-vocal ensemble has collaborated with world-famous names   Bobby McFerrin, Dame Cleo Laine, Sir Johnny Dankworth, and Norma Winstone. Hall One 6.45pm (Lasts ~60-mins) £12.50 £15.50 £18.50 £21.50 Saver Seats £9.50 Saturday Pass £48 | Festival Pass £84

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

Talk: A Global A Cappella Community SPOKEN WORD A panel discussion with leading figures   in a cappella from around the world, discussing contemporary trends in a cappella music from marketing via social media to networking and a cappella resources for singers and fans. Don’t   miss this free event. Hall One 5pm FREE. Tickets required. Call Box Office.

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Philippe Graffin (violin), Henri Demarquette (cello) & Daniel Blumenthal (piano) Grieg Andante con moto in C minor for piano trio  Peter Fribbins Dances & Laments for violin & cello duo (UK premiere)  Ravel Piano Trio (1914) Schubert Piano Trio in E flat, D929 CLASSICAL

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

A piano trio formed of three remarkable soloists perform Grieg’s only work in the medium (composed when he was 35), the sublime Schubert E flat major and Ravel trios, and Dances & Laments, a new work by Fribbins, here receiving its UK premiere.

Swingles & Friends

Hall One 6.30pm

Hall One 2pm (Lasts 45-mins) £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Saver Seats £9.50 Saturday Pass £48 | Festival Pass £84

Sunday 15 January

with support act Euphonism

£14.50 £18.50 | Saver Seats £9.50

CONTEMPORARY Since the ’60s, the unmistakable sound of ‘Swingle singing’, virtuosic vocal blend combined with high-level entertainment, has thrilled audiences around the globe. The current line-up represents the group’s transformation from pioneering classical/ jazz crossover artists to contemporary vocal super-group. A concert with special guests you won’t want to miss. Also featuring support act Euphonism from NYC. Hall One 8.30pm (~90-mins + interval) £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £34.50 Saver Seats £9.50 Saturday Pass £48 | Festival Pass £84

Philippe Graffin


54 LISTINGS

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January 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1 19 – 21 January

Monday 16 January WORDS ON MONDAY

Thomas Heatherwick SPOKEN WORD Thomas Heatherwick, founder of Heatherwick Studio in 1994, lectures on his award-winning projects in architecture, urban infrastructure and furniture design at this special event hosted by Laurence King Publishing. Some of the Studio’s most renowned projects include New Bus for London, the UK Pavilion at the Shanghai Expo 2010, the Rolling Bridge (Paddington Basin, London) and the East Beach Café in Littlehampton. As well as giving an insight into day-to-day working life at Heatherwick Studio, Thomas Heatherwick will be taking questions from the audience. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

ensemblebash@20 part 1: Minimum Maximum Programme to include: Steve Reich Quartet Graham Fitkin (ensemblebash commission, 1992) Stewart Copeland (ensemblebash commission, 1994) CONTEMPORARY

MIKHAIL RUDY, ENDYMION AND the Schubert Ensemble open thE UNWRAPPED series with some of BRAHMS’s best-loved works.

Twenty years after they burst onto the scene, the percussion quartet return to London to present a retrospective of the last two decades. The first concert redefined the percussion ensemble and spawned a host of imitators. Tonight the group’s high-energy performing style and intense, almost telepathic, ensemble skills come to the fore in works by composers with whom they’ve previously have collaborated.

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 19 January BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

Schubert Ensemble: Brahms and the Alto Horn Trio in E flat, Op. 40 (version for violin, viola & piano) Two Songs, Op. 91 for mezzo-soprano, viola & piano Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25 Schubert Ensemble Simon Blendis violin Douglas Paterson viola Jane Salmon cello William Howard piano with Sally Bruce-Payne mezzo-soprano CLASSICAL The viola brings a special quality to this seldom heard version of Brahms’s Horn Trio, one of his most personal and heart-felt works, and also to the two beautiful late songs, Op. 91. Brahms’s First Piano Quartet is one of the great masterpieces of the repertoire, with its symphonic sweep and vigorous Gypsy Rondo finale. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Friday 20 January BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

Endymion: Brahms’s Quintets String Quintet No. 1 in F, Op. 88 String Quintet No. 2 in G, Op. 111 Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115 Endymion Antony Pay clarinet Krysia Osostowicz violin Clara Biss violin Sophie Renshaw viola Ásdís Valdimarsdóttir viola Jane Salmon cello

To whet the appetite for a year-long celebration of one of Europe’s greatest masters, we’ll hear the autumnal beauty of the Clarinet Quintet (Endymion), the buoyant Horn Trio and gorgeous alto songs with viola (Schubert Ensemble) and the magnificent Handel Variations contrasted with the visionary late pieces of Op. 118 (Mikhail Rudy). See Feature on Brahms Unwrapped pp26–29

‘Ensemblebash, who make playing percussion the coolest, noisiest and funniest occupation on earth.’ The Times

CLASSICAL

ensemblebash

Few works are as well-loved as the composer’s autumnal Clarinet Quintet, the finest example of the form since Mozart’s own masterpiece. It was

.


January 2012

LISTINGS 55

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED / ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER / WWW.GEMMALATIMER>COM | ENSEMBLEBASH © NICK WHITE | ENDYMION © EAMONN MCCABE | BABELFISH, MIKHAIL RUDY © SUPPLIED PHOTOS | SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE © JOHN CLARK | TRIO MANOUCHE © PAUL CONDRON

LISTINGS

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Endymion

inspired, like the clarinet sonatas, by the Meiningen court clarinettist Richard Mühlfeld, and here is performed by celebrated master Antony Pay. Also included in this programme, the rarely heard String Quintets, the second of which was a sketch for Brahms’s fifth symphony. Hall One 7.30pm (with two intervals) £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Alternative Burns Night with Babelfish FOLK Babelfish comprise top Scottish musicians  from bands such as the Peatbog Faeries, Session A9, Blazin Fiddles and many more.  They are unique in musical skill combining fiddles, box, percussion, bass and keyboards with poetry. Inspired in their presentation, tonight forms part of a debut   tour which sees the legendary Bard Burns arranged in an alternative and creative way. An evening which mixes Burns with some of the bands own music and poetry, this is a brilliant contemporary performance you are unlikely to see again. 

Babelfish

Mikhail Rudy

‘I couldn’t believe all this glorious music was coming from just five guys’. FRoots

reminiscence, ‘heroic but only in memory’ as Rudy has said.

Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 7.30pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 Premium Seats £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

original work and reworked classics. ‘Very hot and very swing’ Max Reinhardt ‘Definitely one of the highlights of the festival’ Green Futures, Glastonbury

Saturday 21 January BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

Mikhail Rudy plays Brahms: Handel and Schumann Variations Variations and fugue on a theme   by Handel in B flat, Op. 24  Variations on a theme by Schumann   in F sharp minor, Op. 9  3 Intermezzi, Op. 117  6 Klavierstücke, Op. 118 Mikhail Rudy piano CLASSICAL For Mikhail Rudy, discovering Brahms’s Handel Variations as a boy in his provincial Ukrainian town was ‘a revelation: ‘They were my first love. It was like finding an encyclopaedia, a treasury of music history and culture.’ He also plays the visionary and highly sophisticated Schumann Variations and the exquisite late pieces of Opp. 117 and 118, threaded through with Schubert Ensemble

THE BASE

Simon Harris & Trio Manouche Simon Harris guitar/vocals Frank Moon guitar Colin Somervell double bass Quentin Collins trumpet (special guest) JAZZ Trio Manouche are one of the UK’s leading gypsy swing ensembles, performing re-  worked classics of Django Reinhardt and highly acclaimed material penned by their band leader Simon Harris with a unique   and contemporary twist. Since forming in   2005 the trio have performed in top Jazz venues, including 606 Club and Ronnie Scott’s, concert halls from the Royal Festival   Hall to the Barbican and major UK festivals.  They also appeared as regular guest performers on various BBC Radio shows. They have played with leading exponents of Gypsy Jazz (Tchavolo Schmitt and Angelo  Debarre). Tonight’s gig includes Simon’s Trio Manouche

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 22 January LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Chilingirian Quartet & Valeria Resjan (piano) The Romantic Piano Quintets – 1 Haydn String Quartet in D minor, Op. 42 Bartók String Quartet No. 6 Brahms Piano Quintet in F minor Op. 34 CLASSICAL The first concert in a survey of some of the best 19th-century piano quintets, all to be given by the Chilingirian Quartet with pianist guests, begins with Bartók’s last quartet, some mid-period Haydn and the remarkable and passionate piano quintet by Brahms, with Russian-born pianist Valeria Resjan. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50


56 LISTINGS

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January 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS PHELPS / KINCH / WILSON explorations 26 – 28 JANUARY

Monday 23 January TALKING ART

Frida Kahlo SPOKEN WORD The title of Kahlo’s painting Self-portrait with a Thorn Necklace could be a description of her career. She was an unlikely mixture, a well-educated middle-class girl from Mexico City who identified with indigenous traditions of folk art and native culture. She overcame illness and a crippling accident to emerge as a unique, unclassifiable painter whose main subject-matter was herself. The intense gaze looking out from her hypnotic, emblematic self-portraits has become iconic: the Mona Lisa of Mexican art. With her husband Diego Rivera she moved in avant-garde circles, but her work remained direct and compelling in its capacity to communicate her inner life. In recent years Kahlo’s paintings, life and image have become increasingly familiar, but there is still much to discover. St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

WORDS ON MONDAY

Reading the Riots with Paul Lewis SPOKEN WORD The riots that spread across England in August 2011 marked the most serious civil unrest in a generation. Four days of widespread arson and looting left five people dead and hundreds of shops ransacked. In the weeks that followed, more than 2,000 rioters were arrested. Journalist Paul Lewis was in the thick of it. He gained 35,000 Twitter followers as he

A TrIO OF JAZZ talentS, JaY PHELPS, Soweto Kinch AND Alex Wilson play a game of musical chairs eXplorations is a mini-series with a difference: three natural jazz leaders will form three unique, one-off collaborations. Phelps kicks off with Movements for the Modern Artist, saxophonist and rapper Kinch airs his new album The Trials of Mike Smith, while seasoned pianist Alex Wilson brings his new suite with string quartet and kora. See Feature on eXplorations pp36–37

Manu Delago & Living Room in London

reported from the frontline of the initial disorder in Tottenham, and gave a series of on-the-scene reports as the riots spread across the capital and the country. Since then, Lewis has led a research study into the causes and consequences of the riots with the London School of Economics. He talks about his experiences of the disorder, and the lessons learned for the future. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

Manu Delago & Living Room in London Manu Delago Hang Christoph Pepe Auer bass clarinet, saxophone Ellie Fagg violin Tom Norris violin, voice Gregor Riddell cello CONTEMPORARY Living Room in London is an eclectic quintet of instrumentalist-composers. Master Hang drummer and Björkcollaborator Manu Delago, multi-awardwinning clarinettist/saxophonist Christoph Pepe Auer and London-based string players Ellie Fagg, Tom Norris and Gregor Riddell create a unique sound that spans a wide range of musical influences. This concert launches their new album, and premieres new pieces by Peter Wiegold and Milton Mermikides – and a special surprise arrangement! ‘The most intriguing musical fusion I’ve heard.’ Richard Morrison, The Times ‘Quite possibly the best Hang player on the planet’ Music Orbit on Manu Delago Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


January 2012

Thursday 26 January

Friday 27 January

PHELPS / KINCH / WILSON eXplorations

PHELPS / KINCH / WILSON eXplorations

An Evening with Jay Phelps + guests

An Evening with Soweto Kinch + guests

JAZZ

JAZZ

Jay Phelps’s instantly recognisable warm and projecting tone has placed him at the forefront of today’s young and creative jazz musicians. He has recorded with a veritable who’s who of jazz, including Sir John Dankworth, Courtney Pine, Jamie Cullum and Amy Winehouse. In this concert Phelps features both his new quartet and a larger band (including Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson), with special guest vocalists. The ‘big band’ set features Phelps’s new suite, Movements for the Modern Artist.

Award-winning alto-saxophonist Soweto Kinch is one of the most exciting and versatile young musicians on the British jazz and hip-hop scenes. This evening he improvises and explores with a new line-up – and there’s a sneak preview of the new The Legend of Mike Smith CD. Expect beautiful yet challenging music played with passion and virtuosity. With special guests Alex Wilson and Jay Phelps. ‘Phenomenal’ thisislondon.co.uk

Hall One 8pm

LISTINGS 57 LISTINGS

SOWETO KINCH © BENJAMIN AMURE | JAY PHELPS © PROPER RECORDS | ALEX WILSON © MICHAEL VALENTINE | MANU DELAGO & THE LIVING ROOM IN LONDON © Nobby Clark / NOBBYCLARK.CO.UK | DAVID PEARL AND ROBBO ROBSON © IMPROPERA | TRIO GOYA © York Tillyer / Real World Records Ltd | BENET MCLEAN, THE MEMORY BAND © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking

Trio Goya

Benet McLean

Hall One 8pm £14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

£13.50, £15.50, £19.50, £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

The Memory Band

FOLK UNION OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Impropera’s Night o’ Tartan

Listen to Britain: Folk Music & Film with The Memory Band

COMEDY

FOLK

Kings Place favourites Impropera raise   the curtain on the 2012 comedy season with a tartan-tinted explosion of virtuoso musicality and high-wire improvisation inspired by Burns Night. You make the suggestions, they do the rest. Be warned, tatties may be tortured and bagpipes brutalised. ‘Brilliant ingenuity’ The Times

Folk footage from feature films and documentaries sits alongside live music – The Memory Band’s take on traditional pieces used in films such as Far From The Madding Crowd, Barry Lyndon and The Innocents. Folk music is fundamentally linked with national identity, and this performance celebrates, questions and explores how this link has been portrayed on the big screen. Stephen Cracknell’s The Memory Band has established itself in that fine English tradition of slightly

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

schizophrenic projects on the independent  music scene, always entertaining and innovating. Produced by Arctic Circle. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 28 January PHELPS / KINCH / WILSON eXplorations

An Evening with Alex Wilson + guests JAZZ Composer, arranger, performer and educator Wilson is one of the UK’s foremost  Latin music aficionados. He’s performed in  a staggering 50 countries worldwide. Last year, Wilson launched his new trio to great acclaim at Kings Place. This evening they return to perform new material together with the London premiere of Wilson’s Suite for piano, string quartet and kora, and a section of his Compass Suite. With special guests Jay Phelps and Soweto Kinch.

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 29 January LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Trio Goya Haydn Piano Trio in A flat, Hob. XV:14 Beethoven Piano Trio in G, Op. 1 No. 2 Cirri Duetto in G for violin & cello, Op. 12/4 Haydn Piano Trio in C, Hob. XV:27

Hall One 8pm

CLASSICAL

£14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Kati Debretzeni (violin), Sebastian Comberti  (cello) & Maggie Cole – with her wonderful  1795 fortepiano – give an historically informed recital of piano trios, together with a beautiful duo by Cirri, the London-  based Italian composer who studied with Martini, and performed with the young Mozart during his London visit in 1764.

THE BASE

Benet McLean JAZZ Impropera

performer. Music is in his blood – he began playing the violin at the age of three, and has since embraced a staggering range of instruments and genres. In this concert he features music from his two albums alongside jazz standards. ‘Positively bursting with talent and energy… simply sensational.’ Jazzwise ‘Fast-rising young pianist Benet McLean has a piano technique that seems to bring Art Tatum’s music into the 21st century, drawing on classical music, postbop, hip-hop and beyond.’ The Guardian

Pianist-singer-rapper-composer Benet McLean is a powerful and multi-faceted

Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50


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January/February 2012

(trumpet), Lothar Ohlmeier (clarinets), Ollie Bown and Isambard Khroustaliov (electronics) – only Arthurs and Ohlmeier will be on stage, interacting with a computer system programmed to improvise with them.

This Week’s Focus Great Britten! with the dante quartet AND FRIENDS

Hall Two 8pm

1 – 4 FEBRUARY

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Alain de Botton

Monday 30 January

Wednesday 1 February

WORDS ON MONDAY

GREAT BRITTEN!

Alain de Botton SPOKEN WORD For Alain de Botton, recent debates about religion have become increasingly sterile, with militant atheists like Dawkins facing off against equally convinced religious types. But de Botton proposes that atheists have been going down a dead end by merely attacking the doctrines of religion. He argues that even if (like him)one believes nothing, religion has much to teach us, especially as concerns rituals, rites of passage, pilgrimages, morality, art, architecture and institutionalisation of the needs of the soul. So here is an argument that is sure to attract notice, because it maintains that atheists can be deeply fascinated by religion and learn much from it, without needing to believe in any of it. Hall One 7pm £9.50 Benjamin Britten

OUT HEAR

the dante quartet’s enticing exploration of the world of benJamin britten and his musical inspirations This beautifully crafted series offers a rare opportunity to hear all of Britten’s String Quartets, alongside powerful works by his teacher, Bridge, and by Purcell, his greatest influence. Robin Michael performs the spectacular Suites for Solo Cello, written for Mstislav Rostropovich, and Nicholas Daniel is the oboist in the colourful Metamorphoses. See Feature on Great Britten! pp46–47

February

Tom Arthurs & Not Applicable

Britten and Ovid Britten 3 Divertimenti for string quartet Britten Six Metamorphoses after Ovid for solo oboe, Op. 49 (with readings) Britten Phantasy Quartet in F minor for oboe and string trio, Op. 2 Britten String Quartet No. 1 in D, Op. 25 Dante Quartet with Nicholas Daniel oboe Simon Goldhill narrator CLASSICAL The young Britten’s dazzling talent is clearly heard in his 3 Divertimenti for string quartet and in the Phantasy for oboe and strings, played by the Dantes with world-renowned oboist Nicholas Daniel. Britten was always fascinated by musical metamorphoses. Written in 1951, the same year as Billy Budd, the Six Metamorphoses after Ovid for solo oboe are performed together with dramatic readings from Ovid’s mythological tales, describing the raunchy goings-on of gods and nymphs. Britten’s first full-scale string quartet, written in 1941 in the USA, completes this colourful programme. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

CONTEMPORARY Former BBC New Generation Artist trumpeter/composer Tom Arthurs presents two unique takes on contemporary improvised electro-acoustic music, exploring the challenges and contradictions between instruments and computers, composition and improvisation, control and surprise. The first set features Tom with electronic musician Simon Vincent: two Brits living in Berlin, focusing on great sensuality, beauty and extreme subtleties of sound, intimacy and interaction. The second set is the UK premiere of Long Division for two instrumentalists and two computers pre-programmed from afar. Of the four performers – Tom Arthurs

Thursday 2 February GREAT BRITTEN!

Britten’s Cello Suites Britten Cello Suite No. 1, Op. 72 Britten Cello Suite No. 2, Op. 80 Britten Cello Suite No. 3, Op. 87 Robin Michael cello CLASSICAL By the 1950s, Britten was devoting most of his time to opera and had shown little interest in writing purely instrumental music. Therefore it says much for the


February 2012

personality of Mstislav Rostropovich that, after meeting him in 1960, Britten wrote for him not only the Cello Symphony and the Sonata for cello and piano, but also three Suites for solo cello. These suites each inhabit incredibly varied soundworlds. From the Renaissance grandeur of the opening Canto in the First Suite, the austerity and wry humour of the Second Suite to the deeply moving Passacaglia of the Third, Britten uses many of his favourite Baroque forms to create three extremely vivid and emotionally charged works. Whilst the influences of Bach and Purcell are never far  away, there are many echoes of Britten’s   own operas, especially in the Third Suite where the rarefied musical language of Death in Venice paints a poignant picture of the composer’s final years.

longstanding friend and mentor. In Britten’s own words, ‘Frank Bridge is known almost entirely by his early works... To those who know only this period of his work, the later pieces must seem like those of another composer. But the connection between the two periods is clear – the seed of the later work is in the earlier – stemming from a desire to say more personal and subtler things. They can   be difficult at first to follow, apart of course from the invariable fascination of the sound,  but the drama and tensions are easy to feel.’ In between Bridge’s first and last works  for string quartet, brilliant pianist Simon Crawford-Phillips joins soloists from the Dante Quartet in Britten’s duos for strings with piano, and the delightful but rarely heard Young Apollo for piano and strings.

Hall One 7.30pm

Hall One 7.30pm

£14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

£14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Purcell (arr. Britten) Chacony in G minor Britten String Quartet No. 2 in C, Op. 36 Purcell Fantasia upon one note Britten String Quartet No. 3, Op. 94 La Serenissima Dante Quartet CLASSICAL Britten adored Purcell’s music, and his own arrangement of Purcell’s Chacony is for many young musicians the perfect introduction to Purcell’s elegant, restrained but deeply emotional soundworld. Britten wrote his magnificent Second Quartet in homage to Purcell, culminating in his own monumental and majestic Chacony. His third and final quartet, completed in Venice shortly before his death, inhabits another universe. The link with Purcell is unbroken, but a number of other musical styles and ideas are vividly explored in a series of short movements. Quoting frequently from his own last opera, Death in Venice, this is one of Britten’s most personal and deeply original works, whose final Passacaglia, titled La Serenissima, touches mystical realms.

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

FOLK UNION

Miranda Hennessy & Friends + Dregs

RM Hubbert & Friends

COMEDY

One of Glasgow’s more prolific artists, RM Hubbert launches his new album at Kings Place with the Local. Featuring long-time friend Alex Kapranos from Franz Ferdinand on production duties and cameos from special artists such as Aidan Moffat, Emma Pollock, Luke Sutherland, Stuart Braithwaite and Alasdair Roberts. A hugely talented artist, Hubbert finally looks set to gain the recognition he so richly deserves. Expect interesting special guests on the night!

Kit Downes in concert

Hall Two 8pm

Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3 presents...

Fast-rising comedy double-act Dregs present an hour of hilarious sketches and bonhomie from the minds of Max Dickins and Mark Smith. With sketches on Channel 4’s This Just In and BBC2, Dregs invite you into their unique comedy world. Or at least promise to turn up on time.   ‘Buckets of energy’ The Daily Telegraph

BENJAMIN BRITTEN (1946) © GEORGE RODGER/GETTY IMAGES | ALAIN DE BOTTON © VINCENT STARR | Dante Quartet © Benjamin Harte

GREAT BRITTEN!

Britten and Purcell

Sketch comedy written by Miranda Hennessy (C4’s Phoneshop, This Just In and BBC2’s Dick and Dom’s Funny Business), featuring a host of brand-new characters in hilarious and original sketches. Miranda is joined by David Seymour and Steven Shapland. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 3 February GREAT BRITTEN!

Britten and Bridge Bridge Three Idylls for string quartet, H67 Britten Lachrymae for viola & piano, Op. 48 Britten Young Apollo for piano and strings, Op. 16  Britten Suite for violin and piano, Op. 6 Bridge String Quartet No. 4, H188 Dante Quartet with Simon Crawford-Phillips piano CLASSICAL Britten met Frank Bridge when he was only 11, and the older composer became his

FOLK

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 4 February GREAT BRITTEN!

Pre-concert Talk: Birth of a Masterpiece

Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

Silent Movies with Live Improv Band featuring Stephen Warbeck MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY Sunday afternoons will never be the same again. In a new series devised by cellist/ composer Philip Sheppard, top musicians play improvised soundtracks to the world’s greatest silent films without rehearsing in advance. Films include the antics of comic heroes Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd and other classics. We can’t tell you which film is showing when – no-one knows, not even the performers! Take pot luck and enjoy the club-like atmosphere in Hall Two. This month’s special guest is Oscar-winning composer Stephen Warbeck, whose film scores include Billy Elliot, Shakespeare in Love and Captain Corelli’s Mandolin. Hall Two 3pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Not So Silent Offer: Ticket + Bloody Mary +   Roast Lunch. All for just £29.50 

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Turner Ensemble Martinu˚ Oboe Quartet, H315 (1947) Mozart Oboe Quartet in F, K370 Mendelssohn Piano Trio No. 1 in D minor, Op. 49 Turner Ensemble (LCMS artist-in-residence) CLASSICAL

Kit Downes, one of the UK’s most inspiring pianists, is on stage with drummers James Maddren and Seb Rochford for a special gig recorded for BBC Radio 3’s Jazz Line-Up. Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 6.30pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JAZZ

SPOKEN WORD CLASSICAL In 1975 Britten invited composer David Matthews and his brother Colin to try out his String Quartet No. 3, newly completed, on the piano at his home in Aldeburgh. David’s close connection with Britten – as an assistant from 1966–70, and also as his biographer – forms the starting-point for a lively discussion of Britten’s chamber music, with illustrations from the Dantes.

£4.50

Sunday 5 February

The Turner Ensemble perform oboe quartets  by Czech master Martinu˚ (from 1947) and   by Mozart, who wrote his quartet during a trip to Munich in 1780 for Friedrich Ramm, a virtuoso oboist in the Munich Orchestra. The concert finishes with Mendelssohn’s passionate D minor Piano Trio.

An illustrated talk with composer David Matthews and Dante Quartet

St Pancras Room 6pm

LISTINGS 59

Dante Quartet

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February 2012

THIS WEEK’S FOCUS Purpose and Grace

Wednesday 8 February PURPOSE AND GRACE

Tony Benn & Roy Bailey The Writing on the Wall

8 – 11 FEBRUARY

FOLK Sean O’Brien

Monday 6 February WORDS ON MONDAY

The Sebald Lecture Sean O’Brien – ‘Making the Crossing: the Poet as Translator’ SPOKEN WORD The annual Sebald Lecture on Literary Translation, given by Sean O’Brien, is preceded by a programme of readings, together with the presentation of The Society of Authors’ Translation Prizes 2011. These prestigious, long-established awards, to be presented by the editor of the TLS, Sir Peter Stothard, are given for fiction, poetry and non-fiction, and will this year feature translations from the original Arabic, Dutch/Flemish, French, German and Spanish. In collaboration with the British Centre for Literary Translation and the Society of Authors. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

Phil Minton & Guests Martin Simpson

Legendary acoustic & slide guitarist Martin Simpson brings a live show of his latest acclaimed album, Purpose & Grace This album features a stellar cast, some of whom (June Tabor and Dick Gaughan) perform at Kings Place this week. Also appearing are Roy Bailey and Tony Benn, Chris Wood (BBC Radio 2 Folk Singer of the Year 2011), and the Ruth Theodore Band with Nancy Wallace and Jason Steel. Bright Phoebus join Martin Simpson for the last night. See Folk Highlights on Purpose and Grace p14

CONTEMPORARY A performer like no other, Phil Minton will have you on the edge of your seat, mouth agape. Vocal improv is his bag, and he is truly a master of his art. Enter a peripheral, elemental universe never far from pain, genesis, death and aggression as Minton takes you through the gamut of vocal possibility: animalesque utterances and shrieks, harsh singing, the cries of a newborn or a demented soul, leonine purrs, belches, fighting monkeys – an epic non-verbal journey. Extraordinary and unmissable. ‘Joltingly visceral… electrifying in its immediacy’ LondonJazz ‘Minton’s voice also occupies a category apart, a place in contemporary Improv that makes your regular “sui generis” performer look almost commonplace.’ The Wire Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Tony Benn and Roy Bailey have been entertaining audiences together for 30 years. They won BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards’ ‘Best Live Act’ in 2003, and they still sell out wherever they go. Witty, perceptive and thought-provoking, Benn’s memories and anecdotes from a lifetime at the forefront of British politics are interspersed with protest folk from the excellent Bailey, ‘the very soul of folk’s working-class ideals’ (Mojo) and ‘the greatest socialist folksinger of his generation’ (Tony Benn). ‘Majestic. Provocative. Quietly inspiring’ Mojo ‘What comes across most strongly is their idealism, their principles, their sincerity, their love for what they do and audiences sense this immediately.’ The Scotsman Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 9 February PURPOSE AND GRACE

Martin Simpson with June Tabor & Dick Gaughan FOLK One of the world’s finest acoustic and slide guitar players, Martin Simpson turns his renditions of traditional songs into masterpieces of storytelling. He has been nominated an astounding 23 times in the eleven years of the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards – more than any other performer. His new album, Purpose and Grace, has received critical acclaim, with its plethora of special guests including folk legends June Tabor and Dick Gaughan, who will be joining Martin on this very special evening of music. The queen of English folk, June continues to capture the imagination of audiences from the folk scene and beyond. With his fire and passion, Dick has been at the cutting edge of Scottish music for almost four decades. A gem of a concert, not to be missed. ‘An album of great love and joy, Purpose and Grace confirms that Simpson remains at the top of his game.’ bbc.co.uk/music Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50


OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Tony Law: Go Mr Tony Go! COMEDY Winner of the Amused Moose Award for Best Comic on The Edinburgh Fringe this year, Tony Law is widely regarded by the comedy industry as one of the best comics on the circuit. Mixing delightful, faultless twaddle with some genuinely insightful forays into what it is that makes comedy, he presents a standuppy, sketchy, impro-ey,  arty show that asks the question we’ve probably all asked ourselves at some point.   Namely; is Tony Law a way of doing comedy?  ‘One of the best comedy performances of the year’ The Independent Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 10 February PURPOSE AND GRACE

Chris Wood in concert FOLK

MARTIN SIMPSON © DAVID ANGEL | SEAN O’BRIEN © CAROLINE FORBES | CHRIS WOOD © DYLAN WOLF

Chris Wood, winner of two BBC Radio 2 2011 Folk Awards, is an uncompromising writer whose music reveals his love for the   unofficial history of the English-speaking people. He interweaves tradition and his own contemporary parables, imbued with gentle intelligence, and his writing has   the same timeless quality as Richard Thompson at his best. One of his 2011 awards was Best Original Track, won for Hollow Point, his chilling portrayal of the shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, which shows us the event through the eyes of the victim. It is taken from the Handmade Life album, which has won huge critical acclaim:  ‘Gentle, powerful and classy’ The Guardian Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION PURPOSE AND GRACE

Ruth Theodore Band + Nancy Wallace & Jason Steel FOLK A songwriter like no other. With words as dangerous as her guitar playing, Ruth Theodore is a compelling and original songwriter. Her writing has gained the respect of fans and critics alike, most notably for her second album White Holes of Mole Hills. ‘Songs so quirky and unexpected that   it’s impossible to imagine anyone else performing them, following none of the more conventional styles of songwriting. And it actually works.’ The Guardian Nancy Wallace will be known to many for her work with The Memory Band and, more recently, The Owl Service. Steel has forged a reputation as a distinctive solo performer, marrying a lullaby-sweet voice with his deft finger-picking on banjo, guitar and ukulele. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 11 February

Collective) as the Fay Hield Trio. Fay leads a workshop on learning songs and harmony techniques. Limehouse Room 2pm (Lasts ~90mins) £8.50 | All ages welcome

PURPOSE AND GRACE

Guitar Workshop with Ewan McLennan & Sam Carter FOLK INTERACT Martin Simpson introduces BBC Folk Awards Horizon winners Ewan McLennan (2011) and Sam Carter (2010) in a workshop exploring technique, tunings and the creative process. Bring your guitar and your questions and enjoy a rare opportunity to talk and listen to two of folk’s rising stars. Bring a small notebook, and, if you wish, a recording device. St Pancras Room 3.30pm (Lasts ~90mins) £6.50 | Suitable for all levels

PURPOSE AND GRACE

Martin Simpson & Guests: Bright Phoebus FOLK

A chance to learn from the very best. World-renowned acoustic and slide   guitar player Martin Simpson invites   you to participate in a workshop   exploring technique, performance   and much more. Bring your guitar and your questions and take this rare opportunity to learn with a true master. Bring a small notebook, and, if you wish, a recording device.

Martin Simpson invites young stars from Sheffield-based collective Bright Phoebus to perform with him to close this week’s series. Joining him for an evening of strong voices and exquisite musicianship will be long-term collaborator Andy Cutting and Andy Seward plus, acclaimed folk singer and interpreter Fay Hield, BBC Folk Awards Horizon winners Ewan McLennan (2011) and Sam Carter (2010). ‘Through Bright Phoebus I have come to work with some of the finest younger musicians on the scene, and I’m delighted to present some of those musicians at Kings Place. There will be solo performance  and collaborations, and none of us know where it may go!’ Martin Simpson

St Pancras Room 1pm (Lasts ~90mins)

Hall One 7.30pm

£12.50 | Suitable for all levels

£14.50, £19.50, £24.50, £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

PURPOSE AND GRACE

Guitar Workshop with Martin Simpson FOLK INTERACT

PURPOSE AND GRACE

‘Creating Harmony’ Singing Workshop with Fay Hield

Chris Wood

LISTINGS 61

February 2012

‘Iles is one of the most refreshing and promising figures’ The Guardian ‘Williams has a quietly original pianistic talent which is finally getting the plaudits it deserves.’ The Telegraph Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 12 February SUNDAY SPECIAL

Piano-Yoga® with GéNIA INTERACT Russian virtuoso pianist GéNIA is an acclaimed pioneer on the classical scene, with a wide repertoire embracing classical and contemporary works and multimedia projects. A qualified BWY yoga teacher, she is the creator of the groundbreaking method Piano-Yoga®, now available for the second year in this one-day retreat for   pianists of advanced-beginner to advanced   level wishing to improve their technique while enhancing their well-being. Conquer your performance nerves, improve   concentration, build strength in the fingers   and hands, establish good posture and master different qualities of sound. Suitable  for amateur and professional pianists alike. Includes an optional piano masterclass with GéNIA. piano-yoga.com ‘GéNIA is an inspiring teacher and gifted pianist’ Music Teacher Magazine Limehouse Room 10.30am – 5.30pm £90 | £75 Piano-Yoga® Members

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets 6 Pre-Concert Talk with Dr Robert Hanson ‘A Matter of Life or Death’ Beethoven String Quartet in A, Op. 18 No. 5 Shostakovich String Quartet No. 7 in F sharp minor, Op. 108  Beethoven String Quartet in A minor, Op. 132 CLASSICAL

THE BASE

Nikki Iles & Kate Williams Piano Duo

FOLK INTERACT

JAZZ

Fay Hield is the first new signing for a decade by the prestigious independent Topic Records on which her debut album Looking Glass was released. She currently performs with Sam Sweeney (Bellowhead)   and Rob Harbron (English Acoustic

Melodic contemporary jazz from two highly  original jazz composer-pianists. This gig  features music by John Taylor, and new pieces by Nikki and Kate. A rare chance to hear two leading pianist-composers perform together. 

The sixth concert in our Beethoven cycle   presents an early quartet with one of the   last ones, composed almost 25 years later, interspersed with Shostakovich’s Seventh Quartet, composed in early 1960 in memory of his first wife, Nina Vassilyevna. Preceded by a pre-concert talk by Dr Robert Hanson. Pre-concert Talk – St Pancras Room 5pm Performance – Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

The pre-concert talk is FREE admission, but requires separate ticket. Contact Box Office.

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February 2012

THIS WEEK’S FOCUS celebrating debussy WITH PASCAL & AMI ROGÉ

Monday 13 February TALKING ART

Pangolin Show: Focus on the Venice Biennale SPOKEN WORD

16 & 17 FEBRUARY

A celebration of the 60th anniversary of the 1952 Venice Biennale, which showcased of British sculpture for a worldwide audience and was instrumental in launching a number of artists’ international careers. This lecture coincides with an exhibition at Pangolin London that focuses on these artists and their work. St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

WORDS ON MONDAY

Foyles Literary Lecture SPOKEN WORD With everything from literary luncheons for heads of state to slam nights for debut writers, Foyles has been running a varied programme of literary events for almost a century. This evening Foyles hosts a reading and discussion with one of today’s favourite authors. Please go to www.kingsplace.co.uk for more information. Hall One 7pm £9.50

Australian composer Alex Pozniak and performances of Claudia Molitor’s playfully theatrical Tango and Rolf Hind’s groundbreaking virtuoso work Towers of Silence. ‘Fiery charm and virtuosic fluency’ Sydney Morning Herald Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 16 February CELEBRATING DEBUSSY WITH PASCAL & AMI ROGÉ

The Young Debussy Danse bohémienne Suite bergamasque (incl. Clair de lune) Ballade Deux Arabesques Petite Suite Images Book II La Mer Pascal & Ami Rogé pianos CLASSICAL In this pair of ingeniously programmed recitals celebrating Debussy’s genius, Pascal and Ami Rogé use the 150th anniversary year of his birth (22 August 1862) as a springboard into his distinctive soundworld. This first recital features both early works and later larger and typically descriptive works. The miraculous musical evocations of Debussy’s second book of solo piano Images are paired with his own four-hand version of La Mer. Hall One 7.30pm

OUT HEAR Claude Debussy

Peerless interpreters Pascal & Ami Rogé mark Debussy’s 150th birthday with two nights of ravishing music Having released acclaimed new recordings of Debussy’s complete piano works (Onyx), Pascal Rogé presents two programmes highlighting works from the composer’s youth and old age. As well as Images and selected Preludes, there will be a rare chance to hear the duet versions of La Mer and Nocturnes, for which Pascal will be joined by his wife Ami. See Classical Highlights for Celebrating Debussy p10

Zubin Kanga: Piano Inside/Out

£14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Combined Ticket Offer: 20% off if booking both Debussy concerts. Excludes Online Savers

Rolf Hind Towers of Silence Claudia Molitor Tango David Gorton Orfordness (world premiere) Michael Finnissy Z/K (world premiere) Alex Pozniak Interventions (UK premiere) Zubin Kanga piano CONTEMPORARY Australian pianist Zubin Kanga is one of today’s most sought-after young classical contemporary performers. Tonight he challenges the sonic and dramatic conventions of the piano recital with new and recent works by British and Australian composers. The newly commissioned work by Michael Finnissy alternates between pre-Classical elegance and thorny midtwentieth-century modernism. David Gorton's Orfordness is inspired by reports of secret military research in Suffolk. The recital also features a work by young

Zubin Kanga


Gong in 60 Seconds COMEDY ʻGong Show: An event marred by confusion, ineptitude, and shenanigans’ Urban Dictionary The good, the bad and the downright delusional compete to see who can beat the gong to survive five minutes onstage and win an open spot at a Kings Place professional comedy night. Come along and laugh, cheer or boo off the losers. Who wins? You decide! Featuring a host of brand-new acts and a top headliner.

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 18 February

Hall Two 8pm

THE BASE

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

CLAUDE DEBUSSY © TULLY POTTER COLLECTION | ZUBIN KANGA © ERLAND HOWDEN | BREABACH © ARCHIE MACFARLANE / WWW.ARCHIEMACFARLANE.COM | MARIUS NESET © TIM DICKESON | PASCAL & AMI ROGÉ © NICK GRANITO

Breabach

Norwegian saxophonist Marius Neset is increasingly regarded as a major emerging voice on the European jazz scene, and his second album, Golden Xplosion, more than justifies the acclaim that is coming his way. Neset makes his instrument dance like a gazelle and soar like an eagle. It’s not just the virtuoso technique that impresses, although he is at a level few saxophonists can compete with. Nor is it just Neset’s distinctiveness as a composer. He has that indefinable extra factor that makes for a unique musical personality – and he has it in spades. Neset will be joined on stage by the talented Jasper Høiby, Anton Eger and Ivo Neame.

The Late Debussy Élégie Trois Études 6 Preludes from Book I  En blanc et noir Estampes L’Isle joyeuse Nocturnes Pascal & Ami Rogé pianos CLASSICAL

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Marius Neset

Sunday 19 February LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Hall One 7.30pm

Shaham-Erez-Wallfisch Piano Trio

£14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50 Combined Ticket Offer: 20% off if booking both Debussy concerts. Excludes Online Savers 

Mendelssohn Piano Trio No. 2 in C minor, Op. 66  Shostakovich Piano Trio No. 2 in E minor, Op.67

FOLK UNION

Breabach

CLASSICAL Hagai Shaham (violin), Arnon Erez (piano) and Raphael Wallfisch (cello) perform two remarkable piano trios, one from the 19th century and one from the 20th, in this first of our concerts forming part of Jewish Book Week at Kings Place.

FOLK One of the most celebrated Scottish folk bands of recent times, Breabach command  the stage with flare, charisma and a sound that is as expansive as it is distinct. The band was nominated as ‘Best Group’ at both the 2011 BBC Radio 2 Folk awards and  the Scots Trad Music Awards. Powered by

Marius Neset: Golden Xplosion JAZZ

CELEBRATING DEBUSSY WITH PASCAL & AMI ROGÉ

The second 150th-anniversary recital celebrating Debussy’s genius, given by Pascal and Ami Rogé, pairs a sequence of late works with an exploration of his innate ability to conjure pictures through music. From the triptych that takes its name from copper or wood prints (estampes) to the two-piano transcription of his orchestral Nocturnes, complete with vocal part in Sirènes, Debussy’s musical imagination is refreshingly re-minted.

LISTINGS 63 double bagpipes, flute and fiddle, this uncompromising force is further fuelled by the tight groove of double bass, guitar, vocals (English and Gaelic) and step-dance.  A repertoire that effortlessly fuses the traditional and contemporary underlines Brebach’s commitment for their musical heritage whilst displaying a willingness to explore and challenge boundaries.  ʻBreabach are magnificent live’ fRoots

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Friday 17 February

February 2012

Pascal & Ami Rogé

Hall One 6.30pm (Lasts ~60mins) £12.50 £15.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

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February 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Saturday 18 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Curated by Geraldine D’Amico and Mekella Broomberg 18 – 26 FEBRUARY

60 Years On… Zygmunt Bauman, Linda Grant & Simon Schama Anniversary Opening Night chaired by Emily Maitlis SPOKEN WORD 60 years ago, when the first JBW took place, memories of the War were painfully fresh and Israel was a fragile, idealistic fledgling state. It was the year Elizabeth II became Queen and the publication of The Diary of Anne Frank in English. Now, religion is openly criticised, society is multicultural, Israel has still not achieved peace with its neighbours and the future of the book seems doomed. Emily Maitlis invites three brilliant minds – sociologist Zygmunt Bauman, novelist Linda Grant and eminent historian Simon Schama – to remember, debate and look to the future on our anniversary opening night. Hall One 8pm (Event lasts ~90 mins)

Linda Grant

War. The Palestinians are stunned and cannot comprehend their losses, whilst the Israelis are waking up to a new political reality. Nuri Imari is appointed advisor on Arab affairs for the Israeli government. With little guidance, he is asked to help restore relations with their Palestinian neighbours and some sort of normality to their life. Despite his goodwill, he soon finds himself confronting bigotry and hatred on both sides. Then he meets Yasmine, a Palestinian woman recently returned from Paris. Hall One 12.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

£24.50  Includes invitation to the party

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Sunday 19 February

Adina Hoffman

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The Poetry of Taha Muhammad Ali

Anne Sebba That Woman – Wallis Simpson chaired by Jane Mays SPOKEN WORD

Umberto Eco

Literary passions, heated discussion and brand-new talent, London’s oldest book festival comes to Kings Place. Umberto Eco and David Aaronovitch unpick conspiracies, Ron Arad shares his passion for design, Deborah Lipstadt and Anthony Julius revisit Eichmann’s trial, and these are just a handful of highlights from a festival comprised of 60+ events, brimming with ideas. Explore Jewish culture, enjoy nine days of talks, book launches, comedy, music and films. See Features on JBW pp30–35. To request the programme booklet, e-mail info@jewishbookweek.com. Details at kingsplace.co.uk/jbw

26 years after her death, Wallis Simpson exerts a more powerful fascination than ever. That Woman is the first full-scale biography written by a woman about the Duchess of Windsor, one of the most glamorous and vilified women of the 20th century and a key character in the recent film The King’s Speech. Historian Anne Sebba explores the mind and motivations of this enigmatic American divorcée who nearly became queen of England gives a new interpretation of what happened during the abdication crisis. Hall Two 11am (Event lasts ~60 mins) £6.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Eli Amir & Hillel Halkin Yasmine SPOKEN WORD Eli Amir discusses his novel Yasmine, the sequel to The Dove Flyer, with his translator Hillel Halkin. Jerusalem 1967: everyone is reeling from the aftermath of the Six-Day

SPOKEN WORD Adina Hoffman’s Jewish Quarterly-WingatePrize-winning biography of Palestinian poet Taha Muhammad Ali is a moving account of the ways ‘ordinary’ individuals are swept up by the floodtides of both war and peace. Beautifully written, My Happiness tells the story of an exceptional man and the culture from which he emerged, as well as reflecting on the often alchemical means by which experience is transformed into art. Hall Two 12.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

David Abulafia & Philip Mansel with Felipe Fernández-Armesto: Tales of Mediterranean Co-existence SPOKEN WORD Al-Andalus (Islamic Spain) and the 19thcentury Levant are often spoken of in legendary terms as places in which different peoples and religions peacefully co-existed. But how much genuine social, cultural and economic interaction was there really between Christians, Jews and Muslims? In this talk chaired by Prof. Felipe


February 2012

Fernández-Armesto, Prof. David Abulafia, author of The Great Sea and Dr Philip Mansel, whose recent book focuses on the Levant, give us a whirlwind tour of Granada,  Palermo, Smyrna, Alexandria, Beirut, and Tel Aviv/Jaffa, from the 15th-century to today.

provides a fresh opportunity to look at one of the author’s most iconic characters.

survived WWII not only physically intact but wealthier, thanks to a cache of Nazi gold.

In association with the Dickens Museum

St Pancras Room 5pm (Lasts ~60 mins)

Hall One 3.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

£6.50

£9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Hall One 2pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Dennis Marks

proceedings throughout the world. This ‘trial of the century’ is revisited by award-  winning historian Deborah Lipstadt, whose   new book couples historical perspective with contemporary urgency. She’ll speak to Anthony Julius, who led her defence team in the David Irving Holocaust denial trial. Hall One 8pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

David Wesley

Eilat Negev & Yehuda Koren

in conversation with   Tom Selwyn:Israeli Arabs

The First Lady of Fleet Street chaired by Vanessa Thorpe

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

£14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

The Golem

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD In the late 1800s, at a time when women were still denied the vote, Rachel Sassoon Beer edited both The Observer and The Sunday Times – 80 years before another woman was able take the helm of a national newspaper. Negev and Koren reveal a striking biography of a figure who was a key player in British journalism at a time of historical importance, including her role in proving Dreyfus’s innocence. This is a very late first biography of such a pioneer but the tragedy which struck in her later years reveals her omission from history.

Silent Film with Live Music

The Austrian writer Joseph Roth was born in 1894 on the edge of Eastern Europe. He died, aged 44, in a Paris sanatorium, a rootless, stateless alcoholic. In between he   wrote 15 novels and novellas, and some of the most evocative journalism of the 1920s   and 30s. His writings have been compared   to the works of Kafka and Mann. On this psycho-geographical journey, Marks travels through Austria and Ukraine in search of a great author who was both a compulsive liar and the prose poet of displacement.

Wesley went to Israel as a young Zionist   to participate in what he saw as Jewish national rebirth. In this conversation with Tom Selwyn, he challenges popular conceptions about existing/possible Arab-  Jewish relations. Discrimination in allocation of land and development resources has increased and become entenched over the years despite Israeli government programmes that ostensibly seek greater authority. Wesley shows how his research contests conventional anthropological thinking regarding images associated with the Israeli-Arab population.

Hall Two 6.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

Hall Two 2pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

Hall Two 3.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

Hall Two 8pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

£9.50

£9.50

£9.50

£9.50

Joseph Roth SPOKEN WORD

UMBERTO ECO © LEA CRESPI / LUZPHOTO | LINDA GRANT © CHARLIE HOPKINSON | ‘FAGIN THE JEW’ BY KYDII © REPRODUCED COURTESY OF THE CHARLES DICKENS MUSEUM, LONDON

LISTINGS 65

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Peter Cole & Adina Hoffman Sacred Trash: The Lost and Found World of the Cairo Geniza SPOKEN WORD

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Fabrice Humbert The Origin of Violence chaired by Michael Arditti SPOKEN WORD During a trip to Buchenwald concentration camp, a young French teacher comes across a photo of a man whose resemblance to his own father is uncanny. Obsessed by the memory of the photograph, he embarks on   a search which takes him to the heart of the   Nazi machine, but more disturbingly, draws   him into the dark heart of his own family. A subtle, moving book, The Origin of Violence shows the ways in which humans inflict harm on each other, and how individual people, not societies, are the perpetrators.

Michael Eaton, Florian Schweizer & Leo Litvack

In 1896, a meeting took place between a Romanian-born maverick Jewish intellectual  and twin learned Presbyterian Scotswomen to inspect several pieces of rag-paper and parchment. This was the start of a remarkable saga that has changed our sense of what it means to lead a Jewish life. Join us for the UK launch of the highly acclaimed Sacred Trash, with Hoffman and Cole, whose book tells the story of what is arguably the greatest discovery of Jewish manuscripts.

St Pancras Room 6.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

Fagin the Jew

Hall One 5pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

£6.50

SPOKEN WORD

£9.50

Fagin the Jew

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Charles Dickens’s Fagin is one of the most famous Jewish characters in world literature. Manipulative and ruthless, Fagin has become synonymous with London’s low life and organised street crime. He has divided critics and readers since the tale was published in 1837-9. This multi-media panel discussion will question why Dickens deleted all references to Fagin’s Jewishness in later editions and consider how he later responded to accusations of anti-semitism. The bicentenary of Dickens’s birth in 2012

JEWISH BOOK WEEK JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Neill Lochery

Deborah Lipstadt & Anthony Julius

Portugal at War

The Eichmann Trial – 50 Years Later

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD

In a gripping tale of high-stakes intrigue, betrayal, double-dealing and survival, Neill Lochery tells the story of how Portugal,   a relatively poor country trying frantically to remain neutral amidst huge pressures,

The trial in Jerusalem of Lt-Colonel Adolf Eichmann, after his capture by Israeli agents  in Argentina in 1960, sparked a global debate on how genocide can be judged, and became a touchstone for judicial

MUSIC FILM A screening of the 1920 silent film classic The Golem, accompanied by a new musical score from Robin Harris (piano) with a few brass surprises. The film centres on the Golem, a haunting figure from Jewish lore, dating back to 16th-century Prague. A Rabbi in the ghetto creates a figure from clay and brings it to life to protect the Jewish community from the mounting threat outside its walls. A tale of prophecy, lust and monsters – not to be missed.

Monday 20 February WORDS ON MONDAY JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The Poetry of Bob Dylan SPOKEN WORD Dylan’s songs formed an indispensable soundtrack to the 60s, and have continued to capture the imagination of audiences ever since. His song lyrics are often praised for their poetry and he has been acclaimed by some as one of the great unsung poets of the 20th century. This event will feature poets, musicians, experts and friends of Dylan talking about the importance of words  in his music and about the complex and subtle relationships between lyrics and poetry. With acoustic performances of Dylan songs. Co-curated by Poet in the City. Hall One 7pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

Jewish Book Week Ticket Offers Group Booking* Group of 8 or more people for one event  20% discount Multi-event discount* Book 3 or 4 events and save 15% Book 5 or 6 events and save 20% Book 7 or more events and save 30% * Excludes Gala Opening and Online Savers

LISTINGS

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66 LISTINGS

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February 2012

Monday 20 February OUT HEAR

CHROMA Ensemble celebrating 15 years of new work Mark Bowden Root of the Wind Charlie Piper Bordello Ian Wilson Cˇetiri kamena (world premiere) Claudia Molitor, Raymond Yiu and Michael Zev Gordon New works CONTEMPORARY This February marks CHROMA’s 15th year, and to celebrate a decade and a half of collaborating with composers this is a programme of pieces for CHROMA, including four premieres, written for clarinet, accordion and string trio. ‘Exemplary’ The Guardian Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Avner de-Shalit, Barbara Mann & Ziona Strelitz Constructs of Place: their grip on thought and experience SPOKEN WORD This session considers space and place in ideology, narrative and practice: how Jewish concepts (temple, eruv, diaspora and Zion) persist in identity and community coherence, and what contemporary cities evoke with today’s experience of global exposure, concluding with a focus on Tel Aviv and Jerusalem, both places of pluralistic perception relating to the viewer’s lens. Hall One 8.30pm (Event lasts ~90 mins) £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Tuesday 21 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Bernard Wasserstein with Daniel Wildmann: ‘On the Eve’ SPOKEN WORD A great deal has been written about the genocide of the European Jews under Nazi rule, but much less attention has been paid to the worlds that were destroyed: the private spheres of Jewish individuals and families, and the public ones that they shared. Historian Bernard Wasserstein’s book On the Eve examines the values, beliefs, politics and ambitions of Jews in Europe. In doing so, it restores to the historical record the forgotten people whose lives were soon to be cut short. Hall One 7pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Claude Lanzmann

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Claude Lanzmann The Patagonian Hare chaired by Alan Yentob SPOKEN WORD Claude Lanzmann fought in the Resistance, opposed the war in Algeria, was Simone de Beauvoir’s lover and close to Jean-Paul Sartre, played an important role in French intellectual life and is above all known for his magisterial 9.5-hour film Shoah. All this and much more is contained within the pages of his extraordinary autobiography, which will be launched at JBW. In what promises to be a thrilling interview, the author will explain why he called his book The Patagonian Hare, and talk about his life, his work and his passions. Hall Two 8.30pm (Event lasts ~90 mins) £9.50

inflected klezmer and Balkan music. Formed in 2003, the band combines energy and passion with the soul of improvisation, performed by some of the finest instrumentalists that Scotland has to offer. An intoxicating, life-affirming mix of Eastern European dance music, Middle Eastern rhythms and virtuoso performances... Hall Two 7pm (Event lasts ~2 hours) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Jonathan Sacks, Marcus du Sautoy, Daniel Glaser God, Science and the Search for Meaning SPOKEN WORD The Great Partnership: God, Science and the Search for Meaning by Jonathan Sacks is the starting point for a conversation between the Chief Rabbi and atheist mathematician Marcus du Sautoy, chaired by Daniel Glaser. They will explore the relationship between religion and science in different cultures whilst discussing belief and scepticism, faith and doubt, open-mindedness and intolerance, and the challenge of the other or the unknown. Hall One 8.30pm (Event lasts ~90 mins)

Wednesday 22 February

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Ron Arad SPOKEN WORD A central figure in contemporary design, Arad is renowned for pushing the boundaries between disciplines and experimenting with processes and materials. Many of his works such as the Bookworm bookshelf and the Rover chair, are iconic. His architectural projects – Design Museum Holon or the Tel Aviv Opera House – are unique. The restless maverick designer will talk to us about his passion for marrying unconventional forms or materials with unexpected functions, and about the sources of his unbridled creativity. As he once said in an interview, ‘I’m afraid of boredom, fundamentalists and philistines’. Hall One 7pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Moishe’s Bagel FOLK When Moishe’s Bagel take to the stage, expect rip-roaring, foot-stomping, jazz-

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

David Schneider My Son, The Gold Medallist – A short history of the Jews and the Olympics. Entirely made up by David Schneider SPOKEN WORD From a young Israelite shepherd named David pipping the Philistine champion to the gold medal in the slingshot to the modern Jewish domination of synchronised kvetching, here’s the real history of the Olympic Games and the People of the Book (where that book is actually How To Avoid Sport). Actor and comedian David Schneider and guests present some of the Jews’ greatest Olympic triumphs from Talmudic gymnastics (with commentary by Rashi) to 4 x 400 metres Yiddish cursing. Hall One 8.30pm (Event lasts ~90 mins) £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

FRIday 24 February FOLK UNION

Alex Highton FOLK Heartbreaking songs or simple life observations with lush orchestration played with such a refreshing honesty... One day Ashton Kutcher tweeted about Scouse Alex Highton and the next day Al saw a gazillion listens to his myspace page. Since hitting the ground again he’s raised the cash for a proper recording of debut album The Woodditton Wives Club (Sellaband) and also a trip to the USA for his first gigs in NYC, Austin and LA. He will here perform songs from his debut, and invites some excellent friends to join him. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Ron Arad

Thursday 23 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Etgar Keret SPOKEN WORD The critically acclaimed short-story-teller Etgar Keret gives us a taste of his magic with his new collection of stories. More absurd, humorous, surreal and compassionate than ever, they reflect Israel’s uncanny reality. Yet, at the same time, his characters are defined by a fierce humanity which is truly universal. Etgar discusses his stories with readings by an actor. Hall One 7pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

Saturday 25 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Jonathan Safran Foer, Jeffrey Goldberg & Maureen Kendler Re-telling the Story SPOKEN WORD The Hagaddah recounts the story of the Jews’ exodus from Egypt and is read around the Passover table each year. There are over 4000 known versions in existence; however this one is set to become the new standard. It’s edited by Jonathan Safran Foer, translated by Nathan Englander and filled with essays and commentary from some of the brightest Jewish literary and


February 2012

intellectual voices including Rebecca Goldstein, Howard Jacobson, Tony Kushner, Simon Schama, and Lemony Snicket, along with some stunning illustrations. Join its editor, Safran Foer for a delve around Jewish tradition made new. Hall One 7.30pm (Event lasts ~90 mins) £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 26 February JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Jacqueline Rose Proust among the Nations

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Jeremy Ben-Ami & Jonathan Freedland A New Voice for Israel SPOKEN WORD The leader of America’s pro-Israel, pro-peace  lobby explains to Jonathan Freedland why he felt the need to found J Street. He comes from a family who were founders of Tel Aviv and fighters for Israel’s independence. He tells us why he thinks the country’s future should be secured through peace.

Hall Two 11am (Event lasts ~60 mins) £6.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Shalom Auslander & Bidisha Hope: A Tragedy SPOKEN WORD The hero of Hope: A Tragedy had hoped to escape the past, history, wars and genocide in a rural US town but nothing happens as expected. Find out more from one of the most original, witty and darkest voices on the Jewish American scene. Join the cult! Hall One 12.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

CLAUDE LANZMANN © HÉLIE GALLIMARD COUL | RON ARAD © JOHN DAVIS

David Conway & Michael Portillo Jewry in Music SPOKEN WORD

their green credentials, and organic food grown on industrial farms are all signs of the gap between appearance and reality in modern life. In her book, Glaser describes how PR and marketing have helped to create a world in which vested interests appear in disguise. She’s joined by Julia Hobsbawm (Editorial Intelligence) to debate whether PR is a necessary evil or   a force for good.

Hebrew Melodies on Byron’s poems, flanked by works by Fribbins and Mendelssohn.

Hall Two 3.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

Israel and the European Left: between Solidarity and Delegitimisation

£9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

£9.50

Aharon Appelfeld & Eva Hoffman

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Alison Pick & Jake Wallis Simons Kindertransport SPOKEN WORD Pick’s novel Far to Go combines the shrewd hindsight of a contemporary academic with   the 1938 narrative of the Czech Bauer family who are initially reluctant to send 6-year-old Pepik on the Kindertransport to England. Rosa in Simons’ The English German Girl, is 15, and upon leaving Berlin is faced with the huge burden of securing papers to help the rest of her family escape. Hall Two 2pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Henry Goodman & Howard Jacobson Ulysses Revisited SPOKEN WORD For Jacobson, Ulysses is the greatest Jewish novel of the 20th century; for Goodman, it’s the one that articulated his artistic hopes and identity. They revisit James Joyce’s iconic text, published 90 years ago this month. Does Bloom, this great hero of weakness and masochism, consciousness and inaction, belong in the great tradition of comic fiction?  With passages read by actress Dervla Kirwan.

Blooms of Darkness SPOKEN WORD Appelfeld talks to Hoffman about his latest novel, Blooms of Darkness, an unlikely love story between an 11-year-old boy and the unhappy prostitute hiding him from the Nazis. The multi-award-winning writer crafts  out of the depths of unfathomable tragedy a renewal of life and a deeper understanding of what it means to be human. Hall One 5pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

For Shindler, the new generation Left was more influenced by the decolonisation movement than by wartime experiences, leading it to favour the Palestinian cause in the post 1967 period. Thus the Israeli drive to settle the West Bank after the Six-Day War enhanced an existing attitude, but did not cause it. Starting with Lenin and Trotsky, this is a historical overview of the Left’s changing views of Zionism and Israel. Hall Two 6.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Umberto Eco & David Aaronovitch SPOKEN WORD David Aaronovitch (Voodoo Histories: How Conspiracy Theory Has Shaped Modern History) interviews Umberto Eco about the latter’s brilliant novel The Prague Cemetery, set in 19th-century Europe. With his customary erudition and brilliance, Eco brings together Jesuits, Freemasons, French criminals, Italian Republicans and secret services, all linked by one sinister villain. They will talk about the Dreyfus affair   and the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, conspiracies, scapegoats and anti-semitism.

Pantheon by Sam Bourne SPOKEN WORD Set in 1940, Pantheon is Freedland’s latest novel, which he wrote under the pseudonym Sam Bourne. It follows an academic’s search  for his missing wife and child. The story later turns on the Anglo-American intellectual elite’s attraction to eugenics – an idea that would be deemed horribly close to Nazism. Joined by James Purnell, the author examines why so many luminaries were drawn to the notion of breeding a better class. Hall Two 5pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

Hall Two 12.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

SPOKEN WORD

Mendelssohn Viola Sonata in C minor Joachim Hebrew Melodies, Op. 9 Peter Fribbins Fantasias for viola & piano

To Eliane Glaser, public spending cuts that target the poor, oil giants’ adverts about

A programme from the renowned viola-  piano duo, featuring Joachim’s evocative

£9.50

Colin Shindler & Nick Cohen

Jonathan Freedland & James Purnell

£9.50

How to tell it like it’s in a world of illusions

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

The Protocols of Prague

Hall One 3.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

Eliane Glaser & Julia Hobsbawm: Get Real

£12.50 £15.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Portillo is joined by Conway to discuss the   latter’s new book. At the start of the 19th century, no Jews were active in the field of concert music whereas by the end of the century the Jews were regarded as ‘musical people’ occupying major positions. What happened in between to enable this? And why did Wagner launch his vicious attack on   Jewry in music? With live musical samples...

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Hall One 6.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

SPOKEN WORD

Hall One 2pm (Event lasts ~60 mins)

SPOKEN WORD In her new book, Proust Among the Nations, Jacqueline Rose takes her far-reaching analysis of the regional conflict into the heart of Europe. Offering a radical re-reading  of the Dreyfus affair through the lens of Proust, in dialogue with Freud, she traces the shifting dynamic of memory and   identity across the cultural links between Europe and Palestine, using the case to interpret political struggle in the Middle East.

LISTINGS 67

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Sarah-Jane Bradley & Anthony Hewitt CLASSICAL

Hall One 8pm (Event lasts ~90 mins) £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JEWISH BOOK WEEK

Jay Rayner & Jazz Piano A Love Story (unrequited) SPOKEN WORD JAZZ Restaurant critic Jay Rayner’s passion for playing jazz piano is far less well-known than his love for good food. He’ll talk about his flirtation with 80s electropop and being drummed out of a blues band made up of writers, then will be joined by some special guests to perform a few favourite numbers.. Hall Two 8.30pm (Event lasts ~60 mins) £9.50

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


68 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

February/March 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2

Monday 27 February TALKING ART

Venus – the Goddess of Love in Art Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

1 – 3 MARCH

Harold Budd

SPOKEN WORD Aphrodite in ancient Greece, Venus in ancient Rome, the goddess of love is the most enduring of the pagan Olympian deities, still a popular point of reference for female beauty. In art her appearance varies to appeal to the taste of the times – from Botticelli to Rubens, Titian to Burne-Jones, artists have painted her naked figure as their ideal of womanhood (and a great excuse to depict the nude, made artistically respectable by a few classical embellishments). This talk charts her visual history from pre-classical goddess through the types and variations of Greek and Roman art, her spectacular reappearance in the Renaissance and her continuing popularity as a motif. It also looks at her associations with mythology and symbolism. St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

OUT HEAR

Harold’s Sound: Harold Budd, Simon Fisher Turner & Daniel Biro A tribute to the sound of the Rhodes electric piano CONTEMPORARY Sargasso:C pays tribute to the iconic ’70s Fender Rhodes electric piano, named after its inventor, Harold Rhodes, and originally built from US Air Force bomber parts. Ambient avant-garde artist Harold Budd makes a rare London appearance, joined by cult sound-sculptor Simon Fisher Turner and long-time Rhodesobsessive Sargasso artist Daniel Biro. Together they create a unique and unmissable collaborative work. Hall Two 8pm

WORDS ON MONDAY

Tennyson: ‘To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield’ SPOKEN WORD

Academy of St Martin in the Fields

Brahms found his perfect form in the sextetS, balancing the instruments AND allowing EVERYONE to shine  Harvey DE Souza The in-depth survey of Brahms’s chamber music continues with his magnificent String Sextets and Second Serenade performed by the Academy of St Martin in the Fields. In Youth and Maturity violist Philip Dukes and pianist Charles Owen explore the composer’s early Ballades for piano and his voluptuous Sonata for Viola, Op. 120 No. 1. See Feature on Brahms Unwrapped pp26–29

The last line of Alfred, Lord Tennyson’s poem Ulysses was chosen by Winning Words to be engraved at the centre of the Olympic Village to inspire the world’s athletes taking part in the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, and as a legacy for future generations of residents and school children. Many years after his death, Tennyson remains one of the most popular and celebrated British poets. His famous poem The Charge of the Light Brigade is an iconic record of pride, courage, grandeur and folly. This special event, held in anticipation of London 2012, features leading experts on Tennyson and readings from his poems by well-known actors. Curated by Poet in the City in partnership with Winning Words. Winning Words is a major initiative for Forward Arts Foundation. The permanent poetry installations throughout the park are being supported and delivered by the ODA, as part of their strategy to integrate art into the park.

Hall One 7pm £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

March Thursday 1 March BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2

Youth and Maturity: Brahms’s Music for Piano and Viola – 1 Four Ballades, Op. 10 Sonata No. 2 in F sharp minor, Op. 2 Sonata for piano and viola in F minor, Op. 120 No. 1 Charles Owen piano Philip Dukes viola CLASSICAL A fascinating recital combining Brahms’s earliest solo piano music with one of the autumnal viola sonatas performed by two of Britain’s most acclaimed musicians. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50


March 2012

Brahms’s traditionally conservative place in music history, the harsh critical responses to which he was subject, the richness of his intellectual life, and his vital place in an emerging German culture.

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

The Fix presents Raybot COMEDY Join The Fix for a brand-new video-based comedy night. Raybot feature the biggest names and the best new talent via the medium of the online video. Exclusive premieres and hit online videos, all threaded together with an innovative live element. This night is the future of live comedy. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 2 March

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS © ALICIA J ROSE | HAROLD BUDD, AIMUA EGHOBAMIEN © SUPPLIED PHOTO | HARVEY DE SOUZA © GUY MAYER | Southern Tenant Folk Union © Douglas Robertson

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2

Harvey de Souza

STFU perform with soul and beauty in their murder ballads and laments, and tear it up with their Hootenanny sawdust-kickers and high-energy sound. They have appeared on Radio 2 (Mark Lamarr), RTE TV (The View) & Radio 4 (Loose Ends), and received great reviews in The Sunday Times, The Guardian and The Independent. An exciting act that sells out right across Europe. ‘A smart conflation of Celtic tradition and bluegrass played with rare intuition’ Uncut Hall Two 8pm

Academy of St Martin in the Fields Chamber Ensemble: Brahms String Sextets

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

String Sextet No. 1 in B flat, Op. 18  String Sextet No. 2 in G, Op. 36

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2

CLASSICAL A treat for all lovers of chamber music: leading instrumentalists from ASMF perform Brahms’s magnificent string sextets. As violinist Harvey de Souza comments, ‘If the quartet was Haydn’s ideal medium then for Brahms it was the string sextet. He understood intuitively how to write for the combination, to balance the instruments perfectly… they are wonderfully composed.’ They begin with the lush sonorities of the B flat,   Op. 18 before turning to the unexpectedly haunting and ethereal G major, Op. 36. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 3 March

Brahms Study Day – 1: The Life and the Legacy INTERACT Part 1 – Tracking Brahms’s Life Michael Musgrave (Juilliard School of Music) Brahms specialist Michael Musgrave provides a context for the composer’s famously gruff exterior through his family background, changing social position and professional ambitions. He discusses his many friendships and relationships with women, and his special association with the Schumann family. Finally, he explores

St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm; Lunch break; 2pm–4.30pm £47.50 | Includes refreshments and lunch

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2

Academy of St Martin in the Fields: Brahms’s Second Serenade String Quintet No. 2 in G, Op.111   (arr. Woehr for string orch.) Serenade No. 2 in A, Op. 16 CLASSICAL The String Quintet No. 2 was originally conceived as a fifth symphony and then reduced, but translates wonderfully well to greater forces as in this arrangement for string orchestra by Woehr. The Academy players then turn to the serene, Classically honed Second Serenade. This performance forms part of Music Nation, a Countdown Event for the London 2012 Festival, the finale of the Cultural

Olympiad. Directed by Andrew Watkinson (violin) and Robert Smissen (viola). Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

Aimua Eghobamien

THE BASE

Aimua Eghobamien JAZZ Contemporary jazz artist Aimua Eghobamien follows up his critically acclaimed debut album Poured Gently with original compositions celebrating storytelling melodies and lyrics. From a classical voice background, his style incorporates jazz, pop and soul.  ‘Jazz vocals with absolute gentleness... synthesizes the two finest male jazz singers [Kurt Elling and Ian Shaw] on the planet. Which is not to suggest any derivativeness. He is a true, thoroughly exciting, original.’ JazzTimes ‘Eghobamien’s voice is rich and sure, relying for its considerable effect on its resonance and timbre.’ Vortex reviews Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 4 March LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

FOLK UNION

Rosamunde Trio

Southern Tenant Folk Union

Mozart Piano Trio in G, K496 Roussel Piano Trio in E flat, Op. 2 Brahms Piano Trio No. 3 in C minor, Op. 101

Adam Bulley mandolin Jenny Hill double bass Carrie Thomas fiddle, vocals Chris Purcell guitar, vocals Pat McGarvey banjo, vocals Ewan Macintyre percussion, harmonica, vocals  Jed Milroy guitar, banjo, vocals

CLASSICAL The renowned Rosamunde Trio –  Martino Tirimo (piano), Ben Sayevich (violin) and Daniel Veis (cello) – in a concert in which works by Mozart and Brahms frame Albert Roussel’s beautiful Piano Trio of 1902.

FOLK A seven-piece all-acoustic band with banjo, mandolin, fiddle and harmony vocals, the

Part 2 – Brahms and the Third Reich Erik Levi (Royal Holloway, Univ of London) The Reichs-Brahmsfest in Hamburg was one of the first important musical events to take place after Hitler’s appointment as Chancellor of Germany. This session will explore the political machinations which surrounded the Reichs-Brahmsfest, as well as the subsequent tortuous attempts to ‘Nazify’ Brahms by detaching him from Jewish association, particularly given his long-standing collaboration with the great violinist Joseph Joachim.

LISTINGS 69

Southern Tenant Folk Union

Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

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March 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL IN THE SPRING

Monday 5 March

8 – 10 MARCH

WORDS ON MONDAY

LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

What’s Religion? with Karen Armstrong

Vida Guitar Quartet

SPOKEN WORD

After their sensational debut in 2007, the Vida Guitar Quartet established themselves as one of the best guitar ensembles in the world. The group’s first CD, Love, the Magician, won enthusiastic acclaim around the globe. This concert presents its eagerly awaited follow-up. Consisting of the Eden-Stell Guitar Duo (Mark Eden and Christopher Stell), Helen Sanderson and Mark Ashford, Vida will enthrall you with an evening of ravishing, predominantly Spanish guitar sounds. Never heard a guitar quartet? Well now’s your chance – don’t miss it! Programme includes works by Manuel de Falla and Georges Bizet.

Karen Armstrong first came to public attention with Through the Narrow Gate (1982), her highly praised memoir of seven years as a Roman Catholic nun. Since then, she has established herself as one of the most lucid, compelling and respected writers and speakers on the major world religions. In 2009, she published a Charter for Compassion, whose signatories include Queen Noor of Jordan, the Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Paul Simon. In response to escalating religious fundamentalism and division, she argues that religion has more to do with behaviour than belief, and urges us to make compassion ‘a clear, luminous and dynamic force in our polarised world’. Curated by The Royal Society of Literature

Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

£9.50

BetaMax

NONCLASSICAL presented by Gabriel Prokofiev & Richard Lannoy CONTEMPORARY

The formidable Vida GUITAR Quartet, new talent Fernando Espí AND DÚo Hermanos Cuenca star in a Spanish-themed line-up.

CLASSICAL

Hall One 7pm

OUT HEAR

Vida Guitar Quartet

Thursday 8 March

Cult club night and record label NONCLASSICAL’s pioneering alt-classical DJs Richard Lannoy and Gabriel Prokofiev feature live sets from Larry Goves plus rising stars from the alt-classical scene. Line-up to be announced later, see www. kingsplace.co.uk. ‘One of London’s bravest and most creative nights out.’ Time Out Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

The Beta Males: The Train Job and Max and Ivan are... Holmes and Watson COMEDY Two sell-out Edinburgh Fringe shows from two of the best sketch teams in the UK. The Beta Males present their narrative comedy thriller The Train Job, which hurtles like a juggernaut through a world of hardboiled cops, gentlemen thieves and a disgraced former Secretary of State for Transport. This train calls at Suspense, Conspiracy and Berwick-upon-Tweed. ‘Genius’ The Sunday Times The world’s greatest detective tackles Chicago’s murky underworld in his final thrilling escapade, recently discovered by multi-award-winning comedy duo Max and Ivan. This show is a breakneck, cinematic and hilarious prohibition-era tale of revenge, whisky and javelins, from the creators of

The London Guitar Festival in the Spring presents big names on the international scene alongside masterclasses and workshops. Along with the first London International Guitar Competition on Saturday, there will be Albéniz and Rodrigo from Dúo Hermanos Cuenco, and Falla and Bizet from the Vida Guitar Quartet. See Classical Highlights on London Guitar Festival in the Spring p11

Dúo Hermanos Cuenca

Fernando Espí


March 2012

LISTINGS 71 LISTINGS

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The Beta Males

the 2011 Foster’s Edinburgh Comedy Award  Panel Prize winning show The Wrestling. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 9 March LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

Spanish Guitar Night with Dúo Hermanos Cuenca + Fernando Espí

BBC Young Folk Awards 2011 finalists, and on the road have toured extensively as part of David Gibb & The Pony Club and supported such acts as Cara Dillon, Chris Wood, Coope, Boyes and Simpson, Jez Lowe, and Megson. Their first EP, Three Children Sliding On The Ice, was very well received, and given airplay and praise by Mike Harding. Their full-length debut,   Old Chairs To Mend, is due for release just before this concert, ahead of a packed summer of festival appearances. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

CLASSICAL

BLUE TOUCH PAPER © ROB O’CONNOR | OTHER ARTISTS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

José Manuel and Francisco Cuenca Morales form an exquisite piano-guitar duo, considered by critics to be ‘unique   in the way the two instruments meld as one with great elegance and a subtlety   of touch’. Since their studies in Córdoba, the brothers have won many international and national prizes, and their extensive touring schedule makes them one of   the most successful and busiest duos around today. Fernando Espí is one of the most exciting young players in the world and one of the very best Spanish guitarists of his generation. He has won a number of major international guitar competitions, including the Guerrero Foundation Competition in Madrid and the Francisco Tárrega Competition in Benicassim. He has recorded a number of very successful CDs including two featuring music by Francisco Tárrega. Supported by the Embassy of Spain’s Office for Cultural and Scientific Affairs.

Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

David Gibb & Elly Lucas FOLK Young Derbyshire duo Gibb and Lucas play  a mixture of original and re-worked traditional material. They were chosen as

Elly Lucas and David Gibb

Blue Touch Paper

Saturday 10 March LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

Classical Solo Guitar Masterclass with Fernando Espí INTERACT Fernando Espí (see 8 March) has released several highly acclaimed CDs including class leading recordings of the music of Franciso Tárrega. This is a unique chance to study with a much sought after teacher. St Pancras Room 9.30am (Lasts 2 hours) £19.50 (Player) | £9.50 (Observer) Limited availability | Bring your guitar

LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

Classical Guitar Ensemble Masterclass with Vida Guitar Quartet INTERACT Mark Eden and Chris Stell (one of the very best guitar duos in the world, the Eden-Stell  Guitar Duo) are joined by Helen Sanderson and Mark Ashford in a breathtaking guitar quartet. All four are experts in guitar ensemble tuition and this is a chance to study with the very best in the business. St Pancras Room 12pm (Lasts 2 hours) £19.50 (Player) | £9.50 (Observer) Limited availability | Bring your guitar

LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

The Classical Guitar in the 21st Century Panel Discussion led by Guy Traviss, editor of Classical Guitar magazine `

electronic – it’s all of these, yet none of these. Leave your expectations behind – this is not a predictable band! ‘A magic sweet shop’ Jazz thing Magazine Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

SPOKEN WORD CLASSICAL Is the classical guitar on its last legs, with its phenomenal popularity waning in recent years? Or is the guitar alive and well with more brilliant players from all over the world than ever before, more composers writing for the instrument than at any time is the past. With leading figures from the world of the classical guitar. Join in the debate! St Pancras Room 4pm (Lasts 2 hours) FREE. Tickets required. Call Box Office.

LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL

London International Guitar Competition Final CLASSICAL IGF presents the 1st London International Guitar Competition for guitarists under 30. The most talented young players from all over the world fight it out for a top cash prize of £4,500 as well as a host of other prizes including concerts at IGF festivals around the UK. The Finale features work especially commissioned by IGF. This is your chance to witness history being created as you hear tomorrow’s stars. Hall One 7.30pm

Sunday 11 March NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

Silent Movies with Live Improv Band featuring Elspeth Hanson MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY

In a new series devised by cellist/composer Philip Sheppard, top musicians play improvised soundtracks to the world’s   greatest silent films without rehearsing in advance. Films include the antics of comic heroes Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd and other classics. We can’t tell you which film is showing when – no-one knows, not even the performers! Take pot luck and enjoy the club-like atmosphere in Hall Two. This month’s guest is Elspeth Hanson, fiddle player extraordinaire, star of the Beijing Olympics Closing Ceremony and member of record-breaking quartet Bond. Hall Two 3pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Not So Silent Offer: Ticket + Bloody Mary + Roast Lunch. All for just £29.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

£9.50

Tippett Quartet

THE BASE

Simon Holt Two Movements for string quartet Haydn String Quartet in C, Op. 76 No. 3 [Hob. III:77] Emperor Smetana String Quartet No. 2 in D minor

Blue Touch Paper JAZZ

CLASSICAL

Colin Towns’ new six-piece band celebrates the UK launch of its debut album. Featuring Mark Lockheart (Polar Bear, Loose Tubes), Chris Montague (Troyka), Benny Greb, Stephan Maass (Randy Brecker), Edward Maclean (Peter Fox) and Colin Towns (Mask Orchestra). Blue Touch Paper has no rules or barriers. Jazz, rock, film, classical,

The superb Tippett Quartet perform quartets by Haydn and Smetana along with Simon Holt’s award-winning Two Movements, part of a cycle of pieces using the poetry of Emily Dickinson. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50


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March 2012

Kenneth Hamilton

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3

Wednesday 14 March BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3

Johannes Brahms: A Portrait at the Piano

14 – 17 MARCH Monday 12 March WORDS ON MONDAY

Graphic Thought Facility in conversation SPOKEN WORD London-based design consultancy Graphic Thought Facility have created print and digital graphics, products and environments for businesses, art institutions and other orangisations, including Frieze Art Fair, Design Museum, Gagosian Gallery, Marks & Spencer, The Science Museum and Habitat. Partners Paul Neale, Andy Stevens and Huw Morgan will be speaking about their work, their inspirations and the future of design. Curated by Laurence King Publishing.

Concert & Conversation with Kenneth Hamilton Piano Sonata No. 3 in F minor, Op. 5 Variations and Fugue on a theme by Handel in B flat, Op. 24 Gavotte (from Iphigénie en Aulide) Three Chorale Preludes (from Op. 122) Kenneth Hamilton piano CLASSICAL This recital traces a fascinating path through Brahms’s musical life, beginning with his first truly great work, the passionately Romantic F minor Sonata, and ending with a serene chorale-prelude composed just before his death – ‘O World, I now must leave you’. Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Premium Seats £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR

EXAUDI: Exposure 2012

Harry Christophers

Programme to include: Joanna Bailie New Work (world premiere) Georges Aperghis from Récitations Robert Fokkens New Work (world premiere) Mauricio Kagel 5 Vokalisen Christopher Fox one/two/three/four-piece John Cage Five; Four2 Lucier Unamuno Aldo Clementi Im Frieden dein o Herre mein EXAUDI / James Weeks director CONTEMPORARY

Harry Christophers and the Sixteen bring the chamber version of Brahms’s great Requiem to Kings Place. Brahms’s great German Requiem was first heard in Britain in this intimate, revealing version for choir and two pianos, which The Sixteen have recorded to great acclaim. Christophers also presents two fascinating salon evenings of rarely-performed small-scale vocal quartets and duets interwoven with piano miniatures by the Schumanns and Brahms himself. See Feature on Brahms Unwrapped pp26–29

EXAUDI’s groundbreaking Exposure series continues with three new commissions from British composers Christopher Fox, Joanna Bailie and Robert Fokkens, tributes to Cage and Clementi, and solo works by Aperghis and Kagel. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 EXAUDI

Thursday 15 March BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3

The Sixteen sings Brahms & Schumann – 1 Brahms Vocal Quartets, Op. 64 Schumann Waldscenen, Op. 82 (excerpts) Brahms Vocal Quartets, Op. 92 Schumann Sommerruh, Wo09 Liebhabers Ständchen, Op. 34 No. 2 Schumann Arabeske, Op. 18 Brahms Liebeslieder, Op. 52 Members of The Sixteen Harry Christophers director CLASSICAL ‘Of all the Romantic composers, Brahms was one of the few who could translate the love of Lied into choral writing of real distinction,’ says Harry Christophers. Almost half of Brahms’s output is vocal or choral, and in this concert we hear an octet of singers from The Sixteen singing


March 2012

duets and quartets by Brahms, interwoven with atmospheric piano miniatures by Schumann.

Barb Jungr returns to launch her brand-new project, Take Me to the River. It is a journey down rivers of emotion – tears, grief, joy, homesickness, love, marriage and death – through her radical reinterpretations of songs both popular and less well known. The programme marks the inaugural collaboration of Jungr with strings, with uniquely inspired arrangements by long-time collaborator Simon Wallace and the vital, intense and beautiful performances of her young and extremely talented string quartet. ‘The same creative capacity for reinterpretation and re-examination that Ella Fitzgerald and Mabel Mercer brought to Cole Porter.’ The Wall Street Journal

Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Gong in 60 Seconds! COMEDY ʻGong Show: An event marred by confusion, ineptitude, and shenanigans’ Urban Dictionary The good, the bad and the downright delusional compete to see who can beat the gong to survive 5 minutes onstage and win an open spot at one of the professional comedy nights here at Kings Place. Come along and laugh, cheer or boo off the losers. Who wins? You decide! Featuring a host of brand-new acts and a top headliner.

HARRY CHRISTOPHERS © MARCO BORGGREVE | EXAUDI © DAVID JENSEN | THE SIXTEEN © MARK HARRISON | BARB JUNGR © STEVE ULLATHORNE | KENNETH HAMILTON, MARTIN CARTHY © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 16 March BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3

The Sixteen sings Brahms & Schumann – 2 R Schumann ‘Bedeckt mich mit Blumen’, Op. 138 No. 4  ‘Blaue Augen hat das Mädchen’,   Op. 138 No. 9  C Schumann Romance in E flat minor, Op. 11 No. 1  Brahms Zigeunerlieder, Op. 103 Schumann Tanzlied, Op. 78 No. 1 ‘So wahr die Sonne scheinet’, Op. 37 No. 12  Fantasiestücke, Op. 12 (excerpts) Brahms Neue Liebeslieder, Op. 65 Members of The Sixteen Harry Christophers director CLASSICAL Another fascinating tapestry of vocal and piano music evoking a 19th-century salon, and the musical family of which Brahms became a member. In this programme an octet of singers from The Sixteen perform duets and quartets by Brahms, interwoven with Lieder and piano pieces by Schumann and the exquisite Romance by Clara Schumann. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS 73

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Martin Carthy

FOLK UNION

Martin Carthy FOLK Martin Carthy has been one of folk music’s greatest innovators for more than 40 years. He is one of the best-loved, most enthusiastic and, at times, most quietly controversial of figures. His skill, stage presence and natural charm have won him many admirers, not only from within the folk scene, but far beyond it. ‘Arguably the greatest English folk song performer, writer, collector and editor of them all.’ Q Magazine

Barb Jungr

The Sixteen’s recording has garnered critical acclaim. ‘A triumph; the new benchmark in this version.’ BBC Music Magazine. ‘Brahms was steeped in the music of Schütz’, comments Christophers, ‘so we have decided to preface the Requiem with his wonderful verse anthem for double chorus, the Musikalische Exequien. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Barb Jungr ‘Strung Out’ – Take Me to the River

Saturday 17 March

Following her celebration of Bob Dylan at Kings Place, foremost interpreter of song

Hall Two 8pm

JAZZ

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3

A German Requiem with The Sixteen Schütz Musikalische Exequien, Op. 7 Brahms Ein deutsches Requiem, Op. 45 (in Brahms’s own version for choir   and piano duet) The Sixteen Harry Christophers director Christopher Glynn & John Reid pianos CLASSICAL Brahms’s great German Requiem was first heard in London in this two-piano version arranged by the composer himself. It allows for a degree of intimacy, precision and contrapuntal clarity that cannot be achieved in the orchestral version, and

The Sixteen

Sunday 18 March LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Turner Ensemble in collaboration with the Royal Academy of Music & Trinity College of Music, London Poulenc Sextet for piano and winds Brahms Horn Trio in E flat, Op. 40 Dvorˇák String Quintet No. 2 in G, Op. 77 CLASSICAL LCMS artists-in-residence the Turner Ensemble are joined by talented students from the Royal Academy of Music and Trinity College of Music in a varied selection of chamber works: Poulenc’s ever-popular Sextuor, the Brahms Horn Trio and Dvorˇák’s Quintet for string quartet and double bass. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

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March 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS BBC RADIO 3 CONCERT IMOGEN COOPER

Monday 19 March TALKING ART

Manet SPOKEN WORD Can such now familiar images as Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe, Olympia and A Bar at the Folies-Bergère be seen as the revolutionary beginnings of modern art? The painting of Edouard Manet presents a paradox, clearly deriving from an academically approved Old Master tradition and yet breaking down so many barriers of style and taste that, deeply controversial in its time, it became a major source of influence on the development of Impressionism. This talk looks at the range of Manet’s work, discussing his capacity to absorb and transform the masterworks (by artists such as Titian and Velázquez) that inspired him and examining his radical use of contemporary subject matter.

23 MARCH

St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

WORDS ON MONDAY

Forward into the 21st century SPOKEN WORD

Imogen Cooper

Imogen Cooper plays Schubert’s Impromptus and Sonata in D to launch Radio 3’s celebration of the composer

OUT HEAR

Miriam Kramer and Will Dutta: Post-Minimal Programme to include: Nico Muhly Three Etudes for piano; Honest Music Judd Greenstein Be There John Adams Phrygian Gates; Road Movies Miriam Kramer violin Will Dutta piano CONTEMPORARY High on shimmering textures, loops, drones and washes of electronic colour, this programme of post-minimalist music from the new generation of downtown New York composers is presented by violinist Miriam Kramer and pianist Will Dutta. They give the UK premiere of Judd Greenstein’s Be There alongside Nico Muhly’s Three Etudes for piano and Honest Music for violin and tape. John Adams’s behemoth Phrygian Gates and the lyrical Road Movies for violin and piano round off the programme. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 22 March

The Forward poetry prizes are amongst the most important and respected in the English-speaking world. This celebration of the 20th anniversary of both the prizes and the Forward anthology is presented by William Sieghart, creator and long-time supporter of the Forward prizes. It will feature some of the previous prizewinners. Don’t miss this unique event, celebrating all that is best in contemporary British poetry, and forging a poetic route map for the 21st century. Curated by Poet in the City in partnership with the Forward Foundation.

The sap is rising! Join Impropera for an evening of blossoming operatic improvisation and fragrant comedic invention to celebrate the Spring solstice, British Summer Time and all things Spring! This performance will be pollen free – but may contain nuts. ‘Riotously good fun’ The Telegraph

Hall One 7pm

Hall Two 8pm

£9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Impropera: Spring is Sprung! COMEDY

To launch BBC Radio 3’s week-long celebration of Franz Schubert, one of his finest exponents plays some of his bestloved works: the Four Impromptus D899, the majestic Sonata in D, D850 and the Allegretto in C minor. Cooper’s Schubert, acclaimed live and on record, has been described as ‘playing of the greatest intelligence and musical integrity’. See Classical Highlights p10

Miriam Kramer

Will Dutta


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Friday 23 March BBC RADIO 3 CONCERT

Imogen Cooper plays Schubert Allegretto in C minor, D915 Four Impromptus, D899 Piano Sonata in D, D850 Imogen Cooper piano Vicky Yannoula

CLASSICAL To kick off BBC Radio 3’s week-long celebration of the music and life of Schubert, one of his greatest exponents performs some of his best-loved works. Hall One 7.30pm £16.50 £21.50 £29.50 £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 24 March THE BASE

Mike Gibbs with the Hans Koller Ensemble celebrating Gil Evans’ music and influence JAZZ

IMOGEN COOPER © SUSSIE AHLBURG | Will Dutta © Michael Williams | ANNBJØRG LIEN © ERIK HOLAND | MIRIAM KRAMER, VICKY YANNOULA © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Annbjørg Lien

FOLK UNION

Annbjørg Lien Band Annbjørg Lien Hardanger fiddle, fiddle, keyed fiddle & vocal  Bjørn Charles Dreyer guitars Hans Fredrik Jacobsen flutes Bernt Moen keyboards & harmonium Per Elias Drabløs bass Per Hillestad drums/percussion FOLK

A tribute to the great composer/arranger Gil Evans, who is justly famous for his work with Miles Davis (Miles Ahead, Porgy and Bess and Sketches of Spain). But Gil also made many other exceptional albums that had a major influence on the development of jazz from the 1950s to the 1980s. Composer/arranger Mike Gibbs has been greatly influenced by his work. This concert includes some of Gil’s work adapted by Mike for the Hans Koller Ensemble, and some of Mike’s works that show the Gil Evans influence. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 25 March LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Vicky Yannoula & Jakob Fichert Piano Duo

Welcome to a folk/world music night, with one of Norway’s greatest Hardanger fiddle players – Annbjørg Lien – and her amazing band. This evening will be colourful, powerful, and an up-close-andpersonal encounter with Annbjørg, whose heart is deeply rooted in tradition, played out in a world music arena.  ‘Start out with a razor-sharp Hardanger technique. Add a fearless sense of musical adventure. Top it off with the ability to weave the threads of Norwegian, Celtic, jazz, and avant-garde musics into a wild, dazzling sonic tapestry. Mix these ingredients together and you get Annbjørg Lien.’ RootsWorld

Prokofiev Scythian Suite (arr. for four hands)  Tchaikovsky Nutcracker Suite (arr. for two pianos)  Lutoslawski Paganini Variations for two pianos  Shostakovich Symphony No. 9 (arr. for four hands)

Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 6.30pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Enjoy live comedy in a cool venue with innovative, inventive and original acts

CLASSICAL An exciting concert of Slavic music by the wonderful Yannoula–Fichert piano duo, to coincide with their recent CD release of Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 9, in the composer’s own four-hands arrangement, on the Toccata Classics label.

PHOTO © MIRANDA HENNESSY & FRIENDS, 2 February 2011, HALL TWO 8PM (SEE P59)


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March 2012

This Week’s Focus NEW ZEALAND at Kings Place NEW WORLDS: NEW PERSPECTIVES

Monday 26 March WORDS ON MONDAY NZ AT KINGS PLACE

New Worlds: New Perspectives

26 – 31 MARCH

SPOKEN WORD From London to the Pacific. Three poets report on New Zealand’s changing understanding of its global position and relationships over the past half century. Reading and discussing their work are London-based Fleur Adcock, Wellingtonian Bill Manhire – one of New Zealand’s most acclaimed poets – and Tusiata Avia, an exciting young performance poet of Samoan heritage. Hall One 7pm £9.50

OUT HEAR NZ AT KINGS PLACE

The Body Electric Chris Black persona elemental Michael Norris De Corporis Fabbrica John Coulter Mouthpiece John Croft mit schwarzem Glanz Dugal McKinnon Nowdrift Alexandra Hay New work Richard Haynes clarinet John Coulter voice Barbara Luneburg viola Madeleine Pierard soprano Robin Michael cello NEW ZEALAND

AT KINGS PLACE

Taste the sounds of the SOUTHern HemisPhere with music that crosses oceans, continents AND centuRIES. The New Zealand String Quartet with Jonathan Lemalu and friends lead a journey of discovery into contemporary Kiwi music and literature, showcasing composers whose music crosses temporal and cultural boundaries, bringing a new perspective to Maori, Far Eastern, classical and electronic traditions. Discover new voices and ancient instruments. See Feature on New Zealand at Kings Place pp38–40

Jonathan Lemalu

Jack Body Three Transcriptions Tan Dun Eight Colors Beethoven String Quartet No. 1 in F, Op. 18 No. 1 New Zealand String Quartet Jonathan Lemalu bass-baritone CLASSICAL CONTEMPORARY The western elegance and beauty of Beethoven and Mendelssohn are contrasted with eastern and exotic sounds from Chinese and New Zealand composers. Tan Dun draws on colours of China and techniques of Peking Opera, Gao Ping sets Chinese poetry with themes of happiness, love and amorous desire and Jack Body cunningly transcribes music from China, Madagascar and Bulgaria.

CONTEMPORARY

Hall One 7.30pm

Exciting new works for voice, instruments and multi-media from the younger generation of New Zealand composers, who have abandoned the country’s Romantic search for musical representations of landscape, and instead are reflecting upon increasingly personal engagements with concepts of space, memory and body. Music by Michael Norris, John Coulter, John Croft, Dugal McKinnon and Alexandra Hay.

£13.50 £15.50, £19.50, £24.50, Online Savers £9.50

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 29 March NZ AT KINGS PLACE

Eight Colours Mendelssohn Capriccio in E minor, Op. 81 No. 3 Gao Ping Three poems by Mu Xin for baritone and string quartet NZSQ commission; UK premiere

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Lady Garden & Friends COMEDY Joined by some of their favourite acts on the circuit, Lady Garden bring their critically acclaimed comedy spectacular Lady Garden & Friends to Kings Place. Their first show together was at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2008, and since then they have travelled the length and breadth of England bringing sublime sketch comedy to the people. We’re glad they’ve finally reached Kings Place! ‘Britain’s funniest women’ Daily Telegraph ‘Slick and quick, versatile actors and sharp scripts’ The Independent ‘You leave utterly elated by this comedy cocktail’ The Times Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


Friday 30 March

Sunday 1 April

NZ AT KINGS PLACE

NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

Death and the Maiden

Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

Michael Norris Exitus Ross Harris The Abiding Tides (poems by Vincent O’Sullivan) for   string quartet and soprano UK premiere Schubert String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D810 Death and the Maiden

MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY

New Zealand String Quartet Madeleine Pierard soprano CLASSICAL CONTEMPORARY Schubert’s much-loved string quartet gives its name to this moving programme focused on death and the afterlife. Ross Harris has composed a powerful mono-drama that moves between the sinking of the Titanic in the Atlantic and the boats of illegal immigrants north of Australia. Michael Norris creates soundscapes inspired by stories of the afterlife from four indigenous cultures, Inuit, Mayan, Norse and American Indian. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50, £19.50, £24.50, Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNIOn

Jack Cheshire FOLK With his 2011 release Copenhagen, Jack Cheshire has supplemented the sweetly-slurred melodies, kaleidoscopic finger-picking and intricate layers of his 2008 debut, Allow It To Come On, with shuffling drums, double bass, celestial harmonies and an uncompromising sound and vision that sweep from micro to macro, from introspection to constellation.   ‘Ludicrously underrated... You’ll adore it if you like Roy Harper, Nick Drake, Gravenhurst or Badly Drawn Boy, for this is exquisite melancholy song-writing in the

New Zealand String Quartet

finest traditions of mildly psychedelic, quintessentially English, stoner folk… Buy this now.’ The Sunday Telegraph on Copenhagen Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

fragility rather than a celebration of peace through the peace goddess Hineputehue and Maori traditional instruments. Beethoven’s late Op. 131 completes the programme. It is regarded by many as his greatest and most spiritual string quartet. Hall One 7.30pm

SATURday 31 March NZ AT KINGS PLACE

£13.50 £15.50, £19.50, £24.50, Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Sunday afternoons will never be the same again. In a new series devised by cellist/ composer Philip Sheppard, top musicians play improvised soundtracks to the world’s greatest silent films without rehearsing in advance. Films include the antics of comic heroes Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd and other classics. We can’t tell you which film is showing when – noone knows, not even the performers! Take pot luck and enjoy the club-like atmosphere in Hall Two. Hall Two 3pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Not So Silent Offer: Ticket + Bloody Mary + Roast Lunch. All for just £29.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Pre-Concert Talk: Maori Instruments

Tom Hewson’s Treehouse

Chilingirian Quartet & Sofya Gulyak (piano)

Richard Nunns

JAZZ

Romantic Piano Quintets – 2

Led by virtuoso pianist Tom Hewson, Treehouse is a unique trio featuring MOBO-  winning vibraphonist Lewis Wright and Mercury-nominated bassist Calum Gourlay.  They take the improvisational drive of jazz into a chamber context, creating original music of exhilarating contrast and clarity.  ‘Emerging piano virtuoso Hewson displays   great maturity here in this drum-less trio, with stunning Empirical vibes master Lewis  Wright and bassist Calum Gourlay … impressive, free-flowing solos – think a 20-something take on the MJQ.’ Time Out

Haydn String Quartet, Op. 33/3 The Bird Schubert String Quartet No. 13 in A minor Rosamunde Schumann Piano Quintet in E flat, Op. 44

Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 6.30pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£14.50 £19.50 | Online Savers £9.50

SPOKEN WORD WORLD New Zealand musician Richard Nunns is an authority on Taonga Puoro (Maori instruments). He introduces these musical treasures in a fascinating illustrated talk, explaining their cultural meaning and describing their historical use and modern revival. St Pancras Room 5pm FREE. Tickets required. Call Box Office.

NZ AT KINGS PLACE

Spiritual Journeys

CLASSICAL Our survey of 19th-century piano quintets continues with Schumann’s E flat quintet, performed by Sofya Gulyak (the only ever female winner of the Leeds International Piano Competition). Also with Haydn’s Bird quartet, and Schubert’s sublime Rosamunde quartet.

John Psathas Abhisheka Gillian Karawe Whitehead Hineputehue (‘the woman of the sound of the gourd’) for string quartet and Taonga Puoro Beethoven String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, Op. 131 New Zealand String Quartet Richard Nunns Taonga Puoro (Maori instruments) CLASSICAL CONTEMPORARY

Jack Cheshire

Three composers explore musical and spiritual ideas of intensity and depth. John Psathas was inspired by the great truths in the writings of a Buddhist guru to navigate slower passages of musical time. Gillian Whitehead expresses the

Easter Jazz Workshop and Music Festival Kings Place, 6–9 April 2011 Workshops and performances for students and music fans alike… Featuring Bruce Barth, Deborah Brown, Pete Churchill, Stephen Keogh and many more. www.globalmusicfoundation.org   |  www.kingsplace.co.uk/gmf-easter

DEBORAH BROWN © MELODY AND IAN MCCLAREN

NEW ZEALAND AT KINGS PLACE – ILLUSTRATION © TRANSFORMER DESIGN | NEW ZEALAND STRING QUARTET © ROBERT CATTO / WWW.CATTO.CO.NZ | JONATHAN LEMALU © SUSSIE AHLBURG | Jack Cheshire © Mark Arrigo

LISTINGS 77

March/April 2012

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

CALENDAR JANUARY

CALENDAR

78 CALENDAR

JANUARY– MARCH 2012

ENGLISH STRING MUSIC – ORCHESTRA OF ST JOHN’S

31 December Hall One

6pm

New Year at Kings Place – Vivaldi’s Four Seasons with Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

Classical

1 Sun

Hall One

1pm

New Year at Kings Place – Vivaldi’s Four Seasons with Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

Classical

5 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

English String Music – From Elgar to Tippett with Orchestra of St John’s

Classical

6 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

English String Music – From Bridge to Vaughan Williams with Orchestra of St John’s

Classical

7 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Jiri Slavik/Fred Thomas Duo + Benoît Delbecq

8 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Sacconi Quartet 10th-Anniversary Concert

LONDON A CAPPELLA FESTIVAL

11 Wed

Pangolin London

until 3 March

’50s & ’60s British Sculpture Show

12 Thu

Hall One

7pm

London A Cappella Festival – Vasari Singers (with special guests The Swingle Singers)

12 Thu

Hall One

9pm

London A Cappella Festival – The Boxettes (with support act Cadenza)

13 Fri

Hall One

7pm

London A Cappella Festival – Cadence

13 Fri

Hall One

9pm

London A Cappella Festival – FORK

Jazz Classical Art Classical Contemporary Jazz Contemporary

14 Sat  FREE Concert Level Foyer All Day

London A Cappella Festival – Free Foyer Events

Interact

14 Sat

Hall Two

11am

London A Cappella Festival – Workshop 1: Voice Camp with the Swingle Singers

Interact

14 Sat

Hall Two

12.30pm

London A Cappella Festival – Workshop 2: Improvisation with Pete Churchill

Interact

14 Sat

Hall Two

3.30pm

London A Cappella Festival – Workshop 3: Introduction to Live Looping with FreePlay Duo

14 Sat

Hall One

2pm

London A Cappella Festival – Cottontown Chorus (with Crossfire)

14 Sat  FREE Hall One

5pm

London A Cappella Festival – Talk: A Global A Cappella Community

14 Sat

Hall One

6.45pm

London A Cappella Festival – London Vocal Project (with support act FreePlay Duo)

Contemporary

14 Sat

Hall One

8.30pm

London A Cappella Festival – Swingles & Friends (with support act Euphonism)

Contemporary

15 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Philippe Graffin, Henri Demarquette & Daniel Blumenthal

Interact Contemporary Spoken Word

Classical

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 1

16 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Thomas Heatherwick

16 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – ensemblebash@20 part 1: Minimum Maximum

Spoken Word

19 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 1 – Schubert Ensemble: Brahms and the Alto

Classical

20 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 1 – Endymion: Brahms’s Quintets

Classical

20 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Alternative Burns Night with Babelfish

21 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 1 – Mikhail Rudy plays Brahms: Handel and Schumann Variations

21 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Simon Harris & Trio Manouche

22 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Chilingirian Quartet & Valeria Resjan (piano)

Contemporary

Folk Classical Jazz Classical

PHELPS / KINCH / WILSON – explorations

23 Mon

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

Talking Art – Frida Kahlo

23 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Reading the Riots with Paul Lewis

23 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Manu Delago & Living Room in London

26 Thu

Hall One

8pm

eXplorations – An Evening with Jay Phelps + guests

Jazz

26 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Impropera’s Night o’ Tartan

Comedy

27 Fri

Hall One

8pm

eXplorations – An Evening with Soweto Kinch + guests

Spoken Word Spoken Word Contemporary

Jazz


FEBRUARY

CALENDAR 79

January—March 2012

27 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Listen to Britain: Folk Music & Film with The Memory Band

Folk

28 Sat

Hall One

8pm

eXplorations – An Evening with Alex Wilson + guests

Jazz

28 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Benet McLean

Jazz

29 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Trio Goya

Great Britten! with the dante quartet & FRIENDS

Classical

30 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Alain de Botton

30 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Tom Arthurs & Not Applicable

1 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Great Britten! – Britten and Ovid

Classical

2 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Great Britten! – Britten’s Cello Suites

Classical

2 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Miranda Hennessy & Friends + Dregs

3 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Great Britten! – Britten and Bridge

3 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – RM Hubbert & Friends

4 Sat

St Pancras Room

6pm

Great Britten! – Talk: ‘Birth of a Masterpiece’ – David Matthews & Dante Qt

4 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Great Britten! – Britten and Purcell

4 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Kit Downes in concert – presented by Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3

5 Sun

Hall Two

3pm

Not So Silent Movies with Live Improv Band featuring Stephen Warbeck

5 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Turner Ensemble

Spoken Word Contemporary

Comedy Classical Folk Spoken Word Classical Classical Jazz Music/Film/Comedy Classical

Purpose and Grace

6 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – The Sebald Lecture: Sean O’Brien

6 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Phil Minton & Guests

8 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Purpose and Grace – Tony Benn & Roy Bailey: The Writing on the Wall

9 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Purpose and Grace – Martin Simpson with June Tabor & Dick Gaughan

9 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Tony Law: Go Mr Tony Go!

10 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Purpose and Grace – Chris Wood in concert

10 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union / Purpose and Grace – Ruth Theodore Band + Nancy Wallace & Jason Steel

11 Sat

St Pancras Room

1pm

Purpose and Grace – Guitar Workshop with Martin Simpson

Folk Interact

11 Sat

Limehouse Room

2pm

Purpose and Grace – ‘Creating Harmony’: Singing Workshop with Fay Hield

Folk Interact

11 Sat

St Pancras Room

3.30pm

Purpose and Grace – Guitar Workshop with Ewan McLennan & Sam Carter

Folk Interact

11 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Purpose and Grace – Martin Simpson & Guests: Bright Phoebus

Folk

11 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Nikki Iles & Kate Williams Piano Duo

Jazz

12 Sun

Limehouse Room

10.30am – 5.30pm Sunday Special – Piano-Yoga® with GéNIA

12 Sun

St Pancras Room

5pm

London Chamber Music Series – Pre-Concert Talk: ‘A Matter of Life or Death’

12 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets 6

celebrating debussy WITH PASCAL & AMI ROGÉ

13 Mon

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

Talking Art – Pangolin Show: Focus on the Venice Biennale

13 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Foyles Literary Lecture

Spoken Word

13 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Zubin Kanga: Piano Inside/Out

Contemporary

14 Tue

Kings Place Gallery

until 23 March

Norman Cornish: The Early Years – Paintings and Drawings

16 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Celebrating Debussy – The Young Debussy

Classical

16 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Gong in 60 Seconds

Comedy

17 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Celebrating Debussy – The Late Debussy

17 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Breabach

JEWISH BOOK WEEK HIGHLIGHTS  (see www.kingsplace.co.uk/jbw for full programme)

18 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Jewish Book Week – 60 Years On… Zygmunt Bauman, Linda Grant & Simon Schama

18 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Marius Neset: Golden Xplosion

19 Sun

Hall Two

11am

Jewish Book Week – Anne Sebba: That Woman – Wallis Simpson

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall One

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Eli Amir & Hillel Halkin: Yasmine

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall Two

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Adina Hoffman: The Poetry of Taha Muhammad Ali

Spoken Word

Spoken Word Contemporary Folk Folk Comedy Folk Folk

Interact Spoken Word Classical Classical Spoken Word

Art

Classical Folk Spoken Word Jazz

CALENDAR

JANUARY

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk


FEBRUARY MARCH

CALENDAR

80 CALENDAR

January—March 2012

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

JEWISH BOOK WEEK HIGHLIGHTS continued  (see www.kingsplace.co.uk/jbw for full programme)

19 Sun

Hall One

2pm

Jewish Book Week – David Abulafia & Philip Mansel with Felipe Fernández-Armesto

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall Two

2pm

Jewish Book Week – Dennis Marks: Joseph Roth

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall One

3.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Michael Eaton, Florian Schweizer & Leo Litvack: Fagin the Jew

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall Two

3.30pm

Jewish Book Week – David Wesley in conversation with Tom Selwyn: Israeli Arabs

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall One

5pm

Jewish Book Week – Peter Cole & Adina Hoffman – Sacred Trash

Spoken Word

19 Sun

St Pancras Room

5pm

Jewish Book Week – Neill Lochery: Portugal at War

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Shaham-Erez-Wallfisch PianoTrio

19 Sun

Hall Two

6.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Eilat Negev & Yehuda Koren: The First Lady of Fleet Street

Spoken Word

19 Sun

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Fabrice Humbert: The Origin of Violence

Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall One

8pm

Jewish Book Week – Deborah Lipstadt & Anthony Julius: The Eichmann Trial – 50 Years Later Spoken Word

19 Sun

Hall Two

8pm

Jewish Book Week – The Golem: Silent Film with Live Music

20 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – The Poetry of Bob Dylan

20 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – CHROMA Ensemble: Celebrating 15 years of new work

20 Mon

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Avner de-Shalit, Barbara Mann & Ziona Strelitz

Spoken Word

21 Tue

Hall One

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Bernard Wasserstein with Daniel Wildmann: ‘On the Eve’

Spoken Word

21 Tue

Hall Two

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Claude Lanzmann: The Patagonian Hare

Spoken Word

22 Wed

Hall One

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Ron Arad

Spoken Word

22 Wed

Hall Two

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Moishe’s Bagel

22 Wed

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – J Sacks, M du Sautoy, D Glaser: God, Science and the Search for Meaning Spoken Word

23 Thu

Hall One

7pm

Jewish Book Week – Etgar Keret

Spoken Word

23 Thu

Hall One

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – David Schneider: My Son, The Gold Medallist

Spoken Word

24 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Alex Highton

25 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Jewish Book Week – J Safran Foer, J Goldberg & M Kendler: Re-telling the Story

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall Two

11am

Jewish Book Week – Jacqueline Rose: Proust among the Nations

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall One

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Shalom Auslander & Bidisha – Hope: A Tragedy

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall Two

12.30pm

Jewish Book Week – David Conway & Michael Portillo: Jewry in Music

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall One

2pm

Jewish Book Week – Jeremy Ben-Ami & Jonathan Freedland: A New Voice for Israel

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall Two

2pm

Jewish Book Week – Alison Pick & Jake Wallis Simons: Kindertransport

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall One

3.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Henry Goodman & Howard Jacobson: Ulysses Revisited

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall Two

3.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Eliane Glaser & Julia Hobsbawm: Get Real

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall One

5pm

Jewish Book Week – Aharon Appelfeld & Eva Hoffman: Blooms of Darkness

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall Two

5pm

Jewish Book Week – Jonathan Freedland & James Purnell: Pantheon by Sam Bourne

Spoken Word

26 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Sarah-Jane Bradley & Anthony Hewitt

26 Sun

Hall Two

6.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Colin Shindler & Nick Cohen – Israel and the European Left

26 Sun

Hall One

8pm

Jewish Book Week – Umberto Eco & David Aaronovitch: The Protocols of Prague

26 Sun

Hall Two

8.30pm

Jewish Book Week – Jay Rayner & Jazz Piano: A Love Story (unrequited)

Classical

Music / Film Spoken Word Contemporary

Folk

Folk

Classical Spoken Word Spoken Word Spoken Word Jazz

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 2

27 Mon

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

Talking Art – Venus: The Goddess of Love in Art with Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

Spoken Word

27 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Tennyson: ‘To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield’

Spoken Word

27 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Harold’s Sound: Harold Budd, Simon Fisher Turner & Daniel Biro

Contemporary

1 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 2 – Youth and Maturity: Brahms’s Music for Piano and Viola – 1

1 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – The Fix presents Raybot

2 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 2 – Academy of St Martin in the Fields: Brahms String Sextets

2 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Southern Tenant Folk Union

3 Sat

St Pancras Room

10.30 am – 4.30pm Brahms Unwrapped Week 2 – Brahms Study Day – 1: The Life and the Legacy

3 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 2 – Academy of St Martin in the Fields: Brahms’s Second Serenade

3 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Aimua Eghobamien

Classical Comedy Classical Folk Interact Classical Jazz


4 Sun

Hall One

CALENDAR 81

January—March 2012

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Rosamunde Trio

Classical

LONDON GUITAR FESTIVAL IN THE SPRING

5 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – What’s Religion? with Karen Armstrong

5 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – NONCLASSICAL presented by Gabriel Prokofiev & Richard Lannoy

8 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

London Guitar Festival – Vida Guitar Quartet

8 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – The Beta Males: The Train Job and Max and Ivan are... Holmes and Watson Comedy

9 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

London Guitar Festival – Spanish Guitar Night with Dúo Hermanos Cuenca + Fernando Espí

9 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union / London Guitar Festival – David Gibb & Elly Lucas

10 Sat

St Pancras Room

9.30am

London Guitar Festival – Classical Solo Guitar Masterclass with Fernando Espí

10 Sat

St Pancras Room

Spoken Word Contemporary Classical Classical Folk Interact

12pm

London Guitar Festival – Classical Guitar Ensemble Masterclass with Vida Guitar Quartet

10 Sat  FREE St Pancras Room

4pm

London Guitar Festival – Panel: The Classical Guitar in the 21st Century

Classical Spoken Word

Interact

10 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

London Guitar Festival – London International Guitar Competition Final

Classical

10 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Blue Touch Paper

11 Sun

Hall Two

3pm

Not So Silent Movies with Live Improv Band featuring Elspeth Hanson

11 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Tippett Quartet

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 3

12 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Graphic Thought Facility in conversation

12 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – EXAUDI: Exposure 2012

14 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 3 – Johannes Brahms: A Portrait at the Piano with Kenneth Hamilton

14 Wed

Pangolin London

until 5 May

Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff

15 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 3 – The Sixteen sings Brahms & Schumann – 1

15 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Gong in 60 seconds!

16 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 3 – The Sixteen sings Brahms & Schumann – 2

16 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Martin Carthy

17 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped Week 3 – A German Requiem with The Sixteen

17 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Barb Jungr ‘Strung Out’ – Take Me to the River

18 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Turner Ensemble in collaboration with the RAM & Trinity Laban Classical

Jazz Music/Film/Comedy Classical Spoken Word Contemporary Classical Art Classical Comedy Classical Folk Classical Jazz

BBC RADIO 3 CONCERT – IMOGEN COOPER

19 Mon

St Pancras Room

6.30pm

Talking Art – Manet

19 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Forward into the 21st century

19 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Miriam Kramer and Will Dutta: Post-Minimal

22 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Impropera: Spring is Sprung!

Comedy

23 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

BBC Radio 3 Concert – Imogen Cooper plays Schubert

Classical

23 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Annbjørg Lien Band

Folk

24 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Mike Gibbs with the Hans Koller Ensemble celebrating Gil Evans’ music and influence

Jazz

25 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Vicky Yannoula & Jakob Fichert Piano Duo

Spoken Word Spoken Word Contemporary

Classical

NEW ZEALAND at Kings Place

26 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday / New Zealand at Kings Place – New Worlds: New Perspectives

26 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear / New Zealand at Kings Place– The Body Electric

29 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

New Zealand at Kings Place – Eight Colours

29 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Lady Garden & Friends

30 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

New Zealand at Kings Place – Death and the Maiden

30 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Jack Cheshire

31 Sat  FREE St Pancras Room

5pm

New Zealand at Kings Place – Talk: ‘Maori Instruments’ with Richard Nunns

31 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

New Zealand at Kings Place – Spiritual Journeys

31 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Tom Hewson’s Treehouse

1 April

Hall Two

3pm

Not So Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

1 April

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Chilingirian Quartet & Sofya Gulyak (piano)

Spoken Word Contemporary

Classical Contemporary Comedy Classical Contemporary Folk Spoken Word World Classical Contemporary Jazz Music/Film/Comedy Classical

CALENDAR

MARCH

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk


82 CONTEMPORARY

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

January—March 2012

Q&A Bellatrix Bellatrix, aka Belle Ehresman, is a world champion beatboxer and founder of The Boxettes, who’ll be starring in the A Cappella Festival at Kings Place on 12 January 2012

You studied jazz bass at the Guildhall – is that still a big part of your life? Jazz will always be an important part of my life, and I love it with a passion. The reality is, though, that the mastery of jazz music requires a discipline that can leave little space for anything else, and I wasn’t prepared to give up my career as a beatboxer, though bass playing is still a prominent part of my performing life.   When did you discover beatboxing and get the bug to practise it a lot? I discovered beatboxing from a family friend called DukeBox, who was one of the pioneers of UK beatbox, and I was absolutely mesmerised by what he could do. I started to practise it myself when I was about 15.  

What did you have to do to become the World Champion Beatboxer? I had to battle in the World Championship in Berlin 2009. In hip-hop, battling is where opponents compete head to head and the strongest contestant goes through to the next round. Battles are sometimes judged on audience reaction, but there are judges to mediate. Contestants will be judged on things like ‘technique’, ‘originality’, ‘musicality’, etc. The next World Championship is in March 2012. You do much more than make bass beats in the group: how do you make those extraordinary noises? I do a lot of ‘sound making’ – one of the most important sounds I make is the ‘lip bass’. It is our ticket to success as a female group! It’s simply made by adjusting the air pressure and the tension in my lips to change the pitch. I discovered it about three years ago...   You have said that your initial selection of friends at college turned out to be an amazing array of talent – talk us through your line-up. Yes, I was very lucky. Our original line-up contained Harriet

I do a lot of ‘sound making’ and my ‘lip bass’ is our ticket to success! Syndercombe Court, who was in my year at Guildhall. She’s an incredible vocalist but left the band a year ago and after a long audition process our newest member Kate Brown joined us. Kate’s voice is at the poppy end of soul, with a natural smokey hint to it. She can belt like nobody I’ve worked with yet! Then there’s Neo, who has a unique voice, with a special twang and a cheeky glint to it that makes her extremely distinctive. Alyusha is an exceptional classical singer, which is a great element to have at our disposal. But she’s very versatile and has this interesting trip-hop quality to her voice. Last, but not least, we have Yvette. She has a beautifully subtle voice, that demands your absolute attention. She’s a natural communicator on stage and can whisk any crowd into a frenzy within moments.

How do you ‘compose’? As a group, or is there one overall creative vision? Generally, one person will come up with an idea, bring it to rehearsal and we’ll turn it into a Boxettes song. I’d like to do more composing as a group, as we come up with some great stuff when jamming together.  How did you come to work with Jarvis Cocker? We met him through a friend and fellow beatboxer, Shlomo – I used to be in his band, the Vocal Orchestra. He put on this great night at the Southbank, and Jarvis came and performed a few tracks with us. Jarvis is really up for supporting new music. He’s had us on a project of his and uses our girls as backing singers for Pulp. He also played one of our tracks on Radio 6. We like him a lot!  What can we expect from your set at the Festival this January? Well, you’d better buy a ticket and come and find out! I will say you can expect more than last year. Songs, stagecraft, execution... it’s all getting better.

The Boxettes 12 January London A Cappella Festival 12–14 January. See Listings pp52–53

Belle Ehresmann © TOM GRIFFITHS 2010

Why did you take up bass guitar – it’s not the first instrument every young girl grabs hold of... I started playing the bass guitar when I was about 13 – I was always really into groove-based music, and it was the rhythm section that attracted me. When I was about 15 my teacher Riaan Vosloo sneakily introduced me to the double bass and after one lesson I knew I had to learn it…


uk www.standpointmag.co. 31 April 2011/£4.50/Issue

Last hope of England The Tories must be bolder Tim Montgomerie Irwin Stelzer Michael PintoDuschinsky ue 30

uk www.standpointmag.co.

March 2011/£4.50/Iss

rns sour Ben Judah: Arab Spring tu la Peter Whittle: Kate v Car the C of E fence of/Michael Prodger/Frank Field gar: InShrde Nigel Bigsy Wau R.W. Johnson iver/ l : ione gh/L ks Daiton as erson/John D. Barrow her/ol r FiscB hn JoTibo James/Hephzibah And ve /Cli s ning Jen emy anuele Ottolenghi /Em ders Wen Jessica Duchen/Jer im /W McElvoy/Joseph Bottum nne a rk/Am Bue hael Mic ba has O lost Egypt?

No he can’t Shiraz Maher

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JANUARY–MARCH 2012

STARTING JANUARY 2012, Performers include:

Spoken Word

Jewish Book Week: Henry Goodman on Ulysses Umberto Eco Jonathan Safran Foer

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER  www.gemmalatimer.com

and many more...

WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012

Banquet of Books SIMON SCHAMA AT Jewish Book Week

SIMON SCHAMA – JEWISH BOOK WEEK  |  BRAHMS UNWRAPPED  |  NEW ZEALAND IN LONDON

Academy of St Martin in the Fields Aurora Orchestra with Maxim Rysanov The Sixteen Natalie Clein Gould Piano Trio Orion Quartet Schubert Ensemble Philip Dukes Katya Apekisheva Charles Owen Mikhail Rudy Ivo Varbanov

music+art+restaurants

Classical

Brahms Unwrapped Dante Quartet: Britten New Zealand in London

Contemporary

A Cappella Festival Manu Delago

Jazz

Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson

Comedy

Tim Minchin Lady Garden YOUR FREE COPY

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What's On Spring 2012