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APRIL–JUNE 2012

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WHAT’S ON APRIL–JUNE 2012 STARTING JANUARY 2012

With the complete Shostakovich CYCLE Contemporary

Francesco Tristano Percussions Claviers de Lyon

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER  www.gemmalatimer.com

and many more...

The Brodskys Are Back!

BRODSKY’S SHOSTAKOVICH  |  SIBELIUS: INNER VOICES  |  SONGLINES

Academy of St Martin in the Fields Aurora Orchestra with Maxim Rysanov The Sixteen Natalie Clein Gould Piano Trio Orion STRING Quartet with susan tomes Schubert Ensemble Philip Dukes Katya Apekisheva kenneth hamilton Charles Owen Mikhail Rudy jeffrey siegel Ivo Varbanov

Classical

Brahms Unwrapped Sibelius: Inner Voices Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Music for a Monarch

World

Songlines: R.U.T.A. Madagascar All Stars

Jazz

Girls in Airports Dave Stapleton

Folk

The Epstein

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Classical

Stravinsky Remix Dufay Collective Claire Booth Terry Riley

Jazz

Mike Figgis Django Bates John Taylor

Folk

Peggy Seeger June Tabor Kevin Burke

Art

‘Very 21st century’ Financial Times

‘Magnificent’

Wall Street Journal

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER www.gemmalatimer.com

Classical

Brahms Unwrapped Sibelius: Inner Voices Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Music for a Monarch

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER www.gemmalatimer.com

Brahms Unwrapped Dante Quartet: Britten New Zealand in London

BRAHMS SILHOUTTE BY OTTO BOEHLER © THE TULLY POTTER COLLECTION

Classical

World

Classical

Darbar Songlines Encounters

Robert Glasper Classic Songbooks: Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan and more

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Jazz

Jay Phelps, Soweto Kinch and Alex Wilson

Comedy

Tim Minchin Lady Garden WWW.KINGSPLACE.CO.UK

Jazz

Girls in Airports Dave Stapleton

Folk

The Epstein

Join us in opening the way to London 2012 at facebook.com/eurostar

Fiddles on Fire Arctic Circle Emily Barker

Orphy Robinson Dennis Rollins

A Cappella Festival Manu Delago

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Folk

Jazz

Contemporary

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London Sinfonietta with Matthew Bourne / Nils Økland

The Labèque sisters LIFEM: Mari Boine

Songlines: R.U.T.A. Madagascar All Stars

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Contemporary

Contemporary

World

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DJANGO BATES | FIDDLES ON FIRE | GOODBYE STALIN!

Francesco Tristano Percussions Claviers de Lyon

Notes & Letters: Will Self Jonathan Coe Philip Ball Marina Warner CLAUDIA AURORA – LIFEM | NOTES & LETTERS | SONGBOOKS

Contemporary

AND MANY MORE...

CONCERTS WHAT’S AT ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012 KINGS PLACE DURING

Jewish Book Week: Henry Goodman on Ulysses Umberto Eco Jonathan Safran Foer SIMON SCHAMA – JEWISH BOOK WEEK | BRAHMS UNWRAPPED | NEW ZEALAND IN LONDON

AND MANY MORE...

WITH THE COMPLETE SHOSTAKOVICH CYCLE

Spoken Word

music+art+restaurants

Spoken Word

APRIL–JUNE 2012

THE BRODSKYS ARE BACK!

BRODSKY’S SHOSTAKOVICH | SIBELIUS: INNER VOICES | SONGLINES

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION STRING QUARTET WITH SUSAN TOMES SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA KENNETH HAMILTON CHARLES OWEN MIKHAIL RUDY JEFFREY SIEGEL IVO VARBANOV

AND MANY MORE... WHAT’S ON

Nico Muhly / Aurora Orchestra Mozart Unwrapped

& Schnittke WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2011Shostakovich John Woolrich

The Sixteen BANQUET OF BOOKS Imogen Cooper 2012 Mozart Unwrapped SIMON90SCHAMA AT9AG | Box Office: 020 York Way, London N1 7520 1490 JEWISH BOOK WEEK Jazz

APRIL–JUNE 2012

STARTING JANUARY 2012

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION QUARTET SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA CHARLES OWEN MIKHAIL RUDY IVO VARBANOV

JANUARY–MARCH 2012

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION QUARTET SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA CHARLES OWEN MIKHAILmusic+art+restaurants RUDY IVO VARBANOV

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Classical

SWEET SORROW CLAUDIA AURORA, NEW FACE OF FADO

STARTING JANUARY 2012, PERFORMERS INCLUDE:

STARTING JANUARY 2012, PERFORMERS INCLUDE:

music+art+restaurants

Photo Tom Bland

SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2011

Take part in Eurostar’s cultural celebrations, win tickets to test events and keep up to date with all our latest plans.

David Bailey Albert Irvin

DJANGO BATES PLAYS TRIBUTE TO CHARLIE PARKER

TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM JULY 2011

[4442/11]

SCHUMANN BICENTENARY NATALIE CLEIN AND FRIENDS CELEBRATE A TROUBLED GENIUS

APRIL–JULY 2011

Join in the fun (and games)

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WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2010

ONLINE SAVERS £9.50

SAVER SEATS £9.50 ONLINE

win! a Season Pass

for Autumn 2012

Register by 30 June 2012. Customers who have already registered will automatically be eligible to enter the prize draw. The season pass is applicable to Autumn 2012 only. Restrictions may apply and are subject to event availability.


03

Welcome to the SUMMER 2012 season at Kings Place!

COVER: BRODSKY QUARTET © NICK WHITE  |  Mike Sims © Hayley Madden  |  OTHER CONTRIBUTORS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

We kick off the season this Easter Weekend with a vibrant array of jazz from the Global Music Foundation. Our spaces will be buzzing with workshops and concerts from an amazing team of musicians, so come down and discover free events and prestigious performances. One of our most innovative regulars, Not So Silent Movies on the first Sunday of every month, has proved a huge hit and is selling out every time. Brainchild of cellist and composer Philip Sheppard, the event involves spontaneously improvised soundtracks to classic silent movies, with special guest artists featured each time. Tim Minchin, our Artist-inResidence, will be joining the band for an oneoff sporting edition on Friday 29 June. Talking of sport, we could hardly ignore a rather significant sporting event in our capital

this summer, so look out for a wonderful photographic exhibition from Beijing 2008 by Tom Jenkins at Kings Place Gallery and some Poetry gymnastics of our own on 11 June. Our classical music programme is studded with gems, from our cover artists the Brodsky Quartet’s Shostakovich Quartet Cycle, the first they have done in London for over 20 years, to some delectable programmes for Brahms Unwrapped (we welcome once again the Orion Quartet, this time with peerless pianist Susan Tomes) and two special concerts honouring the Queen’s Jubilee (see p44). An illuminating exploration of music by Sibelius and David Matthews boasts a UK Sibelius premiere, Kuolema, while the talented young La Nuova Musica will perform their first opera, Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo (21, 23 June).

Look out for news in this issue of the trend-setting Songlines Festival, with artists from Madagascar, Poland and Chinese Inner Mongolia. Plus, the rise of the urban wedding and Jonathan Glancey’s evocative meditation on the rapid transformation of this very area from grimy goodsyard to cultural hub. I am happy to announce that Kings Place Halls One and Two are now available for artistic hires (see p77). Last, but not least, our Festival tickets go on sale in April, so prepare for another exciting programme of 100 events.

Peter Millican, CEO

CONTRIBUTORS

Jonathan Glancey is the architectural and design correspondent for The Guardian. He writes on the evolution of the King’s Cross hinterland over the last 40 years, from one of London’s dirtiest and poorest backwaters to a gleaming cultural hub – a process he has observed at close range.

Lucie Greene, who writes on the trend for city weddings, is a freelance fashion and lifestyle journalist and contributor to the Financial Times, The Telegraph, Elle Decoration, Vogue and Women’s Wear Daily. She splits her time between writing and travel to far-flung destinations. 

Mike Sims, who celebrates 25 years of Paupers Press, is the deputy editor of Printmaking Today and the co-founder of The Illustrated Ape magazine. He has written the introductory essay to American Sampler – The Artwork of Corita Kent (50 by 70).

Susan Tomes, who writes on performing Brahms, is one of Britain’s most treasured pianists. Renowned as a soloist and as a chamber musician,  formerly with Domus and the Florestan Trio, she’s also the author of three books. She will be apearing with New York’s Orion Quartet this June.


CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS 8 La Nuova Musica presents Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo 9 Tchaikovsky from Tirimo and Royal Academy Baroque 28 D  ARKNESS VISIBLE The Brodsky Quartet play the Shostakovich quartet cycle 33 NOT JUST FOR BEARS Susan Tomes pleads for a fresh approach to Brahms 44 G  arland for the queen The musical legacy of  our monarchs 50 Inner Voices  n intriguing new series A mixes Sibelius and  David Matthews

REGULARS

SPOKEN WORD

SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS 10 The Anti-Ad Man The celebrated Dutch advertising guru Erik Kessels (above) has something to say even to those who don’t like advertising 11 B  irdsong’s Long Echoes Sebastian Faulks comes to Words on Monday to discuss his novels. Plus, appearances by Patricia Routledge and Fiona Shaw

03 WELCOME 06 TICKET INFORMATION 07 PLANNING YOUR WEEK 08 HIGHLIGHTS 28 FEATURES

FOLK FOLK HIGHLIGHTS 12 Tales of the Unexpected Rachael Dadd’s (above) life and music hover between Japan and the UK 13 T he Epstein Colin Irwin catches up with the quirky band fast becoming a super group

R.U.T.A. WITH ROBAL, WARSAW 2011 © Bartek Muracki

Rachael Dadd © BROKEN SOUND MUSIC

Eric Kessels © MARC ECKARD

BRODSKY QUARTET © NICK WHITE

CLASSICAL

JAZZ/WORLD JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS 14 Polaroid Express Dave Stapleton’s new work 15 P  artikel Accelerator A visit from the much talkedabout Partikel Trio 15 E aster Piano Parade The Global Music Foundation boasts a stellar pianist line-up 16 G  irls in Airports Great Danes at The Base WORLD HIGHLIGHTS 34 SONGLINES FESTIVAL Groups from Inner Mongolia, Madagascar and Poland (above, R.U.T.A.) feature in the new line-up.

54 LISTINGS 55 APRIL 62 MAY 68 JUNE

76 ART LISTINGS 77 ARTISTIC HIRES 78 CALENDAR 82 Q&A with Jamie Bissmire

WHAT’S ON APRIL– JUNE 2012


CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS 18 The Art of Cage  Francesco Tristano brings his bachCage set to Out Hear 19 High-Voltage  Volkov The fêted Israeli conductor has another side to his art 20 Itinerant Duo Emmanuelle Bertrand and Pascal Amoyel on their relationship with two of France’s greatest composers

COMEDY

ART

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS 17 The Complete Guide to... Tom Reynolds and Tim Daniels create a dastardly guide to an unsuspecting Kings Place 21 Not So Silent Summer Special Tim Minchin (above) joins the Not So Silent Movies team for a romp through Buster Keaton’s sporting disaster film College in June

82 Q&A: JAMIE BISSMIRE The King of British techno comes to play at Kings Place

WITTANK © SUPPLIED PHOTO

Lorraine Robbins, BEAST 43 © STEVE RUSSELL

TIM MINCHIN © JAMES PENLIDIS

FRANCeSCO tristano © Aymeric Giraudel

CONTEMPORARY

LISTINGS

ART HIGHLIGHTS 22 Strange Beasts A new generation of British artists responds to the work of sculptor Lynn Chadwick 38 THE NEW KING’S CROSS Jonathan Glancey reflects on the extraordinary transformation of the area around Kings Place 42 OLYMPIC EYE The work of sports photographer Tom Jenkins will be on show this summer 46 THE MECHANICAL HAND Mike Sims on the crucial creative role played by Paupers Press on British art

LISTINGS 54 Listings 76 Art Listings 77 Artistic Hires 78 Calendar 24 FOOD & DRINK HIGHLIGHTS Rise of the Urban Wedding  Lucie Greene charts the new trend for city nuptials, as Kings Place opens its doors as a wedding venue 26 INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS An inspirational programme from the National Youth Jazz Collective for students and instrumental teachers

EDITORIAL TEAM Publisher Kings Place Music Foundation Contact +44 (0) 20 7520 1440 mag@kingsplace.co.uk www.kingsplace.co.uk

Editor-in-Chief Helen Wallace

Art Direction Ana Acosta

Editorial Team Lindsay Garfoot Michael Green Janie Nicholas Emrah Tokalaç

Picture Research Sunita Sharma-Gibson Proofreading Susannah Howe Print Wyndeham Roche

Thanks to Peter Millican, Jen Mitchell, Tanya Cracknell, Chris Nye, Holly Thomas, Zoë Jeyes, Sally Pembroke, Joanie Magill, Hervé Bournas, Andrew McIntosh, Richard Hartwell, Isaac Robson, Antonia Barnett-McIntosh, Samuel Kang, Tom Brown

© Kings Place 2012 All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of Kings Place is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at the time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Kings Place.


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April—June 2012

TICKET INFORMATION www.kingsplace.co.uk Box Office 020 7520 1490

your journey We are located a short walk from King’s Cross and St Pancras Stations. Our main entrance is on York Way.

Public Transport

Visit www.tfl.gov.uk to help plan your journey, or call London Travel Information 020 7222 1234.

BOOKING

Tickets for all performances from £9.50 online The online ticket prices are shown in the listings. Please add £2 to the online ticket price if booking by other methods.

ONLINE

www.kingsplace.co.uk Secure online booking 24 hours a day.

Hall One

Choose your exact seating location pick your seat: BOOK NOW

or opt for the Online Savers option online savers: BOOK NOW

You are guaranteed a seat. Its location will be allocated by the Box Office. £9.50 Online Savers can only be purchased online and are subject to availability. Tickets may be collected at any time during the hour before the performance.

Hall Two

All seating is unreserved, some events may be standing only. £9.50 Online Savers can only be purchased online and are subject to availability.

ST PANCRAS ROOM

All seating is unreserved, some events may be standing only.

BY Phone & in Person

020 7520 1490 Mon–Sat: 12–8pm, Sun 12–7pm (Closed Bank Holidays) Opening hours may vary – please check the website for the most up-to-date information.

BY Post

Kings Place Box Office 90 York Way, London N1 9AG

Groups

Buy 8 or more tickets and save 20%. Group discounts are only available directly through the Box Office and exclude Online Savers.

Parking

NCP Car Park – Pancras Road. Visit www.ncp.co.uk or call 0845 050 7080 for further details.

access

Kings Place aims to be accessible to all, and the venue offers suitable seating for  wheelchair users. Please inform us of any access requirements when booking. There is an induction loop at the Box Office to assist those with hearing aids. An infrared system is installed in Halls One and Two, with hearing advancement headsets for audience members who do not use a hearing aid. Neck loops are available to use with hearing aids switched to  the ‘T’ position. All areas of Kings Place are  accessible to those with Guide & Hearing Dogs.

SUMMER 2012 SPECIAL OFFERS Available for the following events: Brahms Unwrapped Brodsky Quartet – The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich Inner Voices – The Music of Sibelius and David Matthews London Chamber Music Series Please check kingsplace.co.uk for additional offers.

kings place hall one ©  keith paisley

TICKETS

06 TICKETS


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April—June 2012

PlanNING YOUR

Week

PLANning YOUR WEEK 07

Weekly Focus  Wednesday/THURSDAY–Saturday each week A collaborative mix of artists, curators, organisations and producers presenting an exciting series of events

See Listings p54 for details or go to

www.kingsplace.co.uk

A NEATLY EFFECTIVE IDEA OF INVITING DIFFERENT MUSICIANS TO PLAN WEEKLY THEMED CONCERTS... THE GUARDIAN

THURSDAYS FRIDAYS

SATURDAYS SUNDAYS

CONTEMPORARY

COMEDY

JAZZ

CLASSICAL

MONDAYS

FOLK

MONDAYS

SPOKEN WORD

Regular NIGHTS


8 HIGHLIGHTS

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April—June 2012

CLASSICAL

La Nuova Musica with director David Bates (far right)

A trip to the underworld La Nuova Musica is one of Britain’s fastest-rising vocal ensembles. Director David Bates talks about its L’Orfeo project at Kings Place in June You started your career as a countertenor? Yes, I sang in many choirs and learnt a great deal from directors like Andrea Marcon, Marc Minkowski, Nicholas McGegan and Emmanuelle Haïm. Working with the Monteverdi Choir and Sir John Eliot Gardiner was a huge inspiration: La Nuova Musica shares that set-up, a small choir and instrumental group working closely together and feeding off each other. The name of your group has a special significance? Yes, when I was at the Scholar Cantorum in Basle studying with Andreas Schola, I explored Caccini’s treatise Le Nuove Musiche (1602). Instrumentalists in the early music field tend to be familiar with contemporary guides to playing style by Tartini and Geminiani, but singers are often ignorant of Caccini’s ideas, which tell us so much about how to execute Renaissance and early Baroque music, how to deliver it vocally and give an emotionally charged performance. I wanted to evangelise about his work.

What’s critical to your success? Ensuring we have sufficient rehearsal, which is very tough in the UK. European choirs and orchestras tend to have the luxury of shambolic first rehearsals and a gradual honing of the performance over several sessions. In this country we are expected to get it right first time, and the standard of sightreading is so high, we can. But musically it’s absolutely critical we have time to explore our repertoire, to let it seep in and to find depth. I fight tooth and nail for that. Why L’Orfeo? In many ways Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo is the first great operatic masterwork, and I felt it was important that our first opera as a group was the first opera! South African baritone William Berger will be a great soloist; he has a real interest in the singing style of this period. We’ll also be joined by the six trombones of Il Nuovo Chiaroscuro, a terrific young outfit. Hopefully, this will be the first of a trilogy of Monteverdi operas at Kings Place.

HIGHLIGHTS You’ve recently been signed to the prestigious Harmonia Mundi label? Yes, it’s very exciting. We recorded Il pastor fido independently, and sent it to Robina Young of Harmonia Mundi USA. She’s issuing it early in 2012 and our next recording will feature both Vivaldi’s and Handel’s setting of Dixit Dominus: that’s a real test as the works are so wellknown, we have to say something new, and fill the performance with detail and passion. Rosemary Joshua will be joining you for one of your events? I met Rosemary when I was assisting on an opera in Toulouse. We got on famously: she’s a wonderful artist, as well as a brilliant interpreter and linguist. We’re thrilled that she’ll be singing Mad Songs and Laments for us, in a further exploration of the heady, sensual world of Monteverdi and his English contemporaries John Blow and Purcell.’

La Nuova Musica: A Deeper Tyde 21–23 June. See Listings pp74–75 for details

I fight tooth and nail for rehearsals. It’s very tough in the UK to get time to explore the music in depth


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CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS 18–21 APRIL

Brahms Unwrapped

Charles Owen & Katya Apekisheva pianos (18 Apr) Jeffrey Siegel piano (19 Apr) Philip Dukes viola & Katya Apekisheva piano (20 Apr) Maxim Rysanov viola & Principal Players of Aurora Orch. (21 Apr)

26–29 APRIL

The Music Diaries of Shostakovich Brodsky Qt play the complete Shostakovich quartets + Preludes & Fugues and Piano Quintet with Jenny Lin piano (26 Apr)

3–5 May

Inner Voices: David Matthews’ Sibelius Kreutzer Quartet (3 May) Sara Trickey violin & Daniel Tong piano (4 May) Laura Mikkola piano (5 May) English Chamber Orchestra Paul Watkins conductor UK premiere of Kuolema (5 May)

16–19 MAY

Tchaikovsky: The Romantic Genius Martino Tirimo (16 May) Amar Quartet (18 May) Rosamunde Trio (19 May)

La Nuova Musica © Ash Mills | Pyotr Tchaikovsky © Alamy | Martino Tirimo © Francesco Tirimo | Laurence Cummings © Sheila Rock

30 MAY–2 JUNE

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

April—June 2012

Russian Season

Tchaikovsky

Tchaikovsky may be known for his epic symphonic works, but his chamber music holds secret delights, argues pianist Martino Tirimo, who curates a sparkling series this May ‘You so rarely hear Tchaikovsky’s piano and chamber music – I want to present this more intimate side of his character,’ says Martino Tirimo, who opens his series with The Seasons, twelve glorious miniatures penned for a monthly periodical to represent the months – just as Dickens penned his novels at that time. ‘Biographers have slated these lovely pieces, saying they were “churned out in haste”, which upsets me greatly! Tchaikovsky was one of the greatest melodists of all time, as The Song of the Lark, Harvest Song and The Snowdrop all prove, while Troika, the sleigh ride, is a masterpiece. You can see how he was attracted to Schumann’s imaginary world.’ He’s also playing Mikhail Pletnev’s piano arrangement of The Nutcracker: ‘Taneyev made a workable but disappointing version, but Pletnev succeeds in bringing out the ballet’s essence,

its magical quality. He’s so sensitive to sonority, to pianistic possibilities, it sparkles.’ The Amar Quartet will present the lyrical String Quartets 1 & 3, while Tirimo’s own Rosamunde Trio take on the epic Trio, Op. 50: ‘This is truly a piano concerto! It’s an outpouring of nostalgia and pain at the loss of his friend Rubinstein. It’s written on a huge scale, and is a cathartic experience to play. The variations include a mazurka, a waltz, a fugue, a musical box – the lot!’ Cellist Daniel Veis will join him in the final concert for the Rococo Variations: ‘I first encountered Daniel performing these Variations and was so impressed we started working together, so it’s a special piece for us.’

Martino Tirimo

Tchaikovsky Festival with Martino Tirimo 16–19 May See Listings pp64–65 for details

Brahms Unwrapped

Jeffrey Siegel piano (30 May) Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes piano (31 May – 1 Jun) String/Piano Quartets

A Right Royal Spread

4 & 5 JUNE

The Diamond Jubilee

English String Serenades (4 Jun) The Triumphs of Oriana & A Garland for the Queen (5 Jun)

14–16 JUNE

Royal Academy of Music

Brahms Songs (14 Jun); Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet & Schubert’s Octet (15 Jun) and The Grand English Baroque (16 Jun)

21–23 JUNE

‘A Deeper Tyde’ with La Nuova Musica

Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo with William Berger (21 & 23 Jun) Mad Songs and Laments with Rosemary Joshua (22 Jun)

SUNDAYS, 6.30 pm HALL ONE 15 APRIL

Aquinas Piano Trio

Volkmar Andreae 50th Anniversary Concert

22 APRIL

Allegri Quartet The Complete Beethoven Quartets 7

Catch the festive spirit with the Royal Academy of Music’s concerts in June, which include The Grand English Baroque featuring soprano Rhiannon Llewellyn and mezzo Sarah Shorter in rousing arias form Handel’s Scipione and Sosarme, and Arne’s inimitable ‘Rule, Britannia’, alongside Boyce’s brilliant Symphony in D and Purcell’s stately music from The Fairy Queen. The celebrated specialist Laurence Cummings conducts the Royal Academy’s crack Baroque Orchestra in this event (16 June) which is preceded by an evening of Brahms’s most intimate songs presented by the Royal Academy of Music Song Circle (14 June), and a delightful chamber music event by the award-winning Castalian Quartet (15 June), featuring Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet and Schubert’s charming Octet.

29 APRIL

Brodsky Quartet

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich – Final Concert

Brahms Unwrapped: The Royal Academy of Music  14–16 June See Listings pp72–73 for details

Laurence Cummings

9


10 HIGHLIGHTS

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April—June 2012

Radical Dutch artist and ad designer Erik Kessels is coming to Kings Place to talk about ‘Advertising for People Who Don’t Like Advertising’. And he is one of them as Helen Wallace discovers Erik Kessels is something of a cult figure in artistic circles. He trained as an art director and graphic designer before moving into the commercial world of advertising, where he sought to overturn as many ingrained assumptions as he could. He has a parallel role as a publisher of playfully provocative image books (KesselsKramer Publishing), which include a series of found amateur photos edited into startling histories, conceptual books like American Zoo,

picturing the animals US presidents most closely resemble, and the hilarious Bad Food Gone Worse that features deteriorating restaurant meal photos. Kessels explained his idiosyncratic approach in a recent interview for Conscientious Extended: ‘I hated a lot of work in advertising because the images are like a big cliché, they are full of stereotypes. That’s why fifteen years ago we started our own agency. We felt a

ONE THING HE TRIES TO INSIST ON – IS IMPERFECTION

strong need to change that. Since then I have worked with a lot of photographers who never did a commercial job before. I try to put authentic work into campaigns, because authenticity and advertising – that has a little friction. It’s almost not possible.’ He has succeeded in straddling the worlds of graphic design, fine art, curating, film-making and advertising without losing his soul. One thing he tries to insist on is imperfection: ‘And that’s very important in my advertising work because when I make a campaign and I need a photograph of somebody, I try to get a photograph where that person has maybe a big pimple or spot somewhere, and I don’t retouch it. For a commercial client I try to leave it. That’s the authenticity I’m looking for.’ In 2011 Kessels filled the Foam Gallery in Amsterdam with print-outs of all the photos uploaded on Flickr in a 24-hour period. ‘We’re exposed to an overload of images nowadays,’ says Kessels. ‘This glut is in large part the result of image-sharing sites like Flickr, networking sites like Facebook, and picture-based search engines… By printing all these images, I visualise the feeling of drowning in representations of other people’s experiences.’ He’s also asking fundamental questions about the impact images can still have on a society suffering from photo fatigue. For a dose of radical thinking on the power of the image, Kessels is your man.

Words on Monday – Erik Kessels: Advertising for People Who Don’t Like Advertising 28 May Curated by Laurence King Publishing See Listings p67 for details

SPOKEN WORD

The Anti-Ad Man

HIGHLIGHTS


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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

April—June 2012

The Long Echoes of Birdsong Words on Monday boasts a glittering array of guests this season, including Sebastian Faulks, Fiona Shaw and Patricia Routledge

Erik Kessels © Mark Eckard | Sebastian Faulks © Deborah Feingold | Patricia Routledge © John Timber

Sebastian Faulks

some People think film or stage versions represent a higher form of life towards which a book should labour. I think the book’s the thing…

Patricia Routledge

It was the First World War epic that made Faulks’s name, and became the opening novel in his French trilogy (the other two being The Girl at the Lion d’Or and Charlotte Gray). Birdsong is a passionate, complex love story set amidst the cataclysmic events of the early 20th century and has found a resonance with readers of all generations. With more than 5 million sales worldwide, and voted the 13th most popular book in Britian by the BBC’s Big Read, pipping Great Expectations and Rebecca, Birdsong has become a literary introduction to the First World War for pupils taking their GCSEs just as Wilfred Owen’s poetry was for an earlier generation. From the moment it hit the headlines in 1993, it seemed destined to become a movie, but, despite 15 years in development, no film was made. Instead, there was a small-scale theatre production in the West End in 2010, and this January a lavishly-made two-part BBC1 drama scripted by Abi Morgan. Faulks, who comes to discuss the book and its afterlife with Professor John Mullan at Kings Place, has never seen adaptation as the goal: ‘I long ago became resigned to the fact that it was not going to happen and was in many ways relieved, as it would have been a difficult film to make well. Some people think film or stage versions represent a higher form of life towards which a book should labour. I think the book’s the thing... But if you have enjoyed a book there is a pleasure in seeing it in another form; it can ask fascinating questions about the imagination – that of both writer and reader.’ Other guests in our Words on Monday series this season include two formidable women who both straddle the world of music and theatre. Fiona Shaw is one of our finest classical actresses, though better-known by the younger generation as the ghastly Mrs Petunia Dursley from the Harry Potter films. More recently she has directed two operas for English National Opera, Vaughan Williams’s Riders to the Sea and Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro. Patricia Routledge trained as a singer as well as an actress, and had great success in musicals on both sides of the Atlantic before her days of Hyacinth Bucket in Keeping Up Appearances. In this event broadcaster and critic Edward Seckerson plans to uncover her musical life, whose highlights include Carousel, Candide and Darling of the Day.

MONDAYS, 7pm – HALL ONE

Words on Monday: Patricia Routledge 23 April, Fiona Shaw 21 May, Sebastian Faulks 25 June See Listings p60, p66 and p75 for details

2 JULY

2 APRIL

Picador: 40th-anniversary ‘Something Old, Something New’

16 APRIL

Robert Browning and the Pied Piper 23 APRIL

Patricia Routledge: Facing the Music In conversation with Edward Seckerson

30 APRIL

PhotoVoice Lecture Series: Peter Marlow 14 MAY

Carol Ann Duffy & Friends 21 MAY

An Audience with Fiona Shaw In conversation with Edward Seckerson

28 MAY

Erik Kessels ‘Advertising for People Who Don’t Like Advertising’ 11 JUNE

Poetry Gymnastics 18 JUNE

Politics Live with Steve Richards & Guests 25 JUNE

Guardian Review Book Club with Sebastian Faulks Shakespeare’s Poetry

11


12 HIGHLIGHTS

April—June 2012

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

FOLK HIGHLIGHTS The first time I came to Japan I performed on a moving train Who are your major influences? Early on it was Joni Mitchell, Kate Bush, Neil Young. Then I moved to Bristol and met other musicians like Rozi Plain and we had a sort of collective. Then I met Wig Smith and we formed a duo called The Hand. I first came to Japan about four years ago and found it all so exciting and inspiring.

Tales of the unexpected Colin Irwin meets idiosyncratic folk musician Rachael Dadd, who divides her time between Britain and Japan and comes to perform at Kings Place in June Rachael Dadd is not your usual singersongwriter. Hailing from the rural Surrey market town of Farnham, the intrepid traveller now splits her year between England and Japan, which may explain the unusual hybrid of intriguing flavours in her music, which conforms to no easy classification. Her instrumentation, for one, is unorthodox – she plays everything from clarinet to ukulele, banjo, organ and guitar, while her husband Ichi invariably accompanies her at gigs on trumpet, glockenspiel and anything else he can get his hands on. Her DIY ethos is as heartwarming as it’s rare, and the one thing we can confidently expect from Rachael’s appearance at Kings Place is, well, the unexpected…

People always have trouble describing your music – how would you describe it? I suppose the word that springs to mind is ‘folk’, but I have trouble myself describing what folk music is. The immediate reaction of a lot of people to that word is artists from America in the 1960s and ’70s singing protest songs with guitars. But I think of folk as music by the people for the people from a time long before CDs, when people just played music for one another. I’m trying to find that music in Japan. You’ve been called an ‘experimental folk multi-instrumentalist’… Yes, I quite like that. It gives the idea of a broad spectrum, it’s quite open and gives me a free rein.

How has Japan affected you musically? The pentatonic scale is seeping into my subconscious! I’m quite immersed in the underground scene which accepts all genres, so I hear so many different styles. I want to learn to play the shamisen, which is a traditional threestringed Japanese folk instrument. What sort of gigs do you play in Japan? All sorts. Small places. Big places. Galleries. Shops. Garden centres. The first time I came to Japan I played on a moving train along the coast. Is it weird commuting between Japan and Britain? No, I like having two lives. We spend the winter in Japan and then escape the summer heatwave playing gigs in England, which is really nice. This summer I’m planning a bicycle tour with a troupe of musicians with tents on a trailer playing pubs and countryside venues.

Folk Union: Rachael Dadd Friday 22 June See Listings p75 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

April—June 2012

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

THE EPSTEIN Colin Irwin reports on remarkable young British band, The Epstein, who’ll play a rare, intimate gig at Kings Place in May

FRIDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 13 APRIL

The Long Notes 20 APRIL

Jim Moray 27 APRIL

Adrian Crowley with Gill Sandell 4 MAY

Tom McConville with David Newey 11 MAY

The Epstein + Hannah Aldridge 18 MAY

Steven Finn 25 MAY

Issy & David Emeney with Kate Riaz 1 JUNE The Epstein © Richard Neuberg | Adrian Crowley © Dara Munnis | Rachael Dadd © Supplied Photo

We Aeronauts

The impressive surge of young British bands adopting intriguing elements of folk music to flavour their own personal style continues apace with The Epstein, who are fast developing into one of the most intelligent and exciting groups among the new wave. Not, of course, that they are wet behind the ears or attempting to jump on any perceived bandwagon. Indeed, The Epstein have come a long way, honing their craft and expanding their own highly individual identity since singer and main songwriter Olly Wills first started introducing The Epstein concept at open mic nights in the back rooms of pubs in Oxford. The name was adopted somewhere along the journey in tribute not – as most imagine – to the former Beatles manager Brian Epstein but to the Bristol University professor who discovered, documented and gave his name to the Epstein-Barr virus suffered by one of the band’s early members. They subsequently emerged as an extraordinarily accomplished and powerful trio, built around Olly Wills, keyboard

8 JUNE

Also part of Songlines Encounters

Sam Lee & Friends 15 JUNE

Damien O’Kane 22 JUNE

Rachael Dadd

Adrian Crowley

They’ve evolved into a mature band without sacrificing their soulful, rootsy edge

player Sebastian Reynolds and electric guitarist Jon Berry, and evolving dramatically from their modest folksie-country beginnings into a mature and rounded band with a much more expansive and ambitious sound. That they’ve done it without sacrificing the soulful, rootsy edge that gave them such a distinctive character in the first place speaks volumes. Ask them for their influences and they come up with names as wide-ranging as Leonard Cohen, Nick Cave, African blues and Weather Report (indeed, they named their own record label Zawinul after Weather Report’s experimentalist keyboard player Joe Zawinul). Which all may go some way to explaining their compellingly elusive and disparate style that’s hardened over the last couple of years as they’ve toured regularly around Britain and Europe, becoming festival circuit favourites.

Their 2008 album Last Of The Charanguistas won the accolade of Editor’s Choice in Rolling Stone, but they’ve grown majestically since then and their Kings Place show is an enticing opportunity to hear the new material they’ve been painstakingly working on over the last year to spearhead their assault on 2012. ‘The new material is about moving on, about people leaving, about different paths and about moments and how they shape the memories traced in these songs,’ say The Epstein. ‘It’s about how the smallest detail in a story can last longer than the larger surrounds…’ It’s also an increasingly rare chance to hear them in the intimate environment of Hall Two. The Epstein are a band on a mission…

Folk Union: The Epstein 11 May See Listings p64 for details

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14 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April–June 2012

JAZZ

Polaroid Express

HIGHLIGHTS

Dave Stapleton is proving a major producing talent as well as an exciting pianistcomposer, as his new work with Marius Neset shows.

Dave Stapleton brings Polaroid, a new suite for string quartet and jazz quartet – featuring a star in the making, Norwegian saxophonist Marius Neset – for its London premiere at The Base in May. Stapleton is a composer, pianist and a record producer: ‘I love to write and create music – whether it’s producing it, promoting it, or recording it’, he says. ‘I enjoy all the parts of that process.’ He started his first record label just two years out of college. Since 2008 he has been the coowner of and musical guiding spirit behind one of Europe’s most innovative small labels, Edition Records. Run on a tight budget, Edition produces a fraction of the output of larger imprints, but its quality and strong label identity have already seen it compared to ECM. As a composer, Stapleton is building a broad portfolio of commissions, remarkable for their depth of feeling, but also for powerful riffs and accessible melodic hooks. The Conway Suite (2005) for church organ and saxophone leant towards contemporary minimalism. Catching Sunlight (2007), with saxophone quartet, featured the expressive trumpeter Neil Yates. He wrote his first string quartet in 2009. Stapleton is an improvising pianist, but doesn’t consider himself a jazz musician: ‘I studied classical piano at the Royal Welsh College in Cardiff. I never formally studied jazz. I don’t play bebop. I don’t play standards’, but Keith Tippett did ‘open my ears to the improvised world’.

Polaroid marks a deliberate distancing from jazz, says Stapleton. It is a suite of movements with compositional threads going right through the piece. ‘The string quartet will take a major role’. Górecki and Shostakovich have influenced the spacious string writing, he says, ‘leaving room to improvise. I’m trying to blur that thing between improvised and composed.’ He sums up his activities with modesty: ‘I’m trying to build that 360-degree career of a creative musician.’ With his enviable consistency, not just of vision, but also of focus, Dave Stapleton is going further: he is actively reshaping expectations, and setting the agenda for adaptable, multi-skilled musicians of the future. Sebastian Scotney The Base: Dave Stapleton with Marius Neset  5 May See Listings pp63 for details

I’m trying to blur that thing between improvised and composed


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HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

April–June 2012

Partikel Accelerator

6 April

Deborah Brown sings The Great American Songbook + Guillermo Rozenthuler & Francesco Petreni

Sebastian Scotney welcomes a visit from Duncan Eagles’ much talked-about Partikel

Hall One 8pm

Dave Stapleton © Tim Dickeson / Edition Records | Partikel © Victoria Bennett | Jason Rebello © Melody and Ian McLaren

Google the phrase, ‘Monday night jam session’, and where will you land? Back in the 1940s, perhaps, in Harlem for the Big Night at Minton’s, with Parker, Gillespie and Monk? Er, no. Nearer home than that: the new Hideaway Club in Streatham, where the much talked-about house band for the regular weekly jam is Partikel, a saxophone/bass/drums trio led by Duncan Eagles, with Max Luthert and Eric Ford. This trio got going at another Monday night jam which Eagles used to run in Kingston, and where the saxophonist and his long-term friend and musical colleague, bassist Luthert, got to know drummer Eric Ford in 2007. Ford had returned from four years in Paris, where he had worked extensively in jazz/rock-fusion, but also with African musicians. This encounter provided the spur for Eagles to bring the three players together as Partikel. Fortified

Easter Piano Parade The Global Music Foundation’s Easter Festival boasts a stellar line-up of pianists

7 April

by all those regular Monday nights and by touring, the band have rapidly been making waves, notably at the 2011 Brecon Jazz Festival, where their loping grooves, intense dialogue and huge dynamic range caught the ear. The band’s second album, Cohesion (Whirlwind Recordings), released in January 2012, confirms the earlier promise. They’ve arrived. The Base: Partikel (Duncan Eagles, Max Luthert and Eric Ford) 14 April See Listings p57 for details

‘I love a piano, I love a piano. I love to hear somebody play ... I know a fine way to treat a Steinway...’ Judy Garland, Easter Parade, 1948. Easter Sunday’s concert (8 April) in Hall One brings a parade of no fewer than three pianists to a Steinway, during the Global Music Foundation’s Easter Jazz Workshop and Festival. Kit Downes, Mercury Prize 2010

finalist, will play a solo set. ‘Playing solo is about finding the direction of a narrative, and it has to happen quickly,’ says Downes. Another fine Londonbased pianist, Berklee-trained Frank Harrison, will be with his trio, which includes Davide Petrocca, a regular member of Monty Alexander’s trio. The third pianist is California-born Bruce Barth, whose keyboard mastery has been a feature of fourteen albums as leader or co-leader, and of the regular working and touring bands of Nat Adderley and Terence Blanchard. He’ll be making a rare London appearance. Other Easter weekend highlights include Kansas City-born singer Deborah Brown (6 April) and saxophonist Peter King’s rich-textured, rarelyperformed, Bartók-inspired suite Janus (7 April). SS

Stardust: Jazz Rainbow Trio featuring Jason Rebello Featuring favourite theme tunes from children’s films/ TV shows, including Ben 10, In the Night Garden, Scooby Doo, Spiderman, Thomas the Tank Engine, Harry Potter and more! Hall Two 1.30pm

Peter King and the Global Arts Ensemble + Jim Mullen & Jean Toussaint Quintet Hall One 8pm

Audiogold + threeforagirl Hall Two 10pm

8 April

Jazz at the Movies: The Talented Mr Ripley Hall Two 4pm

Frank Harrison Trio + Kit Downes (solo) + Bruce Barth Trio Hall One 8pm

9 April

Student Concert featuring student ensembles, jazz choir, samba group and more Hall Two 6pm

6–9 April Global Music Foundation Easter Festival  6–9 April See Listings pp55–57 for details

FREE Foyer Events throughout the Festival See Listings p55

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16 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April–June 2012

SATURDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 14 APRIL

Partikel: ‘Cohesion’

GREAT DANES CHECK IN…

21 APRIL

Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3 presents… Kit Downes

Hot Danish band Girls in Airports have a quirky approach to jazz, as Neil McKim discovers from saxophonist Lars Greve

28 APRIL

Empirical 5 MAY

Dave Stapleton

feat. Marius Neset, Dave Kane, Olavi Louhivuori & Brodowski Quartet

12 MAY

Girls in Airports 19 MAY

The Quentin Collins / Brandon Allen Quartet 26 MAY

Phronesis: Album Launch 2 JUNE

Abram Wilson: Philippa 9 JUNE

Also part of Songlines Encounters

Lauren Kinsella’s Thought-Fox featuring Soufian Saihi 16 JUNE

The Fini Bearman Group: Porgy and Bess Revisited 23 JUNE

Jack Davies Big Band

With one of the most intriguing names on the current jazz scene, Girls in Airports get their fair share of bizarre misunderstandings when, for example, their members show up at an airport. ‘We were in China,’ says saxophonist Lars Greve. ‘We had a girl standing at the airport waiting for us with a sign saying “Girls in Airports”. All the people were looking at her like she’s crazy!’ And it’s this playful, quirky outlook on life, combined with some seriously cuttingedge musicianship, which won this Copenhagen-based band a Danish Music Award in 2010. They’ve also caught the attention of London’s Spitz director Jane Glitre. She has organised the band’s first UK appearance in a Danish Embassysponsored ‘Spitz at Kings Place’ concert highlighting Denmark’s six-month Presidency of the European Union. Glitre picked them out from a sizeable list of bands: ‘I thought they were more Spitzy… slightly offbeat!’ she says. The Spitz itself, which began life as the renowned jazz club in Spitalfields, now promotes jazz across the capital. Its own top-form Jazz Collective has been a feature at Kings Place and it

they come out of the city’s experimental underground scene has booked the Quentin Collins/ Brandon Allen Quartet as a followup concert to Girls In Airports. With two albums under its belt, and Migration just released, Girls In Airports continue to develop shimmering soundscapes. These draw on far-flung worldwide influences such as Moroccan Sufi trance-like percussion, or a Burmese website of random collected sounds (or ‘sublime frequencies’). Even their gigs adapt to the surroundings. ‘We make up a new set-list for each gig,’ says Greve. ‘We go to the venue and figure out who’s going to be listening and make it for that day’. Copenhagen boasts a long jazz heritage, harking back to Stan Getz and the Jazzhus Montmartre, but it’s the more

experimental underground scene found in Christiania’s Børneteater (children’s theatre) or on the city’s lively festival circuit, that forms this band’s backdrop. The band – which also includes saxophonist (and founder) Martin Stender, along with Mathias Holm on keyboards, Mads Forsby on drums, and Victor Dybbroe on percussion – can count Brit-jazz maverick academic Django Bates as a key influence. He taught them at Copenhagen’s Rhythmic Music Conservatory, and has said ‘This is the post-complexity generation. They make music pure and simple, with plenty of emotion, but no excess of baggage.’ Remaining, of course, enigmatic about their name, the band insist that every track ‘tells a story’. When Girls in Airports check in at Kings Place they should prove to be extremely interesting arrivals.

Spitz at Kings Place: Girls in Airports 12 May Quentin Collins/ Brandon Allen Quartet 19 May See Listings p64 and p65 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS

April–June 2012

The Complete Guide to Kings Place Comedy duo Tom Reynolds and Tim Daniels, famous for their popular comedy podcasts The Complete Guide to Everything, turn their attention to an unsuspecting Kings Place, where they’ll appear in April, along with the squirrels... We’ve established a reputation as the definitive source for literally all of the world’s information. In April of 2011 we performed one show at Kings Place on a sleepy Sunday evening, making us experts on everything about the complex. We’ve compiled our favourite inside tips and fun facts about Kings Place below:

 The oak veneer inside Hall One has come from the one 500 year-old German oak, which might explain the abundance of birds and squirrels throughout the theatre.

THURSDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 5 APRIL

Tim Key & Tom Basden FREEZE!

12 APRIL

Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds: The Complete Guide to Everything – Live! SOLD OUT Additional Show: 11 April

3 MAY GIRLS IN AIRPORTS © SUPPLIED PHOTO | ILLUSTRATION © MATT HERRING

Impropera’s Mayday Mayhem

17 MAY WitTank

31 MAY

An Audience with Shazia Mirza & Joy Carter

14 JUNE

Impropera’s Sports Day

21 JUNE

Really Lovely Comedy presents…

 Elvis Presley recorded his 1975 Live From Las Vegas special in Hall One of Kings Place.  Kings Place is also famous for providing a number of “Super Saver Seats” for only £9.50 at many events. The catch? One random Super Saver Seat has a very high voltage electrical current

running through it for no obvious reason. But hey, you save £3.

 The Rotunda Bar is the perfect place to enjoy a pre- or post-event cocktail in a luxurious setting. It should be noted, however, that the bartenders will stop serving you after your 12th drink, even if you’ve explained to them that you’re an American internet podcaster.  Any seasoned Kings Place patron will surely recommend you to visit the second-storey men’s lavatory, home to an extensive all-you-can-eat ice cream sundae bar.

 Comedians performing at Kings Place should take note that they will share a common backstage area where they can expect to be bullied, teased and harassed both physically and mentally by the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment.

HIGHLIGHTS COMEDY

 According to their website, not only is Kings Place a concert hall, it also boasts state-ofthe-art office facilities that are home to some of London’s most prestigious companies, including England’s largest glue manufacturing operation. Management kindly requests that visitors refrain from loud complaints about the overwhelming stench of rotting horse carcasses.  The boats around the back are for performer use, no need to ask before taking one out for a spin.  Kings Place sits across the water from the London Canal Museum which is, improbably, even more boring than it sounds.  Looking for a fun yet sensible night out with the missus? The escalators in the atrium can be used free of charge and run all night. So take it from us, whether you’re taking in a classical orchestra performance in Hall One, an up-and-coming comedy act in Hall Two or the nightly Lethal Weapon 2 Stunt Show out back on Regent’s Canal, you’ll find that Kings Place is London’s premiere cultural hub. Off with their Heads: The Complete Guide to Everything 11 April See Listings p57 for details

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18 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April—June 2012

century sensibilities. Founder, in 2001, of The New Bach Players ensemble, with whom he has documented Bach’s complete keyboard concerto cycle, Tristano has also recorded the composer’s Goldberg Variations and French Suites. In stark contrast, he has tackled Berio’s complete piano works and collaborated with electronic/techno artists such as Murcof, Carl Craig and producer Moritz von Oswald. The latter helps add a processed shimmer to much of the exquisitely rendered bachCage, Tristano uniting the sonic universes of Bach’s ornate Menuet II and Cage’s proto-ambient In a Landscape, for example. Cage, an American influenced by Eastern philosophy, infamous for using ‘prepared’ pianos, with objects wedged between the strings, and chance as a compositional tool (and for his 1952 ‘silent’ composition, 4’33”), already has much in common with Bach, Tristano insists. ‘They share several notable compositional processes, such as mathematical layout of rhythmic patterns and overall rhythmic structure… and a kind of abstract scoring. They’re both determined to capture music in written form.’ Tristano includes his own pieces alongside these Meisterwerke.

‘I think of bachCage as a sound installation. I designed the set list just like a curator choosing paintings and themes for an exhibition… My compositions function as illustrations.’ He also admits to a genuine feeling of kinship with both Bach and Cage. ‘They were both men of their time – true contemporary figures.’ For his Out Hear performance, Tristano will revisit works from bachCage, including live electronic processing. This season will also include a visit from British group ensemblebash, who will essay three of Cage’s 1940s percussion pieces, including Third Construction and Credo in US, written in the wake of the Pearl Harbour attack, featuring prepared piano, radio samples and tin cans. In addition, Switzerland’s We Spoke: New Music Company will gather round their signature onstage table to perform Cage’s Living Room Music, a 1940 quartet piece composed for instruments derived from the everyday domestic environment.

Out Hear: We Spoke: Table 16 April ensemblebash@20 part 2: Cage@100 7 May Francesco Tristano: bachCage 2.0 28 May See Listings p58, p64 and p67

CONTEMPORARY

They are not the most obvious bedfellows, but JS Bach and John Cage have more in common than their revered places in the classical music pantheon. Certainly that’s the belief of tousle-haired Wunderkind pianist Francesco Tristano, whose latest album, bachCage (DG), places solo keyboard works by the two maestros alongside one another in a bold conflation of decorous partita and demanding avant-garde etude. A rising star of the European concert circuit, Luxembourgian Tristano is well placed to locate a synergy between 18th- and 20th-

HIGHLIGHTS i think of ‘bachcage’ as a sound installation

THE ART OF CAGE David Sheppard talked to pianist Francesco Tristano about mixing John Cage with JS Bach-part of an intriguing Cage strand in Out Hear this season.


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

April—June 2012

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

work, and every day there were two shows. I wanted to hear the music I loved, and to bring people over who I’d met in other parts of the world. I’ve curated sound art in a museum in Holon, and put on shows in Jerusalem as well. I’ve enjoyed the spontaneous nature of planning – everything in the classical world is planned so far ahead – and the sense of urgency. We’ve learned to make do with very little: there’s a different atmosphere, and an audience coming with different expectations, much rowdier – there’s nothing sterile about it. How would you describe this side of your music? Mines, which we’ll perform for Out Hear, combines two classically trained violinists with a drummer from a rock background. It’s improvised music, not jazz: we’re searching for a common language, we’re never limited to one style, it’s an ongoing process of research. In Wolff’s piece Stones, we all play on stones, so you get the instrumental baggage out of the way and open the way to free music-making.

Francesco Tristano © Aymeric Giraudel | John Cage © AF Archive / Alamy | Ilan Volkov © Supplied Photo

The quality of Hall Two’s piano is critical – it’s not easy to find a good piano on which to improvise in London!

High-Voltage Volkov Conductor Ilan Volkov makes an appearance at Out Hear in April, playing to a very different set of rules, as Helen Wallace discovers

The young Israeli conductor Ilan Volkov is best known in the UK as the man who galvanised the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, and has gone on to make waves as the Music Director of the Iceland SO. In fact, he lives a double life as a violinistic free improviser, underground impresario and mover and shaker on the Tel Aviv contemporary scene. This spring he makes a rare London appearance as an instrumentalist in Gold Mines with a group including his partner Maya Dunietz and John Tilbury, playing Feldman, Christian Wolff and their own improvisations. When did you become involved in the free improvisation scene? About seven years ago I helped to start up a club in Tel Aviv called Levontine 7. It was a private project to stage small-scale experimental

The legendary pianist John Tilbury is joining you for the Feldman piano duos... Yes, it’s an honour to perform with him, he’s such a good listener, he makes a huge impact on everyone. He has this inner stillness, and a unique way of creating space around his playing which makes everyone listen, it’s so subtle. What does Hall Two offer you? The quality of the piano is critical – it’s not easy to find a good piano on which to improvise in London! You don’t find that in a venue like Café OTO, for example – and when you have an artist with the amazing touch of John Tilbury, it’s vital. How do your two different music worlds feed each other? They are two sides of creativity: instead of being a medium for someone else’s thoughts, when I improvise I’m expressing another side of my mind, playing with another set of rules, the process is as important as the result. I’m trying to find a way of bringing the two sides of my work together when I’m on tour. Recently I did a small show when I was touring in Korea and met a whole lot of different people. I’d say this area of my music is as important as my conducting.

Out Hear: Gold Mines  30 April curated by Ilan Volkov See Listings p62 for further details

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20 HIGHLIGHTS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April—June 2012

MONDAYS, 8pm – HALL TWO 2 APRIL

Jamie Bissmire, Leon Michener & Guests: Crossing the Rubicon 16 APRIL

23 APRIL

Itinerant Duo

30 APRIL

Cellist Emmanuelle Bertrand and pianist Pascal Amoyel have both worked intimately with some of France’s greatest composers, as their May programme for Out Hear reveals

Aisha Orazbayeva: The Traces of Sound Ilan Volkov & Guests: Gold Mines (with pre-concert talk at 6pm)

7 MAY

ensemblebash@20 part 2: Cage@100 14 MAY

Percussions Claviers de Lyon: Striking Visions 21 MAY

Emmanuelle Bertrand (cello) with Pascal Amoyel (piano) 28 MAY

Francesco Tristano: bachCage 2.0 11 JUNE

Apartment House: Facing Beauty 18 JUNE

Mark Knoop (piano): Artificial Environments 25 JUNE

Jane Chapman: A Shimmering Microcosm

Emmanuelle Bertrand and Pascal Amoyel make up no ordinary classical duo: Emmanuelle has premiered works by Dutilleux, Bacri and Berio, while Amoyel became so involved in their drama Block 15 about the musicians of Auschwitz, he composed a piece himself, Itinérance, with which Emmanuelle has just won France’s Disc of the Year. Theirs is an intensely creative partnership, as Amoyel admits: ‘We are very lucky to know each other, as we share the same objective – to have no limits! We will go as far as we both can towards our goal.’ Their Out Hear programme in May includes Itinérance, and also reflects their close relationship with two particular composers, Henri Dutilleux and Olivier Greif. Emmanuelle encountered the former when very young. ‘I immediately fell in love with his sound collages, his poetry, his sense of limitless possibility on the instrument. I met

For me GrEif is a real genius, his music defies category him as a student and he gave me wonderful advice: he said, “You have the spirit, so go where it takes you”. In some ways he gave me the keys to interpretation. I feel so grateful for his generosity and humility.’ She is still in touch with the composer, now 94, and will play his elegant Trois Strophes sur le nom de Sacher. Dutilleux has described her performance as ‘a revelation’. She’ll also be playing Sonate de Requiem by Greif (1950–2000), a figure still little known in the UK. Amoyel takes up his story: ‘Greif’s parents were both in Auschwitz and that overshadowed his

life and work, which is deathobsessed. For me he was a real genius, his music defies category. Emmanuelle will be playing the Sonate de Requiem, a homage to his mother, which tracks the transition of the soul from life to death, but is always filled with light. I’ll be performing his Sonata No. 22, a homage to his father, which takes in 17th-century dance forms and the inspiration of Lou Reed. His quotations are not anecdotal or superficial: he was interested in the silence into which the theme was born. I met him in 1997 and had the privilege to work with him. He died suddenly at his piano; it was a great loss to French music.’ This rare visit by Bertrand and Amoyel is just one of the events promoted by Diaphonique, who are also supporting the highoctane Percussions Claviers de Lyon, in a programme of Gavin Bryars, Gabriela Ortiz, Thierry Pécou and François Narboni, who have all been composersin-residence for the radical percussion ensemble based at the Hameçon in Lyon.

Out Hear: Percussions Claviers de Lyon: Striking Visions 14 May Emmanuelle Bertrand and Pascal Amoyel 21 May See Listings p65 and p66 for details

Emmanuelle Bertrand and Pascal Amoyel © Jean Philippe Voidet | TIm MINCHIN © James Penlidis

We Spoke: Table


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

April—June 2012

HIGHLIGHTS contemporary

Tim’s a consummate musician, and he has the timing. I think we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg so far

Not So Silent SPORTING Special Philip Sheppard’s Sunday afternoon spontaneous musicand-movie events have been a runaway success. No wonder Tim Minchin wanted to join them for a sporting special

The films only get chosen the night before, and the musicians neither see them nor rehearse before launching into a spontaneous film score together. It may sound like a recipe for chaos, but it’s proved a sell-out success, attracting ‘the most diverse audience I’ve encountered. Four-year-olds, young couples and 80-year-olds all finding it funny,’ says cellist-composer Philip Sheppard, the brains behind Not So Silent Movies. Of course, it relies on musicians of a very particular calibre, who can improvise with anything thrown at them and respond to special guests: ‘We had Roger Eno with us before Christmas: he was spectacular, it sounded like Brahms one moment and then turned into jazz funk. You get to know musicians instantly by encountering them like this, and they are really keen to come – composers, in particular, work so much alone, they want to team up. When I contacted film composer Stephen Warbeck he was, like, “I’ll be there!” and Tim Minchin immediately saw the point of it.’ Minchin, currently Artist-in-Residence at Kings Place and known most widely for his comedy shows and for writing

the musical Matilda, has a background in composing for film and theatre: ‘When it comes to what Tim is capable of, I think we’ve only seen the tip of the iceberg so far. He’s a consummate musician, unfettered by formal training. He’s been a music director, he’s got the comedic timing – and he’s incredibly modest. I can’t wait to work with him.’ He’ll be joining the NSSM Sporting Special on 29 June, in Hall One, for which, exceptionally, there’s one preplanned item: ‘The main feature will be Buster Keaton’s hilarious film College, in which he tries every track and field event and fails miserably at all of them. It’ll be an antidote to all that physical prowess on show this summer!’ For the other editions of NSSM, Sheppard will be spotlighting some of the musicians in the core band, who all ‘live double lives, like most good musicians these days’. There’s steel guitarist Mark Neary, star of Noel Gallagher’s latest album, harpist Julia Thornton, who is percussionist for Roxy Music, and classical violinist Elspeth Hanson, who also forms part of the Bond line-up. ‘These shows are so stimulating, it’s like the equivalent of having six espressos! I rush home afterwards and want to compose. It’s the musical adolescence I never had, and if the audience enjoys it, we’ll keep going.’

Not So Silent Movies Special Edition featuring Tim Minchin Friday 29 June 7.30pm Hall One See Listings p75 for details Not So Silent Movies Sunday 3pm; 13 May See Listings p64 for details

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April—June 2012

ART HIGHLIGHTS

Lorraine Robbins Beast 43 Plaster and Paint Below: Lynn Chadwick Stretching Beast Welded Stainless Steel

strange beasts A new generation of young artists respond to the work of celebrated sculptor Lynn Chadwick at a Pangolin show opening in May

Daniel Sparkes Thorpham’s Grunt Mixed media

artists love boundaries because they love to smash them down LORRAINE ROBBINS Marcus Harvey


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April—June 2012

Ralph Macartney Pyro-Biro II (Negative) C-Type Print

ART HIGHLIGHTS 14 March – 5 May Pangolin London

Two in One: Charlotte Mayer and Almuth Tebbenhoff 30 March – 20 April Kings Place Gallery

abstract critical Newcomer Award 27 April – 22 June Kings Place Gallery

PHOTOS © PANGOLIN LONDON / STEVE RUSSELL

The Mechanical Hand

An ant farm, a sand pit, hairy creatures, films in which time is stretched to breaking point, and a woman with a box of dog biscuits on her head. All these new pieces, inspired by the work of sculptor Lynn Chadwick, will be on show at Pangolin in May. Strange Beasts was initiated by Jane Buck and Claude Koenig in 2011 at Pangolin Editions as a way of connecting the Gloucestershire foundry with Stroud’s vibrant local art scene. Artist Lorraine Robbins, who once worked in their wax department and now lectures at Stroud Art College, was asked to curate an exhibition. Having always been intrigued by the glimpses of Chadwick’s sculptures she caught when working at the foundry, she gathered a small group of artists to respond to his work, for so long identified with Pangolin Editions. Her cue was the 60th anniversary of the Festival of Britain, at which the largely self-taught young Chadwick showed the striking mobiles and sculptures which launched his career. For Lorraine, the title Strange Beasts does not refer to his own animal pieces or the curious artworks that resulted but to the artists themselves: ‘Each artist challenged the brief in their own way… artists love boundaries because they love to smash them down.’ Chadwick’s use of the triangle and prism is legendary, and for Gavin McClafferty this was a starting point. Seeking to create a dialogue between ‘his current interest in the possibilities of 3D computer modelling and methods that Chadwick might have found familiar’,

McClafferty redefined the surface of a rock as a series of triangles. For Ralph Macartney, it was the ‘double time of drawing’ in Chadwick’s Teddy Boy and Girl that provoked him to explore his own methods of drawing, its trace and residue. Robbins herself had always found Chadwick’s Beast VII from 1956 menacing, ‘a powerful, thrusting, dangerous beast, an animal devoid of sentimentality’. She confronted its maleness with a subversive female sculpture of her own: ‘Beast 43 started as a desire to physically become Chadwick’s beast.’ She deliberately wore triangular bra and g-string as a distorted echo of the hard, geometric shapes in Chadwick’s work. Daniel Sparkes, who Robbins feels is spiritually most closely aligned to Chadwick, was also attracted to a confrontational creature, this time Miniature Lion IV (1986), which he answers with an extraordinary bewigged animal carrying a cannon, the mythical Thorpham’s Grunt. Summing up the project, Lorraine Robbins comments: ‘I hope this exhibition shows that Lynn Chadwick’s legacy is not a lesson to be learned or a heritage to be hermetically preserved but a body of vital work to be enjoyed and to inspire further generations of artists.’

Charles Avery Untitled 4

25 May – 16 June Pangolin London

Strange Beasts: Lynn Chadwick and the New Generation

TALKING ART 2 APRIL

Two in One

16 APRIL

Shakespeare – A True Portrait with Dr Gail Nina Anderson

21 MAY

Edvard Munch and The Scream with Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

11 JUNE

Gold Silver Bronze

Pangolin London: Strange Beasts 25 May – 16 June See Listings p76 for details

18 JUNE

Matisse with Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

HIGHLIGHTS ART

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April—June 2012

RISE OF THE URBAN WEDDINg With Kings Place now licensed to hold weddings, Lucie Greene looks at the trend for metropolitan nuptials, navy blue icing, gritty street photography – and herbs in the bouquets

Cate and Ewan Brown were faced with a familiar dilemma when planning their wedding last autumn: Town, or Country? ‘Most people picture grand country estates when they imagine getting married but the more we thought about it, the more we thought London seemed more exciting,’ says Cate. ‘We’re both Londoners and we wanted the wedding to reflect who we are. We also had friends who would be travelling from different corners of the country, so it had to be easily accessible.’ They opted for Kings Place, King’s Cross’s thriving canal-side office block-cum-arts centre,

which has recently acquired a licence as a wedding venue. ‘The first thing that strikes you when you walk in is the light,’ says Cate. ‘The building is very modern, but it has a great sense of place. You have the best of both worlds because it’s right in the heart of London, but step inside and it’s peaceful, and when lights flicker over the canal it’s just magical.’ She added: ‘We also liked the fact it had an art gallery which was interesting for guests to explore.’ Cate and Ewan are one of many couples turning to cities for their wedding, reaping the benefits of dramatic urban landscapes, abundant services

HIGHLIGHTS and easy access. ‘We’ve seen a big increase in the past 6–8 months,’ says Sach Sing, owner of wedding cake specialists Genuine Cakes. ‘People are waking up to the convenience, there’s also more awareness of the great venues in London. They’re thinking outside the box more.’ ‘They want to get married in venues closer to home,’ adds Kathryn Williams, Wedding manager at Kings Place. ‘Traditional venues can be old and stuffy. People want uniqueness and London has that.’ ‘Urban weddings are definitely on the increase,’ agrees Jade Beer, editor of Brides magazine. ‘We’re

Venues here are also less fixed than country hotels, which seem to limit you to set packages only


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being asked more to help brides-to-be find venues in the capital that also offer space for a marquee. They want the variety the city can offer with the wow factor of classic country wedding styling. We’re also seeing an increase in the number of women asking us to recommend restaurants that they can not only hold their reception in but that are licensed for the service too. If a couple are very city-orientated they quite rightly don’t see why they should compromise on that for their big day.’ Indeed. One of the biggest benefits of an urban wedding is the flexibility: ‘You can organise your day how you want in London. You can have it anywhere from your old pub around the corner to something more glamorous,’ says Wichet Khongphoon, founder of North London-based florist Aflorum. ‘A lot of Londoners don’t want something ostentatious. They’re downsizing weddings with the recession. They want something more informal and you can do that here.’ ‘You have every service, venue size, hotel, right on your doorstop available to you,’ agrees Cate. ‘Venues here are also less fixed in their offer than country hotels which seem to limit you to set packages only. At Kings Place we were allowed to have everything exactly how we wanted it. It was great.’ ‘We can do anything, really,’ says Williams. ‘People can have their whole ceremony here. They can have formal food, barbecues or communal dessert stations. That, combined with the fact that we’re in the centre of London, but also have outdoor space overlooking the water, has made us hugely popular.’ Are urban weddings affecting trends in nuptials? ‘I think so,’ says wedding photographer Victoria Grech. ‘It’s definitely prompted a shift in the style of photos couples want. I’m taking more and more candid streetscapes and pictures of couples against industrial buildings, or outside the pubs, something celebrating their London life as it is.’

HIGHLIGHTS FOOD & DRINK

April—June 2012

London’s abundance of artisanal bakeries has also prompted more adventurousness with wedding cake design: ‘Cupcakes continue to be hugely popular,’ says Sing. ‘But there’s also a focus on clean lines, minimalism and modern shades such as navy blue or black in icing decoration. Brides are also interested in flavours beyond the traditional fruitcake – from carrot cake to lemon to chocolate. We now offer 35 flavours, including coconut and lime, chocolate orange, and amaretto.’ Eco-consciousness is also becoming a key concern: ‘People want seasonal British flowers and more relaxed arrangements. We’re using sustainable containers, such as jam jars and wooden boxes that can be reused,’ says Knongphoon. ‘They’re also experimenting with mixtures of plants, such as heathers and herbs, with flowers.’ Kings Place’s Rotunda Restaurant, headed by Chef Ian Green, was a major draw for Cate and Ewan for this reason. The Restaurant is famed for its modern British cuisine, complete with grass-fed free-range livestock from its own farm in Northumberland and high-quality seasonal produce: ‘We wanted to keep the carbon footprint of our wedding low, so Rotunda’s concept was a massive draw,’ says Cate. The couple feasted on a menu of sustainably sourced Scottish smoked salmon, organic chicken and fresh green vegetables, and lemon meringue pie for dessert. ‘There’s nothing like fresh British produce at its peak,’ says chef Green. ‘Our peas are fresh in the pod from farms in Kent, so are our strawberries. Our fish is caught off the south coast. Everything we serve here is traceable. It’s become a big selling-point both for couples having their weddings here and for day-today diners.’

Book your wedding at Kings Place +44(0)20 7014 2838 events@kingsplaceevents.co.uk

Rotunda Supper ClubS

27 March 6.30pm

Champagne Dinner 1 May 6.30pm

Cheese & Wine Night 26 June 6.30pm

Spring Lamb Dinner 17 July 6.30pm

Australian Wine Tasting & Dinner 11 September 6.30pm

New World vs Old World Wines and Dinner 16 October 6.30pm

Game Dinner

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April—June 2012

Learning to Break Loose The National Youth Jazz Collective is cooking up a heady brew of creative music-making at their bi-monthly workshops in Kings Place. Teachers and young players are all welcome to join in, as Artistic Director Issie Barratt explained to Helen Wallace. Sundays are buzzing with creativity at Kings Place these days. Every other month the National Youth Jazz Collective takes up residence with a vibrant programme of workshops for small groups of young musicians, and for teachers too. Founded in 2006 by acclaimed jazz composer, leader, baritone saxophonist and educator Issie Barratt, the NYJC is all about providing high-quality jazz training and performance opportunities for young musicians aged between 8 and 18. The bimonthly sessions at Kings Place, which began in 2009, are open to all comers, whatever their instrument, and focus on small-group improvisation. Issie herself is joined by key tutors Percy Pursglove and Mick Foster and a team of specially trained jazz ambassadors. ‘It’s imperative that our teaching encourages uninhibited learning, free of distractions and any sense of fear,’ explains Issie. ‘We’re here to help young jazz musicians learn the idiom, and to make their own journey of discovery and self-expression. So the events all take place in a comfortable, friendly, well-resourced environment with drum-kit, amps and keyboards and Kings Place offers the space to divide into small groups and focus on key areas of music-making.’ For those jazz musicians further along the track these sessions offer a fantastic networking opportunity, as one young

We’re here to help young jazz musicians learn the idiom, and to make their own journey of discovery and self-expression participant, Ralph, explains: ‘What NYJC provides is extremely important, as most schools don’t offer students the option of small ensemble improvisation, and it’s often disregarded at county level as well. The course is excellent for making contacts too, which is so important in jazz. Just two weeks after the course I was playing in gigs with friends I’d met at the NYJC.’ As well as the chance to play with professionals, more advanced students gain help preparing for auditions for summer schools and Conservatoire-level jazz programmes. Kings Place is just one of 22 NYJC regional centres: by becoming involved young performers are plugging themselves into a much bigger, more ambitious national programme that takes players up to the highest level. Each year, auditions are held at regional centres to select 30 of the most gifted and talented young musicians to attend the NYJC Summer School.

INTERACT

Issie Barratt

HIGHLIGHTS


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HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

April—June 2012

INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS 21 APRIL

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Study Day 2: Enrichment and Reduction

Professor Robert Pascall PART I Brahms enriches his chamber music style PART II The symphony from concert hall to home St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm; Lunch break; 2pm–4.30pm

Issie Barratt, who set up the jazz department at Trinity College of Music, knows a thing or two about the effects of skilled early training on the quality of musicians coming through to college level. A passionate advocate for nurturing creativity, she recognises that some very talented natural improvisers never get near jazz simply because their teachers have no skills in this area to help them. Which is why NYJC is also running workshops at Kings Place for teachers: ‘Many talented and inspirational music teachers still feel uncomfortable about including aspects of improvisation in their teaching,’ she explains. ‘Our aim is to demonstrate good practice in the teaching of jazz, while demystifying the musical process, often helping non-jazz music teachers find ways in which they can draw on their own musical skills to support and develop the needs of the young jazz musician.’ With their happy, welcoming vibe, the National Youth Jazz Collective sessions at Kings Place is the ideal place for young musicians to come and develop their skills. ‘It’s impossible to leave Kings Place on Sunday without feeling enthused and motivated!’ says Issie. One student, Rosie, couldn’t agree more: ‘NYJC was such an amazing and valuable experience for me. Full-on learning and playing with some of the most inspiring jazz musicians I have ever met.’ Check it out. National Youth Jazz Collective at Kings Place 18 March, 6 May, 24 June Young Musicians Programme £20 per session Continuing Professional Development Programme for teachers £40 per session 10am–6pm with a performance at 4.30pm in Hall Two. To book contact judith@nyjc.co.uk (Concessions and a bursary scheme are available for those in receipt of benefits.) www.nyjc.co.uk

5 MAY

INNER VOICES: THE MUSIC OF SIBELIUS AND DAVID MATTHEWS

Study Day on Sibelius and David Matthews PART I Andrew Barnett (Chairman, UK Sibelius Society): ‘The Theatre Music of Sibelius’ Julian Anderson (composer): ‘Sibelius Today’ PART II Edward Clark (President, UK Sibelius Society): ‘Sibelius’s First Versions’ David Matthews (composer): ‘Sibelius and the symphonic quest’ St Pancras Room 11am–1.30pm; Lunch break; 2.30pm–5pm

2 JUNE

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Study Day 3: Brahms in Perspective PART I Brahms looks back Dr Martin Ennis (University of Cambridge) PART II Brahms in perspective Prof. John Rink (University of Cambridge) St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm; Lunch break; 2pm–4.30pm

3 March

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Brahms Study Day – 1 PART I Tracking Brahms’s Life with Michael Musgrave (Juilliard School of Music)

PART II Brahms and the Third Reich with Erik Levi (Royal Holloway, University of London) St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm; Lunch break; 2pm–4.30pm

30 APRIL, 16 MAY & 15 JUNE

Pre-Concert Talks in association with City Lit Pre-concert talks with Malcolm Miller from City Lit, London’s destination for inspiring part-time adult education. The tickets cover both the pre-concert talk and performances. See listings for further details. To book, contact City Lit: 020 7831 7831 http://www.citylit.ac.uk/courses/ Music/Music_appreciation

SUMMER 2012

NATIONAL YOUTH JAZZ COLLECTIVE

NYJC Young Musicians Programme Workshops, jam sessions and performance opportunities for school-aged young jazz musicians Led by Issie Barratt and Percy Pursglove, the NYCJ young musicians programme focuses on small group improvisation in streamed groups designed to support all levels of ability. Each Sunday workshop ends with an informal concert given to the students’ families and friends.

SUMMER 2012

ChamberStudio

Sunday afternoon coaching and support sesions for up-and-coming post-college chamber groups. Eminent chamber players and teachers will provide coaching and guidance, and an oppotunity to meet other like-minded musicians. Sessions at affordable rates. For more information and to book a session, go to www.chamberstudio.org Observers are welcome at the ChamberStudio masterclasses. Observers can move quietly in and out of the sessions at any time. Spaces are limited and can be booked either by ‘Contact Us’ tab on the ChamberStudio website, or by leaving a message on 020 7193 4377. Coaching Sessions Wenlock / Limehouse Rooms 2.30am–4pm; 4.30pm–6pm 18 MARCH Richard Ireland Krysia Osostowicz 25 MARCH Anthony Marwood Christoph Richter 1 APRIL Susan Tomes James Boyd 15 APRIL William Howard David Waterman 22 APRIL Simon Rowland-Jones

Sundays 9am – 5pm 6 May, 24 June

29 APRIL Richard Lester Krysia Osostowicz

Hall Two 4.30pm – Performance for friends and family

6 MAY James Boyd

Cost for the programme: £20 a session. A bursary scheme is available for young people in receipt of benefits.

13 MAY Paul Watkins Richard Ireland

NYJC also offers a CPD programme for teachers on the same dates. Cost for the CPD programme is £40 a session. Concessions available. For further information, visit kingsplace.co.uk/interact/ interact-events The NYJC can also support and assess Arts Award candidates.

20 MAY Shmuel Ashkenasi Public Masterclasses (Hall Two 11am–2pm; 3pm–6pm) 24 JUNE ChamberStudio Showcase Concert Hall One 6.30pm Details to be announced www.kingsplace.co.uk Go to www.chamberstudio.org for programme details and performing chamber ensembles

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April—June 2012

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Darkness Visible

The Brodsky Quartet started their journey 40 years ago, and what a journey: of all Britain’s leading quartets, it is the Brodsky who have transformed the face of the string foursome, enlarged its scope, exploded its role, and acted as a crucible for creative change. This was the quartet who donned outfits from Issey Miyake when white tie and tails was the order of the day; the group who co-wrote an album with Elvis Costello, The Juliet Letters, who worked with Théâtre de Complicité on The Noise of Time

BRODSKY QUARTET © NICK WHITE

The Brodsky Quartet will perform the complete cycle of Shostakovich’s quartets at Kings Place in May. Cellist Jacqueline Thomas and violist Paul Cassidy delve into the private world of these works with Helen Wallace


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April—June 2012

CLASSICAL BRoDSKY'S SHOSTAKOVICH

Every single quartet has a completely different identity and there isn’t a weak one… We are finding more and more beauty there

and commissioned a new quartet drama on the Balkan war, Requiem. This is also the quartet who kicked the chairs away and performed standing up, who brought into the world numerous new works from a global list of composers and resurrected neglected repertoire with scintillating results. The Brodsky, in short, are Britain’s answer to Kronos Quartet, and have inspired a new generation of ensembles to take more risks and push the envelope yet further. The cycle of 15 string quartets written by Shostakovich have been closely intertwined with the quartet’s own journey, and it’s fitting that their 40th-anniversary year sees the first London performance of the complete quartet cycle for 23 years. As cellist Jacqueline Thomas comments: ‘We started the quartet as children and one of the first things we tackled was Shostakovich’s Eleventh Quartet! I remember we moved on to No. 3, then Bartók and then dived headlong into the classics – we tried everything, we had no fear. We had no idea we’d still be playing together today.’

Violist Paul Cassidy, who joined the quartet just as they were leaving the Royal Northern College of Music and has been with them ever since, recalls that one of their very first recording projects, in the late 1980s, was the complete cycle of Shostakovich quartets – at a time when it was even hard to get hold of scores. ‘Can you imagine that? The last one we learnt was No. 6 because we literally couldn’t get hold of the music! It arrived late and proved almost impossible to play. We were rehearsing the last movement and towards the end we just stopped and said – we can’t play this, and we can’t play the cycle if we can’t play this. It seemed so dull and meaningless, nothing was happening, and we couldn’t work out what to do – it wasn’t well known here then. Eventually we got

a look at the full score and saw the word Allegretto was there. We had been playing it Adagio molto all the way through because that’s how it started – we were doing 300 bars of Adagio!’ Jacqueline comments that the amiable Sixth Quartet has become one of their favourites now, ‘so gorgeous and rewarding’. She also notes that their approach to the quartets at the time of their first recording was very different, partly due to unfamiliarity and a general nervousness about getting it right. ‘We were working with a young producer at Teldec, and it was his first time on these works, so he was a stickler for the metronome marks. We’ve since discovered that Shostakovich is as Romantic and free as any composer, and he would have hated the idea that people were sticking rigidly to metronome marks, even though there are very driven, rhythmic moto

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CLASSICAL BRoDSKY'S SHOSTAKOVICH

April—June 2012

Paul Cassidy, Violist of the Brodsky Quartet, introduces

Shostakovich‘s 15 quartets Saturday 28 April  3pm

Quartets Nos. 6, 4 & 5

This is a programme of charged emotion, from the intimacy of No. 6 to No. 4 which is arguably the most melodic of all the quartets – its four movements all contain one beautiful theme after another. We conclude with the amazingly symphonic No. 5; its vast structure is played without a break, with a gloriously evocative slow movement and the magical ending that seems to come from outer space. Saturday 28 April  7.30pm

String Quartet No. 7, 8 & 9

Beethoven Quartet for whom the quartets were written

Thursday 26 April  7.30pm

Brodsky Quartet with Jenny Lin (piano): Preludes & Fugues / Piano Quintet

That Shostakovich’s 15 quartets are all in different keys isn’t just accidental; he set out to explore the medium in the manner in which he wrote his earlier Preludes and Fugues for piano: methodically working through the chromatic scale. Before embarking upon the epic quartets we delve into the mind of Shostakovich in more depth – his Preludes and Fugues for piano and the remarkable Piano Quintet, with Jenny Lin. Friday 27 April  7.30pm

Quartets Nos. 1, 2 & 3

The First Quartet was written after the birth of Shostakovich’s son and has a childlike quality throughout. The Second, by contrast, is a monumental tour de force. By the Third Quartet, the great man has settled very comfortably into his own skin. This masterpiece has gone on to become one of the most famous works not only in the cycle but in the whole repertoire.

Without doubt one of the most personal and powerful quartets in the whole repertoire, No. 8 is dedicated to the victims of Fascism and war, and is also the composer's own epitaph. Quartet No. 7, dedicated to his first wife, is the shortest of the set and is played without a break, inquisitive yet solemn, energetic but ghostly. No. 9, for his second wife, is a rarely played gem and one of the most exciting – building in momentum and emotion till the triumphant and explosive final cadence. Sunday 29 April  3pm

Quartets Nos. 11, 12, 13 & 14

Shostakovich dedicated a work to each of the members of the Beethoven Quartet, from the diversity of the Eleventh, in memory of the second violinist, to the huge display of emotion within the Twelfth, for the first violin. In the Thirteenth Quartet, he explored the mysterious world of the viola; listen for the jazz section and the infamous, lonely viola solo at the end. The Fourteenth, for the cellist, exploits the cello’s melodic possibilities to the full with a heartbreaking slow movement. Sunday 29 April  6.30pm

Quartets Nos. 10 & 15

The Brodsky Quartet’s Shostakovich marathon ends with this special concert. An exceptional piece of writing, there is quite simply nothing like the Fifteenth Quartet in all of music, a profound comment on humanity, life and death. Preceding it we explore the Tenth, dedicated to Mieczysław Weinberg, the composer and friend with whom Shostakovich entered into battle to complete a tenth quartet first: guess who won!

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He had such humour: he said ‘perform it so that flies drop dead in midair and the audience leaves the hall out of sheer boredom!’

perpetuo parts, but in other places there’s a huge freedom of expression. I’m finding more and more beauty there.’ The view that Shostakovich’s music is distinctive and intensely emotional is newer than we realise. For those of us growing up in the 1970s and 80s, his music was dismissed by the Modernists as being too simplistic and conservative, and by the traditionalists as being strident and politically suspect. Tragically, in his own country, where the truth of his art was experienced viscerally by listeners, he was officially condemned for the very Modernism he was thought to lack in the West. Thomas also points out that a vibrant performing tradition has since grown up and changed the way we hear the music, bringing with it a familiarity that has engendered love: ‘You have to remember Shostakovich was still thought of then as a very dry composer, and quite rigid. I remember players from other quartets coming up to us and saying “Do you really like those quartets, don’t you find them very boring?” There was this perception that it was all the same, which couldn’t be less true. ‘Our feeling is that every single one has a completely different identity and there isn’t a weak one. In a way, we feel the strength of the most popular ones is overrated because we can see how good the others are. And when we’ve played the cycle the audience response has been extraordinary and no one has ever felt they were the same.’ Paul Cassidy concurs that the 21st-century view of Shostakovich is radically different even from that commonly found 20 years ago: ‘I think Shostakovich has become accepted as one of the great composers of recent times; he’s no longer suffering from the reputation of being a conservative composer, he’s become as iconic and popular as Mahler.’ But, for Cassidy, that emphatically doesn’t mean he should


Beethoven quartet © Saikov/RIA Novosti  |  BROSKY QUARTET © NICK WHITE

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be treated with a po-faced reverence: ‘This music is so extraordinary, we shouldn’t get too precious about it. It’s OK to play it as a straight performance, and it’s also OK to make a very theatrical performance from it, as we did with Simon McBurney and Théâtre de Complicité with the Quartet No. 15; The Noise of Time was an amazing experience. We played with no music as part of a drama, and the next time we played it in a normal concert we still used no music and had all these extraordinary images in our minds as we played. 90% of the time we play things straight. No composer wants to put just one image on a piece of music because that can limit its potential, lock it up.’ Cassidy also points out that although we think of Shostakovich the man as tight-lipped, depressed and oppressed, he had a coruscating sense of humour: ‘There’s his wonderful instruction on how to play the first movement of the Fifteenth Quartet: perform it so that flies drop dead in mid-air and the audience leaves the hall out of sheer boredom! What he meant was he wanted us to create this incredible stillness, almost to suck the oxygen out of the

April—June 2012

You have to remember Shostakovich was still thought of in the 1980s as a very dry composer, and quite rigid…

air. He was saying “don’t feel any compulsion to entertain”. It’s actually one of the most serene and tender movements there is.’ I’m reminded of the comment the composer made on first hearing the devastating Eighth Quartet performed: ‘I shed the same amount of tears as I would have had to pee after half a dozen beers,’ he commented, not because he was moved, but out of ‘wonder at its superlative unity of form’. Cassidy points out his humour

CLASSICAL BRoDSKY'S SHOSTAKOVICH

also finds its way into the Twelfth Quartet with its nod to Schoenberg’s 12-note rows, ‘and I love the fact that he wrote No. 10 because his friend Mieczysław Weinberg had just written nine quartets and he had to go one better!’ As the Brodsky make clear in their title of the series, the quartets form a personal diary, beginning in 1938, just after he had suffered the set-back of Lady Macbeth, and stretching to 1971, four years before his death. ‘He originally wanted to write 24 quartets on all the keys, but you wonder where he had left to go after No.15; it’s like a Requiem, a perfect ending to a cycle’, says Cassidy. That cycle contains the composer’s own epitaph (No. 8) and portraits of his two wives (Nos. 7 and 9) and all the members of the Beethoven Quartet (Nos. 11–14 – see box). He suffered a heart attack at the premiere of the Eleventh Quartet, and after this point the texture of the works begins to thin out: ‘In No. 15, he often uses just two voices together, and in No. 14, too, cello and violin also play for long stretches. It’s as though he was paring things down as he became more isolated, and lost his physical strength.’ The two musicians clearly find the quartets an inexhaustible source of mystery and fascination. Paul tells a story of meeting the late Mrs Shostakovich after a concert in Bologna: ‘I was sitting next to her at the dinner table, and I thought this was an incredible opportunity that I would never get again – she was then in her eighties… so I asked her what that threenote knocking motif was, what did it mean? It pervades all his quartets, all his music – she said something in Russian which sounded very like it, and which meant “Never again”. Then she said something else in Russian which sounded the same, but which meant “Almighty God”. She even said something else, and then said, “It’s much too personal”.’ The motif has also been attributed to a knock on the door from the secret police, the opening of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony, a quote from Rossini’s William Tell, the falling of bombs over Leningrad. Whatever it meant, Shostakovich built huge edifices from this tiny fragment: ‘I came away feeling that this is a mystery we can’t and shouldn’t solve,’ says Cassidy. ‘The worst thing would have been if she’d said, “It’s the knock on the door” – that would have closed the door! She gave me so much food for thought. She didn’t mean it was too personal to ask – I think she meant it was personal to everyone listening too.’

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich: Brodsky Quartet  26–29 April See Listings pp60–61 for details

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April–June 2012

Brahms isN‘t just for bears

Why is Brahms often played loudly and heavily? Pianist Susan Tomes, who joins the Orion Quartet in Brahms piano quartets, pleads for a subtler, more transparent approach

ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER / WWW.GEMMALATIMER.COM

When I was learning the piano as a child, I hardly ever tackled any Brahms because it seemed to be written for a different sort of pianist altogether. My only experience of hearing Brahms’s piano music was at Friday night concerts of the Scottish National Orchestra, where Brahms piano concertos always seemed to be played by huge bears of men, preferably Russian. My piano

teacher told me that Clifford Curzon had once humorously calculated it required more physical stamina to play the Brahms piano concertos than to shovel coal into the engine of a steam train all the way from London to Edinburgh. Somehow these images fused in my mind and made me envisage ‘the Brahms pianist’ as a sweating titan at his burning fiery furnace. Later, when I got the chance to try Brahms’s chamber music, I was surprised to find that his piano writing was rather different from what I had imagined. For a start, the look of his piano parts on the page was often quite sparse and transparent. Yes, there were outbursts of anger or passion, but there was also

plenty of cool-headed reasoning and emotional restraint. I was also surprised when I realised that Brahms’s dynamic markings were less gigantic than I had supposed when I heard his concertos being pounded into submission. His use of fortissimo was actually very careful and sparing. Many of the passages I was used to hearing played very loudly were only marked forte even at climaxes. On the other hand, there were long passages marked piano or pianissimo. There were also many instructions given by the composer which indicated a subtle, nuanced approach to sonority. It started to become clear that ‘the Brahms sound’, far from being laid on with a trowel as it often seemed to be on recordings, was in fact a more complex and mercurial thing.

we know brahms’s own playing had ‘transparency of touch, elegance and simplicity’

CLASSICAL 33 I began to realise that I had witnessed a rather unhelpful chapter in Brahms interpretation, fuelled by performances of his symphonies by orchestras and conductors famous for overwhelming effects. Why was Brahms usually played so slowly? I couldn’t see any reason for this in the scores. Why was his music often played so loudly and pompously? That was a mystery too, especially when you consider the kind of pianos available to him in the 19th century. Brahms ‘in his own words’ was clearly not a dictator. Yet today there still seems to be a kind of default setting for Brahms. When I coach young ensembles I often ask them where they get the notion that Brahms has to be played so solidly, and they say, ‘It’s just how people play it’. Fortunately, that’s changing. Historians have opened our eyes to how things were in Brahms’s day, and we’re starting to be more aware of the light and shade which Brahms brought to his own music. We have accounts of his playing by people like Fanny Davies, a Clara Schumann pupil who lived in Germany in the 1880s and 90s, often meeting Brahms and hearing him play. She described it as ‘free, very elastic and expansive’ and pointed out that ‘in his playing, as in his music and in his character, there was never a trace of sensuality’. Regarding the power of his touch, she said it could be ‘warm, deep, full and broad in the fortes, and not hard, even in the fortissimos; and his pianos, always of carrying power, could be as round and transparent as a dewdrop’. He had ‘unbelievable transparency of touch, elegance, simplicity and ease of phrasing’. Not a stuffy old patriarch, then, but a very warm, deep and subtle musician whose true nature we should honour.

Brahms Unwrapped: Orion String Qt with Susan Tomes 31 May, 1 June, 2 June See Listings pp68–69 for details


34 WORLD

April—June 2012

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Exploding Traditions

Band – and the songs are accompanied by rustic medieval fiddles and percussion. The lyrics are folk texts about peasant uprisings, railing against cruel landowners and the clergy. Old rebellious texts accompanied by new music with deep peasant roots. ‘R.u.t.a. is about freedom,’ says Szajkowski. ‘When we released the CD Mubarak was kicked out of Egypt and people came on the streets in London and New York against the banks. There’s something in the air and you can help build a new world through music.’ One of the key musicians in the Madagascar All Stars is Dama, leader of the band Mahaleo, Madagascar’s most famous group, which also started during student protests of the 1970s, in an atmosphere similar to that of Europe in 1968. Their songs are known by everybody, including the younger generations. In the All Stars, Dama joins fellow vocalist Marius ‘Fenoamby’

In R.u.t.a., the punks have joined up with members of Poland’s progressive folk scene

R.U.T.A. WITH GUMA, WARSAW 2011 © Bartek Muracki

This is the second Songlines Encounters festival and a rare opportunity to hear exciting musicians that we at Songlines, the world music magazine, have enthused about over the last 12 months or so. The festival opens with R.u.t.a., a radical punkmeets-folk band, just a year old, who’ve already caused a stir at home in Poland, and it closes with the Madagascar All Stars, featuring the best songwriters and instrumentalists from the Indian Ocean island. In between there is accordionled music from Finland, the Balkans and Argentina, there’s innovative folk from the English group Spiro and French Canadian group Le Vent du Nord, and combining spectacular throat-singing and horse-head fiddles is Anda Union from Inner Mongolia, one of the most talked about bands at last year’s WOMAD festival. So what is Songlines Encounters about? Unusual instruments played by master musicians is one of the themes and an innovative approach to traditional styles is another. These certainly come together in Poland’s R.U.T.A. ‘This is a kind of protest,’ says percussionist Maciej Szajkowski. The group includes members of Poland’s 1980s punk scene – a strong oppositional force against the communist system – including Guma, usually described as the ‘Polish Johnny Rotten’. The punks have joined up with members of Poland’s progressive folk scene – groups like the Warsaw Village



Horse-head fiddles from Inner Mongolia, Finnish tango and punk-folk from Poland. Simon Broughton of Songlines magazine brings you the latest glittering talents from all over the globe


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April—June 2012

WORLD Songlines Encounters 2012

R.U.T.A. from Poland

SONGLINES encounters festival 2012 6 June R.U.T.A.

Folk with attitude from Polish punks

7 June Lepistö & Lehti + Kosmos + Fugata Quintet

An accordion trail from Finland through the Balkans to Argentina

8 June Spiro + Le Vent du Nord

Spectacular new takes on English and French Canadian folk

Sam Lee & Friends

The rising star of British folk scene ALSO PART OF FOLK UNION

9 June Film: Anda Union – From the Steppes to the City Documentary film telling the band’s extraordinary story

Anda Union + Madagascar All Stars World-class bands from the other ends of the earth

Lauren Kinsella’s Thought-Fox

featuring Soufian Saihi Up-and-coming jazz ensemble with Morroccan oud player ALSO PART OF THE BASE

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WORLD Songlines Encounters 2012

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April—June 2012

Clockwise from left: Madagascar All Stars, Lepistö & Lehti and Kosmos

Fontaine, accordionist Régis Gizavo, guitarist Erick Manana, percussionist Ricky Olombelo and Justin Vali, the leading virtuoso on the plucked valiha and marovany zithers from Madagascar. The island is famous for its wealth of varied wildlife, but its music is equally rich and multifarious and to get the chance to hear such a range of musicians from Madagascar is a rare treat. From even further afield come Anda Union, who are based in the city of Hohhot in Chinese Inner Mongolia. This 10-strong group evoke their homeland in a vivid and colourful way. Many of their songs feature overtone singing – both the deep guttural type and the shimmering, ethereal kind – which has to be heard to be believed, and they include instrumentalists on the morin khuur (horse-head fiddle) and various Mongolian lutes. The legendary horsemanship of the Mongolian steppes is never far away and pervades the sounds and rhythms of their extraordinary music. The red threads that run through the concerts of Lepistö & Lehti, Kosmos and the Fugata Quintet are the accordion and tango. Lepistö & Lehti are a highly acclaimed accordion and double-bass duo from Finland,

To get the chance to hear such a range of musicians from Madagascar is a rare treat

the second home to tango, who create an innovative sound from just two instruments combined with their vivid musical imagination. Kosmos are a UK-based group exploring the colourful sounds of Jewish klezmer, Balkan, Arabic, Greek and tango music, featuring Serbian accordionist Milos Milivojevic. And the Fugata Quintet, also based in the UK, are a new group playing the dramatic and visceral nuevo tango of Argentinean composer Astor Piazzolla. An exciting international group of musicians from the UK, Greece, Serbia and

Armenia, they are all graduates from the Royal Academy of Music. ‘The appeal of Piazzolla’s music lies in the tension between traditional structures and spontaneous expression,’ says their violinist Anastasios Mavroudis. ‘His improvised music should be regarded as highly as his scored works in the classical canon.’ British quartet, Spiro bring English folk into the world of Philip Glass and Steve Reich. On a seemingly conventional line-up of violin, mandolin, accordion and guitar they create a soundworld that is just their own. ‘All sorts of musical influences are woven into this very contemporary music,’ says Peter Gabriel, who’s released their last two albums on his Real World label. ‘I think this is soulful music, passionate music and I love it.’ Another quartet, Le Vent du Nord, bring new life and energy to French Canadian traditions from Quebec. On accordion, fiddle, guitar, hurdy-gurdy and a host of other instruments, this powerful and vivacious band are celebrating their 10th anniversary in 2012. Songlines Encounters Festival 2012 6–9 June. See Listings pp70–71 for details

Lepisto & Lehti © Nauska | KOSMOS © PIERRE MARCAR | MADAGASCAR ALL STARS © SUPPLIED PHOTO

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ENJOY A YEAR’S WORTH OF MUSIC, FOOD, DRINK, SPOKEN WORD AND FAMILY FUN PACKED INTO JUST A FEW DAYS IN THE AWARD-WINNING BUILDING.

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE Academy of St Martin in the Fields London Sinfonietta Orchestra of Age of Enlightenment Orchestra of St John’s Principal Players of Aurora Orchestra with Little Angel Theatre Chilingirian Quartet Sacconi Quartet Lekker Quintet Matthew Barley Cardinal Burns Adam Buxton Bridget Christie John Hegley Colin Hoult Jonny Kearney & Lucy Farrell Leon McCawley Marius Neset Ardal O’Hanlon The Jay Phelps Sextet The Emily Portman Quartet Jeffrey Siegel Dimitry Sitkovetsky Abram Wilson Tarporley Boat Trips and many more


38 SPECIAL FEATURE

April—June 2012

SINCE 1852 TRAINS HAVE PLUNGED INTO GASWORKS TUNNEL, SLOWLY SLIPPING THE BONDS OF A PART OF LONDON ONLY RECENTLY EMERGED FROM CENTURIES OF SQUALOR

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April—June 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE KING’s CROSS

King’s Cross comes of age

Gasholder Triplet © GMJ / Miller Hare

Architecture critic Jonathan Glancey has been observing the area behind King’s Cross since he was a boy. Here he reflects on its recent, most radical transformation from grubby goods yard to 21st-century cultural hub

Artist’s impression of the ‘Gasholder Triplet’ – a new residential / retail complex

As they have done since the station opened in 1852, trains from King’s Cross climb from platform ends into the slippery depths of Gas Works Tunnel. They struggle on past Belle Isle before plunging into Copenhagen Tunnel, slowly slipping the surly bonds of a part of London only recently emerging from centuries of squalor. I can just remember Gresley Pacifics at the head of the Flying Scotsman, Talisman and Tees-Tyne Pullman, although as I learned to read and write the likes of Mallard, Prince Palatine and Meg Merillies gave way to roaring Deltic diesels and today’s 140mph electric flyers. King’s Cross has changed with its trains. The railway yards of King’s Cross and St Pancras set the tone of the area until the mid-1960s. Even then, the atmosphere of late steam-era King’s Cross – beautifully caught by Alexander Mackendrick’s The Ladykillers, a black-and-white Ealing Comedy from 1955 starring Alec Guinness and Peter Sellers – survived until the early 1990s. Slowly, but surely, it is evaporating, as redevelopment gets a grip and worlds of engine drivers, villains, pimps, prostitutes, drug dealers, savage dogs, sex shops, seedy pubs, dodgy clubs, and a history of horse butchers, fat melters, bone crushers and slums yields to an art college, a newspaper office, loft apartments, art galleries, gleaming shops, clean pavements and chain cafés with their pricey cappuccinos and ‘lar-tays’.

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SPECIAL FEATURE KING’s CROSS

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April—June 2012

Savage dogs, sex shops, seedy pubs and dodgy clubs yield to AN art college, newspaper offices, clean pavements and pricey cappuccinos… Top left and centre: Artist’s impression of Granary Square / Central Saint Martins

The Guardian and The Observer at Kings Place

Aerial view of Kings Place construction site (2005)

Artist’s impression depicting the transformation of the King’s Cross area

GRANARY SQUARE © GMJ | Granary Square (LANDSCAPE VIEW) © Anderson Terzic | KiNG’S CROSS ILLUSTRATIVE BUILD-UP © Miller Hare | www.kingscrosscentral.com | KING’s CROSS AERIAL VIEW 2005 © IAN HAY

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Kings Place glass faÇade and hall one © keith paisley

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I remember the opening of the Gagosian art gallery here in 2004 – ‘dahling!’ this-andthat, m’wah-m’wah air kisses and flutes of champagne – and thinking of walks not so very long ago through streets where the last Victorian slums were being torn down as King’s Cross de-industrialised. The Beaconsfield Buildings, designed by Charles Barry Jr, were barrack-like rows of five-story ‘walk-ups’. Known as the ‘Crumbles’, they could have been home to Oliver Twist and the Artful Dodger. This was in Belle Isle, home, according to Charles Booth when the Salvationist drew up his Poverty Map of London in 1898–99, of the ‘lowest class; vicious, semicriminal.’ Blimey. The area was simply very poor, and remained so while the Kings Road and Carnaby Street began to swing. The financial boom of the late 80s triggered real change at King’s Cross. In 1987, the London Regeneration Consortium announced a ‘masterplan’ for the area drawn up by Norman Foster; the vast triangle of land north of King’s Cross and St Pancras stations was to become a new Regent’s Park encircled by fine new buildings, many of them homes for professional people, or ‘Yuppies’ as they were known then. It was a handsome scheme, but fell foul of financial collapse. In recent years, with Argent as lead developer, progress on the transformation of the King’s Cross district has been steady rather than rushed. Old buildings have been saved, transformed and even moved. With the opening of the new Central Saint Martins, part of the University of the Arts London, the creative presence of students jostles alongside the ghosts of engine drivers, cleaners and fitters of half a century ago. Meanwhile, on the other side of York Way, Kings Place demonstrates an imaginative and even altruistic new way of going about office development; here, the offices of The Guardian and The Observer are mixed with other commercial enterprises: an art gallery, concert hall, café and canal-side restaurant underpinned by an enlightened programme of cultural events. With determination, and a little luck, King’s Cross may yet be redeveloped into a characterful district alive with independent shops, restaurants, clubs and places of intelligent and interesting work. And, if not, there are plenty of trains on which to escape from here not just to the Midlands, the North East and Scotland, but also to France, Belgium and all points continental. This alone would have been all but inconceivable to those living and working here when I first watched trains leaving King’s Cross – over the body of Boudicca, buried it is said between Platforms 9 and 10 – and over the walls of York Way.

April—June 2012

SPECIAL FEATURE KING’s CROSS

The undulating glass façade of Kings Place covering the west-facing York Way frontage

Hall One at Kings Place – the first new concert hall in Central London since the 1980s

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42 ART

April—June 2012

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April—June 2012

ART Tom Jenkins EXHIBITION

Sporting Hero

Luke Dodds introduces the work of photographer Tom Jenkins, whose pictures from the Beijing Olympics will be on display at the Kings Place Gallery this summer

Usain Bolt © TOM JENKINS

Tom Jenkins is, arguably, the best sports photographer of his generation. He has worked at The Guardian since 1990 and in that time has covered virtually every major sporting event and fixture. His photographs are characterised by an iconic quality – he invariably manages to impose a classical unity on the most chaotic scene. Jenkins has won numerous awards including: Young Photographer of the Year, 1990; Sports Photographer of the Year, 2004, 2006 and 2007; British Press Awards Sports Photographer of the Year, 2000 and Barclays Football Photographer of the Year, 2009. Jenkins’s picture of Usain Bolt as he won his second gold medal at the Beijing Olympics (2008) is one of his most memorable (and reproduced) images – the fastest man in the world, ever, in the immediate aftermath of establishing a new world record for the 200m of 19.3 seconds. Kings Place Gallery: Tom Jenkins  29 June – 24 August See Art Listings p76 for details

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44 CLASSICAL

April—June 2012

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A Garland for the Queen Roderick Swanston reflects on the musical legacy of the British monarchy as the New London Choir mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee In the 17th century an English monarch, or one of his family, could hardly change coaches without Purcell dashing off a Welcome Ode. Nowadays all they get is a red carpet and, if they’re lucky, a brassy fanfare. It’s nice to imagine that James II and George II walked more proudly down the aisle engulfed by the glories of Purcell’s My heart is inditing or Handel’s Zadok the Priest. Prince Charles, no less, confessed on television to his back stiffening with pride when he hears Parry’s I was glad, first heard at Edward VII’s coronation. Was Elizabeth II’s young heart touched when Vaughan Williams’s gently alluring O Taste and See wafted down from the organ loft at her coronation in 1953? Queen Victoria liked music, inspired no doubt by the passion of her husband Prince Albert, who composed himself. Strange as it may seem, when Mendelssohn arrived as a guest at Windsor Victoria sang him one of his own songs she particularly liked. Mendelssohn thanked her but pointed out that it was not by him but his sister, Fanny. Did


Illustration © Hardie / www.hardieillustrator.com | Queen Elizabeth II’s coronation ceremony at Westminster Abbey © Keystone Pictures USA / Alamy

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women’s rights take a dainty step forward at that moment? Later, Mendelssohn dedicated his Scottish Symphony to the queen, and in 1899 to celebrate her 80th birthday a group of composers and poets under the auspices of Walter Parratt (organist of St George’s Windsor) and Arthur C Benson persuaded the likes of Parry, Elgar, Stanford and others to set words by Austin Dobson, Frederick Myers and Benson himself in part-songs, a selection of which were performed in St George’s quadrangle while the queen had breakfast. The magnificent collection forms a snap-shot of Victorian English music and verse, which, in retrospect, turns out to be far superior to current estimates. Everyone was on best behaviour and creative fire. Let’s hope they didn’t burn the toast. Royal funerals have given rise to some magnificent music notably Purcell’s majestic Funeral Music for Queen Mary II. The motet In occasu sideris almost certainly marked the death of Henry II, at the time a prisoner in Chinon. His wife Eleanor of Aquitaine came from the heartland of contemporary troubadour music, which no doubt filled Henry’s court when he wasn’t wanting to be rid of ‘troublesome priests’ or sorting out the legitimacy of his heirs. Richard was supposed to have been rescued by his minstrel Blondel, one of his best-recorded royal services, though almost certainly not true. Monarchs have been honoured with works to mark special occasions or just for being on the throne. Byrd and Tallis, keen to bathe in royal favour, dedicated their joint Cantiones sacrae to Elizabeth I in 1575. To press the point home they composed 17 motets each, one for each year of her reign. They hoped she could count... Both Elizabeths have received musical garlands. In 1601 the composer Thomas Morley gathered together the work of some fellow madrigalists and published The Triumphs of Oriana. Morley had a royal patent for publishing so history usually credits him with inaugurating the project as well as having the madrigals printed. But popular history can seldom be relied upon to tell the whole truth. While Oriana almost certainly represents Elizabeth, the collection was not dedicated to her but to her cousin Charles Howard, Earl of Nottingham. It was modelled on earlier Italian collections, but the madrigals have no narrative connection, so it is more likely they were assembled opportunistically rather than artistically. Some dated from the 1590s, others were hurriedly penned to swell the collection to 25. However tentative the connection with Elizabeth may be, The Triumphs was a great success and ran to two reprints in 1601 alone. It’s easy to see why: amateur madrigalists singing at home

April—June 2012

CLASSICAL QUEEN’s DIAMOND JUBILEE

Scenes from the Coronation of Queen Elizabeth II

THE QUEEN’S DIAMOND JUBILEE 4 June English String Serenades 5 June The Triumphs of Oriana & A Garland for the Queen

The Garland for the Queen was to be saturated with novelty, not reminiscence

welcomed a new collection of four- and fivepart madrigals by 23 different composers. Some of the madrigals are still popular today. Where would we be without Morley’s Hard by a crystal fountain, John Bennet’s All creatures now or Weelkes’s gorgeous As Vesta was from Latmos hill with its graphic trippings up and down the mountain, its witty matching of ‘Diana’s darlings’ with the number of voices, and its glorious bell-like finale in praise of ‘Oriana’? If it wasn’t intended for Elizabeth it was certainly worthy of her. As part of the celebrations for the coronation of Elizabeth II the Arts Council commissioned ten composers to write a modern equivalent to The Triumphs of Oriana. Entitled A Garland for the Queen, it was first performed on the eve of the coronation, on

1 June 1953. The ten composers represented were Bliss, Bax, Tippett, Vaughan Williams, Berkeley, Ireland, Howells, Finzi, Rawsthorne and Rubbra. At the time some critics were either lukewarm or even antipathetic to the collection, emphasising what they considered either its timidity or its conservatism. Nowadays it’s easy to see it as part of the extraordinary creative outburst that accompanied the coronation and was used to blow away the shadows of war and recent austerity. The party was to be saturated with novelty, not reminiscence, though some of the music in the collection does look over its shoulder. Ireland’s setting of James Kirkup’s The Hills is a hauntingly beautiful reflection, as in a different way is Vaughan Williams’s evocative setting of his wife’s Ursula Silence and Music, with its parallel intervals suggestive of the bleaker parts of the Sinfonia antartica. Acknowledgement was paid to younger composers with Tippett’s lively take on Christopher Fry’s Dance, Clarion Air or Edmund Rubbra’s magical setting of Christopher Hassall’s Salutation. Over the years royalty has mostly lived in the passive voice: music is done for it rather than its doing it itself. But if it has been the ‘cause of greatness in others’ then that is worth some tribute in itself. Queen’s Diamond Jubilee  4 & 5 June Ivor Setterfield/New London Singers See Listings p69 for details

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46 ART

April—June 2012

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The Mechanical


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April—June 2012

ART PAUPERS PRESS

Jenny Saville Separates

Hand

Many of our most celebrated contemporary artists have made prints at the Paupers Press. As an exhibition celebrating the studio’s 25-year history opens at Kings Place Gallery, Mike Sims reflects on the dynamic relationship between printer and artist

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ART

Paupers Press

April—June 2012

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Artists include... Damien Hirst, Paula Rego, Rachel Whiteread, Cornelia Parker, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Tony Bevan, Grayson Perry, Glenn Brown, Mat Collishaw, Chris Ofili, Rosie Snell, Stephen Chambers, Hughie O’Donoghue, Elizabeth Magill, Sue Webster & Tim Noble, Keith Coventry, Jock McFadyen, Eileen Cooper, Christopher Le Brun, Andrzej Jackowski, Catherine Yass, Charles Avery, Bob & Roberta Smith

‘Left to my own devices,’ Stephen Chambers RA told an audience at the Jerwood Foundation last year, ‘I’d make potato prints.’ By contrast, the Paupers Press studio, where he produces his otherworldly, often ravishing images, is an entirely different scenario. ‘It’s like having the keys to a Ferrari on an empty night-time street, and knowing that it won’t matter if we crash,’ he said. ‘Chemistry, trust and friendship allow me to go to places I wouldn’t otherwise reach.’ Catherine Yass’s collaboration with printers Mike Taylor and Simon Marsh on her 2011 etchings suite Safety Last was equally exhilarating. It uncovered ‘possibilities that I didn’t realise were there… images that did what I’d originally wanted them to do but not in a way I could foresee,’ she said.

So much for the notion that printmaking is a reproductive process – that prints are copies, if sometimes extraordinarily skilful ones, of other, grander, art forms. ‘That’s a very old idea – that “oh, you can’t afford a painting, here’s a print” thing,’ responds Taylor. ‘Look at the prints of Goya or Picasso – printmaking is an intrinsic part of how they expressed themselves.’ The idea of collaboration can be puzzling – isn’t the artist the presiding genius and sole creator of a work? In our post-Romantic, postmodern times, many artists have stopped worrying about that. Paupers has a peerless list of clients: Hughie O’Donoghue, Paula Rego, Damien Hirst, Grayson Perry, Chris Ofili, Jake & Dinos Chapman, the Alan Cristea, Marlborough, White Cube and Karsten

Schubert galleries. They are interested in printmaking because it is, says Taylor, ‘as expressive, flexible and experimental as any other way of making art and, secondly, because it’s another way of making an image at a time when contemporary art is incredibly pluralistic’. His quarrel with the art schools that have broken up their print departments is that their view is founded on a hopelessly narrow notion of what art is and how it is made. Almost at the same moment as presses were being discarded and dumped, Rego, Hirst and the Chapman Brothers were bringing the unique qualities of print to the fore. ‘My experience, everywhere I look, is that art is being made in every medium, in every genre. Take Charles Avery: he makes films, constructions, massive diorama drawings – and prints. Look at the work of Mat Collishaw or Mark Wallinger. If art has anything to offer the postmodern experience, it is this plurality.’ For some Paupers artists, printmaking is central, Taylor adds. The tormented ruins of Hughie O’Donoghue’s images of war, memory and myth, for example, are perfectly expressed through the scorched blacks and ragged textures of etching and carborundum. While the Chapmans may mock the gravitas that irresistibly attaches itself to the etching process, they also pay tribute to the dark visions it afforded Goya. Chris Ofili made his delicate North Wales portfolio ‘on the road’, drawing onto pre-prepared hard ground etching plates rather like an empire-building explorer, carefully recording dates and locations. But all that history, while significant and fascinating, is not the point, says Taylor. ‘Most important of all is printmaking’s relationship with the image and how it takes that forward.’ Kings Place Gallery – The Mechanical Hand: 25 Years of Printmaking at Paupers Press 27 April – 22 June See Art Listings p76 for details


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April—June 2012

ART

Paupers Press

Mat Collishaw Insecticide 13 Far Left: Jake Chapman Dinos not Jake

Look at the prints of Goya or Picasso – printmaking is an intrinsic part of how they expressed themselves

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50 CLASSICAL

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April—June 2012

Voices IN THE WILDERNESS

Sibelius is a special figure for David Matthews: in this Inner Voices series, he has interwoven his own chamber and instrumental works with those of the Finnish master and a composer who influenced both, Beethoven. He hugely admires the way Sibelius creates ‘a sense of imperceptible movement between fast and slow tempi’ in his one-movement Seventh Symphony, and has often striven to follow its example. He’s also very much looking forward to hearing his own works for strings alongside Sibelius’s Rakastava (The Lover) – ‘a gorgeous piece’ – and the theatre music for the play Kuolema (Death), receiving its British premiere in this concert. Then Matthews’ Beethoven-inspired Variations for piano and Two Dionysus Dithyrambs rub shoulders, in a recital by Laura Mikkola, with some of Sibelius’s still-underrated solo piano music. Earlier, violinist Sara Trickey and pianist Daniel Tong tackle Beethoven’s stormy Violin Sonata in C minor, Op 7, Matthews own searching threemovement Adonis, and Sibelius’s Three Pieces, Op 116 – ‘I love those late violin pieces’, says Matthews. ‘They’re quite strange…’

David Matthews

Most artists have decisive moments. For David Matthews there was the time, in his early thirties, when he and his composer brother Colin played Benjamin Britten’s newly finished Third Quartet to the composer in piano duet. David took the two violin parts, Colin the viola and cello. More than thirty years later, Matthews still feels more than a little awestruck by Britten’s response. ‘The experience of playing it was extraordinary enough. But then at the end there was a long silence – I didn’t know what to say. Then Britten finally said in a small voice, “Do you think it’s any good?” We were both stunned, then we both said something like “Yes, we think it’s wonderful”, then the conversation lapsed into pleasantries again. But I remember looking round his room – the paintings, the books, and that wonderful music still ringing inside me – and thinking that Britten probably hadn’t got long to live, and that this creativity, this great culture was something I must try to keep going. It was worth dedicating one’s life to. And that piece summed it up. To this day, if I had to write only one kind of piece, it would be the string quartet.’

The Sibelius Family at their house in Ainola © DEA/A. Dagli Orti/De Agostini/Getty Images | David Matthews © Supplied Photo

Birds, folk song and imperceptible time-shifts link composer David Matthews with Sibelius in Matthews’ new series, Inner Voices, as Stephen Johnson discovers


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

April—June 2012

CLASSICAL Sibelius: INNER VOICES

The love of birds and their songs links Matthews with Sibelius

The Sibelius family at their house in Ainola

51


CLASSICAL Sibelius: INNER VOICES

April—June 2012

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

Jean Sibelius – caricature by Gunnar Clemens

I love those late violin pieces; they’re quite strange

Alongside Sibelius’s Voces intimae, the main Matthews event of this series is the performance of his Twelfth and latest String Quartet, for which Matthews admits to taking Beethoven’s Op. 130 (Grosse Fuge) as the starting point of his kaleidoscopic work. It was hearing the Kreutzer Quartet (the performers in this concert) play Op. 130 that gave Matthews the idea to write his own Twelfth Quartet. Other composers might have shrunk from the comparison: not Matthews. ‘I’m not intimidated by Beethoven at all. I find him inspiring. He’s a friend – obviously a friend who can do much better than me – but I find it uplifting just to be in the same room as him. When I heard Op. 130 I wondered if I could write a piece on that scale. The Kreutzers were really up for it – not many quartets would be. And soon I had a form in my mind: my “Great Fugue” is at the beginning rather than the end, but it was a wonderful way to get started. I’ve got rather hooked on fugues – I enjoy writing them so much.’ Another great love of Matthews – and Sibelius – is reflected at several stages in the new quartet: birdsong. Most of the avian participants are English, but the two imitated in the finale are Australians. ‘I’ve found that Australia is one of the few places in the world where you can write happy music! It’s not just the “no worries” culture – it’s so relaxed there, a long way from the horrors of the rest of the world. I went to a performance of Mahler’s Third Symphony down there and it sounded distinctly odd – all that Angst!’ Perhaps that explains something that happened to Matthews while he was taking the ferry from Freemantle to Rottnest Island. ‘There we were setting off on this absolutely gorgeous day and this tune – almost a pop tune – came into my head, and I wrote it down on a piece of paper. Then I thought, “Do I dare put this in a quartet?” Then I thought “Oh, what the Hell!” And it turned out to be linked thematically with the rest of the quartet. What Sibelius called “the inner connection between all the motifs” was there too.’

INNER VOICES

Sibelius & David Matthews 3 May Voces intimae: Master String Quartets by Sibelius and David Matthews 4 May Sara Trickey and Daniel Tong play Sibelius and David Matthews

Works for violin and piano

5 May Sibelius and David Matthews: Piano Works Sibelius’s Kuolema: a UK Premiere

English Chamber Orchestra plays Sibelius and D Matthews

plus Study Day

The love of birds and their songs links Matthews with Sibelius. Sibelius jotted down the cries of birds in his diaries, along with suggestions as to which instruments they resembled. This can be heard in the exquisitely haunting Scene with Cranes, from Kuolema, played by the ECO alongside a piece by Matthews entitled Three Birds and a Farewell. The first two bird portraits feature traditional Welsh and Manx folk songs, but when it came to writing the third, ‘Blackbird’, Matthews decided to have a go at writing his own ‘folk’ melody – just as Sibelius did after he’d been saturated in the so-called Runic Singing from the Finnish province of Karelia. ‘It’s a bit of a daring thing to do nowadays – writing folk music isn’t really approved of! But it’s a bit like David Hockney painting landscapes, or Lucian Freud doing portraits. Everyone said they couldn’t – or shouldn’t – be doing this sort of thing. But they did it, wonderfully. If you believe this enough you can do it.’

Jean Sibelius at his home in Järvenpää in 1939

Inner Voices: Sibelius and David Matthews 3 – 5 May. See Listings p62–63 for details

Jean Sibelius at his home in Järvenpää in 1939 © Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy | Jean Sibelius – caricature by Gunnar Clemens © DEA/A. Dagli Orti/De Agostini/Getty Images

52


Winterreise by Franz Schubert

AlexAnder WAll Tenor JAmie thompson Piano Friday 13th April 2012 @7.30pm hall one The story of one man’s journey through ice and snow with the memory of his past love… Hear Schubert’s masterpiece from two up-an-coming performers in the much-praised acoustics of Hall One at Kings Place.

www.alexanderwall.co.uk

Ticket Price: £19.50 Online Savers: £9.50 (subject to availability)


LISTINGS 55 62 68 76 77 78

APRIL MAY JUNE ART LISTINGS ARTISTIC HIRES CALENDAR

In the following pages, you will find details of our fantastic Summer 2012 Season. From classical, jazz, folk and world music concerts to spoken word and comedy nights, with so many events to choose from and tickets going very quickly, book early to secure your seats!

BOOK NOW ONLINE SAVERS £9.50 www.kingsplace.co.uk Box Office: 020 7520 1490

See Comedy Highlights  p17 and ‘WitTank’  p65 Photo: WitTank © Supplied Image


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking

APRIL

EASTER JAZZ WORKSHOP AND MUSIC FESTIVAL 2012

Monday 2 April

6 – 9 APRIL

OUT HEAR

Jamie Bissmire, Leon Michener & Guests: Crossing the Rubicon CONTEMPORARY

WORDS ON MONDAY

Picador: 40th Anniversary

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

TALKING ART

Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

Thursday 5 April OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Tim Key & Tom Basden FREEZE!

£6.50

Free Events

GMF EASTER WORKSHOP & MUSIC FESTIVAL 2012

DEBORAH BROWN © Melody and Ian McLaren | TIM KEY & TOM BASDEN © SUPPLIED PHOTO

SPOKEN WORD Join Picador as we turn 40. A chance to come and share your passions, discuss your favourite books, share ideas and hear special guests champion their favourite novels through readings and debate. Huge book give-aways, free digital downloads and prizes. Ticket price includes a fabulous new-look Picador classic.

SPOKEN WORD

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

See Jazz Highlights on GMF p15

‘Something Old, Something New’

Two in One Almuth Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer talk about their work and inspirations in this panel discussion hosted by Tom Flynn.

Her superlative quartet, including Bruce Barth and Stephen Keogh, gets the weekend underway. We’ll also hear from Francesco Petreni, Guillermo Rozenthuler, Jason Rebello, Peter King, Jean Toussaint, Frank Harrison, Jim Mullen and Kit Downes. Don’t miss this unique opportunity to hear the cream of the world’s jazz musicians under one roof.

Tim Key & Tom Basden

One of the UK’s leading DJs, producers and exponents of techno music, Jamie Bissmire, and contemporary experimental pianist Leon Michener join forces for a musical collaboration. They pay homage to the ideas that have mapped man’s struggle to change the common perceptions of our known universe. In Crossing the Rubicon we leave the backwaters of our everyday life and find ourselves at the point of no return. Here we can no longer conform to our known reality, which leaves us no choice but to journey on into the unknown... Hall Two 8pm

Legendary singer Deborah Brown kicks off a feast of jazz at the Global Music Foundation Easter Festival

LISTINGS

This Week’s Focus GLOBAL MUSIC FOUNDATION

Deborah Brown

LISTINGS 55

April 2012

Friday 6 April Rainbow Harp Ens.  1.30pm in Foyer led by Miriam Keogh London Vocal Project  2.15pm in Foyer led by Pete Churchill Singers Corner  5.45pm in Foyer Saturday 7 April Samba for Everyone!  3pm led by Felix Gibbons (with public participation) Singers Corner  5.45pm in Foyer Sunday 8 April Samba for Everyone!  2.30pm led by Felix Gibbons (with public participation) Singers Corner  6.30pm in Foyer Monday 9 April Samba for Everyone!  2.30pm led by Felix Gibbons (with public participation)

COMEDY Freeze! is a quasi-innovative two-man situation-based control-conditioned explosion. It stars Tim Key and Tom Basden, who used to live together and now live apart. There is some poetry and song and some housework and flat-out abuse. Not suitable. Tim Key has been in Newswipe and has made a record. Tom Basden has written two plays and is ideal. Key has won the Edinburgh Comedy Award (formerly the Perrier Award). Basden has only won the Edinburgh Best Newcomer Award (formerly the Perrier Best Newcomer Award). They were both in Cowards (BBC4). ‘Genius’ The Guardian ‘In any other sphere apart from comedy, we’d probably class this way of looking at the world as certifiable. Here it feels like genius.’ The Telegraph ‘An indefinably crackers hour’ The Independent ‘It’s almost impossible to describe in words the absurd inventiveness of this show – you can only go and see it yourself’ The Observer Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


56 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April 2011

FRIDAY 6 April GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

Deborah Brown sings ‘The Great American Songbook’ Guillermo Rozenthuler and Francesco Petreni ‘Viva Brasil’ Deborah Brown Quartet Deborah Brown voice Bruce Barth piano Jeremy Brown bass Stephen Keogh drums Guillermo Rozenthuler and Francesco Petreni Band Guillermo Rozenthuler voice Francesco Petreni percussion Frank Harrison piano Arnie Somogyi bass JAZZ A double bill that showcases two great singers from the Americas. Deborah Brown is simply one of the greatest jazz singers in the world today. She appears here with her quartet, featuring a world-class rhythm section made up of Bruce Barth (piano), Jeremy Brown (bass) and Stephen Keogh (drums). She will perform a programme of classics from the Great American Songbook to which she gives her own exquisite touch. Then down to South America with Guillermo Rozenthuler and Francesco Petreni drawing on some beautiful songs by composers like Antonio Carlos Jobim and Caetano Veloso from Brazil, Astor Piazzolla from Argentina, folk music from Venezuela and some great originals by Guillermo. Hall One 8pm £19.50, £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

SATURDAY 7 April GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

Stardust: Jazz Rainbow Trio with Jason Rebello Jason Rebello piano Arnie Somogyi bass Stephen Keogh drums JAZZ An invitation to music lovers of all ages to enjoy this lively interactive programme of delights and surprises from the GMF’s Stardust Project with the Jazz Rainbow Trio. Jazz Rainbow is a charming and witty reimagining of classic children’s tunes drawn from a mix of popular film and TV themes, original compositions and other

Jason Rebello

spontaneously improvised pieces, featuring fun quizzes and audience participation spots that entertain and educate at the same time. Jason Rebello’s virtuoso performance, together with a world class rhythm section featuring bassist Arnie Somogyi and drummer Stephen Keogh, moves from the sublime to the plain silly and back again in a matter of bars. Every piece will bring smiles of recognition and surprise with its reinvention of much-loved tunes. Including favourites Ben 10, In the Night Garden, Scooby Doo, Spiderman, Thomas the Tank Engine, Hedwig’s Theme from Harry Potter and more! Hall Two 1.30pm £12.50 Adults | £6.50 Under 12s

GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

Peter King & The Global Arts Ensemble Jim Mullen & Jean Toussaint Quintet

Peter King

Frank Harrison

GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

writer Edana Minghella. A rare chance to get behind-the-scenes insight into the making of a major film.

Audiogold + threeforagirl Audiogold Raphael vocals and keyboards Jonny guitar Alex bass Marco drums

Hall Two 4pm

threeforagirl Imogen Mason vocals, mandolin Cecila Christophers violin, vocals Eleanor Mason guitar, vocals

Frank Harrison Trio + Kit Downes (solo) + Bruce Barth Trio

CONTEMPORARY

Frank Harrison piano Kit Downes piano Bruce Barth piano

Audiogold are Raphael, Jonny, Alex and Marco. Rising up from the music circuit of Barnet, London, they recently released their debut album Embers & Theories on JAMC Records (ChinChin Records). Threeforagirl write and perform acoustic/folk music, favouring close experimental harmonies and hauntingly beautiful instrumentals. They have supported a number of high-profile artists, more recently Smoke Fairies, Edwina Hayes and Katy Lied. Hall Two 10pm

Peter King alto saxophone Jim Watson piano Jeremy Brown bass Stephen Keogh drums Global Arts Ensemble led by Darragh Morgan Jean Toussaint saxophones Jim Mullen guitar Barry Green piano Jeremy Brown bass Eddie Hick drums

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

JAZZ

GMF invite you to a screening of Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999; 139 mins). Jazz music emerges as a character in its own right in this awardwinning feature film starring Matt Damon, Gwyneth Paltrow and Jude Law. The screening will be followed by an onstage Q&A session with members of the cast* and featured musicians, chaired by Anthony’s sister, the singer and screen

A double bill comprising some of the finest jazz and classical artists in Europe, and featuring a performance of Janus by Peter King – a suite written for string quartet and jazz quartet, hailed by many as the best work of its kind. Hall One 8pm £19.50, £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

*Appearance of cast subject to availability

SUNDAY 8 April GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

Jazz at the Movies – The Talented Mr Ripley FILM SPOKEN WORD

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

Davide Petrocca bass Stephen Keogh drums JAZZ A triple bill of three astonishing pianists and composers, each with his own voice and each from a different generation. A living example of the timelessness of jazz and how jazz as an art form adapts to new conditions, absorbs new influences and is constantly being reborn. The concert will showcase compositions from the Frank Harrison Trio’s new CD , Sideways, recorded July 2011 in Berlin, and from Bruce Barth’s latest CD, Live at Smalls. Kit Downes will play a selection of his own pieces for solo piano. For anyone interested in the piano, good music and good writing, this is not to be missed. Hall One 8pm £19.50, £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Kit Downes


GMF Students in concert

Johnson, is accompanied by James Baillieu in a concert of English parlour songs, Schubert Lieder, and Benjamin Britten arrangements of Purcell. This concert will be broadcast live on BBC Radio 3

JAZZ

Hall One 7.30pm

Monday 9 April

KIT DOWNES © EMILE HOLBA | BEN JOHNSON © CHRIS CLOAG | JAMES BAILLIEU © BENJAMIN HARTE | PARTIKEL © VICTORIA B. | AQUINAS PIANO TRIO © JAMES TAYLOR | BRUCE BARTH © SUPPLIED PHOTO | JASON REBELLO, PETER KING, FRANK HARRISON © Melody and Ian McLaren

GMF EASTER FESTIVAL

A concert where the student ensembles that have been working with their tutors during the course have the chance to perform in public. Many students surpass their own expectations at an event like this and the atmosphere created is exciting and emotive. Performances from the choir – made up of all the students and tutors together – followed by the whole group playing and singing samba and other music from various regions of Brazil make for a truly festive end to the course.

£13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

WEDNESDAY 11 APRIL

FREE. Tickets required. Call Box Office.

BBC R3 LIVE In CONCERT

Ben Johnson (tenor) & James Baillieu (piano) Britten The Purcell Realisations from Orpheus Britannicus (selection) Schubert Wehmut, D772; Der Zwerg, D771 Nacht und Träume, D827; Lied des Florio, D857/2; Willkommen und Abschied, D767 Britten Canticle I: ‘My beloved is mine and I am his’, Op. 40 Songs by Virginia Gabriel, Maude Valérie White, Liza Lehmann and Amy Woodforde-Finden CLASSICAL One of the stars of BBC Radio 3’s New Generation Artists programme, tenor Ben

SATURday 14 April THE BASE

The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

Partikel: ‘Cohesion’

Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds COMEDY Complete sell out! Second show added due to popular demand. See Wed 11 April Hall Two 8pm SOLD OUT

The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

Friday 13 April

COMEDY

Hall Two 6pm

THURSDAY 12 APRIL OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds

LISTINGS 57

April 2011

FOLK UNION

The Long Notes

The iTunes chart-topping comedy podcast, with over two million downloads, returns to London, following up a sold-out debut with an all-new live show! Join hosts Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds as they continue their quest to provide the world with a complete resource of knowledge that isn’t as stodgy and boring as an encyclopaedia. Along the way, they’ll share outrageous personal stories, concoct hare-brained schemes, solve audience members’ personal problems, bicker with each other and crack jokes with varying degrees of tastefulness. While you may not ‘learn’ anything per se, these two world-weary Americans will provide an insight into the mind of twenty-first-century man that will simultaneously amuse and unnerve you.

The Long Notes uniquely represent Ireland, England and Scotland in both their music and their heritage. The line-up includes Scottish fiddler Jamie Smith (Beneche, SBO Band), Irish-born accordionist Colette O’Leary (Bumblebees), London-Irish banjo/ mandolin virtuoso Brian Kelly (Shane McGowan and The Popes) and Dorsetbased guitarist/singer Alex Percy (Beltane).  ‘A not dissimilar mix, on paper, to many a contemporary Celtic act, but the magic that The Long Notes make with it is truly something else.’ The Scotsman ‘They demonstrate a cutting edge to their music that makes it all the more enjoyable and exciting… it’s just what the trad scene needs.’ www.folkradio.co.uk

Hall Two 8pm

Hall Two 8pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

FOLK

Duncan Eagles saxophones Max Luthert double bass Eric Ford drums, percussion JAZZ Since releasing their debut album in 2010, Partikel have established themselves as a fresh new voice on the British contemporary jazz scene. Fusing lyrical melodies, creative improvisations, North and West African and Latin American rhythms, the trio have been captivating audiences up and down the UK with their high-energy and fiercely interactive music. Tonight Partikel will be performing music from their second album, Cohesion, released earlier this year on Mike Janisch’s Whirlwind Recordings label. ‘All the players are strong and creative, and are set to develop together as a group … The compositions are episodic and full of variety’ Julian Joseph, BBC Radio 3 Jazz Line-Up Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 15 April LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Aquinas Piano Trio Volkmar Andreae 50th-Anniversary Concert – under the auspices of the Swiss Embassy, London Pre-concert talk by conductor Marc Andreae (grandson of Volkmar Andreae) Shostakovich Piano Trio No. 1 Andreae Piano Trio No. 1 in F minor Haydn Piano Trio in A, Hob. XV:18 Saint-Saëns Piano Trio No. 1 in F, Op. 18 CLASSICAL

James Baillieu

Ben Johnson

The Aquinas Trio gave an impressive debut in the LCMS series in 2009, and return with a varied programme featuring a trio by the Swiss composer Volkmar Andreae (1879–1962), an important musical voice in his day and, as conductor, Mahler’s assistant at Vienna Opera. The concert marks Guild’s new recording of his symphonies, conducted by Marc Andreae, who joins us to talk about his grandfather’s work.

Aquinas Piano Trio

Pre-Concert Talk – St Pancras Room 5pm Performance – Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Bruce Barth

Partikel

The pre-concert talk is FREE, but requires a separate ticket. Contact Box Office.

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


58 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April 2012

THIS WEEK’s FOCUS BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 4 18 – 21 april

monday 16 April TALKING ART

Shakespeare – A True Portrait Dr Gail-Nina Anderson SPOKEN WORD Would a jobbing playwright really merit an expensive portrait in sixteenthcentury Britain? Do we really know what William Shakespeare looked like? Aside from the engraved frontispiece to his plays and his funerary monument in Stratford, many paintings have been put forward as contenders for the Bard’s true likeness. In this talk we survey the range of possibilities, placing them in the context of Elizabethan/Jacobean art and considering the ways in which individuals were depicted at that time. We also look at later images of Shakespeare, where he can appear as anything from a flourishing literary hero to a tourist attraction.

Serge Vuille Noisy Interval Jacques Demierre Une table pour trois ou la troïka s’ennuie CONTEMPORARY With silent movements and noisy immobility, We Spoke: Table explores the habits, reflexes and conventions of music making and performer communication. It has been presented over 15 times in Switzerland, Europe and Brazil and this will be the UK premiere of the whole production. The event features tongue dancing, conceptual noise, domestic grooves, coffee making and unspoken narratives. Led by Serge Vuille, We Spoke: New Music Company is a Swiss group which proposes thematic perspectives on contemporary classical and cutting-edge musical creation. In each project the group collaborates with musicians, composers and artists from different backgrounds to explore the labyrinth of music in new ways. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

WORDS ON MONDAY

Robert Browning and the Pied Piper SPOKEN WORD

Maxim Rysanov joins the aurora orchestra in a week featuring the WORKS FOR viola Week 4 of Brahms Unwrapped throws the spotlight on the burnished tone of the viola with Maxim Rysanov taking the clarinet part of the Clarinet Trio and Philip Dukes performing the two sonatas with Charles Owen and Katya Apekisheva. There’s a rare version of the First Piano Concerto, and a Keyboard Conversation® with Jeffrey Siegel See Feature on Brahms by Susan Tomes p33

Stories are the lifeblood of a nation. They follow us from childhood to death with an inescapable grip on the collective consciousness. Browning’s narrative poems are one of the great achievements of British poetry. In particular his Pied Piper transforms the fairy tale into a dark, disturbing vision, which has had a lasting impact on our cultural landscape. 2012 is the bicentenary of Browning’s birth. As the world descends on the city for the Olympic Games, the work of this late, great, London-born poet will inspire our imaginations with this grim and salutary tale of social snobbery, ingratitude and infanticide. Curated by Poet in the City in partnership with the Browning Society.

Wednesday 18 April BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Brahms for Four Hands Variations on a theme by Haydn in B flat for two pianos, Op. 56b 16 Waltzes, Op. 39 for piano four hands Hungarian Dances for four hands (selection) Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15 (arr. for four hands by Brahms) Charles Owen & Katya Apekisheva pianos CLASSICAL Two of London’s finest pianists join forces to present Brahms’s exhilarating series of Hungarian Dances, Waltzes and the masterly Haydn Variations. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

We Spoke: Table A We Spoke: New Music Company production Programme to include: Christian Kesten Zunge Lösen John Lely Distance Learning John Cage Living Room Music

Thursday 19 April BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Keyboard Conversations® The Power and Passion of Brahms A Concert with Commentary 2 Rhapsodies, Op. 79 Rhapsody in E flat, Op. 119 No. 4 Ballades, Op. 10 Nos 1, 3 & 4


April 2012

wherewithal to locate folk music in its rightful landscape: the modern world. In Jim’s vision, the oral tradition is electrified, not only technically but emotionally. ‘A compelling landmark in contemporary folk’ The Independent Hall Two 8pm

Charles Owen

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 21 April BRAHMS UNWRAPPED Philip Dukes

Waltzes, Op. 39 (selection)  Albumblatt in A minor Questions & Answers Jeffrey Siegel piano CLASSICAL In the first of his Keyboard Conversations®, Jeffrey Siegel performs and discusses   Brahms’s flamboyant rhapsodies, fired by poetic drama, and his narrative ballades, which tell stories in tone. The First Ballade is a rarely performed work, inspired by its spooky underlying tale; another suggests sylvan scenes alive with the sound of birds, while the charming, melodious waltzes reveal the lighter side of this profound composer. The programme also offers a unique opportunity to hear the recently recovered Albumblatt in A minor.

MAXIM RYSANOV © IRINA PODUSHKO | CHARLES OWEN & KATYA APEKISHEVA © JACK LIEBECK | PhiLIP DUKES, JIM MORAY © SUpplied photoS

Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Premium Seats £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

Friday 20 April BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Youth and Maturity: Brahms’s Music for Piano and Viola – 2 Variations on an original theme,   Op. 21 No. 1 Scherzo from the F–A–E Sonata Piano Sonata No. 3 in F minor, Op. 5 Viola Sonata in E flat, Op. 120 No. 2 Philip Dukes viola Katya Apekisheva piano CLASSICAL The dark sonorities of the viola were loved   by Brahms, and this programme by leading  violist Philip Dukes and acclaimed Russian pianist Katya Apekisheva contrasts early and late works. The volcanic Scherzo from the F–A–E Sonata was written as a gift to violinist Joseph Joachim, but shines with an 

Brahms Study Day – 2 Enrichment & Reduction

Katya Apekisheva

enlarged scope and depth when played on the viola. The late sonata in E flat, too, was originally conceived for clarinet, but Brahms rapidly arranged it and it became the first important sonata for the viola. Its   veiled, husky resonance is possibly even   better suited to the music’s elusive moods. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Premium Seats £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Jim Moray FOLK Jim Moray sees pop, rock and folk all as   parts of the same musical world – because  they are. He has known no other way to   think about music. From his debut, BBC Folk Award-winning album in 2003, Sweet England, through Jim Moray (2006), Low Culture (2008: fRoots Critics Poll Best Album Award-winner and Mojo Folk Album  of the Year) and In Modern History (2010), Moray’s career has been a continuous avowal of folk’s relevance to contemporary  life and its total indivisibility from the impulses which shape the very best rock   and pop. Now he comes bearing Skulk (2012), his best album yet, with the Jim Moray

Brahms in the Drawing-room Professor Robert Pascall (University of Nottingham) INTERACT Part 1 – Brahms enriches his chamber music style Professor Pascall traces the extraordinary story of Brahms’s Sarabande and Gavotte, the first music of his heard in London, in   1856, which went on to form a compositional quarry for his String Sextet No. 2 in G; String Quintet No. 1 in F; and Clarinet Quintet in B minor. Violinist Kenneth Sillito of the Academy of St Martin  in the Fields will join him in the second half. Part 2 – The symphony from concert hall to home Professor Pascall looks into that forgotten aspect of Brahms’s symphonism – his arrangements for piano duet, which brought the symphonies into the 19thcentury home – and also into his art of arranging, the chamber-like qualities of the  music itself and its textual transmission. St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm, 2pm–4.30pm £47.50 | Includes refreshments and lunch

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Maxim Rysanov & Aurora Orchestra play Brahms Clarinet Trio in A minor, Op. 114   (transc. for viola by Rysanov) Scherzo from the F–A–E Sonata (performed with viola & piano) Serenade No. 1 in D, Op. 11 (chamber vrs.) Maxim Rysanov viola with the Principal Players of Aurora Orchestra Oliver Coates cello John Reid piano Nicholas Collon conductor CLASSICAL Ukrainian viola star Maxim Rysanov joins   the Aurora Principals in his own new

LISTINGS 59 transcriptions of two of Brahms’s bestloved chamber works, including the elegantly melancholy Clarinet Trio. These gems set the stage for a performance of the First Serenade, a masterpiece of boundless invention and rich colour   heard here in the chamber orchestration for which it was originally conceived. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Saver Seats £9.50

THE BASE

Kit Downes Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3 presents Kit Downes piano James Maddren drums Seb Roachford drums JAZZ A unique chance to hear Kit Downes, one of the UK’s most dynamic pianists, in the company of top British drummers Seb Roachford and James Maddren. An event not to be missed! The concert will be recorded for Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 22 April LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets – 7 Pre-Concert Talk with Dr Robert Hanson: ‘La Malinconia – Muss es sein?’ Beethoven String Quartet in B flat, Op. 18 No. 6 Shostakovich String Quartet No. 8 in C minor, Op. 110 Beethoven String Quartet in F, Op. 135 CLASSICAL The seventh concert in our BeethovenShostakovich cycle couples one of the early Beethoven quartets with his very last, completed in 1826, and combines it with perhaps the most famous of Shostakovich’s quartets, the dramatic eighth, composed in only three days in July 1960. Pre-Concert Talk: St Pancras Room 5pm Performance: Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 | Online Savers £9.50 The pre-concert talk is FREE, but requires a separate ticket. Contact Box Office.

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60 LISTINGS

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April 2012

This Week’s Focus THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH BRODSKY QUARTET & FRIENDS

Monday 23 April WORDS ON MONDAY

Patricia Routledge: Facing the Music In conversation with Edward Seckerson

26 – 29 April

SPOKEN WORD It is still one of the best-kept secrets in show business that Patricia Routledge trained not only as an actress but also as a singer and had considerable experience and success in musical theatre, both in Britain and in the US. Her many awards include a Tony for her Broadway performance in the Styne-Harburg musical Darling of the Day (1967) and a Laurence Olivier Award for her role in Bernstein’s Candide (Old Vic, 1989). Her one-woman show Come For The Ride toured the UK in 1988 and in 1992 she played Nettie Fowler in the highly acclaimed production of Carousel at the National Theatre. In 1998 she was honoured with the Gold Badge of Merit by the Academy of Songwriters, Composers and Authors. Writer and broadcaster Edward Seckerson’s diligent discovery of her ‘musical life’ makes for a fascinating evening. Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

Aisha Orazbayeva: The Traces of Sound

Brodsky Quartet

Programme to include: Luigi Nono La lontananza nostalgica utopica futura for violin and electronics Pierre Boulez Anthèmes I Martin Matalon Traces VIII for violin and electronics, UK premiere Aisha Orazbayeva violin CONTEMPORARY

the pioneering brodsky quartet play the complete CYCLE OF quartetS BY DMITRI shostakovich In his 15 quartets, Shostakovich turned inwards and explored his own life and art, creating a vivid diary in music, evoking his wives and fellow musicians, recording his anguish at the victims of oppression and war, and, ultimately, writing his own epitaph in the face of death. This promises to be an unmissable experience. See Feature on the Brodsky Quartet pp28–31

This charismatic Kazakh-born young violinist and champion of contemporary music is taking the music world by storm. At 25 she has already studied in Italy and at the Royal Academy in London, and worked all over the world. She’s played with top-level groups such as the Ensemble Modern, and many composers have written pieces for her. Tonight she thrills with works from Italian avant-garde composer Luigi Nono (for violin and eight channels of pre-recorded electronicallymodified violin and other sounds), Boulez (Anthèmes, celebrating the solo violin) and Paris-based Argentinean composer Martin Matalon (presenting the UK premiere of his new Traces, for violin and electronics). ‘A great talent for playing emotionally and technically demanding music by living

Jenny Lin

composers.’ Ivan Hewett, The Telegraph ‘Brilliantly adventurous’ Tom Service, The Guardian Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 26 April THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH

Brodsky Quartet with Jenny Lin: Preludes & Fugues / Piano Quintet Preludes & Fugues, Op. 87 for solo piano (selection) Adagio & Allegretto for string quartet Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57 Brodsky Quartet Daniel Rowland violin Ian Belton violin Paul Cassidy viola Jacqueline Thomas cello with Jenny Lin piano CLASSICAL That Shostakovich’s 15 quartets are all in different keys isn’t just accidental: he set out to explore the medium in the manner in which he wrote his earlier Preludes and Fugues for piano, methodically working through the chromatic scale. Before embarking upon the epic quartets we delve into the mind of Shostakovich in more depth – his Preludes and Fugues for piano and the remarkable Piano Quintet. Joined by pianist Jenny Lin, the Brodsky Quartet kick off this exciting series. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

BRODSKY QUARTET Ticket Offers Multi-event discount* Book 2–3 concerts and save 20% Book 4–6 concerts and save 30% * Excludes Online Savers. Conditions apply.


April 2012

Friday 27 April THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH

Brodsky Quartet: Complete Shostakovich Quartets – 1 String Quartet No. 1 in C, Op. 49 String Quartet No. 2 in A, Op. 68 String Quartet No. 3 in F, Op. 73 Brodsky Quartet

flautist with Emily Barker & The Red Clay Halo, she has also previously worked with the likes of The Broken Family Band, Chris T-T and John Peel-revered band Magoo. Gill’s debut solo album Tarry Awhile blends a delicate sensibility with dark lyrical twists,  beautifully lifted by her soft, ‘breathlessly pretty’ voice and exquisite arrangements around guitar and piano lines. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Adrian Crowley & Gill Sandell

Brodsky Quartet © Nick White | Adrian Crowley © Dara Munnis | Empirical © William Ellis | Jenny Lin © Supplied Photo

FOLK Irish troubadour Adrian Crowley won the   prestigious Choice Music Prize for his 2009 album, Season of the Sparks (Chemikal Underground). A lyricist of rare perspicacity, he is also a multiinstrumentalist, as adept with arcane instrumental exotica as he is on electric guitar. North London folk singer Gill Sandell  will be supporting Adrian on this gig. Sandell is fast gaining a strong reputation as a bittersweet songwriter of rare subtlety. Best known as accordionist and

Saturday 28 April THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH

Brodsky Quartet: Complete Shostakovich Quartets – 2 String Quartet No. 6 in G, Op. 101 String Quartet No. 4 in D, Op. 83 String Quartet No. 5 in B flat, Op. 92 Brodsky Quartet CLASSICAL This is a programme of charged emotion, starting with the intimate No. 6 to No. 4 which is arguably the most melodic of all the quartets – its four movements all contain one beautiful theme after another.  We conclude with the amazingly symphonic No. 5; its vast structure is played without a break, with a gloriously evocative slow movement and the magical, outer-space ending. Hall One 3pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH

Brodsky Quartet: Complete Shostakovich Quartets – 3 String Quartet No. 7 in F sharp minor, Op. 108 String Quartet No. 8 in C minor, Op. 110 String Quartet No. 9 in E flat, Op. 117 Brodsky Quartet CLASSICAL

Adrian Crowley

exciting – building in momentum and emotion till the triumphant and explosive final cadence! Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Empirical JAZZ

CLASSICAL The First Quartet was written after the birth of Shostakovich’s son and has   a childlike quality throughout. The Second, by contrast, is a monumental tour de force. By the Third Quartet, the great man has settled very comfortably into his own skin. This masterpiece has gone on to become one of the most famous works not only in the cycle but   in the whole repertoire.

LISTINGS 61 LISTINGS

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Without doubt one of the most personal and powerful quartets in the whole repertoire, No. 8 is dedicated to the victims of fascism and war, and is also   the composer’s own epitaph. No. 7   is the shortest of the set and is played without a break, inquisitive yet solemn, energetic but ghostly. No. 9, is a   rarely played gem and one of the most

Empirical is a group of four young, British jazz musicians whose music manages to be both timeless and totally now, inside and out. They have carved out a place as one of the most exciting young jazz bands, touring from New York to Molde, London to Montreal, and they have won numerous awards including the 2010 MOBO for best jazz act and Jazzwise and Mojo albums of the year. Elements Of Truth is their third album, and second with the current line-up of Nathaniel Facey (alto sax), Shaney Forbes (drums), Tom Farmer (bass) and Lewis Wright (vibes). Alongside the musical influences from the oblique sounds of Andrew Hill and Eric Dolphy’s sublime Out To Lunch, to the more contemporary stylings of Vijay Iyer, Wayne Shorter and Branford Marsalis, it is their wide range of ideas through the collaborative trial and error process of   jazz improvisation that makes them such a powerful group. ‘The coolest of Britain’s young jazz bands’ Daily Telegraph Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sunday 29 April THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH

Brodsky Quartet: Complete Shostakovich Quartets – 4 String Quartet No. 11 in F minor, Op. 122 String Quartet No. 12 in D flat, Op. 133 String Quartet No. 13 in B flat minor, Op. 138 String Quartet No. 14 in F sharp, Op. 142 Brodsky Quartet CLASSICAL Shostakovich dedicated a work to each of the members of the Beethoven Quartet, from the diversity of the Eleventh, in memory of the second violinist, to the huge display of emotion within the Twelfth,  for the first violin. In the Thirteenth Quartet, he explored the mysterious world

Empirical

of the viola; listen for the jazz section and the infamous, lonely viola solo at the end. The Fourteenth, for the cellist, exploits the melodic possibilities to the full with a heartbreaking slow movement. Hall One 3pm £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES THE MUSICAL DIARIES OF SHOSTAKOVICH

Brodsky Quartet: Complete Shostakovich Quartets – 5 String Quartet No. 10 in A flat, Op. 118 String Quartet No. 15 in E flat minor,   Op. 144 Brodsky Quartet CLASSICAL The Brodsky Quartet’s Shostakovich marathon ends with this special concert, which also concludes the London Chamber Music Series 2011/12 season. An exceptional piece of writing, there is quite simply nothing like the Fifteenth Quartet in all of music, a profound comment on humanity, life and death. Preceding it we explore the Tenth, dedicated to Mieczysław Weinberg, the composer and friend with whom Shostakovich entered into battle to complete a tenth quartet first: guess who won! The explosive second movement is unique in its relentless intensity whilst the third is beautifully calm, tender and tearful. Hall One 6.30pm £14.50 £18.50 Online Savers £9.50


62 LISTINGS

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April/May 2012

This Week’s Focus INNER VOICES: THE MUSIC OF SIBELIUS AND DAVID MATTHEWS curated by David Matthews

Monday 30 April WORDS ON MONDAY

PhotoVoice Lecture Series: Peter Marlow SPOKEN WORD The award-winning international charity PhotoVoice continues its lecture series with this evening’s talk by Peter Marlow. Born in 1952, Marlow is one of Britain’s leading photojournalists, whose work has appeared in most of the world’s major magazines. Marlow joined Magnum Photos in 1980, becoming a full member in 1986. Although he travelled widely in his early career, Marlow’s major projects have often been concerned with contemporary British life. In recent years, he has worked more extensively in colour and concentrated on his exploration of the physical and personal landscape. Marlow’s current project is a survey of the naves of all 42 of England’s cathedrals.

3 – 5 may

Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

Pre-Concert Talk in association with City Lit At the Cutting Edge: Ilan Volkov and friends in concert SPOKEN WORD Pre-concert talk with Malcolm Miller from City Lit, London’s destination for inspiring part-time adult education. Wenlock Room 6pm Jean Sibelius at his home in Järvenpää in 1939

THE MOST INTIMATE WORKS OF THE FINNISH GIANT UNDERPIN A FASCINATING WEAVE OF MUSIC English composer David Matthews has produced four intricate and resonant programmes interweaving the music of Sibelius with his own recent compositions. A rare opportunity to explore Sibelius’s piano music, his chamber works and the UK premiere of his music for Kuolema with the English Chamber Orchestra. See Feature on Inner Voices by Stephen Johnson pp50–52

This package is offered in partnership with City Lit | Limited availability £9.50 – Covers both the pre-concert talk (6pm) and performance (8pm) To book, contact City Lit – 020 7831 7831 http://www.citylit.ac.uk/courses/Music/ Music_appreciation

OUT HEAR

Ilan Volkov & Guests: Gold Mines CONTEMPORARY Ilan Volkov is one of the guiding forces behind Levontine 7, a performance venue in Tel Aviv that brings together different musical genres, including classical, jazz, electronic and rock. He is Music Director and Chief Conductor of the Iceland Symphony, where his role includes creating an annual new-music festival where the orchestra collaborates with contemporary composers, non-classical

musicians and artists. His event consists of three sets: Mines (with Yael Barolsky and Ram Gabay) for two violins and drums; Morton Feldman improv pieces for piano four hands played by John Tilbury and Maya Dunietz; Christian Wolff’s Stones with Ilan Volkov and guest performers. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

may Thursday 3 May INNER VOICES

Voces intimae: Master String Quartets by Sibelius and D Matthews Sibelius Andante festivo (string qt. vrs.) Sibelius String Quartet in D minor, Op. 56 Voces intimae D Matthews String Quartet No. 12, Op. 114 Kreutzer Quartet CLASSICAL The dynamic Kreutzer Quartet, whose extensive discography includes the first volume of the complete string quartets by David Matthews (2010, Toccata), present two mighty works. Sibelius’s titular masterpiece and Matthews’ 12th and most recent quartet both take the multimovement, late-Beethoven quartet form as models. Indeed Matthews admits to taking the Op. 130 with the Grosse Fuge as the starting point for his kaleidoscopic work, except his ‘Great Fugue’ opens the work instead of closing it. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Impropera’s Mayday Mayhem COMEDY It’s the time of year when all good folk strap on their knee bells, pick up their Morris Dancing hankies and head for the Kings Place village green for some musical merriment with resident musical improvisation virtuosos Impropera. Our maypole is up. Anything could happen! ‘Brilliant ingenuity’ The Times Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


May 2012

Sara Trickey

Daniel Tong

elements. He has appeared alongside Stéphane Grappelli, Barbara Dickson and Lindisfarne, recorded with Richard Thompson and continues to be in huge demand. Seth Lakeman and Kate   Rusby count him as a huge influence. David Newey’s guitar playing is unique and unrivalled, encompassing both the flat-pick and finger-style techniques with power, fluency and control. He often blurs the boundaries between acoustic and electric styles, coaxing out sounds normally  associated with rock and roll, jazz and country. David himself is a 2003 Radio 2 Young Folk Award finalist. His solo album prompted a 5-star review in Rock and Reel. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 4 May

Jean Sibelius © Pictorial Press Ltd / Alamy | Daniel Tong © Benjamin Harte | Sarah-Jane Bradley © Hannah Chlala | English Chamber Orchestra © Keith Saunders | Sara Trickey © Supplied Photo

INNER VOICES

Sara Trickey and Daniel Tong play Sibelius and David Matthews Works for violin and piano Sibelius Sonatina in E, Op. 80 D Matthews Aria, Op. 41 Sibelius Four Pieces, Op. 115 D Matthews Adonis, Op. 105 Sibelius Three Pieces, Op. 116 Beethoven Violin Sonata No. 7 in C minor, Op. 30 No. 2 Sara Trickey violin Daniel Tong piano CLASSICAL A programme of contrasting works for violin and piano, including the last two published works by Sibelius. David Matthews Adonis was written for Sara Trickey, who premiered it at the Presteigne Festival in 2007. Like Sibelius before him, Matthews is a fervent admirer   of Beethoven, whose passionate C minor sonata completes the programme. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Tom McConville with David Newey FOLK This duo are internationally renowned for their fiery, heart-stopping performances. Tom McConville (BBC Folk Musician of the Year 2009) is one of the most original fiddlers in the UK, blending traditional music from his native Newcastle with Irish, American and Scottish influences and jazz, folk, bluegrass and classical

Saturday 5 May INNER VOICES

Study Day on Sibelius and David Matthews PART I Andrew Barnett (Chairman, UK Sibelius Society): ‘The Theatre Music of Sibelius’ Julian Anderson (composer): ‘Sibelius Today’ PART II Edward Clark (President, UK Sibelius Society): ‘Sibelius’s First Versions’ David Matthews (composer): ‘Sibelius and the symphonic quest’ INTERACT A full day of study and discussion on varied aspects of the careers of Sibelius and David Matthews. Andrew Barnett, whose authoritative book Sibelius was published in 2007, explains the background to Sibelius’s music for   the theatre, which encompassed almost his entire career. Celebrated composer Julian Anderson has built a career around a wide range of compositional genres.   His talks and programme planning expertise are widely admired. Edward Clark, author of Sibelius Reflections (2007), talks about some of the many   first versions of Sibelius (not least the Violin Concerto and the Fifth Symphony), including that of Valse triste to be heard in the evening concert, as part of the music for Kuolema. Composer David Matthews, the curator of this unique series, will speak about his experience of writing symphonies at a time when Sibelius   has become a strong influence in the wider world of music. St Pancras Room 11am–1.30pm, 2.30pm–5pm £47.50 | Includes refreshments and lunch

INNER VOICES

Sibelius and David Matthews: Piano Works Sibelius Five Esquisses, Op. 114 D Matthews Two Dionysus Dithyrambs, Op. 94 Sibelius Five Pieces for piano, Op. 75 D Matthews Variations for piano, Op. 72 Sibelius Six Impromptus, Op. 5 Laura Mikkola piano CLASSICAL A wide-ranging programme for piano, featuring works by two major symphonists, both of whom demonstrate a great ability for writing miniatures as well as extended works for orchestra. Award-winning Finnish virtuoso Laura Mikkola plays both early and late Sibelius works together with two intriguing pieces by David Matthews. His variations for piano is an extended work of 24 variations on a short original theme. Hall One 6pm (Lasts about 45 mins) £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50

INNER VOICES

Sibelius’s Kuolema: a UK Premiere English Chamber Orchestra plays Sibelius and D Matthews Sibelius Andante festivo D Matthews Winter Remembered for viola and strings, Op. 86 Sibelius Rakastava – Suite for strings, triangle & timpani, Op. 14 Sibelius Presto in D for strings D Matthews Adagio for strings, Op. 56b D Matthews Three Birds and a Farewell, Op. 118 (World premiere) Sibelius Kuolema, Op. 44 Music for the original theatre production (incl. ‘Valse triste’) (UK premiere) D Matthews Total Tango for strings, Op. 80a Lucy Roberts soprano Johnny Herford baritone Sarah-Jane Bradley viola English Chamber Orchestra Paul Watkins conductor CLASSICAL A rare opportunity to hear two significant premieres from the celebrated English Chamber Orchestra under its conductor-in-chief Paul Watkins. They   will deliver the first performance of   David Matthews’ new opus, Three Birds and a Farewell, and also perform the UK premiere of the complete incidental music that Sibelius wrote for his brother-  in-law Arvid Järnefelt’s theatre play Kuolema (Death), including the string

LISTINGS 63

version of the much loved Valse triste. Another Sibelian item, Rakastava (The Lover), is the composer’s finest   work for string orchestra, exuding the serenity and grace of the Nordic landscape. Winter Remembered is a beautiful piece for viola and strings, written for Sarah-Jane Bradley in 2002. Matthews is a keen composer of tangos and tonight’s programme ends with   Total Tango for strings – one of his best-loved works. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £17.50 £21.50 £26.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Dave Stapleton feat. Marius Neset, Dave Kane, Olavi Louhivuori & Brodowski Quartet JAZZ Hailed by The Guardian as a ‘UK jazz revelation’, pianist and composer Dave Stapleton brings passion and maturity   to his work with utterly compelling   results. His music is bold and intensely melodic – moving effortlessly between jazz, world and classical styles. He is joined by the Norwegian saxophonist Marius Neset, Irish bassist Dave Kane, Finnish drummer Olavi Louhivuori and   the London-based Brodowski String Quartet. With a European aesthetic and an idiosyncratic compositional approach, this music combines a rich, colourful harmonic language with a strong rhythmical drive. Sensational. ‘Stapleton knows how to shape a 21st-  century modern-jazz unit.’ The Independent Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Sarah-Jane Bradley

English Chamber Orchestra

LISTINGS

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64 LISTINGS

new singles in the UK and continue to increase their popularity at home and abroad. Make the most of this opportunity to see them in the intimate surrounds of The Folk Union where the band will be playing a range of brand-new tracks and some of their old favourites. It promises to be a wonderful evening. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

ensemblebash

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

May 2012

This Week’s Focus TCHAIKOVSKY – THE ROMANTIC GENIUS curated by Martino Tirimo 16 – 19 may

Saturday 12 May THE BASE

Monday 7 May

Girls in Airports

OUT HEAR

Spitz presents...

ensemblebash@20 part 2: Cage@100 John Cage Third Construction; Credo in Us; Double Music Keith Tippett Dance of the Dragonfly Stephen Montague Chew-Chow Chatterbox Gabriel Prokofiev New work CONTEMPORARY 20 years after ensemblebash burst onto the scene, the percussion quartet returns to London to present the second part of a retrospective of those two decades. The first concert redefined the percussion ensemble and spawned a host of imitators. Tonight the group’s high-energy performing style and telepathic ensemble skills take on works by composers with whom ensemblebash has collaborated. Hall Two 8pm

JAZZ Girls in Airports are a young instrumental band that has already achieved excellent reviews as well as bagging a Danish Music Award for the best jazz crossover CD release. (see p16) The band is made up of five male musicians who mix indie-soul, Afrobeat and Indian raga with cool Scandinavian tones. Girls in Airports capture the moment through their steamy rhythms, droning saxophones and a contagious energy, ‘allowing the music to just be’. ‘Girls in Airports bring their delightful musical Esperanto to London. This is the post-complexity generation: they make music pure and simple, with plenty of emotion, but carry no excess baggage.’ Django Bates Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Tchaikovsky

Sunday 13 April Friday 11 May

NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

FOLK UNION

The Epstein

Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

FOLK

MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY

There’s always been a widescreen feel about The Epstein but lately Ollie Wills’ songs and voice have moved from the campfire and the porch to encompass the entire horizon, as typified by ‘I Held You Once’. This is, as The Waterboys might once have said, The Big Music. And as long as The Epstein’s tunes can keep up with the expansion in sound, they’ll soon develop their own gravity fields. The Epstein have been honing their craft onstage and in the studio for a number of years now and this passing time has seen the band develop from country folkies to pop romantics. 2012 will see the band release a number of

Sunday afternoons will never be the same again. In a new series devised by cellist/ composer Philip Sheppard, top musicians play improvised soundtracks to the world’s greatest silent films without rehearsing in advance. Films include the antics of comic heroes Buster Keaton and Harold Lloyd and other classics. We can’t tell you which film is showing when – no-one knows, not even the performers! Take pot luck and enjoy the club-like atmosphere in Hall Two. Hall Two 3pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Not So Silent Offer: Ticket + Bloody Mary + Roast Lunch. All for just £29.50

Tchaikovsky up close, from the sparkling Nutcracker to the elegiac Piano trio Pianist Martino Tirimo is joined by his own Rosamunde Trio and the Amar Quartet in this series focusing on the more intimate side of the Russian Romantic. The melting lyricism of the too-rarely played Quartets contrasts with the delightfully picturesque Seasons for piano, and the showstopping virtuosity of the Rococo Variations for cello. See Classical Highlights on Russian Season with Martino Tirimo p9


May 2012

Monday 14 May WORDS ON MONDAY

Carol Ann Duffy & Friends SPOKEN WORD Poet in the City’s annual celebration of the   poet laureate at Kings Place is fast becoming an institution. Duffy’s work   continues to inspire and delight audiences, and this event provides a great   opportunity for new audiences to discover her superb poetry. She will also be introducing the audience to her special guests, who will include some of the UK’s   finest poets, so the event promises to be a fabulous chance to experience other talented voices. Don’t miss what is sure to be a fantastic evening of poetry! Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

Percussions Claviers de Lyon: Striking Visions Gavin Bryars At Portage and Main Thierry Pécou L’Arbre aux fleurs Gérard Lecointe Divertissement No. 1 François Narboni New work Percussions Claviers de Lyon Gérard Lecointe artistic director Ensemblebash © Nick White | Pyotr Tchaikovsky © RIA Novosti / Alamy | Amar Quartet © Ettore Causa | Martino Tirimo © Francesco Tirimo

CONTEMPORARY Percussion as you’ve never heard it before. The five brilliant members of Percussions Claviers de Lyon have been producing an innovative new repertoire

for their instruments for over 25 years, surprising and delighting audiences with their spirited rhythms and subtle melodies, performing interpretations   of Debussy, Ravel and Bernstein alongside exciting new pieces for percussion. The result – an eclectic repertoire that is perpetually unfolding, for the pleasure of all. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Wednesday 16 May TCHAIKOVSKY – THE ROMANTIC GENIUS in association with City Lit The Seasons and The Nutcracker Suite: Tchaikovsky’s Piano Music with Martino Tirimo SPOKEN WORD Pre-concert talk with Malcolm Miller from City Lit, London’s destination for inspiring part-time adult education.

COMEDY WitTank and friends present an evening   of sketch comedy. Like a runaway carnival of invention, WitTank bring a whirlwind   of colossal characters, rakish charm,   and sketch magnificence to Kings Place. ‘A definite must see’ *****   British Comedy Guide ‘A dazzling display of sketch genius... has to be seen to be believed!’ ***** The List Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 18 May TCHAIKOVSKY – THE ROMANTIC GENIUS

Amar Quartet plays Tchaikovsky String Quartet No. 1 in D, Op. 11 String Quartet No. 3 in E flat minor, Op. 30

Wenlock Room 6pm

Amar Quartet

This package is offered in partnership with City Lit | Limited availability £9.50 – Covers both the pre-concert talk (6pm) and performance (7.30pm) To book, contact City Lit – 020 7831 7831 http://www.citylit.ac.uk/courses/Music/ Music_appreciation

CLASSICAL A special appearance from the Zurichbased Amar Quartet, which adopted the   name of the composer Hindemith’s quartet, in tribute to him. Their Kings Place   debut sees them play Tchaikovsky’s masterful Third Quartet, paired with his brilliant First Quartet in D major. After the premiere of String Quartet No. 3, Tchaikovsky declared: ‘I think I’ve rather written myself out. I’m beginning to repeat myself, and cannot conceive anything new.’ However, after its second performance he cheerfully wrote that ‘it pleased everyone very much. During   the Andante many, so I’m told, were in tears.’

TCHAIKOVSKY – THE ROMANTIC GENIUS

The Seasons, Op. 37b Chanson triste in G minor, Op. 40 No. 2 Mazurka in C, Op. 40 No. 4 Dumka, Op. 59 Concert suite from The Nutcracker, Op. 71

Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Martino Tirimo piano CLASSICAL A programme that presents some of Tchaikovsky’s best-loved piano pieces, including all 12 ‘months’ that constitute   The Seasons, the Chanson triste and also Dumka, which encapsulates much of the essence of the Russian character. The concert concludes with the brilliant Nutcracker Suite, bringing together seven of the best pieces from the composer’s ever-popular ballet. Hall One 7.30pm

Amar Quartet

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

WitTank

Pre-Concert Talk

The Seasons & The Nutcracker Suite

Martino Tirimo

THURSday 17 May

£14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Steven Finn FOLK From the driving rhythm of his national guitar picking to the raw energy of his explosive harp playing, Steven Finn has   been electrifying audiences across Europe.   He combines English folk and Delta blues music to provide a backdrop to his songs of protest delivered with Northern edge. Described as ‘one of the best young acoustic blues guitar players on two legs’. Steven was number one in the UK Blues chart in Summer 2010. This gig will feature

LISTINGS 65

songs from his new album. ‘Timeless, yet completely relevant, these are songs you want to listen to again and again’ Bristol Folk House Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 19 May TCHAIKOVSKY – THE ROMANTIC GENIUS

Tchaikovsky – Piano Trio & Rococo Variations Souvenir d’un lieu cher for violin and piano, Op. 42 Variations on a Rococo Theme   for cello and piano, Op. 33 Piano Trio in A minor, Op. 50 Rosamunde Trio CLASSICAL Hear the members of the wonderful Rosamunde Trio in an evening of Tchaikovsky’s glorious chamber music. The Souvenir d’un lieu cher shows off the violin’s lyrical qualities, the Rococo Variations displays the cello’s huge range   and the much-loved A minor Trio written in memory of Rubinstein is simply one of the composer’s greatest achievements. It is elegant, inventive and awe-inspiring. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

THE BASE

The Quentin Collins / Brandon Allen Quartet Spitz presents... Quentin Collins trumpet Brandon Allen tenor saxophone Ross Stanley organ Enzo Zirilli drums JAZZ The Quentin Collins/Brandon Allen Quartet  brings together four of the most exciting jazz musicians working on the UK and European circuit today. After over four years of extensive touring, last year saw the release of their acclaimed debut album,  What’s It Gonna Be?, described as ‘wonderfully energising’ music that ‘defies   expectations’ (The Guardian). Having worked with such diverse and distinguished  artists as Liane Carroll, Dennis Rollins and Paloma Faith, the Quartet brings its effusive and energetic live show to Kings Place. A night of infectious and melodic hard-bop that’s not to be missed. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

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May 2012

Monday 21 May TALKING ART

Edvard Munch and The Scream Dr Gail-Nina Anderson SPOKEN WORD One of the most instantly recognised works of western art, The Scream, first painted in 1893 by Norwegian artist Edvard Munch, has become an icon of Expressionist angst. This talk will uncover and explore the meaning of the work by examining it within the context of Munch’s career, where it can be seen as part of ‘The Frieze of Life’ – an intense, complex attempt to develop style and subjects that could express the emotional charge informing the pattern of human existence. While Munch’s development as a painter and printmaker shows the influence of such post-impressionists as Paul Gauguin, this chance to survey the range of his work will illustrate that unique capacity to fit form to feeling which makes it feel ‘modern’ even today. St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

Fiona Shaw

WORDS ON MONDAY

An Audience with Fiona Shaw

one New York Critics’ Awards for her performance in TS Eliot’s poem The Waste Land as a one-person show. She recently directed an acclaimed production of Mozart’s opera The Marriage of Figaro for the ENO. Broadcaster, writer and music critic (The Independent) Edward Seckerson leads a fascinating conversation with Shaw about her enthralling career as an actress and director. Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

Acclaimed as one of our finest classical actresses, Fiona Shaw has won wide recognition for her numerous film forays, gathering plaudits for her roles in My Left Foot (1989), Three Men and a Little Lady (1990), The Butcher Boy (1997) and The Black Dahlia (2006) as well as her iconic portrayal of Petunia Dursley in the Harry Potter series. Still first and foremost a stage performer, she has won numerous prestigious theatre awards, including three Laurence Olivier Awards for best actress, two London Critics’ Awards and

Pascal Amoyel

Emmanuelle Bertrand and Pascal Amoyel Henri Dutilleux Trois Strophes sur le nom de Sacher Greif Piano Sonata No. 22, Op. 319 Les Plaisirs de Chérence Pascal Amoyel Itinérance Greif Sonate de Requiem, Op. 283 Emmanuelle Bertrand cello Pascal Amoyel piano CONTEMPORARY In 1999 Emmanuelle Bertrand met composer Henri Dutilleux, whose support was to be of decisive importance: ‘Her interpretation immediately delighted me with its transparency of sound, its rhythmic rigour, its technical perfection, and the brio of her playing. I have no hesitation in saying that it was a genuine revelation to me.’ Her recording of Trois strophes sur le nom de Sacher won Télérama’s ffff award, a Diapason d’Or 2000 and a Choc du Monde de la Musique. Pascal Amoyel and Emmanuelle Bertrand have made two albums of Olivier Greif’s music and the Sonate de Requiem was also awarded a Diapason d’Or 2006. Bertrand recently recorded Amoyel’s Itinérance for her harmonia mundi album Le violence parle, it too the winner of a Diapason d’Or 2011. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

In conversation with Edward Seckerson SPOKEN WORD

Emmanuelle Bertrand

Phronesis

her as ‘a first-rate tunesmith, a fine melodeon player and a songwriter deserving of our complete admiration’. With a love of the material evident in David’s warm and clear vocals they accompany themselves (mainly on melodeon, cello and guitar) with a rare lyrical skill that makes this rising trio one of the most engaging bands on the folk scene today. For cello lovers, this is also a welcome return to Folk Union for the brilliant Kate Riaz who appeared with Dave Swarbrick earlier this year. You won’t see cello played like this anywhere else on the folk scene! ‘Songs full of gentility and grace’ fRoots ‘Make sure you see them - you won’t be disappointed’ EDS Magazine Hall Two 8pm

FRIDAY 25 May

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Issy & David Emeney with Kate Riaz FOLK Issy’s reputation as a top-class melodeon player and composer of some of the finest songs and tunes you’ll hear is well established. She marries stunning melodies with utterly captivating stories that entrance you. Andy Kershaw praises

Issy & David Emeney with Kate Riaz

Saturday 26 May THE BASE

Phronesis: Album Launch Jasper Høiby double bass Ivo Neame piano Anton Eger drums JAZZ Described by The Telegraph as ‘the most electrifying experience to be had in British jazz’, launch their highly- anticipated fourth album, Walking Dark, performing their new material in its entirety for the first time in London. In 2010 they captured the hearts and minds of audiences and developed a fierce reputation as one of the most formidable trios in the UK. Their third album Alive was chosen as ‘Jazz Album of the Year’ by Jazzwise and MOJO magazines. In 2011 the band received outstanding receptions for their live performances across Europe and North America. ‘One of the most exciting bands on the planet today’ Jazzwise ‘Look out for Phronesis – they might change your life!’ Sean Rafferty, In Tune BBC Radio 3 Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


May 2012

organically blends Bach and Cage, blurring borders while emphasising shared elements. Both masters are connected by a mathematically oriented approach to composition. Tristano’s selection of pieces is based on tonal convergence, on cyclical structures and polyphonic construction. He searches for spiritual common ground in both composers, which he conveys through his own compositions, stamping his mark with a fresh and unique sound. This is the London show of Tristano’s bachCage album. The programme includes pieces by Bach, Cage and Tristano himself.

This Week’s Focus BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 5 30 may – 2 june

Fiona Shaw © HBO Home Box Office | Emmanuelle Bertrand and Pascal Amoyel © Jean Philippe Voidet | Orion String Quartet © Indiana University | Erik Kessels © Marc Eckard | Issy and David Emeney with Kate Riaz, Phronesis © Supplied PhotoS

LISTINGS 67

Hall Two 8pm Erik Kessels

Monday 28 May WORDS ON MONDAY

Erik Kessels: Advertising for People Who Don’t Like Advertising Part of the Laurence King Publishing lecture series SPOKEN WORD

Orion String Quartet

SUSAN TOMES JOINS THE ORION STRING QUARTET FOR THREE CONCERTS OF brahms’s BEGUILING PIANO QUARTETS We welcome a return visit from the New York-based Orion Quartet to perform the quartets and piano quartets with Susan Tomes. Also in Brahms Unwrapped, Jeffrey Siegel explores the uniquely creative love triangle between Brahms, Robert and Clara Schumann, while the Study Day explores the history of Brahms performance.

Despite many years spent in the heart   of the advertising industry, KesselsKramer (KK) has always had a love/hate relationship with the business, and   has repeatedly questioned the meaning of advertising and challenged its conventions. Now, KK has decided to write a book about these attitudes, enlisting the help of advertising   mavericks and outsiders in order to help answer its many questions. Opening the evening, Erik Kessels will present KK’s favourite examples of ‘Advertising For People Who Don’t Like Advertising’, creative work and insights that go beyond the traditional in a quest to find the limits of communications. A round table discussion will give guests the opportunity  to chat with KK’s creative directors and special guests. Finally, KK shares visions for the future of advertising. Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

Francesco Tristano presents bachCage 2.0 CONTEMPORARY

See Feature on Brahms by Susan Tomes p33

The differences between JS Bach and John Cage are obvious – or are they? Tristano

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

WEDNESday 30 May BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Keyboard Conversations® A Musical Love Triangle: Brahms & the Schumanns A Concert with Commentary Brahms Variations on a theme by Paganini, Op. 35 Theme and Variations in D minor   for piano from String Sextet No. 1, Op. 18 Clara Schumann Romance in G minor, Op. 11 No. 2 (to Robert Schumann) Romance in F, Op. 21 No. 2   (to Johannes Brahms) Robert Schumann Novelettes (to Clara Schumann) Questions & Answers Jeffrey Siegel piano CLASSICAL Perhaps the most momentous day in Brahms’s life was 30 September 1853, when he was first received into the Schumanns’ home, and they instantly recognised his genius. In the second of ® Jeffrey Siegel’s Keyboard Conversations , he explores the legendary personal and musical relationship between Clara and Robert Schumann and Brahms. He includes the deeply expressive Romances by Clara Schumann (one dedicated to Robert, the other to Brahms), Robert’s passionate Novelettes for Clara, and concludes with two of Brahms’s works which Clara particularly loved, and often performed: the Op. 18 Variations from the String Sextet, arranged for her by Brahms as a birthday present, and a selection from the Paganini Variations. Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 Premium Seats £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

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May/June 2012

We Aeronauts

Thursday 31 May BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes: Brahms Quartets – 1

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

String Quartet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 51 No. 1 Piano Quintet in F minor, Op. 34

Joy Carter

Orion String Quartet Daniel Phillips violin Todd Phillips violin Steven Tenenbom viola Timothy Eddy cello with Susan Tomes piano

Saturday 2 June BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Saver Seats £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

An Audience with Shazia Mirza & Joy Carter COMEDY Top comedians Shazia Mirza and Joy Carter perform their brand-new one-hour shows for us. Birmingham’s awardwinning British Asian stand-up Shazia Mirza brings an hour of brand-new material. With her unique and original take on life she puts a hilarious edge on family, relationships, and the ‘mundanity’ of domestic life. EMMA-award nominee Joy Carter explores modern-day culture, celebrity and controversial news stories in her new show. Likeable, quirky and inventively classy, this black adopted comedian from Scunthorpe isn’t afraid to challenge her audience. Expect a dazzling evening!

Brahms Study Day – 3 Brahms in Perspective

Susan Tomes

CLASSICAL In this, the first in their cycle of piano quartets and string quartets, the American-based Orion Quartet perform Brahms’s First String Quartet in C minor. Always a perfectionist, Brahms once claimed to have destroyed twenty quartets before allowing his Op. 51 quartets to be published when he was forty. The mood of almost feverish aspiration and deep pathos owes much to Schubert’s late quartets, but its song-like Romanze and twilit Intermezzo are pure Brahms. The Orion are joined by pianist Susan Tomes to complete the evening with the magnificent F minor Piano Quintet, one of Brahms’s greatest achievements in any form, in which he thunderously reconciles Beethoven’s rhythmic dynamism and compressed structure with Schubert’s profound lyricism.

­­ ‘Well worth checking out.’ Huw Stephens, BBC Radio 1 ‘Always good to hear good old-fashioned instruments being played with such gusto and with such glee.’ Richard Allinson, BBC Radio 2

INTERACT

Shazia Mirza

Part 1: Brahms Looks Back Dr Martin Ennis University of Cambridge In ‘Brahms Looks Back’, Martin Ennis explores the ways in which Brahms borrowed musical material as well as compositional procedures from the works of earlier composers, particularly in his vocal and choral music. Focusing initially on Brahms’s motets and some secular works for chorus, Ennis then looks at the at the German Requiem to demonstrate how Brahms’s studies of earlier styles and techniques helped him forge his distinctive musical language. ‘Warm, bubbly with a refreshing confidence... and no shortage of gags’ Metro on Shazia ‘A truly beautiful and gifted comic’ Jo Enright, comedian, on Joy Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

june Friday 1 June

motto ‘Frei aber einsam’ (free but lonely) as the first movement’s musical DNA, in amiable conjunction with his own cryptogram, ‘Frei aber froh’ (free but happy). A highlight of the slow movement is the dramatic Hungarian duet for cello and violin, and there’s more Hungarian spice in the finale. This is followed by the rarely heard piano quartet in A major, its serene, spacious design anticipating the great Second Piano Concerto that lay twenty years ahead.

Part 2: Brahms in Perspective Prof John Rink University of Cambridge Two illustrated presentations by John Rink, both of which explore the history of Brahms’s music in performance. The first looks at selected works for voice, while the second addresses the piano music. The performance history of Brahms’s music is rich and interesting, thanks in part to the musical ambiguities that the composer relished and revelled in throughout his long and distinguished career.

Hall One 7.30pm

St Pancras Room 10.30am–1pm, 2pm–4.30pm

£14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Saver Seats £9.50

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes: Brahms Quartets – 2 String Quartet No. 2 in A minor, Op. 51 No. 2 Piano Quartet No. 2 in A, Op. 26 Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes piano CLASSICAL In the second piano and string quartet concert from the Orion, we reach the composer’s warmly melodic quartet in A minor. Brahms uses his friend the Hungarian violinist Joseph Joachim’s

FOLK UNION

We Aeronauts FOLK We Aeronauts was born when eight old friends went to France on holiday with a car full of instruments. When they came back they had a band. They like to play pop songs together. Sometimes the pop songs are more shoegaze or folk than pure pop but they like it that way. They have played a host of gigs, and last year released their acclaimed The Chalon Valley EP, named after the picturesque location which inspired their first offerings.

£47.50 | Includes refreshments and lunch

BRAHMS UNWRAPPED

Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes: Brahms Quartets – 3 String Quartet No. 3 in B flat, Op. 67 Piano Quartet No. 3 in C minor, Op. 60 Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes piano CLASSICAL The third and final part of the Orion Quartet’s survey of Brahms’s quartets begins with the light-hearted B flat String Quartet, which he wrote while holidaying


on the Baltic isle of Rügen, in the aftermath of composing his First Symphony. Carefree and capricious, this work seems to celebrate his release from toil and anxiety, in marked contrast to the Piano Quartet in C minor, which had one of the longest gestation periods of any of his works. He began it when consumed by his love for Clara Schumann, whose husband lay incarcerated in an asylum: the music is overwhelmingly fatalistic, a whirlpool of conflicting emotions and references to Clara. Years later he brought out the manuscript and said: ‘Imagine a man who is just going to shoot himself for there is nothing else to do.’

  June 2012

This Week’s Focus THE QUEEN’S DIAMOND JUBILEE

Monday 4 June THE DIAMOND JUBILEE

English String Serenades

4 & 5 JUNE

Finzi Prelude for strings, Op. 25 Parry An English Suite Elgar Elegy for strings, Op. 58 Britten Simple Symphony, Op. 4 Finzi Romance for strings, Op. 11 Elgar Serenade for strings in E minor, Op. 20 Warlock Capriol Suite Walton Two pieces for strings from the film music for Henry V Holst St Paul’s Suite in C, Op. 29 No. 2

Hall One 7.30pm

Trafalgar Sinfonia Ivor Setterfield conductor

£14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Premium Seats £34.50 Online Savers £9.50

CLASSICAL Ivor Setterfield and the Trafalgar Sinfonia present a snapshot of gems from the astonishingly rich and diverse repertoire of English music for string orchestra, with all its lyrical ardour and lofty serenity.

Shazia Mirza © Martin Twomey | Susan Tomes © Frantzesco Kangaris | Abram Wilson © Cyberex Photography | Ivor Setterfield © Sim Canetty-Clarke | Joy Carter, We Aeronauts © Supplied Photos

THE BASE

Abram Wilson: Philippa

Hall One 6pm

Abram Wilson trumpet, vocals Alex Davis double bass Dave Hamblett drums Reuben James piano

£13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

JAZZ Charismatic New Orleans trumpeter and vocalist Abram Wilson premieres original music inspired by the life of the Harlem-  born classical piano prodigy Philippa Schuyler. Wilson and his band of hard-  hitting musicians will explore new compositional ground with music   ranging from the roughest blues to the most melodic swing. Expect trumpet playing complete with beauty in tone complemented by stunning vocals as Wilson tells the sensitive story of an extraordinary and gifted musician’s troubled life. A combination of music   and story-telling will convey a woman presented with obstacles beyond her control, from heartache to racism. Adventures in Black and White promises to pierce the soul and melt the heart. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

LISTINGS 69

Tuesday 5 June THE DIAMOND JUBILEE

The Triumphs of Oriana & A Garland for the Queen

Ivor Setterfield

IVOR SETTERFIELD CELEBRATES THE DIAMOND JUBILEE WITH MUSIC INSPIRED BY TWO QUEENS The New London Singers and Trafalgar Sinfonia mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee with a programme of royally inspired music, combining selections from The Triumphs of Oriana collected for Queen Elizabeth I, with A Garland for the Queen, composed for our Queen’s coronation in 1953, plus an evening of 20th century English string gems.

Tippett Dance, Clarion Air Ireland The Hills Vaughan Williams Valiant for Truth Walton Set me as a seal upon thine art NLS Composition Competition Winner New Work Bennet All creatures now Gibbons O clap your hands Morley Hard by a crystal fountain Dowland Can she excuse my wrongs New London Singers Ivor Setterfield conductor CLASSICAL New London Singers and conductor Ivor Setterfield present a concert of choral music to celebrate the Queen’s Jubilee. Works include twentieth-century classics written for Elizabeth II’s coronation as part of a famous series called ‘A Garland for the Queen’, and Tudor madrigals written in celebration of our present Queen’s namesake, Elizabeth I. We are also proud to unveil the winner of our Composition Competition with a work composed especially for this concert. Hall One 6pm

Abram Wilson

See Feature on the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee pp44–45

£13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

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June 2012

This Week’s Focus SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS FESTIVAL 2012 Curated by SONGLINES MAGAZINE & IKON ARTS MANAGEMENT R.U.T.A.

6 – 9 June Wednesday 6 June SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

R.U.T.A. Folk with attitude from Polish punks WORLD R.U.T.A. are extraordinary. A folk-inspired punk band in Poland who’ve been around for little more than a year, they already have thousands of enthusiastic fans as well as calls for them to be banned. Fronted by Guma, the ‘Polish Johnny Rotten’, the band has a repertoire of old peasant revolutionary songs – real voices of Poland’s peasant uprisings against the feudal system, given new music accompanied by guitars and old-style Polish fiddles. It’s a totally unexpected soundworld – incendiary lyrics against brutal landowners and the Catholic Church (yelled out so fiercely that those flying Polish consonants could lacerate your cheeks) backed up with scratchy folk fiddles and powerful percussion. The group is unearthing a totally forgotten side of Polish culture, in sympathy with the Occupy protests in the Western world. There will be a Q&A session with R.U.T.A. before the performance. Hall Two 9pm £14.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Le Vent du Nord

Thursday 7 June SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

experience An Explosion of international talent at songlines ENCOUNTERS festival From the zesty French Canadian Le Vent du Nord (above) to Polish punk-folk from R.U.T.A., and from the dream-team Madagascar All Stars to the dramatic tango of the Fugata Quintet or the Inner Mongolian Anda Union, who were such a hit at last year’s WOMAD, this festival brings you the bands that inspire passion among those in the know. See Feature on Songlines Encounters Festival 2012 pp34–36

Lepistö & Lehti + Kosmos + Fugata Quintet An accordion trail from Finland through the Balkans to Argentina WORLD This exciting triple bill opens with the brilliant Finnish accordion and double bass

Kosmos

duo Markku Lepistö and Pekka Lehti. Their imaginative and evocative journeys are extraordinary – ‘wailing minarets, desert storms, icy wastes and northern mists’, part of the Songlines review of their recent Radio Moskova album. And don’t forget, after Argentina, Finland is the second home of the tango. Innovative and unique string trio Kosmos unites the rich texture of the classical string trio with the depth and integrity of music from around the world. Harriet Mackenzie (violin), Meg Hamilton (viola) and Shirley Smart (cello) welcome regular guest Serbian accordionist Miloš Milivojevic for this gig where sophisticated jazz will glide magically into wild Gypsy fiddling, emotive Balkan music into hot-blooded tango and Arabic improvisation into Greek melodies. Fugata Quintet are an international quintet specialising in the dramatic and dark music of Astor Piazzolla. Passionate about his nuevo tango, they use powerful rhythmic tensions and the instrumental colour of his preferred combination of bandoneon/accordion, violin, guitar, piano and bass. An extraordinary finale. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £16.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

Friday 8 June SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Spiro + Le Vent du Nord Spectacular new takes on English and French Canadian folk WORLD The Bristol-based quartet Spiro are one of the most innovative bands on the British folk scene. Much of their raw material is traditional but they re-invent and re-construct it so that, organic and contemporary, it sounds like something by Steve Reich or Philip Glass. Their new album Kaleidophonica is getting rave reviews. Spiro are Jane Harbour Lepistö & Lehti


June 2012

LISTINGS 71

THE BASE SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Lauren Kinsella’s Thought-Fox with guest Soufian Saihi Up-and-coming jazz ensemble collaborate with Morroccan oud player

Fugata Quintet

JAZZ

LE VENT DU NORD © www.photoman.ca | R.U.T.A. with Guma, WARSAW 2011 © Bartek Muracki | KOSMOS © PIERRE MARCAR | LEPISTÖ & LEHTI © NAUSKA | SPIRO © YORK TILLYER | MADAGASCAR ALL STARS, FUGATA QUINTET, ANDA UNION © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Spiro

Madagascar All Stars

Anda Union

(violin, viola), Alex Vann (mandolin), Jason Sparkes (accordion) and Jon Hunt (acoustic guitar, cello). They bring together a combined experience in folk, classical, punk and new wave. ‘I think this is soulful music, passionate music and I love it,’   says Peter Gabriel.

and Scottish and Irish Travellers. However, tonight’s concert presents his music in a rather more global context. His ‘friends’ include some fine string players plus Jonah Brody on Japanese instruments and Camilo Tirado on tabla. British folk as you’ve never heard it before.

Another virtuoso quartet, Le Vent du Nord, bring new life and energy to French Canadian traditions from Quebec. On accordion, fiddle, guitar, hurdy-gurdy   and a host of other instruments, this is   a powerful and vivacious band.

Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Saturday 9 June

Hall One 7.30pm

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

£13.50 £16.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

Film: Anda Union – From the Steppes to the City

FOLK UNION SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Sam Lee & Friends Rising star of the British folk scene FOLK Award-winning singer and researcher Sam Lee is one of the leading lights of the resurgent British folk scene. He is just about to release his eagerly-awaited debut album, Ground of its Own, of which Shirley Collins, no less, has said: ‘The singing is sublime and exquisite! It’s gentle and despairing, trance-like and tender. Strokes of genius there I think!’ For three years he worked with Scottish Traveller and ballad singer Stanley Robertson and ‘inherited’ his repertoire. This has led to a particular interest in the music of the English Roma

Documentary film telling the band’s extraordinary story WORLD This is a rare insight into a forgotten land on the furthest edges of China, home to   more than six million Mongolians. Anda Union, a 10-strong group of young musicians, make a 10,000 km journey through the grasslands of Inner Mongolia revealing the secret of the roots of their haunting and beautiful music. The film is a celebration of their passion for their music   and culture, from wild parties to moving stories of their sacrifices; from the intimacies of pastoral life to the harsh realities of the city; from songs in the Grasslands to the power of Anda Union. St Pancras Room 5pm £6.50

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Anda Union + Madagascar All Stars World-class bands from the other ends of the earth WORLD What we like to do in Songlines Encounters is to feature some unusual instruments and extraordinary sounds and here we are thrilled to offer you a   real treat – a rare chance to hear two virtuoso bands from far, far away.   Anda Union were a huge hit at   WOMAD last year. They are a 10-strong band from Hohhot, Inner Mongolia, with impressive throat-singing skills – guttural and ethereal – who accompany themselves on horse-head fiddles.   If you want an otherworldly musical experience, don’t miss it. The Madagascar All Stars are all   soloists in their own right from different parts of the magnificent Indian Ocean island which has a unique repository of wildlife and music. The group includes Dama, leader of the group Mahaleo; accordionist Régis Gizavo; the valiha (Malagasy zither) player Justin Vali; Marius ‘Fenoamby’ Fontaine, leader   of the group Fenoamby; guitarist Erick Manana and percussionist Ricky Olombelo. Unique and spell-binding. Hall One 7.30pm £13.50 £16.50 £19.50 £24.50 Online Savers £9.50

Winner of Ireland’s Music Network’s Young   Musicwide Award for 2010-13, Thought-Fox  is led by Lauren Kinsella, one of the   freshest voices on the Irish and International  jazz scenes. Thought-Fox takes its name from a Ted Hughes poem written in his 1957 collection ‘Hawk in the Rain’. Lauren’s use of text brings the listener closer to the music but also serves to explore extended vocal technique, odd-time grooves and traditional jazz harmony. With trombonist Colm O’Hara, pianist Tom Gibbs, double bassist Michael Coady and percussionist Simon Roth, Thought-Fox brings together some of the top up-and-coming jazz musicians. For Songlines Encounters they   are joined by Moroccan-born oud (lute) player Soufian Saihi. With his deep knowledge of both Moroccan and oriental   music traditions and years of exploration in alternative music, Soufian and Thought-  Fox are very excited to have the opportunity  to collaborate in Songlines Encounters. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Don’t miss FREE foyer performances throughout the festival programmed in partnership with the Jewish Music Institute

TICKET OFFERS Festival Pass £45 Get the most out of it with the Songlines Encounters Festival Pass, which gives you entry to R.U.T.A.; Lepistö & Lehti + Kosmos + Fugata Quintet; Spiro + Le Vent du Nord; Madagascar All Stars + Anda Union; Film: Anda Union And there’s more! The pass also includes a year’s subscription to Songlines Digital (usually £19.75)

Songlines Subscriber Offer Subscribers to Songlines magazine save 25% on tickets and 10% on festival pass, conditions apply.   To subscribe call 020 7371 2777   or visit www.songlines.co.uk Existing subscribers should contact Songlines on subs@songlines.co.uk for the Promo Code.

LISTINGS

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June 2012

This Week’s Focus BRAHMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 6 / ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

Monday 11 June TALKING ART

Gold Silver Bronze SPOKEN WORD An illustrated lecture looking at the history and methods of making sculpture in three desirable metals.

14 – 16 June

St Pancras Room 6.30pm £6.50

WORDS ON MONDAY

Poetry Gymnastics SPOKEN WORD International athletes are gathering to celebrate the unique union of poetry and sport. The games are upon us, and with poetry filling the Olympic village it is time to get inspired. Throughout history, poetry has had the ability to set hearts racing and rally the masses. This year is no exception. Curated by Poet in the City in partnership with the Romanian Cultural Institute, this spectacular event features celebrated former Olympic gold medallists and sporting superstars, talking about their experiences of competing, and reading poems about sporting achievements and other great human endeavours. The perfect warm-up for the London Olympics. Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

Apartment House: Facing Beauty Laurence Cummings

the essential brahms in an evening of song, MASTERPIECES BY SCHUBERT AND MOZART, plus THE BEST OF ENGLish baroque The Royal Academy of Music presents a concert of some of Brahms’ best-loved songs, a performance of two exquisite chamber works, Schubert’s Octet and Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet, and the glorious Grand English Baroque featuring Arne and Handel, conducted by Laurence Cummings. See Classical Highlights on Royal Academy of Music p9

his direction it has become a venerable exponent of avant-garde and experimental music from around the world. Disregarding style, fashion, and forging nowhere with a Zeitgeistian zeal, Apartment House’s performances have included many UK and world premieres of music by a wide variety of composers. Tonight, it presents a programme concentrating on the intense beauty of sounds, delicate consonances, transparent dissonances, surface tension, harmonic intensity and the intimacy of chamber music: iconic, yet seldom heard works by Morton Feldman complement commissioned work from Christopher Fox and Howard Skempton. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Thursday 14 June BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

Royal Academy of Music Song Circle: Brahms Songs Programme to include: Die Mainacht, Op. 43 No. 2 Wiegenlied, Op. 49 No. 4 Feldeinsamkeit, Op. 86 No. 2 In stiller Nacht, WoO 33 No. 42 Liebestreu, Op. 3 No. 1 Sónia Grané soprano Sarah Shorter mezzo-soprano Stuart Jackson tenor Gareth John baritone David Shipley bass Mark Austin & Matthew Fletcher piano CLASSICAL

Programme to include: David Mahler La Ciudad de Nuestra Señora la Reina de Los Angeles Walter Zimmermann When I’m 84 Morton Feldman Two Instruments; Extensions V for two cellos; De Kooning Michael Pisaro from the Harmony Series Howard Skempton Suite from Delicate; New work for two cellos Christopher Fox New work for two cellos

The Royal Academy of Music presents a programme of Brahms Lieder, arranged chronologically from the early Juchhe! (1852) to three of the late Deutsche Volkslieder (1894), enabling us to follow Brahms’s development as a song-writer. The recital contains many of Brahms’s best-loved songs, and includes Lieder to texts by Goethe, Heine, Hölty, Mörike, Rückert and Storm.

CONTEMPORARY

Hall One 7.30pm

Apartment House was created by the cellist Anton Lukoszevieze in 1995. Under

£12.50 £16.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Impropera’s Sports Day COMEDY

Anton Lukoszevieze

Limber up for the Olympics with an evening of virtuosic push ups, arm-wrestling, star jumps and egg and spoon racing in the company of Kings Place’s resident musical improvisational athletes. A total workout


June 2012

Music return with two enduringly popular and well-loved chamber works: Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet in A, written for the clarinettist Anton Stadler, and Schubert’s F major Octet. These complementary works display the rich serenity and delicate beauty of the chamber genre. Mozart highlights the warm and wistful qualities of   the clarinet, whilst Schubert demonstrates a tenderness of understanding in this charming homage to Beethoven. Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £16.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Damien O’Kane Impropera

for your ears and laughter muscles! Performance-enhancing drugs recommended. ‘Riotously good fun’ The Telegraph Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Friday 15 June ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC Laurence Cummings © Sheila Rock | Damien O’Kane © Pure Records 2010 | David Pearl and Robbo Robson © Impropera | Other Artists © Supplied Photos

Pre-Concert Talk in association with City Lit Classical and Romantic Treasures: Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet and Schubert’s Octet SPOKEN WORD Pre-Concert talk with Malcolm Miller from City Lit, London’s destination for inspiring part-time adult education. Wenlock Room 6pm

FOLK Damien O’Kane is earning a growing reputation for being a creative and exciting musician and singer. His banjo playing in particular has led him to being regarded as one of the finest Irish players on the scene today and he is winning accolades as a singer, focusing on songs from his native Northern Ireland. He is probably best known for his work with Shona Kipling and Flook but has recently been a full-time member of Kate Rusby’s band. Released in May 2010 on the Pure Records label, Summer Hill is Damien’s debut solo album, from which he will perform some of the tracks alongside new material. He’ll be joined on stage by bodhran virtuoso John Joe Kelly (ex Flook) and superb guitarist Gerard Thompson. ‘An outstanding banjo player and superb vocals’ ***** Sunday Express ‘What hits you immediately is the richness of O’Kane’s voice’ BBC Music Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

This package is offered in partnership with City Lit | Limited availability £9.50 – Covers both the pre-concert talk (6pm) and performance (7.30pm) To book, contact City Lit – 020 7831 7831 http://www.citylit.ac.uk/courses/Music/ Music_appreciation

Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet & Schubert’s Octet Mozart Clarinet Quintet in A, K581 Schubert Octet in F, D803 Castalian Quartet with Royal Academy of Music Chamber Ensembles CLASSICAL The award-winning Castalian Quartet and musicians from the Royal Academy of

Saturday 16 June ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

The Grand English Baroque Purcell Symphony from The Fairy Queen Handel ‘Scoglio d’immota fronte’ from Scipione, HWV 20 Arne Rule, Britannia Handel Concerto grosso in A, Op. 6 No. 11 HWV 329 Stanley Concerto for Strings in B minor, Op. 2 No. 2 Handel ‘Per le porte del tormento’ from Sosarme, HWV 30 Boyce Symphony in D, Op. 2 No. 5

Castalian Quartet

Rhiannon Llewellyn

Rhiannon Llewellyn soprano Sarah Shorter mezzo-soprano Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orchestra & Soloists Laurence Cummings director CLASSICAL Nothing expresses the spirit of Britishness better than trumpets and drums. From the majestic sweep of Purcell’s Fairy Queen to the stately grandeur of Boyce’s Symphony in D, this programme explores one of London’s finest and most vivid periods of music-making. Handel, as a naturalised Briton, appears prominently with the dramatic aria ‘Scoglio d’immota fronte’ from Scipione and the exquisite duet from Sosarme, ‘Per le porte del tormento’. We celebrate the tercentenary of John Stanley’s birth with a concerto, and of course no celebration of our national pride would be complete without a rousing rendition of Thomas Arne’s Rule, Britannia. Hall One 7.30pm £12.50 £16.50 Online Savers £9.50

Sarah Shorter

Caption

Fini Bearman

THE BASE

The Fini Bearman Group Porgy and Bess Revisited JAZZ

Damien O’Kane

ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

LISTINGS 73 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking

Porgy and Bess, the groundbreaking opera written by George and Ira Gershwin in 1934–35, contains some of the bestloved and most covered jazz classics, including ‘Summertime’ and ‘It Ain’t Necessarily So’. Up-and-coming Londonbased singer/composer Fini Bearman revisits some of the music from the opera, with exciting new arrangements and compositions based on Gershwins’ music. Together with renowned electronic musician, guitarist and composer Matt Calvert, and a stellar line-up including some of London’s finest jazz musicians (Rick Simpson, Tom Farmer and Jon Scott) she will be looking at this music in a fresh light, calling on various recorded interpretations including the well-known eponymous album by Miles Davis and Gil Evans. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50


74 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

June 2012

This Week’s Focus LA NUOVA MUSICA: A DEEPER TYDE

Monday 18 June TALKING ART

Matisse Dr Gail-Nina Anderson SPOKEN WORD

21 – 23 June

While undoubtedly a major player in the formulation of Modernist Art, Henri Matisse (1869–1954) produced a body of joyous, colourful work that retains its impact and popularity today. During a long career his painting developed not through adherence to theory but via a continuing exploration of the relationship between line and colour, which allies him to the classical French traditions of drawing while pushing the boundaries of those same traditions. Initially criticised for being unconventional, his work has also been dismissed as overly decorative. This overview of his diverse and engaging output allows you to weigh the debate – have we begun to distrust art that offers visual enjoyment?

Thursday 21 June

La Nuova Musica with William Berger: Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo

Award-winning commentator, columnist, broadcaster and author Steve Richards takes you behind the scenes of British politics. What does Cameron really think of Clegg? Can Ed Milliband win an election? Get these answers and much, much more during an evening of live politics. Hall One 7pm Tickets from £9.50

OUT HEAR

See interview with David Bates of La Nuova Musica on p9

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

A DEEPER TYDE

SPOKEN WORD

The fast-rising early music ensemble La Nuova Musica wanted their first opera at Kings Place to be the first opera. William Berger sings the tragic part of L’Orfeo in this exciting concert performance. Celebrated Welsh soprano Rosemary Joshua then joins the ensemble for an evening of ‘Mad Songs and Laments’ from England and Italy.

Hall Two 8pm

£6.50

Politics Live with Steve Richards & Guests

LA NUOVA MUSICA BRING MONTEVERDI’s GROUNDBREAKING OPERA, L’orfeo

to create an original and compelling sound world. Joanna Bailie conjures an imagined situation. Newton Armstrong explores the interior detail of the instrument’s unique acoustic. Stefan Prins adds video, pitting two pianos against each other.

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

WORDS ON MONDAY

La Nuova Musica

William Berger

Mark Knoop: Artificial Environments Joanna Bailie Artificial Environments 8 & 9 (2012) (World premiere) Newton Armstrong New work (2012) (World premiere) Stefan Prins Piano Hero #1 & #2 (2011) Luigi Nono .....sofferte onde serene... (1976) Mark Knoop piano Newton Armstrong electronics and sound diffusion CONTEMPORARY Mark Knoop presents an exploration of music for piano with electronics. Luigi Nono manipulated recordings of the piano, placing them alongside the live instrument

Monteverdi L’Orfeo, favola in musica William Berger baritone (Orfeo) Il Nuovo Chiarascuro trombone quintet La Nuova Musica David Bates director CLASSICAL Written in 1607, Monteverdi’s groundbreaking L’Orfeo, favola in musica fuses the tragical tradition of Greek antiquity and the Baroque’s revolutionary expressive palette. Orpheus and Euridice’s timeless tale will be given insightful and expressive performances by La Nuova Musica in their first curatorship at Kings Place. Baritone William Berger sings the doomed title role, supported by a cast of some of the finest performers of the younger generation. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Really Lovely Comedy presents… COMEDY Really Lovely Comedy returns to Kings Place with a one-off show featuring the cream of live comedy. Curators of a variety of clubs and bespoke comedy events all over London, their stellar line-ups and warm atmosphere have made their shows Time Out Critics’ Choice and seen them


June/July 2012

both. Musicians of both nationalities she has met on her travels accompany her. Very few artists manage to tour the world yet still retain the ability to keep everything intimate. Rachael Dadd is one of these very special souls. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50 Rosemary Joshua

named as one of London’s 6 Best Comedy Clubs in the Evening Standard. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

A DEEPER TYDE

La Nuova Musica with Rosemary Joshua: Mad Songs & Laments from the English and Italian Baroque Rosemary Joshua soprano La Nuova Musica David Bates director

La Nuova Musica © Ash Mills | Rosemary Joshua © Ruth Crafer | Jane Chapman © Letitzia Petrucci | William Berger © Supplied Photo

CLASSICAL La Nuova Musica is delighted to be joined by renowned soprano Rosemary Joshua, who in a rare concert appearance will sing a programme of mad songs and laments, further exploring the heady and sensual world of Monteverdi and his English contemporaries. The recital will include Act Three from Venus and Adonis by John Blow, alongside Monteverdi’s Lamento della ninfa and Scherzi musicali – all interspersed with delicious instrumental works of the day. Hall One 7.30pm £14.50, £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Rachael Dadd

NOT SO SILENT MOVIES

Special Edition: Silent Movies with Live Improv Band feat. Tim Minchin

SPOKEN WORD

CLASSICAL

Hall One 7pm

Another chance to hear William Berger and  La Nuova Musica perform Monteverdi’s   timeless work. See Thu 21 June for details.

Tickets from £9.50

A DEEPER TYDE

La Nuova Musica with William Berger: Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo

Hall One 7.30pm

OUT HEAR

£14.50, £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 Online Savers £9.50

Jane Chapman: A Shimmering Microcosm

THE BASE

Jack Davies Big Band JAZZ Here launching their debut album produced by Colin Towns, The Jack Davies Big Band draw on the raucous power of Colin Towns’ Mask Orchestra, the lyrical melancholy of Kenny Wheeler and the boundary-pushing work of Loose Tubes.   Featuring Martin Speake and Josh Arcoleo   amongst others, this is big band music   which retains the energy and individualism of Duke Ellington, but is infused with the powerful and uncompromising aesthetic of contemporary jazz. Hall Two 8pm £12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

FOLK Experimental folk multi-instrumentalist Rachael Dadd is one of the busiest artists we’ve encountered. Living her life between   Japan and Bristol, she is constantly touring,  and constantly writing. Her recordings are   often born from late nights at home plugged into her 4-track. When she’s not playing, she’s sewing album sleeves and record bags. A true DIY artist in every sense of the word. This event sees the marriage of her two homes, England and Japan. Musically she draws influences from 

WORDS ON MONDAY

William Berger baritone (Orfeo) Il Nuovo Chiarascuro trombone quintet La Nuova Musica David Bates director

Saturday 23 June

Jane Chapman

Friday 29 June

Guardian Review Book Club: Sebastian Faulks Sebastian Faulks joins John Mullan   for a discussion of his celebrated   novel Birdsong. In 1916, after embarking on a doomed love affair with the unhappily married Madame Azaire, Stephen Wraysford enlists as an army officer, and goes to fight in World War I.   Sixty years later his granddaughter Elizabeth discovers his journals, and   sets about deciphering them. Through these two narratives the novel traces Stephen’s harrowing experiences   in the blood-soaked trenches of   northern France.

Monteverdi L’Orfeo, favola in musica

Friday 22 June

Monday 25 June

LISTINGS 75

M Wingfield/J Chapman Parallel Time * Roger Redgate Residua (Complete performance) * Duncan Macleod The New Atlantis Sohrab Uduman Derrière le Miroir * (live visuals by Jon Barraclouch) Images by Norman McBeath (INTERVAL) Stockhausen Nachtmusik (Aus den sieben Tagen) Simon Emmerson Dreamscape ** (live visuals by David Bickerstaff) * World premiere ** UK premiere Jane Chapman harpsichord (percussion) Kate Ryder piano Mark Wingfield electric guitar

MUSIC / FILM / COMEDY Not So Silent Movies is on the move   and this special, one-off edition sees a shift into the Friday night bustle and bright lights of Hall One. The first-rate regulars will be joined on-stage by none other than Kings Place Artist-inResidence and Matilda creator Tim Minchin. Devised by cellist-composer Philip Sheppard, the sell-out concept sees top musicians play improvised soundtracks to the world’s greatest   silent films without rehearsing in advance. Films include the antics of comic heroes Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyds, Fatty Arbuckle and other classics. We can’t tell you which film is showing when – no-one knows, not even the performers! Take pot luck and enjoy   the fun-filled family feast of film, music and comedy. Hall One 8pm Caption SOLD OUT - Returns only | £24.50

july Monday 2 July WORDS ON MONDAY

Shakespeare’s Poetry SPOKEN WORD

‘There came a moment of madness   when the feeling harpsichord thought   that it was the only harpsichord in the world, and that the whole harmony of   the universe resided in it.’ Diderot (1769) Pioneering harpsichordist Jane Chapman brings together ground-breaking performers and visual artists in a unique collaboration, exploring ideas of existence and reality through state-of-the-art technology and dramatic innovation. ‘Britain’s most progressive harpsichordist’ The Independent on Sunday ‘Her virtuosity commands attention’   BBC Music Magazine

In this year of national celebration the spotlight inevitably falls upon William Shakespeare, the nation’s most iconic poet and dramatist. Curated by Poet in the City in partnership with the Shakespeare Institute, this special   event looks in detail at the sonnets   that lie at the heart of his verse,   exploring their mysteries and examining their insights into themes such as love,   death and time. Of course Shakespeare’s poetic voice also runs through all of the plays that we know and love, and this event explores how Shakespeare uses poetry in his drama and stagecraft. Don’t miss this chance to enjoy the poetic genius of Britain’s most famous poet!

Hall Two 8pm

Hall One 7pm

£12.50 | Online Savers £9.50

Tickets from £9.50

CONTEMPORARY

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April–June 2012

ART LISTINGS

76 ART LISTINGS

Daniel Sparkes Thorpham’s Grunt Mixed media

Lorraine Robbins Beast 43 Plaster and Paint

14 March – 5 May PANGOLIN LONDON

Two in One: Charlotte Mayer and Almuth Tebbenhoff ART A joint exhibition of sculpture, prints and drawings by two highly established and diverse female sculptors: Almuth Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer. Charlotte Mayer and Almuth Tebbenhoff’s artworks meditate on notions of the self as well as the world around us and by drawing inspiration from the natural world they both create abstract works that reflect their highly adventurous sculptural styles and playful sense of fun. Their sculptures in particular have the capacity to explore the most humble of subjects and familiar of forms while also communicating much grander concerns with creation, humanity and our relationship with nature. Both artists relish experimentation in the materials they use and the forms they create, ensuring this show will be a feast for the eyes as well as the soul. They are valued members of The Royal British Society of Sculptors and have also exhibited at the Cass Foundation sculpture park in Goodwood; just small tributes to the high regard in which both these artists stand.

Track cycling World Cup Classics © Tom Jenkins

to exhibit alongside them as part of the abstract critical Newcomers Awards. One of the selected graduate artists will be awarded the £5000 abstract critical Newcomers Award. The selected graduate artists are: Jack Sutherland (UCA Canterbury), Katy Kirbach (RA Schools), Dan Roach (Cheltenham), Zara Idelson (Glasgow School of Art) and Gwennan Thomas (Wimbledon School of Art). This is the first year of the prize which has been launched by abstract critical, a not-for-profit organisation which aims to provide a proactive critical forum with a focus on abstract art. For further details please visit abstractcritical.com

25 May – 16 June PANGOLIN LONDON

Dan Roach Inscape 2011 Oil, wax on panel

27 April – 22 June KINGS PLACE GALLERY

30 March – 20 April KINGS PLACE GALLERY

abstract critical Newcomers Award ART Five artists from the 2011 degree shows nationwide have been selected by artists Phillip Allen, Carol Robertson, Iain Robertson, Alan Shipway and Gary Wragg

Cornelia Parker, Tony Bevan, Jake & Dinos Chapman, Grayson Perry, Chris Ofili, Glenn Brown, Mat Collishaw, Stephen Chambers, Hughie O’Donoghue, Sue Webster & Tim Noble, Keith Coventry, Jenny Saville, Jock McFadyen, Eileen Cooper, Christopher Le Brun, Charles Avery, Andrzej Jackowski, Catherine Yass and Bob & Roberta Smith. The exhibition demonstrates the breadth and diversity of the artists’ involvement with the printed multiple through the work of Paupers Press. The accompanying book, The Mechanical Hand, by Blackdog Publishing, includes many of the studio’s publications and commissioned projects, as well as essays by Martin Herbert on Jake & Dinos Chapman and Stephen Chambers, and contributions from Glenn Brown, Paula Rego, Grayson Perry, Catherine Yass, Cornelia Parker and Christopher Le Brun.

The Mechanical Hand ART The importance of the print in British art couldn’t be better illustrated than it is today when some of the most significant contemporary painters and sculptors are also the most exciting printmakers. The Mechanical Hand celebrates 25 years of artists’ projects at Paupers Press and includes works by Damien Hirst, Tracey Emin, Paula Rego, Rachel Whiteread,

Strange Beasts: Lynn Chadwick and the New Generation ART Young contemporary artists respond to the sculpture of highly respected artist Lynn Chadwick for Pangolin London’s Strange Beasts exhibition. The show encompasses sculpture and installations from a range of artists including Lorraine Robbins, Ralph Macartney, Gavin McClafferty, Daniel Sparkes and duo Cockings and Hodge. All participating artists have close links with Chadwick’s work and the area of Gloucestershire he practised in, having grown up, studied or worked there themselves. From an ant farm to a sand pit, the diversity of the work in this exhibition demonstrates the unique influence Lynn Chadwick continues to have on the contemporary British art scene. The results of this

Mat Collishaw Insecticide 13

challenging brief make for an exhibition that is sure to surprise, delight and, above all, provoke thought and discussion.

29 June – 24 August KINGS PLACE GALLERY

Tom Jenkins ART Tom Jenkins is, arguably, the best sports photographer of his generation. He has worked at the The Guardian since 1990 and in that time has covered virtually every major sporting event and fixture. His photographs are characterised by an iconic quality – he invariably manages to impose a classical quality on the most chaotic scene. Jenkins has won numerous awards including: Young Photographer of the Year, 1990; Sports Photographer of the Year, 2004, 2006 and 2007; British Press Awards Sports Photographer of the Year, 2000; Barclays Football Photographer of the Year, 2009.

OPENING TIMES Pangolin London Tuesday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm Mondays by appointment FREE admission | 020 7520 1480 www.pangolinlondon.com

Kings Place Gallery Monday – Friday, 10am – 6pm, Saturday – Sunday, 12pm – 6pm FREE admission | 020 7520 1485 www.kingsplacegallery.co.uk Both galleries will be closed during Easter Weekend (6 – 9 April) and Bank Holidays (7 May & 4 – 5 June).

Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff © Pangolin London/Steve Russell | kings place hall one ©  keith paisley

From left: Charlotte Mayer Release Almuth Tebbenhoff From Dusk Until Dawn


Kings Place auditoria are now available for artistic hire, offering world-class acoustics and an unparalleled level of technical support.

Friday 13 April Alexander Wall & Jamie Thompson

Schubert: Winterreise Schubert Winterreise, D911 Alexander Wall tenor Jamie Thompson piano CLASSICAL Winterreise by Franz Schubert is an earth-shatteringly beautiful work of enormous scope only attempted by the bravest of singers. The 24 songs tell the story of one man’s journey through ice and snow as he recalls his past love – his sweetheart who has rejected him. The cycle starts with him silently leaving her house. As he shuts the gate behind him his loss becomes all too apparent: the journey has begun! He quits the town not knowing where his legs will carry him, but certain that his soul is in pieces. Book your tickets now to be transported into this Schubertian soundscape by young, up-and-coming tenor Alexander Wall, who is joined by pianist Jamie Thompson. Hall One 7.30pm £19.50 | Online Savers £9.50 (subject to availability)

Tuesday 1 May Concert and Discussion

The Dilemma of Romanticism: Brahms, Schumann, Franck ‘An Unattainable Ideal: The Dilemma of Romanticism’ An illustrated talk with Dr Markus Ophälders Brahms Sonata No.1 in F minor, Op. 120 Schumann Three Romances, Op. 94 Franck Sonata in A Iakov Zats viola Vsevolod Dvorkin piano CLASSICAL

For more information: 020 7520 1456  |  artistic.hires@kingsplace.co.uk

Join us as we explore the Romantic dilemma of an Unattainable Ideal. In his pre-performance visual presentation, Dr Markus Ophälders will examine the philosophical and cultural aspects of the Romantic era, its mentality, and its search for reason, form and liberty. Then you will be able to immerse yourself in the true spirit of Romanticism through the music of Brahms, Schumann and Franck. This is more than a concert… Hall One 7.30pm £14.50 £29.50

LISTINGS

Make IT YOUR PLACE

ARTISTIC HIRES 77


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April—June 2012

CALENDAR APRIL

CALENDAR

78 CALENDAR

APRIL– JUNE 2012

GLOBAL MUSIC FOUNDATION EASTER JAZZ WORKSHOP & MUSIC FESTIVAL

30 Fri (Mar) Kings Place Gallery until 20 Apr

abstract critical Newcomer Award

1 Sun

Hall Two

3pm

Not So Silent Movies – Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

1 Sun

Hall One

6.30pm

London Chamber Music Series – Chilingirian Quartet & Sofya Gulyak (piano)

2 Mon

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

Talking Art – Two in One with Almuth Tebbenhoff and Charlotte Mayer

2 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Picador: 40th Anniversary – ‘Something Old, Something New’ Spoken Word

2 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Jamie Bissmire, Leon Michener & Guests: Crossing the Rubicon

5 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Tim Key & Tom Basden: FREEZE!

6 Fri

Foyer

1.30pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Rainbow Harp Ensemble led by Miriam Keogh

Jazz

6 Fri

Foyer

2.15pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – London Vocal Project led by Pete Churchill

Jazz

Art Music/Film/Comedy Classical Spoken Word

Contemporary Comedy

6 Fri

Foyer

5.45pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Singers Corner

Jazz

6 Fri

Hall One

8pm

GMF Easter Festival – Deborah Brown + Guillermo Rozenthuler and Francesco Petreni

Jazz

7 Sat

Hall Two

1.30pm

GMF Easter Festival – Stardust: Jazz Rainbow Trio with Jason Rebello

Jazz

7 Sat

Foyer

3pm    FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Samba for Everyone led by Felix Gibbons

Jazz

7 Sat

Foyer

5.45pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Singers Corner

Jazz

7 Sat

Hall One

8pm

GMF Easter Festival – Peter King & The Global Arts Ens. + J. Mullen & J. Toussaint Quintet Jazz

7 Sat

Hall Two

10pm

GMF Easter Festival – Audiogold + threeforagirl

Jazz

8 Sun

Foyer

2.30pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Samba for Everyone led by Felix Gibbons

Jazz

8 Sun

Hall Two

4pm

GMF Easter Festival – Jazz at the Movies – The Talented Mr Ripley

8 Sun

Foyer

6.30pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Singers Corner

Jazz

8 Sun

Hall One

8pm

GMF Easter Festival – Frank Harrison Trio + Kit Downes (solo) + Bruce Barth Trio

Jazz

9 Mon

Foyer

2.30pm  FREE

GMF Easter Festival – Samba for Everyone led by Felix Gibbons

Jazz

9 Mon

Hall Two

6pm

GMF Easter Festival – GMF Students in concert

Jazz

9 Mon

Hall One

7.30pm

BBC Radio 3 Live in Concert – Ben Johnson (tenor) and James Baillieu (piano)

11 Wed Hall Two 8pm 12 Thu

Hall Two

Film Spoken Word

Off With Their Heads! – The Complete Guide to Everything – Live! Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds

8pm  SOLD OUT Off With Their Heads! – The Complete Guide to Everything

Classical Comedy Comedy

13 Fri Hall One 7.30pm

Artistic Hire – Alexander Wall (tenor) & Jamie Thompson (piano) – Winterreise by Schubert

13 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – The Long Notes

Folk

14 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Partikel: ‘Cohesion’

Jazz

15 Sun

St Pancras Room 5pm

Pre-Concert Talk – with conductor Marc Andreae, grandson of V. Andreae

15 Sun

Hall One

London Chamber Music Series – Aquinas Piano Trio plays Volkmar Andreae

6.30pm

Classical

Spoken Word Classical


April—June 2012

CALENDAR 79

16 Mon

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

Talking Art – Shakespeare: A True Portrait – with Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

Spoken Word

16 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Robert Browning and the Pied Piper

Spoken Word

16 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – We Spoke: Table

18 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Brahms for Four Hands

19 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Keyboard Conversations® The Power and Passion of Brahms Classical

20 Fri

Kings Place Gallery LAST DAY

abstract critical Newcomer Award

20 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Youth and Maturity: Brahms’s Music for Piano and Viola – 2 Classical

20 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Jim Moray

21 Sat

St Pancras Room 10.30am – 4.30pm Brahms Unwrapped – Brahms Study Day 2: Enrichment & Reduction

21 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Maxim Rysanov & the principal players of Aurora Orchestra Classical

21 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Kit Downes in concert – presented by Jazz Line-Up on BBC Radio 3

22 Sun

St Pancras Room 5pm

22 Sun Hall One 6.30pm

brahms unwrapped week 4

Contemporary Classical

Art

Folk Interact

Jazz

Pre-Concert Talk – with Dr Robert Hanson: ‘La Malinconia – Muss es sein?’

Spoken Word

London Chamber Music Series – Allegri Quartet: The Complete Beethoven Quartets – 7

Classical

MAY

the musical diaries of shostakovich: brodsky quartet & friends 23 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Patricia Routledge in conversation with Edward Seckerson Spoken Word

23 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Aisha Orazbayeva: The Traces of Sound

26 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich – Brodsky Quartet with Jenny Lin (piano)

27 Fri

Kings Place Gallery until June 22

The Mechanical Hand

27 Fri Hall One 7.30pm

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich – Brodsky Qt play Shostakovich: Quartets Nos 1, 2 & 3

27 Fri

Folk Union – Adrian Crowley with Gill Sandell

Hall Two

8pm

Contemporary Classical Art Classical Folk

28 Sat Hall One 3pm

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich – Brodsky Qt play Shostakovich: Quartets Nos 4, 5 & 6

Classical

28 Sat Hall One 7.30pm

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich – Brodsky Qt play Shostakovich: Quartets Nos 7, 8 & 9

Classical

28 Sat

The Base – Empirical

Hall Two

8pm

Jazz

29 Sun Hall One 3pm

The Musical Diaries of Shostakovich – Brodsky Qt play Shostakovich: Quartets Nos 11, 12, 13 & 14

Classical

29 Sun Hall One 6.30pm

London Chamber Music / Shostakovich – Brodsky Qt play Shostakovich: Quartets Nos 10 & 15

Classical

Inner voices – THE MUSIC OF SIBELIUS AND David Matthews

30 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – PhotoVoice Lecture Series: Peter Marlow

Spoken Word

30 Mon

Wenlock Room

6pm

Pre-Concert Talk – Ilan Volkov and friends, in association with City Lit

Spoken Word

30 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Ilan Volkov & Guests: Gold Mines

Contemporary

1 Tue Hall One 7.30pm

Artistic Hire – Concert & Discussion: The Dilemma of Romanticism – Brahms, Schumann, Franck

Classical

3 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Inner Voices – ‘Voces intimae’: Master String Quartets by Sibelius and David Matthews Classical

3 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Impropera’s Mayday Mayhem

4 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Inner Voices – Sara Trickey and Daniel Tong play Sibelius and David Matthews

4 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Tom McConville with David Newey

Comedy Classical Folk

CALENDAR

APRIL

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MAY

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

April—June 2012

Inner voices – David Matthews’ sibelius (continued)

5 Sat

Pangolin London LAST DAY

Two in One: Charlotte Mayer & Almuth Tebbenhoff

5 Sat

St Pancras Room 11am – 5pm

Inner Voices – Study Day on Sibelius and David Matthews

Interact

5 Sat

Hall One

6pm

Inner Voices – Sibelius and David Matthews: Piano Works

Classical

5 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Inner Voices – Sibelius’s ‘Kuolema’: a UK Premiere

Classical

5 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Dave Stapleton feat. M. Neset, D. Kane, O. Louhivuori & Brodowski Qt

7 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – ensemblebash@20 part 2: Cage@100

11 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – The Epstein

Folk

12 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Girls In Airports

Jazz

13 Sun

Hall Two

3pm

Not So Silent Movies – Silent Movies with Live Improv Band

Art

Jazz

Contemporary

Music/Film/Comedy

TCHAIKOVSKY – THE ROMANTIC GENIUS 14 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Carol Ann Duffy & Friends

14 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Percussions Claviers de Lyon: Striking Visions

16 Wed

Wenlock Room

6pm

The Romantic Genius – Pre-Concert Talk in association with City Lit

16 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

The Romantic Genius – Martino Tirimo (piano): The Seasons & The Nutcracker Suite Classical

17 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – WitTank

18 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

The Romantic Genius – Amar Quartet plays Tchaikovsky

18 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Steven Finn

19 Sat Hall One 7.30pm

The Romantic Genius – Tchaikovsky: Piano Trio & Rococo Variations with Rosamunde Trio

19 Sat

The Base – The Quentin Collins / Brandon Allen Quartet

Hall Two

8pm

Spoken Word Contemporary Spoken Word

Comedy Classical Folk Classical Jazz

21 Mon

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

Talking Art – Edvard Munch and ‘The Scream’ with Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

Spoken Word

21 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – An Audience with Fiona Shaw – with Edward Seckerson

Spoken Word

21 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Emmanuelle Bertrand with Pascal Amoyel

25 Fri

Pangolin Gallery until June 16

Strange Beasts: Lynn Chadwick and the New Generation

25 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Issy & David Emeney with Kate Riaz

Folk

26 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Phronesis: Album Launch

Jazz

Contemporary Art

brahms unwrapped week 5

JUNE

CALENDAR

80 CALENDAR

28 Mon Hall One 7pm

Words on Monday – ‘Advertising for People Who Don’t Like Advertising’ with Erik Kessels

Spoken Word

28 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

30 Wed

Hall One

7.30pm

Out Hear – Francesco Tristano presents bachCage 2.0 Brahms Unwrapped – Keyboard Conversations® Brahms & the Schumanns

31 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes: Brahms Quartets – 1 Classical

31 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – An Audience with Shazia Mirza & Joy Carter

1 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes: Brahms Quartets – 2 Classical

1 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – We Aeronauts

2 Sat

St Pancras Room 10.30am – 4.30pm Brahms Unwrapped – Brahms Study Day 3: Brahms in Perspective

2 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped – Orion String Quartet with Susan Tomes: Brahms Quartets – 3 Classical

2 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Abram Wilson: Philippa

3 Sun

Hall Two

3pm

Not So Silent Movies – Silent Movies with TBC

Contemporary Classical

Comedy

Folk Interact

Jazz Music/Film/Comedy


CALENDAR 81

April—June 2012

THE QUEEN’s DIAMOND JUBILEE

4 Mon

Hall One

6pm

The Diamond Jubilee – English String Serenades

Classical

5 Tue

Hall One

6pm

The Diamond Jubilee – The Triumphs of Oriana & A Garland for the Queen

Classical

sONGLINES ENCOUNTERS FESTIVAL 2012

6 Wed

Hall Two

9pm

Songlines Encounters – R.U.T.A.

World

7 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Songlines Encounters – Lepistö & Lehti + Kosmos + Fugata Quintet

World

8 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Songlines Encounters – Spiro + Le Vent du Nord

World

8 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union / Songlines Encounters – Sam Lee & Friends

9 Sat

St Pancras Room 5pm

Songlines Encounters – Anda Union From the Steppes to the City

9 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Songlines Encounters – Madagascar All Stars + Anda Union

9 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base / Songlines Encounters – Lauren Kinsella’sThought-Fox featuring Soufian Saihi Jazz

Folk Fim World World

BRAhMS UNWRAPPED WEEK 6 / ROYAL ACADEMY OF MUSIC

11 Mon

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

Talking Art – Gold Silver Bronze

Spoken Word

11 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Poetry Gymnastics

Spoken Word

11 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Apartment House: ‘Facing Beauty’

14 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

Brahms Unwrapped / RAM – Royal Academy of Music Song Circle: Brahms Songs

14 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Impropera’s Sports Day

15 Fri

Wenlock Room

6pm

Royal Academy Of Music – Pre-Concert Talk, in association with CityLit

15 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

Royal Academy Of Music – Mozart’s Clarinet Quintet & Schubert’s Octet

15 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Damien O’Kane

16 Sat

Pangolin Gallery LAST DAY

Strange Beasts: Lynn Chadwick and the New Generation

16 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

Royal Academy Of Music – The Grand English Baroque

16 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – The Fini Bearman Group: Porgy and Bess Revisited

Contemporary Classical Comedy Spoken Word Classical Folk Art Classical Jazz

LA NUOVA MUSICA: A DEEPER TYDE

18 Mon

St Pancras Room 6.30pm

Talking Art – Matisse with Dr Gail-Nina Anderson

Spoken Word

18 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Politics Live with Steve Richards & Guests

Spoken Word

18 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Mark Knoop: Artificial Environments

21 Thu

Hall One

7.30pm

A Deeper Tyde – La Nuova Musica with William Berger: Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo

21 Thu

Hall Two

8pm

Off With Their Heads! – Really Lovely Comedy presents...

22 Fri

Kings Place Gallery LAST DAY

The Mechanical Hand

22 Fri

Hall One

7.30pm

A Deeper Tyde – La Nuova Musica with Rosemary Joshua: Mad Songs & Laments

22 Fri

Hall Two

8pm

Folk Union – Rachael Dadd

23 Sat

Hall One

7.30pm

A Deeper Tyde – La Nuova Musica with William Berger: Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo

23 Sat

Hall Two

8pm

The Base – Jack Davies Big Band

25 Mon

Hall One

7pm

Words on Monday – Guardian Review Book Club: Sebastian Faulks

25 Mon

Hall Two

8pm

Out Hear – Jane Chapman: A Shimmering Microcosm

29 Fri

Hall One

8pm

Not So Silent Movies – Live Improv Band feat. Tim Minchin

29 Fri

Kings Place Gallery FIRST DAY

2 Mon (Jul) Hall One

7pm

Tom Jenkins Olympic Photos Words on Monday – Shakespeare’s Poetry

Contemporary Classical Comedy Art Classical Folk Classical Jazz Spoken Word Contemporary Music/Film/Comedy Art Spoken Word

CALENDAR

JUNE

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk


82 CONTEMPORARY

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April—June 2012

Q&A jamie bissmire Jamie Bissmire is one of the UK’s leading DJs, producers and exponents of techno music. As one third of Bandalu, in the 1990s he pioneered the unique combination of dub and techno influences that would come to define the UK electronic scene. As one half of SpaceDJz and with his Ground and Foundation labels, he remains at the cuttingedge of loose-limbed techno minimalism. In April he plays Out Hear.

I’ll be sitting in front of a musicAL instrument fully exposed TO THE AUDIENCE Can you explain the concept behind the album Crossing The Rubicon? A musical composition that pays homage to the ideas that have mapped man’s struggle to change the common beliefs of our known universe. Crossing the Rubicon is about leaving the backwaters of our known perceptions and journeying into the unknown. How does a leading international DJ who normally plays 140 BPM+ techno come to be playing at Kings Place? After being reunited with childhood friend pianist and composer Leon Michener, we decided to spend

It will be the complete opposite of my usual dj performance some time in the studio together. Joined by composer-electronic artist David Toop the sessions turned into the 2010 Out Hear performance of The 12 Gates, a live reworking of my electronic suite Rhythms Of Nature. Leon also joins me on Crossing The Rubicon as joint writer, and performer.

Do you enjoy collaborations with artists from other music genres? To be honest, my work with Leon Michener and David Toop has been my only excursion outside of the techno genre. That said, I’ve collaborated with lots of artists en route as it’s always nice to get a fresh perspective. Your record label work is based upon a diverse range of subjects, such as ancestry and geometrical patterns. What are you drawing on at the moment? Everything I see and touch. I always look at stuff and think how could I represent that musically or incorporate the design ideas into what I’m doing… really anything from tea cups to tsunamis.

In what way will your Out Hear performance be different from your normal club night set-up? Do you expect the audience to dance or sit and listen? It will be the complete opposite of my usual DJ performance. For one I’ll be sitting in front of a musical instrument fully exposed to the audience, without a darkened DJ booth to protect my identity. I’ll also have a lot more space to manoeuvre in, as I’ll no longer be confined to a particular style or tempo. I’m really looking forward to liberating my inner musician, I might even bring down my banjo… Who will be your guest musicians for this performance? We’re still in the process of finalising the musical content and musicians… Leon will definitely be there. And expect instrumentation from a Buchla 200e, violin, clavichord, piano, Tempest and vocals.

Out Hear: Jamie Bissmire, Leon Michener & Guests  2 April

See Listings p55 for details

JAMIE BISSMIRE © SUPPLIED PHOTO

Which influences can the Kings Place audience expect to hear at your Out Hear performance – any traces of techno, electro and dub reggae? Yes, all of the above. Just refined and wrestled into their appropriate space within our performance. So no MASSIVE kick drums at 140 bpm!


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CONCERTS WHAT’S AT ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012 KINGS PLACE DURING

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APRIL–JUNE 2012

THE BRODSKYS ARE BACK!

BRODSKY’S SHOSTAKOVICH | SIBELIUS: INNER VOICES | SONGLINES

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION STRING QUARTET WITH SUSAN TOMES SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA KENNETH HAMILTON CHARLES OWEN MIKHAIL RUDY JEFFREY SIEGEL IVO VARBANOV

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The Brodskys Are Back!

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Academy of St Martin in the Fields Aurora Orchestra with Maxim Rysanov The Sixteen Natalie Clein Gould Piano Trio Orion STRING Quartet with susan tomes Schubert Ensemble Philip Dukes Katya Apekisheva kenneth hamilton Charles Owen Mikhail Rudy jeffrey siegel Ivo Varbanov

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Brahms Unwrapped Sibelius: Inner Voices Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Music for a Monarch

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What's On Summer 2012 Kings Place