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WHAT'S ON MARCH – JULY 2014

World

Çig˘dem Aslan Habib Koité

Classical

Chamber Classics Unwrapped Why does music make us cry? Matthew Sharp, Renaissance man

Spoken Word

PG Wodehouse, the poet Tim Parks, Jon Ronson

Jazz

Evan Parker at 70

Folk & Americana

Alasdair Roberts  & Emily Portman Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham Suzy Bogguss

Summer Schools Special

RITES OF PASSAGE Family Atlantica at songlines encounters


05

WELCOME TO THE SPRING/SUMMER 2014 SEASON AT KINGS PLACE

We are delighted to be hosting the fourth edition of Songlines Encounters Festival this summer (5 – 7 Jun) and wish a warm welcome to our cover stars Family Atlantica, who mix Ghanaian, Ethiopian and Venezuelan traditions to create a vibrant, tropical psychedelia. Also on the line-up are acclaimed rebetiko singer Çig˘dem Aslan, Malian legend Habib Koité and Romanian vocalist Oana Ca˘ta˘lina Chit˛u. Our major Chamber Classics Unwrapped series features a host of international artists, from Canadian virtuoso James Ehnes, to the Quatuor Mosaïques, Sonia WiederAtherton, Imogen Cooper and the Aronowitz Ensemble. All will be performing at least one of the Top 50 chamber classics, as voted by you, as the centrepiece of imaginative programmes. For more classical treats, make a date with cellist, baritone and actor Matthew Sharp (1 – 3 May) for his highly original RE:naissance

series, featuring song recitals, cabaret, a cello concerto and a high-energy family event on the Sunday. Aurora Orchestra will also be enchanting the young with its innovative series of family ʻorchestral theatreʼ concerts Far, far away... (15 Feb, 5 Apr, 31 May & 13 Sep). We have a very special jazz programme this season, with Evan Parker celebrating his 70th birthday (5 Apr) and the GMF Jazz Workshops & Music Festival returning with René Marie, Jeremy Pelt, Jacques Toussaint, Jim Mullen, Bruce Barth and a host of other stars (17–21 Apr). Alasdair Roberts and Emily Portman co-curate an exciting folk series, Outlandish Nights, featuring The Furrow Collective and Moulettes (27 – 29 Mar), while our weekly folk programme has never looked better, with Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham (11 Apr) and Americana legend Suzy Bogguss (16 Apr).

Alan Titchmarsh (24 Mar), Damon Galgut (31 Mar) and Tim Parks (7 Apr) are all coming to Words on Monday, and look out for fascinating events on PG Wodehouse (14 Apr) and Seamus Heaney (26 May) from Poet in the City. This looks like being our busiest summer ever with a string of summer schools, from our second Chess Festival (14 Jun) and the International Guitar Foundation Summit School (25 – 28 Jul), to the London A Cappella International Summer School (1 – 4 Aug) and the exciting Tête à tête Opera Festival, (7 – 10 Aug) in a new partnership with UAL Central Saint Martins.

Peter Millican, CEO

LUZMIRA ZERPA OF FAMILY ATLANTICA (COVER) & PETER MILLICAN (ABOVE) © NICK WHITE

CONTRIbUTORS

Tim Parks is the author of 14 novels, including Europa and Sex is Forbidden. Heʼs also a translator and a writer on life in Italy. Last year he brought out his profound reflection on chronic pain, Teach Us to Sit Still. He comes to do a Shelf-Help Session on 7 April.

Garth Cartwright wrote our cover feature on Songlines Encounters. Mmusic writer, broadcaster and DJ, Garthʼs books include Princes Amongst Men: Journeys With Gypsy Musicians and Miles Davis: The Complete Illustrated History.

Kate Mossman, who interviews Alasdair Roberts and Emily Portman on their Outlandish Nights series, is Arts Editor of the New Statesman magazine and former Deputy Editor of The Word. Sheʼs also a regular writer, critic and podcaster for The Guardian.

Matthew Wright has written about music, books and film for publications including the TLS, The Guardian and The Arts Desk. He is completing his first novel, Blue Notes, about the erratic spiritual journey of an aspiring jazz musician.


FAY HIELD © DAVID ANGEL

HERMAN KOLGEN © ALPHAVILLE

EMILY SAUNDERS © AMANDA SEARLE

JAMES EHNES © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA

CLASSICAL

JAZZ/ WORLD

CONTEMPORARY

FOLK

CLASSICAL HIGHLIGHTS

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS

FOLK HIGHLIGHTS

08 Spring Sonatas Canadian violin virtuoso James Ehnes (above) is just one of the international stars coming to Chamber Classics Unwrapped 10 Entente Cordiale in C minor Allegri Quartet team up with Wajahat Khan for Raag Desh 11 Isserlisʼs chamber of secrets Watch the famous cellist pass on his wisdom at ChamberStudio 42 THE ART OF CRYING Why does great music make us cry? Neuropsychiatrist Professor Michael Trimble on music and emotion 48 RENAISSANCE MAN Cellist, baritone and actor Matthew Sharp brings a host of theatric-musical events to his RE:naissance 50 ACCESS ALL ARIAS Tête à Têteʼs pioneering new opera festival moves to Kings Place this summer

13 Girls on top Laura Jurd and Kate Williams are in the vanguard of female band-leaders

16 Seeing Double  Effy and Litha Efthymiou bring Parting to Out Hear 18 Dust to dust... Alpha-ville present the extraordinary sonic-visual art of Herman Kolgen (see above)

20 Proud Songsters Award-winning duo, Katriona Gilmore and Jamie Roberts

14 Voice from the inside Emily Saunders (above) makes her Kings Place debut 15 Sound Inventor at 70 Sebastian Scotney talks with the legendary Evan Parker WORLD HIGHLIGHTS

21 Hurricane Fay hits town Colin Irwin interviews Fay Hield (above) 22 Amazing Aly Bain The Shetland fiddler has never lost his appetite for performing 38 OUTLANDISH NIGHTS Three-day folk festival curated by Alasdair Roberts and Emily Portman, featuring The Moulettes, Furrow Collective and Hirta Songs, by Kate Mossmann

34 RITES OF PASSAGE Songlines Encounters Festival works its cosmopolitan magic again,as explains Garth Cartwright

EDITORIAL TEAM

82 Q&A Suzy Bogguss

Publisher Kings Place Music Foundation Contact +44 (0) 20 7520 1440 mag@kingsplace.co.uk www.kingsplace.co.uk

Editor-in-Chief Helen Wallace Editorial Team Emrah Tokalaç Janie Nicholas Michael Green Alice Clark (web) Lindsay Garfoot (web)

Art Direction Moira Gil Picture Research Sunita Sharma-Gibson Proofreading Susannah Howe Print Artisan Press

Thanks to Peter Millican, Jen Mitchell, Alister Hussain, Amy SibleyAllen, Hannah Cooke, Zoë Jeyes, Geraldine D’Amico, Chris Nye, Holly Thomas, Hervé Bournas, Rachel Jackson, Hannah Nicholls, Andrew Clawson, Graham Newlands and Nell Halford.

© Kings Place 2014 All material is strictly copyright and all rights are reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without the written permission of Kings Place is strictly forbidden. The greatest care has been taken to ensure the accuracy of information in this magazine at the time of going to press, but we accept no responsibility for omissions or errors. The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Kings Place.


ART

IAN GREEN © SUPPLIED PHOTO

JON RONSON © SUPPLIED PHOTO

sculpture in the home, 50S SHOW © STEVE RUSSSELL/PANGOLIN LONDON

PG WODEHOUSE P ̒ RINCE FOR HIRE̓ COVER © SUPPLIED PHOTO

SPOKEN WORD

INTERACT/ COMEDY

FOOD & DRINK/ LISTINGS 

SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS

ART HIGHLIGHTS

INTERACT HIGHLIGHTS

FOOD & DRINK HIGHLIGHTS

24 25

Guide to the Mortal Maze Val McDermid on crime writing By Jeeves, he's a poet Tony Ring on PG Wodehouse as a poet and lyricist

30 Sculpture in the Home (above) is a major new exhibition by Pangolin London, placing sculpture in a domestic context

12 F ar, far away... Aurora Orchestra is leading an exciting revolution in children's classical concerts

33 The Whole Beast Rotundaʼs head chef Ian Green (above) specialises in real nose-to-tail cooking, says Jenny Linford

47

THE TRICK IS TO KEEP BREATHING Tim Parks left words behind in order to recover from chronic pain. Then he had to tell his story, and words came back

27 SUMMER SCHOOLS Kings Place hosts a range of summer schools from a cappella singing to guitar playing and jazz composition and performance

53 Listings 79 Calendar

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS 32 The Oh Blimey Big Band Jon Ronson (above) was once keyboard player in the mysterious cult band. He takes up the story...

REGULARS

WHAT'S ON MARCH – JULY 2014

CONTENTS

LISTINGS

03 06 07 08 34 53 54

Welcome Ticket Information Planning Your Week Highlights Features Listings March

59 65 72 76 78 79 82

April May June July Art Listings Calendar Q&A


06 TICKETS

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March — July 2014

TICKET bOOKING & vENUE INFORMATION

bOOKING Tickets for all performances from £9.50 online Tickets are cheaper if booked online. (The online ticket prices are shown in the listings.) Please add £2 per ticket to the online price if booking by telephone or in person. Kings Place do not charge any additional booking or postage fees.

Tue 10–6pm; Sun 12–7pm (closed Bank Holidays). Opening Hours are subject to change – please call the Box Office for more details. 90 York Way, London, N1 9AG £9.50 Saver Seats can only be purchased online and are limited in availability

vENUES

ONLINE Secure online booking 24hr a day. www.kingsplace.co.uk

bY PHONE Kings Place Box Office +44 (0)20 7520 1490

IN PERSON Box Office Opening Hours Mon, Wed, Thu, Fri & Sat 12–8pm;

HALL TWO

All seating is unreserved and general admission – choose your own seat on arrival. Some events may be standing only.

GROUP bOOKINGS Buy six or more tickets per event, and save 20%. Group discounts are available through the Box Office only and are not bookable online. May not be applicable for some events and subject to availability.

One and Two, with hearing advancement headsets available for audience members who do not use a hearing aid. Neck loops are also available to use with hearing aids switched to the ‘T’ position. All areas of Kings Place are accessible to those with Guide & Hearing Dogs.

ST PANCRAS ROOM

HALL ONE Assigned Seating – Choose your own seat when booking. £9.50 Saver Seats can only be purchased online and are limited in availability You are guaranteed a seat. Its location will be allocated by the Box Office. Tickets may be collected at any time during the hour before the performance.

All seating is unreserved and general admission – choose your own seat on arrival. Some events may be standing only.

ACCESS Kings Place aims to be accessible to everyone, and all performance spaces offer suitable seating for wheelchair users. Please inform the Box Office Staff of any access requirements when booking. There is an induction loop at the Box Office Welcome Desk to assist those with hearing aids. An infrared system is installed in Halls

ARRIvING LATE We will endeavour to seat latecomers at a suitable break in the performance, although this may not always be possible and in some instances latecomers may not be admitted at all. Tickets are non-refundable.

TAKING PICTURES The use of cameras, video or sound recording equipment is strictly prohibited during performances, concerts and exhibitions. Kings Place may take pictures during your visit that are later used for promotional purposes.

RETURNS POLICY Tickets cannot be refunded or exchanged, except where an event is cancelled or abandoned when less than half of the performance has taken place.


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

PLANNING YOUR WEEK 07

JOURNEY

WEEKLY FOCUS

KINGS PLACE IS SITUATED JUST A FEW MINUTES', WALK FROM KING'S CROSS AND ST PANCRAS STATIONS, ONE OF THE MOST CONNECTED LOCATIONS IN LONDON AND NOW THE bIGGEST TRANSPORT HUb IN EUROPE. SEE MAP bELOW FOR DETAILED TRAvEL ADvICE

WEDNESDAY/THURSDAY – SATURDAY EACH WEEK

A COLLAbORATIvE MIx OF ARTISTS, CURATORS, ORGANISATIONS AND PRODUCERS PRESENTING AN ExCITING SERIES OF EvENTS

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central saint martins d rd r Wha

Battlebridge Basin

st Pancras international thameslink euston station

British library

d nr sto eu

PUbLIC TRANSPORT The Transport for London Journey Planner provides live travel updates and options on how to reach Kings Place quickly and accurately. You can also call London Travel Information on +44 (0)20 7222 1234.

TUbE

The nearest tube station is King’s Cross St Pancras, on the Circle, Metropolitan, Hammersmith & City, Piccadilly, Northern and Victoria lines. The station has step-free access from platform to street level. From the tube station the quickest way to Kings Place is via the new King’s Boulevard. You can also walk up York Way.

bUS

The bus route to York Way is the 390. Other services running to nearby King’s Cross St Pancras are routes 10, 17, 30, 45, 46, 59, 63, 73, 91, 205, 214, 259 and 476.

CAR

Kings Place is easily accessible by car and is clearly signposted in the immediate area.

ca led on ian rd

King’s cross

90 york Way london n1 9ag

Wharfdale rd

york Way

d sr cra Pan

d dr lan mid

Kin g’s Bou leva rd

ncP car Park

crinan st

ay ds W goo

ville rd Penton K ing ’s c ros sr gr d ay ’s inn rd

The building is outside the Congestion Charge Zone. The nearest car park is NCP London St Pancras on Pancras Road, open 24 hours, 7 days including Bank Holidays. If you are using sat nav our postcode is N1 9AG.

bIKE

There is a Barclays Bike Hire Docking Station right next door to Kings Place on Crinan Street. For its latest status and recommended cycling routes to Kings Place, please visit the Transport for London website: www.tfl.gov.uk/roadusers/cycling or call London Travel Information: +44 (0)20 7222 1234.

FOOT

If you live in King’s Cross or the surrounding area then why not walk to Kings Place? We are located right on the Grand Union Canal towpath.

TAxI

Visitors can pick up taxis either on York Way and the streets immediately surrounding Kings Place or at the taxi ranks at King’s Cross and St Pancras Stations.

PLANNING YOUR WEEK SUNDAYS

CLASSICAL SATURDAYS

JAZZ

P08 P13

SUNDAYS

CONTEMPORARY P16 FRIDAYS

FOLK MONDAYS

SPOKEN WORD THURSDAYS

COMEDY

P20 P24 P32


08

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

March — July 2014

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

CLASSICAL

SPRING SONATAS

Chamber Classics Unwrapped boasts an array of international talent and memorable masterpieces this spring Helen Wallace selects some choice programmes

Imogen Cooper, James Ehnes, Sonia Wieder-Atherton and the Quatuor Mosaïques are just a handful of the distinguished contributors to Chamber Classics Unwrapped this season. First up in April is a chance to hear both Beethoven’s Ghost Trio (voted in at number 48) and Shostakovichʼs coruscating Second Trio (which tipped it at 46), played by a new grouping of Priya Mitchell, Katya Apekisheva and Bjørg Værnes Lewis, the Norwegian cellist who is married to pianist Paul Lewis. Cellist Sonia WiederAtherton and Imogen Cooper mix Webern, Janácˇek and Beethoven with the Romantic Rachmaninov Cello Sonata which, Wieder-Atherton has said, ʻseems to slip itself into the secret universe of its listeners todayʼ (12 April). Acknowledged as one of the world’s leading violinists, Canadian James Ehnes, aligns Strauss and Leclair with the famous Franck

Violin Sonata, which he couldn’t live without: ‘It’s original, uncategorisable, and it’s a huge challenge to do it justice: but when you do, it’s the best piece in the world.’ (17 May). There are opportunities to hear some real rarities in the concert by the French Quatuor Mosaïques, famous for their attention to period detail. They are bringing Félicien Davidʼs String Quartet No. 3, a work that marries rich Romanticism with esoteric spirituality, along with Bohemian Anton Reichaʼs Ouverture générale pour les séances des quatuors, before plunging into Schubert’s Death and the Maiden, which came in at No. 6 in the vote (11 June). The acclaimed Aronowitz Ensemble, meanwhile, will combine Tchaikovsky’s sunny Souvenir de Florence (No. 36) with Dohnányiʼs striking Piano Quintet No. 1 and Schubertʼs lovely Adagio and Rondo concertante (15 May).

HIGHLIGHTS

James Ehnes


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

09

Sonia Wieder-Atherton

THERE ARE OPPORTUNITIES TO HEAR SOME REAL RARITIES ALONGSIDE THE TOP 50 CHAMbER CLASSICS

15 MAY #36 tcHaiKoVsKy Souvenir de Florence Aronowitz Ensemble

16 MAY C H A M B E R C L A S S I C S U N W R A P P E D FOR FULL LIST, PLEASE vISIT KINGSPLACE.CO.UK/CHAMbERCLASSICS

19 MARCH #4 moZart & #7 BraHms The Clarinet Quintets Brodsky Quartet

20 MARCH #47 siBelius Voces intimae Fitzwilliam Quartet

21 MARCH

JAMES EHNES © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | SONIA WIEDER-ATHERTON © SJEAN-BAPTISTE MONDINO

#37 & 14 BeetHoVen Spring & Kreutzer Sonatas Thomas Gould & Alasdair Beatson

There are programmes that meditate on particular concepts in music, such as the Phoenix Piano Trioʼs (27 April), in which the idea of the fugue is explored through Bach and Schumann (in his Canonic Studies) before we arrive at Beethoven’s glorious Archduke Trio with its chromatic, fugal middle movement and slow variations. A special treat will be Aurora Orchestra’s programme on 13 June, featuring Mozart’s serene Gran Partita and Ravel’s scintillating Introduction and Allegro. Exciting for young listeners will be Telling Tales, the New London Chamber Ensemble’s narrated programme which includes Berio’s priceless Opus Number Zoo and Martin Butler’s hilarious Dirty Beasts, based on the poetry of Roald Dahl, as well as old favourites Peter and the Wolf and The Carnival of the Animals (Saturday 17 May at 3pm) and I would also commend younger to listeners the concert by the Royal Academy of Music students on 28 June, who will perform Bartókʼs exciting Sonata for two pianos and percussion along with Stravinskyʼs The Soldier’s Tale.

Chamber Classics Unwrapped 19–21 March; 10–12 April; 14–17 May; 11–14 Jun See Listings pp54–55; pp60–61; pp68–69; pp74–75 for details

10 APRIL #48 & 46 BeetHoVen & sHostaKoVicH Ghost Trio + Piano Trio No. 2 Priya Mitchell, Bjørg Værnes Lewis, Katya Apekisheva

12 APRIL #32 racHmaninoV Cello Sonata Imogen Cooper & Sonia Wieder-Atherton

27 APRIL #15 BeetHoVen Archduke Trio Phoenix Piano Trio

14 MAY #31 sHostaKoVicH Piano Quintet Carducci Qt & Charles Owen

#22 BacH Musical Offering Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment

17 MAY stuDy Day French Chamber Music

saint-saËns

Carnival of the Animals New London Chamber Ensemble #25 FrancK Violin Sonata James Ehnes & Andrew Armstrong

11 JUNE #6 scHuBert Death and the Maiden Quatuor Mosaïques

12 JUNE

ˇ ÁK #9 & 28 DVor American Quartet & Piano Quintet No. 2 Sacconi Quartet & Simon Crawford-Phillips

13 JUNE #23 & 29 moZart & raVel Gran Partita Introduction & Allegro Aurora Orchestra: Nicholas Collon

14 JUNE #41 & 50 scHuBert The Piano Trios Gould Piano Trio

28 JUNE stuDy Day Top 50 Chamber Classics and why we love them in association with The Musical Brain® #40 BartÓK Sonata for two pianos and percussion Royal Academy of Music


10

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March — July 2014

Entente cordiale in C Indian tradition meets Beethoven in the Allegri Quartet’s LCMS concert this May Regular contributors to the London Chamber Music Society, the Allegri Quartet will be presenting a highly unusual programme this May in a concert with Indiaʼs celebrated sarod maestro Wajahat Khan. Son and nephew of sitar legends Ustad Imrat Khan and late Ustad Vilayat Khan respectively, Wajahat is well-known internationally as a performer, composer and collaborator as well as an heir to a dynasty that stretches back to the courts of 16th-century India. He’s composed an opera, The Queens of Govan, for Scottish Opera and sarod concertos with symphony as well as chamber orchestras which has been widely performed, while this concert will feature his Raag Desh, a quintet for string quartet and sarod. The Allegris will begin with Beethoven’s Op. 18 No. 4 Quartet in C minor, which they’ve just recorded to great acclaim. A clever transition from Western to Indian harmonies and sonorities will be played out in an Evening Raga by Wajahat Khan, based on an Indian version of the C minor scale, and performed on sarod, tabla and tanpura. The two performing traditions will then join for Khan’s Raag Desh. Says Allegri violinist Rafael Todes, ‘We’ve never worked with Wajahat Khan before but we know that he’s an extraordinary musician and this quintet has been successfully performed by the Medici and the Carducci Quartets, so we’re really

looking forward to getting our teeth into it. From what I understand, there are elements of improvisation so I imagine every performance is unique.’ A New Statesman review of its first performance remarked on the ‘probing questions concerning form, texture and harmony’ which Khan embodies in the piece, concluding that in seriousness and ambition it goes ‘beyond anything Shankar himself attempted’. The Allegris, who celebrate their 60th anniversary in 2014, are regular visitors to the LCMS concerts at Kings Place, having completed an illuminating series that juxtaposed Beethoven and Shostakovich quartets over the last two years. ‘We love playing in Hall One, it’s got a terrific acoustic, of course, but the audience is great too. That Sunday crowd are a really knowledgeable bunch. We always meet people afterwards in the bar and are struck by their enthusiasm and intelligence. It’s definitely not a venue people go to be “be seen” in, but one where they are really committed to the music.’

LCMS Allegri Quartet and Wajahat Khan 11 May See Listings p67 for details

SUNDAYS, 6.30 pm | HALL ONE

There are elements of improvisation in Wajahat Khan's quintet, so every performance is unique

16 MARCH Callino Quartet Haydn | Mendelssohn Shostakovich 23 MARCH Florilegium Vivaldi | Telemann | Fasch | Bach 30 MARCH Rosamunde Trio Brahms | Dvorˇák | Peter Fribbins 6 APRIL La Mer Trio Telemann | Bax | Debussy Ravel | Leclair | Takemitsu Thomas Oehler 13 APRIL Schumann Quartet Haydn | Schubert | Shostakovich 27 APRIL Phoenix Piano Trio Beethoven | Schumann | JC Bach 4 MAY Badke Quartet Haydn | Beethoven James Francis Brown

Wajahat Khan

11 MAY Allegri Quartet with Wajahat Khan (sarod) Beethoven | Wajahat Khan


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

11

Tim Hugh

SUNDAYS, 11.30 AM | HALL ONE 23 MARCH Sunday Morning Cabaret with Janie Dee 27 APRIL Enoch Arden Lucy Parham & Henry Goodman

WAJAHAT KHAN © SAROD | STEVEN ISSERLIS © SUPPLIED PHOTO | TIM HUGH © KAREN LYNDON LEWIS

25 MAY Solo Inspiration Tim Hugh & Edward Fox

ISSERLIS AND THE CHAMbER OF SECRETS Don’t miss two unusual events by leading cellists this season, says Helen Wallace Steven Isserlis long ago proved himself the most individual – and most articulate – cellist of his generation. In recent recordings of the Dvorˇák Cello Concerto and of Beethovenʼs Cello Sonatas with Robert Levin (both on the Hyperion label) heʼs shown, yet again, how he can illuminate and ignite familiar works with his probing intelligence and mercurial energy. He also has an extraordinary technique

at the service of his creativity, so donʼt miss a chance to discover something of the thinking and inspiration behind his approach at his open masterclasses on Sunday 1 June, from 2pm to 6pm, hosted by ChamberStudio. As the Artistic Director of the Prussia Cover, International Musicians Seminar in Cornwall, he works with and coaches young professionals from all over the world. In this, his first appearance with ChamberStudio, he will be working with the Navarra Quartet, The Busch Ensemble and Trio Isimsiz. Another fine cellist performing at Kings Place this season is Tim Hugh, principal of the London Symphony Orchestra, who joins actor Edward Fox for a meditative concert featuring the poetry of TS Eliot and Robert Browning and Bach’s Suites for solo cello (Word Play, Sunday 25 May). Highly recommended. Word Play: Tim Hugh and Edward Fox 25 May ChamberStudio: Public Masterclass with Steven Isserlis 1 June See Listings p71 for details

1 JUNE Keyboard Conversations® with Jeffrey Siegel: ‘Mistresses and Masterpieces’

CHAMbERSTUDIO MASTERCLASSES

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS, 2.30 & 4.30PM

A year-round base where outstanding chamber groups can be supported as they develop and establish themselves in the early stages of their careers with the guidance of international chamber musicians. FREE admission for observers. Tickets can be reserved by phone at the Box Office. Full details at chamberstudio.org

9, 16, 23 & 30 MARCH 6, 13 & 27 APRIL 4 & 11 MAY 1 JUNE (with Steven Isserlis; 2–6pm) 6 JULY (Mentorship Day)


12

HIGHLIGHTS CLASSICAL

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March — July 2014

FAR, FAR AWAY... Aurora Orchestra is developing a pioneering strand of children’s concerts which aim to immerse even the youngest children in dramatic interactions with classical music, writes Helen Wallace

There’s a quiet revolution underway in children’s concerts, and Aurora Orchestra is in its vanguard. In the events it is developing for very young children at Kings Place, tired, patronising assumptions about introducing children to classical music are replaced by surprising, immersive, interactive and dramatic encounters not only with masterworks of the repertoire but also with great musicians you can reach out and touch. ‘There has been this idea that there is some music deemed “suitable” for children, and that adventuring beyond that is “too risky” or difficult for them. We don’t subscribe to that at all so our starting point is always the greatest music, even if it is in miniature form,’ says Kate Wakeling, Aurora’s Writer-in-Residence, who devises the stories for Far, Far Away. Two projects in 2013 focused on Bach’s Goldberg Variations and the Well-Tempered Clavier, for example, and, in February, their concerts will explore Chopin’s Preludes and Waltzes. Aurora’s events are also unique in that music is always the creative starting-point: Wakeling finds that too often music is shoe-horned into a narrative to act as glorified sound effects: ‘You might have a storm here, a lullaby there, a pick-and-mix approach tied together by a rather tenuous theme, whereas our story starts with the music. So when we explored the Well-Tempered Clavier we had a melody on a quest to find her family, which culminated in a fugue.’ She enjoys finding a story in the music that will require audience interaction rather than it being an add-on: ‘Interaction is central, it drives what happens next – the listening, counting, singing, dancing, toe-wiggling is needed from the audience to get us to the next stop in the tale.’ She always gives her audience something enticing and colourful to listen out for in the music which draws them through the story. ‘I’ve finally found a way of bringing together the two sides of my life as a musicologist and as a writer in working on these concerts. It’s been a revelation and a challenge to hit on a way to link up six preludes and fugues through a narrative so that a five-year-old is itching to hear the seventh.’ She’s keen to stress that a vital part of the process is not only the musicians’ input, but the fact that Aurora’s principal players perform in these events and take them as seriously as any evening concert: ‘The integrity the performers bring adds that extra sparkle and intensity, and the youngest

children respond to great musicianship as immediately as any seasoned adult listener.’ Aurora’s gifted in-house arranger, composer Iain Farrington, makes bespoke arrangements of the music, which allow for instrumentalists to walk around while playing, or to speak lines: ‘There’s no musical compromise in these arrangements, and there’s something freeing about encountering famous piano pieces played by a small group of different instruments.’ The aim is to make the events more theatrical in future, by collaborating and consulting with designers, choreographers and interactive theatrical specialists such as Oily Cart, as Julia Roderick, Director of Learning and Participation for Aurora, explains: ‘It’s amazing how design, lighting and choreography can transform the experience for young children, and we want to give them opportunities to touch, smell, feel as well as hear and see, using bubbles, feathers, leaves and coloured cloths.’ The concerts for younger children will be in the round in Hall Two, while the 6+ events will be in Hall One on stage. Aurora’s current fund-raising campaign, through the National Funding Scheme’s DONATE platform, is geared towards making these concerts accessible to as many local children as possible through partnerships with community centres and groups. ‘It’s important that we keep the events high-quality and intimate,’ says Roderick, ‘so we wouldn’t have more than 50 in the round, but we’d like to be able to do more of them so more children can experience them.’ And for those who cringe at the idea of sitting crosslegged at a tots event, relax: ‘Pixar films can appeal to children and make adults laugh; well, so can we!’, declares Wakeling. Far, far away… 15 February, 5 April, 31 May See Listings pp58 & 71 for details

WHEN WE ExPLORED THE WELL-TEMPERED CLAvIER WE HAD A MELODY ON A qUEST TO FIND HER FAMILY, WHICH CULMINATED IN A FUGUE


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

JAZZ HIGHLIGHTS

March — July 2014

bAND-LEADING LADIES Female band-leaders are still too rare, but both Kate Williams and Laura Jurd, trail-blazing originals from two entirely different traditions, are playing at Kings Place this spring, writes Matthew Wright

FAMILY CONCERTS & LAURA JURD CONDUCTS THE CHAOS COLLECTIVE © SUPPLIED PHOTOS | KATE WILLIAMS © MELODY MCLAREN

This season The Base sees visits from two of the most inventive bandleader-composers in contemporary British jazz. Kate Williams’s septet, which secured a reputation for colourful ambitious music with their acclaimed 2011 album Made Up, make Kings Place the only London UK tour, playing both new compositions and pieces from that album. The Chaos Orchestra, a genre-busting big band directed by stellar trumpeter Laura Jurd, is launching its debut album, Island Mentality. Jazz ensembles of this size require more through-composition than smaller groups, which sustain improvised lines over a skeleton harmony. This suits both musicians, who relish the opportunity to compose. Williams composes all of her septet tunes, while the Chaos Orchestra, in keeping with its collective roots, shares the task around. Four of the eight tracks on the album are by Jurd, the rest by fellow Chaos players Simon Marsh, Alex Roth and Matt Roberts. Though from different traditions – Williams the pianist-composer school of Bill Evans and Chick Corea, and the Chaos Orchestra the innovative big band tradition of groups like Loose Tubes both draw on an exhilarating range of genres and influences. With a broad tonal palette and a fascination with musical textures, both employ

exquisitely imaginative instrumentation. Their sophisticated harmonic writing is allied to a delicately catchy use of melody, while their musical seriousness is balanced by wit and a gift for engaging sound combinations. Kate Williams’s septet teases the audience with tremors of Fifties cool jazz, ruffled by Eliane Elias-style Latin rhythms, built over a rigorous harmonic foundation with hints of Williams’s classical training. Her music is formally inventive, while also being attentive to the individual players she works with: ‘I enjoy exploring the variety of instrument combinations, but I also write for the individual players concerned and their individual sound,’ she explains. The Telegraph’s Ivan Hewett, described their sound ‘as rich and flavoursome as fruit cake’. Williams is now working on new pieces, some of which will be performed in the May concert. The Chaos Orchestra specialises in heady and original new sound mixes. ‘We look for the order within chaos,’ says Jurd. Her own compositions, such as the rootsy Giant’s Causeway, have a subtly distinctive folk flavour. ‘I’m a big fan of traditional folk, and also classical composers who build it into their work,’ she explains. Vocalist Lauren Kinsella adds both pure-toned lyric singing and surreally acrobatic vocal improvisation, which is woven into the instrumental lines giving a new dimension of sensitivity to the big band sound. ‘I don’t think there’s any other big band playing music like ours,’ Jurd suggests.

The Base: Kate Williams 29 March The Chaos Orchestra 17 May See Listings pp58 & 70 for details

HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

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SATURDAYS, 8PM – HALL TWO 22 MARCH Claire Martin with the Montpellier Cello Quartet 29 MARCH Chaos Orchestra presents the music from its debut album, Island Mentality 5 APRIL Evan Parker Special 70th-Birthday Celebration 12 APRIL Ivo Neame Quintet performing music from the albums Caught in the Light of Day and Yatra 26 APRIL Iain Ballamy 50th-Birthday Celebration 3 MAY Julian Siegel Quartet featuring music from their awardwinning album Urban Theme Park plus music from their next album 10 MAY Emily Saunders ESB Album release: ‘Outsiders Insiders’ + Support: Partikel 17 MAY Kate Williams Septet performing compositions from the album Made Up 24 MAY Bad Ass Brass 25 APRIL (HALL ONE, FRIDAY) Marc Copland & John Abercrombie Speak To Me 30 MAY (HALL ONE, FRIDAY, 7.30PM) Tim Garland’s Lighthouse Album Launch: ‘Songs to the North Sky’ featuring Jason Rebello, Asaf Sirkis & Cellophony 31 MAY E17 Jazz Ensemble led by Carlos Lopez-Real and John Turville in ‘Sketches of Anatolia’ ALSO AT KINGS PLACE 17–21 APRIL (EASTER WEEKEND) GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival featuring Rene Marie, Jeremy Pelt, Bruce Barth, Jim Mullen & London Filmharmonic


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HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

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March — July 2014

Voice from the Inside Jazz vocalist Emily Saunders is looking forward to making her debut at Kings Place, as she tells Neil McKim

Jazz vocalist and composer Emily Saunders has been busy putting the finishing touches to her new album, Outsiders Insiders. In 2011 she made a critical splash with her Brazilian-tinged debut disc, Cotton Skies, and now she’s preparing to perform her followup disc, in its entirety, at Kings Place. While her first disc featured repertoire that was strongly influenced by the ‘eccentric genius’ of Brazilian composer Hermeto Pascoal, and the jazz keyboard legend Chick Corea (who both performed with Miles Davis), her new disc, albeit with these influences still in tow, consists purely of her own compositions. Upbeat summer grooves display the Brazilian influences, but there are also undercurrents of reflective, poetic interplay. ‘There’s a lot of concepts on the new album,’ she explains. ‘The idea of “Outsiders and Insiders” comes from the title tune, which is a monotone spoken word tune, like a poem. It’s about the question of social definitions of identity; it’s essentially about social inclusion and exclusion.’ And this theme also pervades her song structures on the new disc. ‘The compositions are very much written but it’s about being able to expand outside them as well, into areas of expansive improvisation: not just within the structure of the tune but also outside,’ she says. Saunders explains how she uses her voice in a range of techniques. ‘I use my voice to bend sounds,’ she says. ‘For example, in the song “Reflections”, here the voice bends and twists along with the words.’ She also uses techniques such as double voices and whisper voices. ‘Within the production the voice is intended to wrap around the ears and not just to sing in an intended straight way,’ she explains. ‘The voice is also used very instrumentally, in a completely non-linguistic way.’ With South London’s Partikel as the support act, her own band ESB features some top names on the current British jazz scene, including Byron Wallen on trumpet, Bruno Heinen on piano, Paul Michael on bass and Jon Scott on drums. ‘Kings Place is a wonderful space and I’m really looking forward to the gig,’ enthuses Saunders. ‘A lot of my colleagues in the jazz scene have worked here and it’s really developed and increased the jazz voice in London.’ The Base: Emily Saunders 10 May See Listings p67 for details

I use my voice to bend and twist along with the words


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SOUND INvENTOR AT 70

In April The Base will host the 70th-birthday celebration of renowned saxophonist and giant of improvisation, Evan Parker. Sebastian Scotney heard about his plans for the night

How are the plans for your 70th-birthday celebration shaping up? The idea for the evening started, as always, with the choice of fellow musicians: seventeen so far, all diverse geniuses, and stalwarts of the London free improvising scene. I’ve worked in smaller and larger combinations with almost all of them over the years. There are existing playing relationships in smaller groups, but also the potential for completely new subgroupings, some solid ground and some outer space. Perhaps the most long-standing colleague is violinist Phil Wachsmann. We worked with Derek Bailey in the final concerts by the Music Improvisation Company. And guitarist John Russell, who I first knew at the Little Theatre Club as a young man with very adventurous taste in music – a long time ago!

many more possibilities. The second half will be for the full group. I am working on a sequence of events to underpin that.

What will be the format for the evening? There’s an array of small group possibilities for the first half. The regular trio I have with John Edwards and John Russell, the trio of string players Alison Blunt, Benedict Taylor and David Leahy would be obvious choices, but there are

EMILY SAUNDERS © AMANDA SEARLE | EVAN PARKER © CAROLINE FORBES

March — July 2014

Django Bates is there too? Django’s an absolute genius. He has an astonishing attention to detail and speed of reaction. Our diaries rarely coincide so I’m looking forward to working with him again. In the UK we just see a fraction of what you do, tell us about the rest. John Zorn invited me to do a week at The Stone in New York at the end of September. While I was there I also recorded in duo with Sylvie Courvoisier for Relative Pitch, made a quartet record with John Escreet and gave a concert at Roulette with a new US-based ElectroAcoustic Septet. Since then I’ve been travelling in Europe with Paul Lovens and Alexander von Schlippenbach. We recorded in Zurich for Intakt in the middle of the trio tour. October and November I was travelling – Warsaw with Barry Guy, Skopje with Zlatko Kaucˇicˇ... busy times.

HIGHLIGHTS JAZZ

And how do you feel about being 70? I’ve still got to get used to the fact that I’m going to be 70. Music is a place where age barriers don’t exist. I find trumpeter Peter Evans and I laugh at the same things, we’re irreverent about the same things. Music makes you ask some straightforward, unspoken questions of yourself and of others: ‘What can you do? What can you bring to it?’ – it’s a case of thinking, ‘I know why I’m here, and as long as you’ve got some idea of why you’re here...’ That’s the way improvising musicians can work with each other. You bump into each other, re-connect quickly. You talk about friends and colleagues in common, what you’re doing next... gigs to avoid. Behind it all is the shared passion.

I'vE STILL GOT TO GET USED TO THE FACT THAT I'M GOING TO bE 70. MUSIC IS A PLACE WHERE AGE bARRIERS DON'T ExIST Your solo playing has been described as bringing a ‘unique sonic language to the world’. Do you still make new discoveries? Thank you. I like to have a space with an inspiring and supportive acoustic, a church or a church-like space. What I do in that context is more about intuition than analysis. There are the things you try to control, with new combinations of reed behaviour and embouchure and cross-fingerings. But that’s the starting-point. The complexity of the partials and the overtones, and the resonance will always be unique in the moment, and in the particular acoustic of the performance space. The saxophone is such a rich and flexible acoustic source, I will certainly run out of time before I discover all its possibilities. The Base: Evan Parker at 70 5 April See Listings p59 for details

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HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

CONTEMPORARY HIGHLIGHTS

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March — July 2014

Anyone interested in the cutting edge of contemporary music needs to know about Effy and Litha Efthymiou, the formidably creative twins from N14. They’ve already written an opera for Tête à Tête and a hip hop ballet, Wherever I hang, for Arcola Theatre, among numerous other projects. They began composing aged 11, as Effy explains: ‘We were lucky enough to have a music teacher who was serious about allowing pupils to compose for live instruments (very rare for a North London state school) and, being twins, we found ourselves working on the same musical projects.’ Both embarked on a composing career even before they studied for a Masters in

SEEING DOUbLE Effy and Litha Efthymiou make up a unique composing-producing duo. This March, they bring to Out Hear a new multi-sensory abstract stage show Parting which recreates the experience of psychosis, as Effy tells Helen Wallace

Composition at Trinity College of Music: ‘We kept finding commissioners would ask us both to write, perhaps because our compositional process is so heavily entwined with one another’s (we both rigorously listen to each other’s work-inprogress) so our work can sound as if it’s cut from the same cloth,’ explains Effy. Citing influences as diverse as Ligeti, Kurtág and James MacMillan, Effy also credits Théâtre de Complicité, Heiner Goebbels and director Katie Mitchell with inspiring their stage productions: ‘We’re creators, directors and producers of the whole work; it’s becoming difficult to categorise us using traditional models,’ she observes.

In March, ‘Efthymiou’, as they are now known, bring a new multi-disciplinary work Parting, to Out Hear, which has been created in collaboration with a clinical psychologist. But this isn’t the first time they have turned to psychology for inspiration. ‘In 2005 we became resident composers at the Playground Studio, which exposed us to dance, theatre and film and led to our first large-scale multidisciplinary project, Reminiscence, whose lead character was a stroke patient, and which received funding from the Wellcome Trust.’ Parting was inspired by their work with clinical and research psychologist Dr Vaughan Bell, part of whose work focuses has been hallucinations and psychosis.


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

EFFY AND LITHA EFTHYMIOU © STANISLAVA BUEVICH | EFFY AND LITHA EFTHYMIOU © SUPPLIED PHOTO

He’s also a leading public engagement figure for psychosis, and has a regular column in The Observer. Says Effy, ‘Dr Bell has helped us to bring the experience of delusions and hallucinations fully to life on stage. We’ve focused on the essence of the psychotic experience (i.e. the hearing of the

March — July 2014

voice, the seeing of the object, having the false belief) and created a multi-sensory, abstract stage show that allows audiences to physically encounter the psychotic phenomenon.’ Visceral string music, evocative films (by Stanislava Buevich) and sinewy choreography combine to create

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

illusions by turn nightmarish and enchanting. To hear and see samples: efthymiou.co.uk. Out Hear: Parting by Efthymiou 16 March See Listings p54 for details

Dr. Bell helped us to bring the experience of delusions and hallucinations fully to life on stage

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HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

March — July 2014

Ashes to ashes, dust to dust In May, Out Hear hosts two London premieres by Canadian artist Herman Kolgen presented by the pioneering arts-technology company Alpha-ville

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Hall Two will be the scene of two rather extraordinary audio-visual experiences created by award-winning Canadian artist Herman Kolgen. The first, Dust, was inspired by Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray’s photograph ‘Élevage de poussière’ and is an intimate exploration of changes in the state of matter, using footage of dust and the behaviour of soundwaves through different media. The forensic intensity of the visuals is married to a soundtrack of equal microscopic marvel, driven by deep beats and peppered with exploded pitches. Kolgen’s description gives some clues about to the making of the film: ‘At the edge of the imperceptible, pigments are suspended around a magnetic field. Random fibrous networks take shape and then form composite objects, hypnotic in their complexity. Sound particles paired with luminous aggregates exist on a scale that cancels out all points of reference. At the turning point between the visible and the invisible, dust becomes intoxicating and the video surface an accumulation of X-rays.’


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

More phantasmagoric still – and more disturbing – is Inject, which follows a human body’s response to being ‘injected’ into a water tank. Made over six days in a vast cistern, this dazzlingly beautiful but at times terrifying piece plays with the notions of breathing, of drowning, of pressure, of the skin and the brain’s response to submersion. Momentarily starved of oxygen, the brain cortex of the Japanese subject, Yso, was monitored, and Kolgen created shattered sequences of his descent into a dreamlike state. ‘Like a human guinea pig,’ writes Kolgen, ‘a matter-body whose psychological states are the object of kinetic tableaux, of singular temporal spaces. It’s a matter of a narrative progression, in perpetual circles of influence and movement, where the real is in dislocation.’ A veritable visual and sonic feast, Inject is a modular projection/ performance in HD format and multichannel audio. This event will be presented by Alpha-ville, an organisation dedicated to connecting the fields of art, technology, design and digital culture through events and their webzine at alpha-ville.co.uk.

HIGHLIGHTS CONTEMPORARY

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THE FORENSIC INTENSITY OF THE vISUALS IS MARRIED TO A SOUNDTRACK OF EqUAL MICROSCOPIC MARvEL

Out Hear: Alpha-ville Live: A special night with Herman Kolgen 18 May See Listings p70for details

ALPHAVILLE (INJECT) © HERMAN KOLGER | ALPHAVILLE (DUST) © HERMAN KOLGER

SUNDAYS, 4PM – HALL TWO 16 MARCH Effy & Litha Efthymiou Parting 30 MARCH Lucy Railton & Aisha Orazbayeva LRAO Album Launch 6 APRIL Play (After Beckett) Ensemble Amorpha presents... 27 APRIL Nicolas Collins & Jonathan Impett ‘Sonorities’ in London 11 MAY Parkinson Saunders Things To Do 18 MAY (HALL ONE, 8PM) Alpha-ville LIVE A special night with Herman Kolgen


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HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

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March — July 2014

FOLK

Proud Songsters Tim Woodall talks to Katriona Gilmore and Jamie Roberts, who come to Kings Place in June, about the duo’s roots and shared stories

HIGHLIGHTS

I just see something – like a scarecrow with a crow on its shoulder – that triggers an idea for a song The duo is a particular feature of British folk music. Just look at the ‘Best Duo’ category at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards. From Martin Carthy and Dave Swarbrick to Spiers and Boden, folk duos frequently flourish into lasting creative partnerships. Katriona Gilmore and Jamie Roberts are relatively new to the field. The pair, who were nominated for that same gong at the 2013 Folk Awards, met at Leeds College of Music, where, as Roberts remembers, ‘I played guitar for Katriona’s recordings and she played fiddle on mine, so we ended up putting together arrangements for that combination.’ Finding that they shared ‘pretty similar’ tastes in music, the two young musicians continued to work together and, three albums later, those music tastes are clear to hear. ‘We both liked acoustic music, folky but with a contemporary feel, like Nickel Creek and Seth Lakeman,’ says Roberts. More specific individual preferences – ‘I was into English folk and Katriona more American roots music’ – brought together the key elements of the Gilmore & Roberts sound. Another aspect of creating music that unites the pair is songwriting. While they compose songs separately before coming together to work on arrangements, they both love telling stories. What do they look for in a song-story? ‘It often comes out of nothing – I just see something

that triggers an idea and from which I can make up a tale,’ says Roberts. ‘An example of that is “Scarecrow”, which just came to me when I saw a scarecrow in a field with a crow sitting on its shoulder. It was enough to base a little story around that.’ He continues: ‘On the other hand, we have songs – like “Doctor James”, which Katriona heard from a cousin just by chance – that are based on an incredible historical tale rather than anything contemporary.’ Both these songs feature on The Innocent Left, the 2012 album that saw a development in the Gilmore & Roberts sound. Vocals, fiddle and guitar – often played with virtuosity as a lap guitar by Roberts – were supplemented by bass and drums for a consciously beefier texture. ‘The chap who produced it [Julian Simmons] is not from a folk background at all so it was interesting having someone else’s take on our folk-based music,’ says Roberts. The result, an impactful set of well-crafted songs with outstanding instrumental performances, took Gilmore & Roberts to another level. Folk Union: Gilmore & Roberts 13 June See Listings p75 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

HURRICANE FAY HITS TOWN

HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

Fay Hield is now firmly established as one of Britain’s finest performers. Formerly with a cappella group Witches Of Elswick, she’s also an ethnomusicology lecturer at Sheffield University, has made two acclaimed solo albums and is the driving force behind the award-winning Full English recording and touring project. What drew you to folk song in the first place? It’s the music I grew up with. I was never drawn to it, it was just there… and I was never drawn away.

Colin Irwin talks to Fay Hield, nominated as Singer of the Year at this year’s BBC Folk Awards, who comes to Kings Place in April with the all-star Hurricane Party

What’s the unique strength of traditional song? The power of ideas bigger than your own, building connections with stories, histories and people. And enacting those thoughts through song, either on your own, or even better, with others. Are you on a crusade? I can’t believe how many people don’t have the opportunity to sing in a group, fill their lungs and make some amazing noise. I want music to be part of everybody’s lives.  I’m not so tyrannical about the kind of songs, but the act of doing it for fun – I feel strongly about that.

GUILMORE & ROBERTS © BARBANY ALDRICK | FAY HIELD & ALY PHIL (NEXT PAGE) © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

I CAN'T bELIEvE HOW MANY PEOPLE DON'T HAvE THE OPPORTUNITY TO FILL THEIR LUNGS AND MAKE SOME AMAZING NOISE

How satisfying was The Full English? The process of turning fragments of lyrics and tunes from paper into live and recorded music was fascinating. For me, it was always about inspiring others to get involved with the traditional archive, and judging from the audience reaction, we certainly achieved that. Do you ever worry about holding an audience’s attention with a big, demanding ballad? Nope. If a story is amazing, and presented appropriately, they will listen. Those are the songs that often get the biggest applause. How positive are you about the future of folk singing? We’re still a long way from the boom of communal folk club singing in the 1960s/70s, but there has been an increase in community choirs and wider interest in amateur music-making generally, which is great.  The folk recording industry is strong, too, with markets developing in all sorts of interesting areas, increased play on mainstream radio shows and discussions. I’m a positive person, and try to help things along by actively working to make sure it all goes in what I think is the right direction. What can we expect from you at Kings Place? Stories, nonsense nursery rhymes, singalong choruses and, I think, exquisite musicianship. I tour with a five-piece band including fiddles, concertina, guitar, melodeon and cello.  The music ranges from feel-good festival tunes to lyrical ballads. All songs are traditional in origin and edited by me and the group into new arrangements. Folk Union: Fay Hield & the Hurricane Party 4 April See Listings p59 for details

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HIGHLIGHTS FOLK

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March — July 2014

Aly Bain: ‘I'm still amazed by it all’ Shetland fiddler Aly Bain MBE may be a national treasure, says Colin Irwin, but he’s never lost his appetite for the music nor his sense of pure wonder

With his distinctively individual bowing technique, a bottomless fund of tunes, instinctive flair, rare passion and an almost unparalleled gift for capturing the essential beauty of traditional music that’s inspired different generations of musicians, fiddle icon Aly Bain is a national treasure… and he’s got the MBE to prove it. Now he’s also a TV presenter and a mainstay of the trailblazing Transatlantic Sessions shows and recordings which have compellingly demonstrated the links between the folk traditions of Britain and America, and his lyrical playing is both instantly identifiable and deeply influential. Nobody at the BBC Folk Awards 2012 at Glasgow’s Royal Concert Hall, when he received a lifetime achievement award, will forget the magic conjured by Bain and accordion wizard Phil Cunningham playing a slow air that sliced through the razzmatazz of the rest of the event to fill the audience with an almost palpable sense of awe and wonder. And it’ll be with Phil Cunningham that he comes to Kings Place in April, so a definite treat in store. Bain’s come a long way since he was a little boy back home in Shetland being taught to play fiddle by his great mentor Tom Anderson. ‘I loved the shape of the fiddle, it looked so beautiful,’ he says. ‘But the idea of playing concerts and making a living playing fiddle just seemed ridiculous – even Scotland seemed like a foreign country then.’

When he did finally venture to mainland Scotland there were profound consequences both for him and music generally as his natural, flowing technique helped ignite the vibrant young Scots folk scene. He established a popular duo with Mike Whellans, played alongside Billy Connolly and – most significantly – helped found The Boys of the Lough, a long-running group who had a galvanising effect on instrumental folk music in the decades that followed. The broad-ranging willingness to explore different styles, cultures and traditions so fundamental to their enduring popularity is symptomatic of the quietly spoken Bain’s own open-minded approach. Along the way he’s collaborated with everyone from classical violinist Nicola Benedetti to Emmylou Harris, Richard Thompson, Jerry Douglas, Shawn Colvin and most of the greats of Scots traditional music. And, all the while, he’s remained as modest, humble and unassuming as they come. ‘I just love beautiful tunes and the cleanliness of the notes,’ he says. ‘I’m still amazed by it all…’ Folk Union: Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham 11 April See Listings p61 for details

the idea of playing concerts and making a living playing fiddle just seemed ridiculous – even Scotland seemed like a foreign country then

FRIDAYS 8pm – HALL TWO 21 March Martin Carthy 28 March (10Pm) Also part of Outlandish Nights The Late Show with Moulettes 4 April Fay Hield & The Hurricane Party 11 April (Hall One) Aly Bain & Phil Cuningham Rare London appearance 16 April (Hall One, WEDNESDAY) An Evening with Suzy Bogguss Album Launch: ‘Lucky’ 25 April Rachel Hair Trio 2 May The Askew Sisters Album Launch: ‘In the Air or the Earth’ 7 May (Hall One, WEDNESDAY) Roddy Woomble Band 9 May Cocos Lovers 16 May Megson Album Launch: ‘In a Boxʼ 23 May John Doyle 30 May Polly and the Billets Doux 13 JUNE Gilmore & Roberts


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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

March — July 2014

SPOKEN WORD HIGHLIGHTS

GUIDE TO THE MORTAL MAZE Crime Writer Val McDermid comes to Words on Monday for a ‘connecting conversation’ with group analyst Sue Einhorn, to explore the world of crime fiction where in which many taboos are broken

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WOMEN ARE RAISED NOT TO bE CONFRONTATIONAL AND THAT MASKS THE FACT WE HAvE THESE FEELINGS OF vIOLENCE When Val McDermid was asked to sum up her life in six words, quick as a flash she retorted: ‘They said I couldn’t do it.’ The lass from Kirkcaldy who was the first girl from a Scottish state school to attend St Hilda’s College, Oxford, has had her share of knocks. Assured that she couldn’t make a living by writing books, she became a successful journalist, but she had a performed play under her belt at the tender age of 23, and kept on trying. She only turned to crime writing because her agent sacked her for failing to make enough money as a drama script-writer. At that point, the creator of the long-running TV series Wire in the Blood thought she would try a new tack: ‘I decided to turn my hand to writing a crime novel because I’d enjoyed reading the genre and I’d been very excited by the New Wave of American women crime writers, who made me wonder if I could write something similar in a UK setting.’ Ten million copies of 27 crime novels later, translated into more than 30 languages, she was clearly on to something. Sometimes lazily dubbed the ‘poster girl for violence’, she has spoken out against the stereotype projected on to her by (usually male) commentators, but anyone who has read her tightly constructed books knows that there’s no gratuitous gore or self-indulgent shock tactics. In this event for Words on Monday she will be interviewed by group analyst Sue Einhorn, who plans to explore with her the way that crime fiction can break taboos of murder, incest, violence and the human struggle with morality and mortality. McDermid has often said that crime novels are a useful

way of dealing with that darker side of human nature, particularly for women, ‘because we’re raised not to be confrontational and that masks the fact we have these feelings of violence. We feel angry, we feel like hitting somebody, but we have nowhere to put that, which is maybe why a lot of women are learning how to box. I’d much rather they read crime fiction. I’ve killed lots of people I don’t like.’ She’s also clear about what motivates her two longest-running characters, psychologist Tony Hill and senior detective Carol Jordan – and it’s not voyeurism or blood-lust: ‘He’s motivated by compassion and empathy, she is motivated by justice. And at the heart of the books is the relationship between them, a relationship that is complicated by the damage they have both sustained in the cases they have worked.’ Her latest novel, Cross and Burn (Little Brown) belongs to the Tony Hill and Carol Jordan series. If a serial killer is in the story, it will usually be a case for them; if it’s not, McDermid will need to invent a whole new cast of characters. Founder and life-force behind the highly successful Harrogate Festival of Crime Writing, she’s now delighted to be giving a platform to a new generation of crime writers that includes Gillian Flynn, SJ Watson, Paula Daly and Belinda Bauer.

Words on Monday: Connecting Conversations Val McDermid with Sue Einhorn 12 May See Listings p68 for details


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

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What Goes Around Comes Around…

VAL McDERMID © MIMSY MOLLER | PGW TYPEWRITER & A GENTELMAN OF LEISURE © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

A new collection of PG Wodehouse’s verse has inspired an evening of poetry and song with Poet in the City. Tony Ring introduces another side to the well-loved humorist PG Wodehouse seems to touch each generation afresh with his arch wit, indelible characters and masterful syntax, but few adorers of his chinless wonders and fearsome aunts are as familiar with his verse and song lyrics. An event jointly presented by the PG Wodehouse Society and Poet in the City aims to set the record straight with an evening of his verse and song, from his earliest days as a diary columnist to his collaboration with composers such as Jerome Kern. Tony Ring, who has edited the forthcoming anthology of Wodehouse’s verse, What goes around comes around, explains how the writer started: ‘While he was working for HSBC bank he was trying to see if he could make a living as a writer and writing for every possible publication, journalistic articles, short stories – and verse. Eventually he got a part-time job on the The Globe & Messenger as a diary columnist. There’s a collection of over 2000 verses from this time on topical subjects, though as there was a team of writers there’s a project to identify exactly which are Wodehouse’s.’ Though this was 100 years ago, the sort of things he was sending up seem all too topical; one poem concerns the impossibility of a young royal courting his fiancée out of sight of the paparazzi, another, Ubique, forecasts the rise of the celebrity culture, while Maud relates the story of an outrageous erotic dancer who had affairs with high-profile figures both male and female, but was banned from dancing in Manchester. Clever word-play and his keen sense of the absurd render them memorable – who else could have come up with these rhymes in the second verse of Napoleon?

MONDAYS, 7pm 17 March Jonathan Fenby Will China dominate the 21st century? 24 March Alan Titchmarsh on his new novel ‘Bring Me Home’ Guardian Review Book Club Emma Donoghue 31 March Damon Galgut talks about his new novel ‘Arctic Summer’ 7 April Shelf Help with Tim Parks ‘Teach Us to Sit Still’ and Parks’ quest to overcome ill health 14 April PG Wodehouse: Poetry and Songs Poet in the City and the PG Wodehouse Society present… 28 April Rock’n’Roll Politics with Steve Richards Behind the scenes of British politics and the media 12 May Connecting Conversations with Val McDermid Crime writer Val McDermid and group analyst Sue Einhorn explore the world of crime fiction 13 May (TUESDAY) Poetry and Sign Poet in the City presents… 19 May INDEX on Censorship Bem-vindos ao Brasil! 26 May Seamus Heaney Tribute Poet in the City presents… In 1915, the state version of PG Wodehouse’s novella, A Gentleman of Leisure, became the first of his works to be made into a silent film


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HIGHLIGHTS SPOKEN WORD

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March — July 2014

He got too fat. We all know that from portraits in the galleries. He never seemed to learn the knack of laying off the calories. But though his waist was large, he faced and overcame all foemen. He knew quite well it’s brains that tell and not a guy’s abdomen.

Tony Ring, Sophie Ratcliffe (who edited Wodehouse’s letters) and Simon Brett will be joined by two well-known actors who will read the poetry, while singer-actress Lucy Tregear (who had such success in By Jeeves ) will sing with tenor Hal Cazalet, Wodehouse’s great-grandson, who has recorded an album of his songs, ‘The Land where Good Songs Go’. It was the success, in 1923, of The Inimitable Jeeves that put paid to Wodehouse’s career as a lyricist, but in 1917 he had songs in no fewer than five shows running on Broadway. The plan for this event is to include the original London stage version of ‘Anything Goes’, which hints subtly at parliamentary shenanigans of the time, and the original version of ‘Bill’, which became so famous in Showboat, but began as a song in Kern’s O Lady! Lady! It promises to be an evening of comic treats for Wodehouse fans and novices alike. Poet in the City: PG Wodehouse: Poetry and Songs 14 April See Listings p62 for details

FEW ADORERS OF HIS CHINLESS WONDERS AND FEARSOME AUNTS ARE AS FAMILIAR WITH HIS vERSE


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March — July 2014

INTERACT

2014 SPRING/SUMMER SCHOOLS SPECIAL The spring-summer season sees Kings Place hosting an array of unique music summer schools and courses, from jazz to guitar and a cappella. Helen Wallace gives the low-down on them all

PRINCE FOR HIRE COVER © SUPPLIED PHOTO | PGW MONTAGE © CHRISTOPHER H KING | GMF WORKSHOP © SUPPLIED PHOTO

HIGHLIGHTS

HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

What’s in a typical day? The day begins with a unique sequence of activities which stimulate self-awareness and enhance creativity: expect workshops on pulse, vocal/body/ breathing, learning by ear, samba, dance and movement. At midday instrumentalists and vocalists divide into separate course streams, to work with tutors, and then to join group/ ensemble sessions. For singer-songwriters, various aspects, of the craft will be covered from song-form and lyric writing to issues of time and feel, guidance on text and help with finding repertoire. Students will also gain skills in chart preparation (including transposition) and how to connect with the rhythm section. While there will be a chance for individuals to sing in the evening, a strong component of this course will be the vocal group. What else is happening? Masterclasses are free to all members of the course, as are the evening concerts and Festival Club shows and jam sessions. A concert will be given by the GMF Student Ensembles, Choir and Samba group on 21 April in Hall One at 6pm, followed by a public concert in which both students and teachers will participate.  What will it cost? £435 (students are entitled to a 10% discount). The Observer fee: £185 Where can I find out more? globalmusicfoundation.org

GLObAL MUSIC FOUNDATION: LONDON JAZZ WORKSHOP AND MUSIC FESTIvAL 2014 What is it? An intensive course taught by an exceptional roster of internationally acclaimed artists/teachers. You will be in receipt of some 6 hoursʼ tuition per day, including supervised rehearsals, instrumental classes, group workshops and ensemble sessions. A stimulating programme of activities to develop musicianship skills and awareness will include choir, samba, pulse training, ear training, coordination and movement. A number of highprofile concerts by members of the faculty and guest artists will be free to all participants. When is it? 17 – 21 April Who is it for? All keen musicians aged 18+, including those with an interest in leading, composing and arranging. The vocal section of this course is ideal for those singers who are serious about improving their skills. Sight-reading is not a prerequisite (much of the choir music will be taught by ear); an understanding of music theory, while useful, is likewise not a requirement. Overall, we are looking for an open mind, a love of jazz and a desire to improve.  Who will be teaching? Stephen Keogh (course leader), Pete Churchill, René Marie (vocal workshops), Jeremy Pelt, David O’Rourke plus a host of other performing visitors, including Bruce Barth, Jean Toussaint, Jim Mullen, Barry Green, Alex Davis, Ric Yarborough, Duncan Hopkins, Tina May, Guillermo Rozenthuler, Francesco Petreni, Arnie Somogyi, Scott Duff, Eddie Hick and others.

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HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

March — July 2014

IGF Guitar Summit What is it? A brand-new four-day festival and summer school offering concerts, masterclasses and lectures from IGF course experts. Specialist courses are offered in Classical (David Russell and Rafael Aguirre), Flamenco (Juan Martín), Jazz fingerstyle (Martin Taylor with Dario Cortese) and Acoustic Fingerstyle (Mike Dawes) When is it? 25 – 28 July Who is it for? Intermediate to advanced guitar students. Who will be teaching? Guitar legends Juan Martín, David Russell and Martin Taylor are joined by young lions Mike Dawes, Rafael Aguirre and Dario Cortese. What’s in a typical day? Each day there will be at least six hours devoted to teaching, including masterclasses and workshops on each of the specialisms being covered. This is followed by performances in Hall One in the evening. What else is happening? Concerts will be given each night by world-class performers, including (in order) Juan Martín, Martin Taylor with support from Mike Dawes and David Russell. On the last evening of the course, a Guitar Summit will be held for participants. What will it cost? £ 395 Where can I find out more? igf.org.uk

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

HIGHLIGHTS INTERACT

JUAN MARTIN © NICK WHITE | DAVID RUSSELL, MARTIN TAYLOR & A CAPPELLA SUMMER SCHOOL © ALL SUPPLIED PHOTOS

LONDON A CAPPELLA INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL What is it? An intensive four-day course for all singers with an enthusiasm for a cappella singing. Its aim is to harness and refine your a cappella potential with a diverse programme of workshops and masterclasses, selected to challenge and advance every participant. Included are performances from some of the finest a cappella performers and educators in the industry, including The Swingle Singers; this promises an immersive vocal experience like no other. When is it? Friday 1 August – Monday 4 August (course registration on the evening of 31 July) Who is it for? Suitable for groups and individuals alike: anyone with a keen interest in this type of singing Who will be teaching? Mentors will include The Swingle Singers, among others. What’s in a typical day? A typical day will begin with a thorough vocal warm-up before launching into a selection of workshops and masterclasses programmed to challenge and advance every participant. They will

include group and solo presentation, vocal hygiene and technique, a cappella arranging, scat singing and improvisation, Beatboxing sessions and audio and visual recording. Initially you will work within groups, while later in the day there are further sessions concentrating on individual development. The course offers a refreshing and fun approach to a cappella singing, and provides a platform for you to perform with like-minded, enthusiastic singers under the guidance of world-class tutors from a range of vocal backgrounds. This is a unique opportunity to develop your ensemble singing and individual performance technique as well as expanding your overall knowledge of the industry. What else is happening? During the evening there will be opportunities to take part in open jam sessions and collaborative projects as well as attending performances from well-known a cappella groups. Where can I find out more? londonacappella.com What will it cost? £395 course fee (£350 early-bird discount)

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HIGHLIGHTS ART

ART HIGHLIGHTS

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March — July 2014

SCULPTURE COMES INTO THE HOME Classic modern sculpture meets domestic interiors in Pangolin’s new Sculpture in the Home exhibition, based on the pioneering post-war touring shows curated by the Arts Council, explains Gallery director Polly Bielecka

Sculpture in the Home celebrates the innovative series of touring exhibitions of the same name curated by the Arts Council in the 1940s and 50s. In order to revisit the original concept and aims of these pioneering shows, the gallery space at Pangolin London will be transformed into a series of three domestic settings, incorporating post-war sculpture and furnishings in this celebration of British art and design. Featuring the work of many prominent artists of the day, the original ‘Sculpture in the Home’ exhibitions were the first of their kind to introduce a post-war audience to the concept of displaying sculpture within a domestic setting. Organised by the Arts Council, four successive exhibitions toured the country between 1946 and 1959, with the aim of widening public access to and ownership of sculpture as well as reforming post-war notions of the domestic interior by celebrating the best of post-war British sculpture and design. Highlighting the continued significance of sculpture in everyday life, Pangolin London’s contemporary revision of the show will feature work by a host of prominent post-war sculptors. Works by many of those artists featured in the original Arts Council exhibitions, including Reg Butler, Lynn Chadwick, Geoffrey Clarke and Bernard Meadows, will be display ed among exquisite period textiles and furniture by designers such as Ernest Race and Robin Day. As the gallery has explored in previous exhibitions, such as Exorcising the Fear and more recently the solo show of Geoffrey Clarke, the post-war years were a particularly exciting time for British sculpture. Artists by choice and necessity explored new materials such as aluminium, welded iron and steel, and there were many more of public sculpture commissions as well as a new acceptance of the move away from the traditional sculptural language of realistic representation. Sculptors too were invited to collaborate in wide-ranging projects with furniture and textile designers.

Geoffrey Clarke, for example, was commissioned by both Sanderson and Edinburgh Weavers for wallpaper and textile designs and one of his engraved panels was incorporated into a Robin Day storage system now in the collection of the V&A. Reg Butler and Lynn Chadwick, both architecturally trained, also designed much of their own furniture primarily for private use but very much in keeping with the modernist style. Pangolin London is delighted to be able to include a number of these rare works in the exhibition. Challenging dominant contemporary views on the display of art, Sculpture in the Home will give viewers the opportunity to enjoy sculpture within the intimate setting of furniture and textiles, rather than in the more conventional and often intimidating atmosphere of the gallery or museum exhibition. The works in the show reflect this notion of intimacy. As with the original Sculpture in the Home exhibitions, there are a small number of abstract works, but the predominant theme is that of the figure, with particular reference to family, relationships and the home. A number of partners are involved in assisting Sculpture in the Home to come to fruition and these include Race Furniture, Sanderson, Amelia McNeil and Carter Wells. This is a selling exhibition and both sculpture and design pieces will be available for sale.

Pangolin London Gallery Sculpture in the Home 10 April – 17 May See Art Listings p77 for details Opening time Monday to Saturday, 10am – 6pm 020 7520 1480 gallery@pangolinlondon.com


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March — July 2014

HIGHLIGHTS ART

28 FEb – 29 MAR Ralph Brown Pangolin London 28 MAR – 9 MAY The Lost World of Norman Cornish Kings Place Gallery 9 APR – 17 MAY Sculpture in the Home Pangolin London 23 MAY – 28 JUN Terence Coventry Pangolin London 9 JUL – 23 AUG Steve Hurst Pangolin London

SCULPTURE IN THE HOME © STEVE RUSSELL

IT WILL GIvE vIEWERS THE OPPORTUNITY TO ENJOY SCULPTURE WITHIN THE INTIMATE SETTING OF FURNITURE AND TExTILES

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HIGHLIGHTS COMEDY

COMEDY HIGHLIGHTS

March — July 2014

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ON THE M6 WITH THE OH bLIMEY bIG bAND Jon Ronson comes to Kings Place in April for Frank, a one-man show in which he tells the very strange story of his keyboard-playing days with Frank Sidebottom and the Oh Blimey Big Band, soon to be a major Hollywood movie…

Who is this Frank Sidebottom and how did you meet him? Frank Sidebottom was a musician who always wore a big fake head. Nobody outside his inner circle knew his true identity. In 1987, when I was 20, I happened to be in an entertainments office in Central London when the phone rang. The franticsounding voice said, ‘Frank’s supposed to be playing tonight but our keyboard player can’t make it so we’re going to have to cancel unless you know any keyboard players!’ I said, ‘I play keyboards.’ He said, ‘WELL YOU’RE IN!’ What did the band sound like? Like grown men fleshing out with real instruments the tinny sound of a cheap 1980s Casio keyboard. Why did you leave the band? He fired me in 1989 for tax reasons. He owed £30,000 back tax. The judge said, ‘This is a serious matter. Have you considered a payment plan?’ He said, ‘Would a pound a week suffice, m’Lud?’ Why did Frank feel the need to wear a big papier-mâché head? I never asked him. Sadly, he died in 2010. What were the highlights of your career on the road with the big band? Nothing makes a young man feel more alive and on an adventure than sitting in a transit van hurtling up the M6 at 2am next to a man wearing a big fake head. How did it all go so wrong? Frank decided to make us more professional-sounding. We lost the audience. We jumped the shark. Then there were the tax issues (see above).

How did it transmogrify into a movie script? OK, 20 years later he telephoned me again out of the blue. He was staging a comeback, he said, and could I write something in The Guardian to publicise it? So I did – a little 2000-word story about my time in the band – and it had a kind of Alice Through the Looking-Glass feel to it. Like Stand By Me but with a man with a big fake head. So my friend the screenwriter Peter Straughan suggested we try to write a fictional version as a screenplay. What was your sell line to the producers? The truthful answer to this was that Peter Straughan was (and is) in demand, and pretty much anything he wanted to be involved with would have got development money. So my sell line was that I was going to write it with Peter. Also, which big star wouldn’t want to play a man who wears a big fake head? And also – once we fictionalised it – it became a kind of tribute to all outsider artists. People too strange to make it in the mainstream. Did Michael Fassbaender need much persuasion to play – who? He’s playing Frank. Our fictional Frank, inspired by the real Frank. I think – although I could be wrong – he didn’t need any persuasion at all. Who will Maggie Gyllenhaal be playing? A fictional band member called Clara. What have been the hardest lessons you’ve learned in Hollywood? Films are like relay races. Once you have your time with the baton you have to hand it on and not try and chase after it. Once the script is finished it isn’t yours any more. Off with their Heads Jon Ronsonʼs: Frank Story 8 April See Listings p60 for details


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March — July 2014

FOOD & DRINK JON RONSON © SUPPLIED PHOTO | ROTUNDA RESTAURANT © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

HIGHLIGHTS

WHAT WE'RE DOING HERE IS SPECIAL AND IT'S GREAT TO HAvE THAT SHARED ENTHUSIASM FROM THE FARMER TO THE bUTCHER TO MY CHEFS

The rise of gastro-patriotism on Britain’s food scene is exemplified by the Rotunda Restaurant’s approach to the food it offers. ‘Provenance’ and ‘traceability’ – buzz words in the restaurant world and food industry – are practised here with conviction. At the heart of the Rotunda Restaurant is a genuine commitment to farm-to-fork dining, exemplified by the close relationship it has with Corneyside Farm in Northumberland, owned by Peter Millican of Kings Place. ‘Our beef and lamb come directly from the farm. On average we get 16 whole carcasses every few weeks, which we then hang,’ explains Executive Chef Ian Green. ‘It’s some of the best meat I’ve ever worked with. It’s the process that Ian Scott, the farmer, goes through that, makes it so good. All the animals are born on the farm, they’re hand-reared and grass-fed and grown at their own pace. We get our spring lambs in June, no earlier.’ Hanging on the bone, the traditional process of dry-ageing the meat, is a very important stage undertaken by the restaurant before the meat is cooked. ‘Our beef is hung on the bone for 32 days, the lamb for a week. This tenderises the meat. There’s a real difference between meat which has been hung on the bone, as we do here, and meat which has been “aged” off the bone.’ Transforming an entire beef carcass into enticing dishes for a restaurant menu is not easy, but Green and his team relish the challenge. ‘Only a third of the carcass is made up of prime cuts like steaks,’ points out Green, ‘so, in the summer months you have cuts of meat that need to be slow-cooked which, at first sight, don’t lend themselves to a summer menu. You’ve got to be clever with it. We braise the meat down and use it in ravioli. Some of the meat we will put in a brine bath and use it to make salt beef for hot salt beef sandwiches, which are very popular. We make summer casseroles, using a lighter stock with summer vegetables and a lighter ale. In winter, it’s easy to use the other cuts up in braised dishes and casseroles. Using the meat in pies like beef and ale pies works really well; they fly out of the door to be honest.’ Here at The Rotunda, the kitchen really is practising nose-to-tail cooking, making use of the entire animal and utilising less popular cuts and offal. ‘We make oxtail croquettes or oxtail ravioli. We keep the fat on the kidneys, so that when we pan-fry them, they get that extra flavour, and we use kidneys in our steak and kidney mix.’ Lamb’s liver is made into faggots and sweetbreads are coated in breadcrumbs and deep-fried. ‘Nothing is wasted.’

HIGHLIGHTS FOOD & DRINK

THE WHOLE bEAST There’s a lot of lip-service paid to chefs using ‘the whole animal’ but Rotunda Restaurant is rare in practising nose-to-tail cooking, with delicious results, as Executive Chef Ian Green tells Jenny Linford

Working behind the scenes is Daryl, the butcher, a key member of the kitchen team and an essential part of the field-to-plate process. ‘He’s got 30 plus years’ experience as a butcher. There’s no point having meat of this quality, if it’s then hacked to bits by someone who doesn’t know what they’re doing. He’s always coming up with new cuts, so with the steaks we’ve tried American cuts like the Denver cut, which comes from the top of the chunk, and the flat-iron steak, a nice juicy bit of meat, best served medium rare.’ For Ian Green, any of the logistical difficulties presented by having entire carcasses to work with are outweighed by the satisfactions. ‘What we’re doing here is special and it’s great to have that shared enthusiasm from everybody, from the farmer to the butcher and my chefs.’ Rotunda Bar and Restaurant is part of Green & Fortune, which also owns and operates the Green & Fortune Café and Kings Place Events. Corneyside’s meat and the same nose-to-tail ethos are used across all three areas, an award-winning attention to detail. Rotunda Restaurant: Reservations 020 7014 2840 rotundabarandrestaurant.co.uk

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Rites of PASSAGE

March — July 2014

Brace yourselves for a cloudburst of colourful sonorities as Songlines Encounters Festival comes to Kings Place. Garth Cartwright meets two of this year’s most exciting stars, Family Atlantica, who open the festival, and Kurdish singer Çiğdem Aslan

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

We're telling a really deep story, an old story, in the present tense

WORLD SONGLINES FESTIVAL

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Family Atlantica are fronted by Venezuelan vocalist Luzmira Zerpa, a performer whose blend of Latin fire and mischievous wit suggests a 21stcentury Carmen Miranda. Their eponymous debut album won them huge amounts of attention, with BBC 6 Music DJ Gilles Peterson describing it as ‘a really great record’. Family Atlantica draw on Venezuela’s Afro-Caribbean music along with Cuban rumba, Ghanaian highlife, Delta blues, Ethiopian jazz and calypso. These myriad music forms blend into a dynamic whole that suggests a tropical psychedelia or jazz from outer space. Luzmira arrived in the UK 16 years ago and met British musician Jack Yglesias, producer, multi-instrumentalist and a veteran of celebrated jazz outfit The Heliocentrics, at a drum workshop. ‘We played together for hours before we spoke to one another,’ she recalls. Quickly becoming a couple, they then met Nigerian percussionist Kwame Crentsil when they heard ‘this powerful sound and found him drumming’. Again, they played together before speaking: ‘It just felt natural,’ says Kwame. Family Atlantica took shape as the trio drafted in likeminded musicians. ‘We really are a family,’ says Jack, a Londoner who ‘grew up on blues, rock, funk and jazz’. He then went and studied music in Cuba ‘and that introduced me to the incredibly rich world of African and Latin music-making’. Luzmira grew up in a small Venezuelan village with a musician father who taught her a great variety of Afro-Caribbean rhythms. ‘We call these rhythms tamunangue, it’s the name of a ritual,’ she says of the music that forms the basis of Family Atlantica’s sound. ‘Tamunangue is a music of resistance, songs of blackness that were first sung when Africans were kept as slaves in Venezuela. It involves very big African drums.’ Salsa is, she explains, the most popular music in Venezuela and she is also schooled in this but ‘my father gave me this really strong identity and all these amazing rhythms and that is what I have brought to share with music lovers in the UK.’ Luzmira blended her long experience with Kwame’s masterful West African percussion skills. ‘My father was a drummer in Ghana,’ he says of his origins, ‘and Fela Kuti was so impressed by him he took him back to Lagos. It was there my father met my mother!’ Combine Luzmira and Kwame’s brilliant rhythms with Jack’s eclectic musical skills and you can understand why Family Atlantica have made such an impression. The 7-piece band is creating a new music full of chance and possibility. ‘We’re telling a really deep story, an old story, in the present tense,’ says Luzmira. ‘We belong to two worlds,’ says Jack, ‘and we merge them together.’

Songlines Encounters Festival

LUZMIRA ZERPA © NICK WHITE FAMILY ATLANTICA © ALEX HARVEY-BROWN

5 June Family Atlantica + Habib Koité It all begins in Africa 6 June Anna Phoebe +  Oana Catalina Chitu A night of passion and romance 7 June Kayhan Kalhor  & Ali Bahrami Fard + Çig˘dem Aslan Major talents from Asia Minor and beyond


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WORLD SONGLINES FESTIVAL

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March — July 2014

Also appearing at Songlines Encounters this year is rising star Çiğdem (pronounced ‘Chee-dem’) Aslan. Born in Istanbul to Kurdish parents, she came to London to study in 2003 and immediately began singing with the capital’s huge diaspora of musicians. ‘My family are Alevi, which is an Islamic sect connected to Sufism and Zoroastrianism. Alevis have no holy book so they communicate their culture orally. I grew up singing and, while studying in Istanbul, I encountered other music forms – Turkish, Armenian, Gypsy, rebetiko – and began to sing with a folk music group while at university. Arriving in London I found an even better music scene than in Istanbul!’ Çiğdem joined She’Koyokh, a hugely talented band of young Londoners who play klezmer and Balkan music, and also led a trio who play rebetiko, an ‘underground’ folk music now largely associated with Greek bars and hashish dens of the 1930s. Rebetiko was, explains Çiğdem, a music that took shape in Asia Minor in the 19th-century and, in its droll, brooding songs of hard living and good times, bears comparison with African-American blues. After the exchange of populations that occurred between Turkey and Greece following the end of World War One – long-rooted Greek populations in Istanbul and Izmir and Turkish in Thessaloniki and Athens were forced to resettle – rebetiko’s ethnically mixed roots were ignored and nationalists branded it ‘Greek’. Aware that rebetiko continued to be sung in select Istanbul taverns and restaurants, Çiğdem began exploring the music with young Greek musicians she met in London. Her 2013 debut album Mortissa (Asphalt Tango) is the startling result and has won rave reviews (in Songlines, fRoots and The Guardian). 2014 has found She’Koyokh (with Çiğdem on vocals) releasing their new album Wild Goats & Unmarried Women (World Music Network). Here Çiğdem sings traditional songs from across the Balkans with exceptional accompaniment from the young Londoners who form the nucleus of She’Koyokh. For the Songlines Encounters Festival concert Çiğdem’s band will be led by Nikolas Baimpas, a talented Greek master of the kanun (a large zither) and santouri (a hammered dulcimer). As notes, ‘politicians may play up tensions between Greeks and Turks but when we musicians come together there are never any problems.’

politicians may play up tensions between Greeks and Turks but when we musicians come together there are never any problems


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March — July 2014

Habib Koité

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS 2014 This new edition of the Songlines Encounters Festival brings together remarkable musicians from the UK, Iran, Romania, Turkey, Mali and Venezuela for three nights of sublime music making. Co-curated by Songlines magazine and Ikon Arts Management, Encounters aims to present outstanding musical talent from around the globe

Kayhan Kalhor

ÇIGDEM ASLAN © HANDAN EREK | HABIB KOITÉ © SUPPLIED PHOTO | KAYHAN KALHOR © TODD ROSENBERG | OANA CHITU © ERIKA BORBELY HANSEN

WORLD SONGLINES FESTIVAL

Oana Ca˘ta˘lina Chit˛u

Produced as a series of double-bill concerts, each night matches musicians from different parts of the globe. Rather than creating a study in contrasts, Encounters aims to pair musicians whose work is mutually complementary and reflects a shared musical language. Thus in 2014 Encounters opens with Family Atlantica, a young London-based band whose music draws strongly on Afro-Venezuelan traditions, and Habib Koité, the celebrated Malian guitarist whose beautiful voice and innovative tunings have won him a wide international following. Friday night’s double-bill features English violinist Anna Phoebe, whose fiery playing blends Western classical and rock with East European folk flavours, and Romanian singer Oana Ca˘ta˘lina Chit˛u. Chitu is a gifted vocalist who is exploring the repertoire of Maria Ta˘nase (1913–1963), the ‘Romanian Edith Piaf’. Saturday night finds artists from Iran and Turkey sharing the stage. Kayhan Kalhor is a renowned kamancheh (spike fiddle) player (joined by fellow Iranian musician Ali Bahrami Fard). Çig˘dem Aslan (see feature) is a Turkishborn, Hackney-based singer who sings in several languages while exploring Balkan regional music styles.

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38 FOLK

March — July 2014

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

OUTLANDISH Alasdair Roberts and Emily Portman’s jointly curated series, Outlandish Nights, promises to be a walk on the wild side of traditional song and story, as Kate Mossman discovered when she spoke to them

A hundred miles west of the Scottish mainland, in the shell of a defunct volcano, a tiny community existed for centuries living off fish and seabirds. The faces of the St Kilda islanders may be familiar today from the old photographs – strong-featured and defiant, the women shoeless and swathed in black shawls, ravelling wool or plucking feathers – but the sound of their voices was all but lost until now. In March, as part of the Outlandish Nights festival, the Perthshire poet Robin Robertson and Glaswegian folk singer Alasdair Roberts will bring Hirta Songs to Kings Place – a suite of music inspired by stories from the archipelago’s largest island, from the tale of the unlucky bird-catcher Neil McLeod, to the day in 1930 when everyone departed, driven out by sickness and hardship, leaving a scattering of oats and an open bible on every table. Outlandish Nights will capture ‘the darker, more macabre elements of traditional folk music’ in three very different performances, says Glastonbury songwriter Emily Portman, who curates the festival with Roberts and plays alongside him in the folk super-group The Furrow Collective. The pair first met some years back on the same bill at a gig in Newcastle: ‘What he was doing seemed miles ahead of everyone else,’ she says today. ‘He is very progressive, very daring, and he is not tethered by any sense of duty.’


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March — July 2014

NIGHTS

FOLK OUTLANDISH NIGHTS

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27 March Alasdair Roberts and Robin Robertson present ‘Hirta Songs’ Songs from the World’s Rim 28 March The Furrow Collective + special guest Marry Waterson Unearthed – Songs from the Archives & Netherworlds The Late Show with Moulettes 29 March Emily Portman Trio + special guests Mary Hampton & Debs Newbold Her Conjuring Voice

THE FURROW COLLECTIVE © CHRIS SAUNDERS | Hirta, st kilda © Ewan Walker | EMILY PORTMAN TRIO (NEXT PAGE) © KAT TIMMINS

Scenes from St Kilda archipelago, source of the inspiration for Hirta Songs

The wiry Roberts, who has collaborated with Will Oldham and Isobel Campbell among many others, combines a scholar’s appetite for traditional material with an intensity of purpose that pushes him way beyond time and gender – and can silence any audience with the searing focus of his delivery: ‘I am a poor girl that’s straight from Callander’, he sang, convincingly, way back on his 2001 debut The Crook Of My Arm. Setting Robinson’s verses to music was, Roberts admits, a daunting task; determined to root his new compositions within the Gaelic soundworld he tracked down melodies gathered from the islanders once they had relocated to the mainland and improvised upon the ancient themes. Technology has pulled folk musicians into a golden age of research, he says: just a few years back you had to roll up your sleeves and climb a ladder in the Cecil Sharp House library, or Edinburgh’s School of Scottish Studies, to find material; now all the archives and recordings are online. ‘Sites like [the Scottish archive] Kist o’ Riches are an invaluable resource for people like me,’ he says. ‘As a singer it has been very important for me to immerse myself in older singers, and the recordings of 40 or 50 years ago, in order to locate my own voice within the continuum of tradition.’

The Furrow Collective, which includes Emily Portman’s regular bandmates Rachel Newton and Lucy Farrell, is a vehicle for the enthusiastic musical spade-work of its members. ‘My band-mates and I had this massive treasure trove of traditional folk songs that we weren’t using because we all wrote our own songs,’ Portman says. ‘This was the stuff we ended up singing in the car…’ Among the ballads on the group’s debut album, released in February 2013, are the famous Demon Lover, in which Satan lures his earthly wife out to sea with a fleet of fine ships (Bob Dylan wrote an answer-song from the wife’s perspective, 1989’s The Man In The Long Black Coat), and King Henry, one of Portman’s favourites – to Roberts’ surprise: ‘This monstrous hag comes to the king’s door and demands food and drink and a bed, he explains. ‘He grants her all her wishes and in the morning she’s turned into a beautiful woman. I was quite surprised that a woman chose to sing this song, which seemed to me quite misogynistic and reactionary!’ ‘To me it said, if men can give women what they want, they’ll get their reward’, counters Portman. ‘The point of the ballad is that a lesser man would not have risen to these challenges because she was a hag!’


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March — July 2014

The alchemy of male and female interpretation brings an exciting, destabilising element to the Furrow Collective’s material. But the final evening of Outlandish Nights is girlsonly (on stage, that is – men can watch), an event called Her Conjuring Voice, which will feature Brighton folk singer Mary Hampton and the storyteller Debs Newbold. As with Hirta Songs, when Robin Robertson will perform poems from the stage, the spoken-word section underlines the narrative element at the heart of traditional balladry. Portman says that her own repertoire has been transformed by The Full English, the online archive of the Cecil Sharp collection: her understanding of the English story-world is deepening all the time. ‘Songs are much smaller than stories – they are like little tableaux in a wider, better-known folk tale that you might zoom in on,’ she says. ‘These songs are still taking on new meanings – I am still discovering how connected everything is. We have more material at our fingertips than ever before.’ Outlandish Nights 27–29 March See Listings pp56–57 for details

We'll capture the darker, more macabre elements of traditional folk music

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42 INTERACT

March — July 2014

THE ART OF CRYING Professor Michael Trimble is a neuropsychiatrist fascinated by our emotional responses to music. He will be contributing to the Chamber Classics Unwrapped Study Day in June organised by The Musical Brain®. Here he tells Helen Wallace what we know about music as a brain stimulant

Music is part of Michael Trimble’s life in two very different spheres. As a music lover he finds certain pieces can unleash such profound emotions in him that he is reduced to tears. As Emeritus Professor of Behavioural Neurology at the UCL Institute of Neurology, he has long been engaged with disorders of the brain where music can have an intriguing, and sometimes mysterious, part to play. He has probed the interrelationships between language, art, creativity and brain function in two books, The Soul in the Brain and Why Humans Like to Cry, and meeting him at his Bloomsbury office it is clear the topic remains inexhaustibly fascinating: ‘I’ve worked with patients with epilepsy where certain music could trigger seizures. That tells us that the music is acting on the brain physiologically, and could be used therapeutically. There is also a link between certain disorders and musical creativity. For example, there are no composers in the Western canon with schizophrenia, while there are many who suffer from bipolar disorder. Creativity suffers at the height of a mania or at the depths of a depression, but when on the way up, or on coming down, creativity seems enhanced –Robert Schumann or Hugo Wolf are just two examples.’ Our understanding of brain function has been transformed in the last 20 years by the ability of neuroscientists to ‘catch the brain at work’, using neuro-imaging to detect the precise areas where metabolic activity is highest when we are doing or thinking specific things. ‘It’s revolutionised our work. In the past, we could pick up scalp electrical activity or we could use very invasive techniques to investigate the brain, but the side-effects of the latter could be serious and you would only use them in acute situations. Here at the Institute of Neurology, we are now able to study the brains of healthy volunteers alongside those with brain disorders, which allows for better-designed studies and a more balanced picture of brain

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activity in many different situations to be assessed.’ Trimble is particularly interested in the different emotional effects that various art forms have on us. When researching his book on crying, he explored differences in the anatomy between the human brain and the brains of our nearest living relatives chimpanzees, that help explain this uniquely human attribute. ‘It is a simple fact that humans are the only living species that cry tears emotionally. Together with my colleague, Dr Dale Hesdorffer of Columbia University, have been studying the degree to which different art forms lead to crying as an emotional response. Our studies revealed that music and reading novels were the most likely to evoke tears, while the number of people who cry in response to looking at a painting or seeing a statue or a beautiful building is considerably smaller.’ They think the significant link between music and novels is that they both take us on a journey in time, and are experienced by and held within our imagination at a deep level. ‘These results seem consistent in different cultures and raise interesting questions. From a neuroscience perspective it is my conclusion that the act of listening to music or reading a novel involves the non-dominant (right) hemisphere of the brain, which is not bound into propositional and literal language, and responds to ambiguity, metaphor and music, and is linked in with our moment-to-moment control of emotion.’ It is known that an aneurysm or stroke which damages the right frontal areas can remove a patient’s appreciation of music, but will not take away the power of propositional speech, one particular function of the left (dominant) hemisphere. The importance of the non-dominant hemisphere, musical appreciation is confirmed by a study of volunteers who experienced ‘shivers’, spine-tingling or goose-bumps when listening to their favourite piece of music (by Blood and Zatorre, 2001). The more significant changes were in the right hemisphere, especially in the fronto temporal areas, linked in with activity in the ‘reward’ areas of the brain.


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March — July 2014

CLASSICAL MUSICAL BRAIN STUDY DAY

The response they experienced seemed to be related to structural events such as the creation and resolution of tension, or unexpected events happening sooner than anticipated in the music (Trimble is keen to stress, however, that a complex interaction between right and left hemispheres is involved when people play or listen to music, and there is a common misperception that they have particular, isolated roles; there is only cerebral harmony through interaction). He was not surprised to discover that in surveys, Bach and Mozart came out on top of the list of music which makes people cry, and remains daunted by the power of these composers to ‘move’ listeners through the centuries. ‘It was Deryck Cooke who concluded in his The Language of Music that if we can call music a language ‘…it is a language of the emotions akin to speech.’ As a regular opera-goer Trimble is also aware of the link between this art form and the genesis of ecstatic sometimes quasi-religious

MICHAEL TRIMBLE © SUPPLIED PHOTO | ILLUSTRATION © GETTYIMAGES | STEPHEN JHONSON (NEXT OAGE) © SUPPLIED PHOTO

certain phrases of music can literally trigger epileptic seizures

experiences. ‘There are obvious cultural associations between music and religion, a history which goes back to the times of the Greek Dionysian festivals, which, in addition to being religious ceremonies, brought together drama, music, dancing and poetry. The echoes of these performances and the communal audience response to them, live on in concert halls, theatres and opera houses – and the cinema, but it is the music which is the kernel of these experiences.’ With colleagues at the Institute of Neurology, he’s been studying the body’s emotional response to an opera, showing how changes in the heart rate and other measures of the body’s emotional state during the performance are correlated in two independent listeners, for example when in both individuals indicate emotional arousal to a particular piece of the drama. Music therapy could have significant applications in several neuropsychiatric disorders. When ‘patients with Parkinson’s Disease find themselves ‘frozen’ it has been

found that providing them with rhythmical sounds can get them moving again. If you take that to the next level, you can view music as another way of stimulating the brain (much less invasive than implanting electrodes into the brain, a successful method of helping the condition, but not everyone can have or wants this). What other conditions could be helped using music as a form of brain stimulation? ‘Researchers have also been looking at the electrophysiology of people with epilepsy to see if they could be responsive to the frequencies of musical stimuli that could regulate abnormal brain waves; the idea is of a kind of biofeedback, picking up the brain’s own irregular waves and feeding alternative ones back.’

Trimble will be joined for the Musical Brain® study day in June by guests including pianist Ian Brown and musicologist Stephen Johnson, who is contributing to all the Chamber Classics Unwrapped Study Days. ‘Stephen has an extraordinary memory for music’, remarks Trimble. ‘I’m fascinated by how much he can hold in his brain at one time. Now, that’s a phenomenon I would like to investigate: the very special memory of conductors and performers and composers…’ Study Day: Chamber Classics Unwrapped Top 50 Chamber Classics and Why We Love Them, in association with The Musical Brain® 28 June See Listings p75 for details

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INTERACT MUSICAL BRAIN STUDY DAY

A MUSICIAN'S PERSPECTIVE

Writer, broadcaster, composer and musicologist Stephen Johnson, who will be contributing to all the Chamber Classics Unwrapped study days, takes a personal view on the way the brain processes music and emotion

How has learning more about the science of the brain informed your understanding of music’s emotional impact on you? Understanding a little more about the limbic system, which deals with emotion, and how the brain processes memory, has been useful. Memory is so important in music: the fact that we recognise a theme when it’s repeated – often after several minutes of music – and that we’re able to remember musical events helps us to understand the structure of a piece. This is as important as the emotional responses triggered by individual musical events. A piece of music, no matter how simple, gets laid down in our memories as a kind of narrative. This is analogous to the way the brain processes emotional experiences in everyday life. When an experience is too powerful or shocking to be processed as long-term memory by the hippocampus, it stays present in the limbic system – ‘frozen’, you might say. This is what happens in trauma. Psychotherapy can help a trauma-sufferer work through the experience, and so permit it to be laid down in the hippocampus as long-term, or ‘autobiographical’ memory, so the sufferer can begin to escape the frozen pain of trauma and say ‘that happened to me’. 

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March — July 2014

Do you think music can help relieve psychological suffering? I’m convinced that music can help a trauma-sufferer come to terms with, and eventually ‘own’ that experience as their own. The memory may still be painful, but it is no longer incapacitating. The same can happen with the experience of grief: music, by making us cry, can help release blocked or frozen emotions. There is a very moving story of Beethoven improvising at the piano for the pianist Dorothea von Ertmann, after she lost a child in infancy and, according to a friend’s account, remained stuck at the shock stage of grief. Beethoven played for about an hour, until ‘the flood gates were opened’ and Ertmann was able to begin the long, painful, but ultimately restorative process of mourning the loss of her child. Despite neuro-imaging being able to show us the brain at work when listening to music, what are its limitations? Neuro-imaging is wonderfully helpful, especially when it comes to treating people with neurological conditions, and the ability to ‘watch’ a brain responding to music is fascinating. But we are only at

the beginning. It’s too early to be able to say whether we’ll ever get anywhere near understanding how the brain as a total organism ‘works’. I like what my friend Ray Tallis (philosopher and clinical gerontologist) says about this: we’re like cavemen, standing in the car park of a multi-national corporation, looking up at the building and trying to work out what it does by observing which light comes on in which window, when.  Memory plays a big part in the emotion we attach to a piece; how does it function when you listen to certain pieces of music? Chamber music possibly requires special effort on behalf of the memory. Without orchestral colour (to say nothing of words or stage action), it is the theme or musical event in its purest, note-based form that we need to remember. And sometimes we’re required to concentrate hard on a sophisticated argument that takes place over a tiny time-scale. You could take the opening of Haydn’s String Quartet in B minor, Op. 33 No. 1, and draw lines in different colours all over it, connecting up rhythmic and intervallic patterns, showing how the leading line is passed between instruments, and opening up levels of ambiguity, till the page looked a lot more complicated than the London tube map – and we’d be talking about less than 20 seconds of music. Memory is involved in this in so many absorbing ways. Yet that shouldn’t make the experience ‘exclusive’ – partly because the Haydn is also very attractive and vital on first hearing, but also because it’s really a matter of getting to know the music, to the point where you hear almost like a performer. The best walking country isn’t always the country with the easiest access points. Time and patience are crucial. 


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March — July 2014

CHAMbER MUSIC REqUIRES US TO CONCENTRATE HARD ON A SOPHISTICATED ARGUMENT OvER A TINY TIME-SCALE

INTERACT MUSICAL BRAIN STUDY DAY

Professor Trimble talks about the ways in which brain ‘disfunction’ helps or doesn’t help creativity: how do you hear the music of Schumann now you know more about his bipolarity? This is interesting. For years I had problems with Schumann. He was the one figure among the great German Romantic composers who I didn’t quite get. Then, after a terrible depressive episode in 1999–2000, I heard some Schumann and experienced almost a wince of pain. A voice in my head said, ‘You’ve been protecting yourself against Schumann because he’s too close to home.’ Schumann was almost certainly bipolar, and I now accept (after initial resistance) that I am too. I quickly came to love him, but also valued the opportunity to explore the bipolarity of his music, present in something as abstract as the structure of Kreisleriana, the A minor String Quartet or the Second Symphony. There’s something about contemplating an image of one’s own predicament that can help you objectify it and cease to be dominated by it. Shostakovich has also been claimed as bipolar, yet it seems he never had significant creatively incapacitating epsiodes. Perhaps by working creatively through his psychological pain he was able to remain stable. Shostakovich clearly had immense inner strength. However, his Fourth Symphony, particularly the finale, sounds like the dramatisation of a spectacular bipolar episode to me. I got to know this work in my teens, just when my own psychological trouble was beginning to kick off. I’m convinced that being able to ‘act out’ my tensions through this music helped me hold myself together. I still feel grateful to Shostakovich for this.  Why do you think Schubert’s Quintet rose to the top? It’s a work that contains so much of Schubert: grandeur and intimacy, light and darkness, tenderness, serenity and violence, exquisite long melodies and trenchant motifs, joy and pain. Schubert is dealing with some pretty dark stuff in this piece, not least the presence of mortality, but in transforming all that into something beautiful he enables us to live with those feelings. The slow movement in particular reminds me of a line from Kafka’s Metamorphosis. Gregor, the ‘hero’, has been shockingly transformed into a gigantic beetle. At one point he hears a violin playing, then comes the line, ‘How could he be an insect if music could make him feel like this?’ Music can do that for many of us, and often at what seem our darkest moments.

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C H A M B E R C L A S S I C S U NW R A P P E D

STUDY DAYS SATURDAYS 10.30AM ST PANCRAS ROOM

17 MAY

French Chamber Music

in association with BBC Music Magazine Dr Christopher Dingle, Stephen Johnson and the Ruisi Quartet from ChamberStudio

28 JUNE

Top 50 Chamber Classics and Why We Love Them

in association with The Musical Brain® Professor Michael Trimble, Stephen Johnson, Ian Brown and other guests

27 SEPTEMbER

Beethoven’s Quartets in association with BBC Music Magazine Professor Barry Cooper, Stephen Johnson and young professional groups from ChamberStudio

13 DECEMbER

Schubert’s Final Masterworks

in association with BBC Music Magazine Richard Wigmore, Stephen Johnson and young professional groups from ChamberStudio


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March — July 2014

T he T rick is to K eep Breathing

It seemed far more likely I would go mad and kill myself than write about it

TIM PARKS © CANNARSA BASSO

By leaving words behind, and focusing on flesh and breath and pulse, Tim Parks gradually edged himself out of chronic pain. Then he found he had to write it all down, and the letters started coming

The first letter surprised me. Essentially, it said: Thank you for writing this book, it has helped me enormously. I gazed at it in perplexity. How could my book have ‘helped’ anyone? That was the last thing on my mind. Other letters followed. Emails. Some taxingly long, others gracefully brief. Teach Us to Sit Still had helped them. Weird. When the book began to appear in the Self Help sections of bookshops, I started to worry for my reputation. School and university had educated me to believe that literature must never have such a crass and simple purpose as helping people. For heaven’s sake. It must not preach or tell them how to live. Son of a clergyman, I had always seen my writing as a sort of anti-sermon, a rejection of all those certainties and simplistic exhortations I’d had to hear from my father’s pulpit as a child. The literary writer, I thought, which was definitely what I set out to be, the sophisticated writer, or simply the honest writer, was one who accepted life’s bewildering complexity, its difficulty, one who would never pass final judgement, never say of another person that they were exactly this or that, and above all, never sell people a line. I was happy with this position. If I think of the books I most admire, The Brothers Karamazov, Chekhov’s stories, Jude the Obscure, Women in Love, Beckett’s trilogy, Coetzee’s Disgrace, Thomas Bernhard’s The Losers, they are none of them exactly bringers of good news. It’s true you come away invigorated, cheered by the accuracy and courage with which these writers have pinned down life’s awfulness. But could you really say that you had been helped? I think not. Certainly my reading didn’t help me one little bit when I fell into the nightmare of chronic pain. While I was in that condition, for about three years, I never thought of writing about it. These were embarrassing pains, it was a humiliating condition. Word like bladder, colon, prostate, urination are not words you feel like sharing. It was also embarrassing that I didn’t look ill, and even if the doctors proved quite unable to cure me they nevertheless assured me I wasn’t going to die. I didn’t have cancer. So how big a drama was this?

SPOKEN WORD 47

Maybe I couldn’t sit down for the sharp pains in my abdomen, but I could still go running. How ill is a person who can go running? It seemed far more likely I would go mad and kill myself than write about it. Then life took a turn. Someone told me to sit still and breathe. Of course it was more complicated than that. There were a variety of suggestions. Shiatsu, meditation. Of course I was hugely sceptical, resisted for ages. Nothing breeds scepticism like a childhood in the Church. But in the end, against the grain, gritting my teeth, I sat down and breathed; I tried to concentrate on flesh and pulse and here and now, rather than words and ideas and ambition and narrative. And very, very slowly, week by week, month by month, things started to change, to move. I started to change. Then suddenly I had to write the whole story down down. Had to. Not to advise others to do the same. Just to try and get my head round all the strange things that had happened and were still happening, all the implications. It was so exciting. At fifty-five I found myself completely revising how I saw life, and yes books too, and writing. Perhaps, looking back, it was this that people found helpful. Just giving all the embarrassing details straight, and the unhappy way pain had become embedded in my very identity, in everything I did; then the surprising way the body can change and pain with it, when one is simply forced to open up, forced do things you would never normally have thought of doing. In the end, how can a writer not write about the most interesting thing that ever happened to him? If someone else feels it helps, that too is an unexpected departure. Words on Monday Shelf-Help with Tim Parks 7 April See Listings p60 for details


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CLASSICAL RE:NAISSANCE

March — July 2014

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R enaissance M an Matthew Sharp, cellist, singer and actor, has been described by The Times as a ‘virtuoso of the arts’. In May he gathers together a host of musicians and composers for a series of adventures fired by the spirit of Shakespeare and the Renaissance, as he tells Helen Wallace

In this age of hyper-specialisation, when violinists must choose between Baroque or Modern and tenors are bel canto or Helden, it’s rare to find a musician who excels at singing, playing, writing, producing, festival directing and acting. But Matthew Sharp is that man, as his new series at Kings Place, RE:naissance, reveals. He dates his multi-skilled approach back to boyhood when, as the son of a violinist who played with Kent Opera, he spent hours in opera rehearsals and found himself on stage in children’s parts – ‘I was in Falstaff with Thomas Hemsley. Amazing!’ While the world of theatre continued to exert a hold over him, he began studying the cello with Alexander Baillie and ‘that became obsessive-compulsive for me’. An exceptional talent was identified and he was encouraged to leave school at 16 to attend the Royal College full-time, but fate, or the Gods of Theatre, intervened and he attended an opera workshop singing Leporello. ‘I had the time of my life and, fortunately, it stopped me from leaving school and only sitting on my bum for the next few years.’ He was advised by Yuri Temirkanov to study cello with the late Boris Pergamenschikow in Cologne and, attracted to that ‘muscular, hard-core Russian style’, he spent a year studying with him before returning to Cambridge University to take a degree in English. ‘I directed, sang, conducted, acted and played my way through a degree! Later on I began to

take serious voice lessons, with Ulla Blom. People kept telling me I had to give something up – and I did, at various times – but the “dilemma” didn’t go away, so I took the view that maybe there wasn’t a dilemma.’ On leaving Cambridge he was a founder member of the Gogmagogs, the pioneering troupe of string players who, with theatre director Lucy Bailey, combined virtuoso performance with dynamic, physical theatre. ‘There was a sense that the core of the classical world was moribund, stale, we were all looking for new, meaningful ways to engage with the audience. There’s been good, and occasionally some extraordinary work around presenting music in new ways, but a lot of it tackles the surface not the DNA. What I’ve always tried to do is take that desire for a thrilling, human connection with an audience to the core of performing and music making in the classical context. I want to invite – sometimes provoke – people into being right here, right now. It’s a bit like, “I’m going to show you mine, I can’t wait for you to show me yours!”’ He heaps praise on the ENO course he attended called ‘The Knack’ which covered singing, acting and movement. By 2003 he was singing Papageno at Opera North. It’s clear from an engaging series of YouTube diary videos following his preparation for a performance of Hans Gal’s Concertino in 2013 that he brings the lessons of theatre into everything he touches on the cello. ‘Theatre and my visceral understanding of singing influences all my cello playing.’ Sometimes those works can be ‘straight’ cello pieces, but increasingly they will be works created especially for him. As far back as 1997, the late John Tavener wrote Petra for the ‘singing cellist’, followed by the massive, dramatic work The Fool, in 2000. In RE:naissance he’ll be reprising Death’s Cabaret – A Love Story, the gripping ‘cabaret opera’ he brought to Kings Place’s 2012 festival, in which he is the central protagonist as a singer, actor and cellist along with the Sacconi Quartet. ‘It’s a marriage of 19th-century concerto form with the grime and sensuality of cabaret’, as he describes it, and the result, specially composed by Stephen Deazley and written by Martin Riley is both chilling and spell-binding. If the spirit of the Renaissance lies behind Sharp’s series, he’s also focusing specifically on Shakespeare, whose 450th anniversary it will be in 2014: ‘Alchemy, espionage, artists who knew no bounds, the world on a stage, great reckonings in little rooms,’ as Sharp encapsulates it. ‘I love the idea of using the imagination to transcend the concert hall, as he did the theatre.’ The first concert will begin with a set, ‘O Fool, I shall go mad’, which includes Strauss’s melodrama Das Schloss am Meere and his Ophelia Songs (sung by Matthew’s sister soprano Rebecca Sharp) and three sonnet settings by Finnish composer Rautavaara. Matthew (as cellist and actor) and the sound collective will then premiere a new work inspired by King Lear by James Francis Brown. The second half turns to Christopher Marlowe with Stephen Deazley and Martin Riley’s Faustus – a one-man ‘opera fantasy’ – and then Matthew is joined by violinist David Le Page and pianist David Gordon to explore the devil’s own tunes in The Devil’s Jukebox. Sharp belongs to a network of like-minded musicians, including the fearless percussionist Joby Burgess (with whom he’ll play Golijov’s

1 May ‘O Fool, I shall go mad’ Shakespeare by Strauss, Rautavaara & James Francis Brown + The Devil’s Jukebox in association with Opera North Late-Night Show ZRI: Brahms and the Gypsy 2 May Undiscovered Country Golijov & Rautavaara + Renaissance Woman A celebration of Errollyn Wallen MBE Late-Night Show Death’s Cabaret: A Love Story 3 May Family Concert: When Yesterday We Met An extraordinary concert for children, adults, families, anyone


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hypnotic Mariel), violist Max Baillie (son of his teacher Alexander) and clarinettist Ben Harlan. The latter formed ZRI, a tavern ensemble named after Brahms’s favourite pub, ‘The Red Hedgehog’ (Zum Roten Igel). ZRI will be performing their now acclaimed version of Brahms’s Clarinet Quintet reimagined using the gypsy instruments of accordion and santouri whose sonorities infuse so much of the composer’s music. On the Friday night Sharp and the Sacconi Quartet will present Rautavaara’s ravishing String Quintet Les Cieux Inconnus. I’m interested in his eclectic choice of composers, which range from Mussorgsky, Tartini and Strauss to a group of living composers: ‘All the music I’ve chosen is by composers who write music that turns me on – sensual, dramatic, uncompromising’ he says, ‘and in all I sense adventure, an undiscovered country or, as Rautavaara’s piece suggests, “unknown heavens”.’ He’s reserved a special place in Friday’s concert for composer-performer Errollyn Wallen: ‘Ah, she’s amazing, a true Renaissance woman. She can play, she can compose and she can write and sing wonderful songs. This is a great opportunity, too, for us to give the London premiere of her fabulous Cello Concerto.’

MATTHEW SHARP © RAPHAEL KLATZKO

I want to invite – sometimes provoke – people into being right here, right now

March — July 2014

The series ends on Sunday morning with a children’s concert about art song, led by Dominic Harlan. Having seen a film of When Yesterday We Met I can confirm that it is quite unlike any children’s concert you will have seen, and uplifts every audience member with audacious tasks and brilliant ideas. As we end our conversation, the ghost of Shakespeare rises again: ‘On a daily basis, around the world, in different media, Shakespeare is reinvented and re-inspires us. I can see an undiscovered country where the same will be said of the classical music canon – that’s the brave new world I’m heading for!’ Matthew Sharp’s RE:naissance 1–3 May See Listings pp56–57 for details

CLASSICAL RE:NAISSANCE

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CONTEMPORARY TÊTE À TÊTE

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March — July 2014

The opera revolution starts here

Over the last decade Tête à Tête: The Opera Festival has forged a unique path as a showcase for brand-new opera. This August it will explode into life at Kings Place and Central Saint Martins, as artistic director Bill Bankes-Jones tells Alexandra Coghlan You never know quite what to expect from the annual Tête à Tête Opera Festival. It could be six women giving birth (singing vigorously all the while), a sequel to Madama Butterfly, an opera about Jade Goody or Gala Dalí, or a promenade piece staged in a secret location. Described variously by critics as ‘wonderfully random’, ‘friendly and funky’ and ‘a musical pick and mix’, Tête à Tête regularly features over 30 world premieres in its three-week run. This summer the festival leaves Hammersmith after almost a decade to set up its new permanent home in King’s Cross. ‘Riverside Studios was marvellous, but there just wasn’t enough room for us to develop there,’ explains artistic director and festival founder Bill Bankes-Jones. ‘We’d been looking for ages for a venue with lots of different theatres all together, but it’s really

hard to find. There are so few places in London with that much space and flexibility.’ Flexibility is essential for a festival whose aim is to give traditional opera ‘a kick up the aria’, and whose first-ever production, The Flying Fox (a new version of Die Fledermaus), startled opera-goers when it stripped them of their seats and turned them into the chorus. Targeting audiences more accustomed to the innovative world of theatre than the opera house’s rigid conventions, works range from 10-minute miniatures to large-scale, fully-staged productions, whose only limitations are the imaginations of the many opera companies who contribute and the eclectic interests of BankesJones himself. ‘The only thing that defines the festival,’ he says, ‘is what people have to say. An over-arching theme will always emerge, but sometimes I’ll only see it afterwards.’


Boii Theatre (Moonflower), JOBY BURGESS (THRASHING THE SEAGOD), VIVIENNE (McCALDIN ARTS) & MITSLALIM SAUM (BEYOND MIND) © CLAIRE SHOVELTON | BILL BANKES-JONES © HUGO GLENDINNING

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk

March — July 2014

But Tête à Tête is far from chaotic. Each evening of the festival is carefully choreographed dramatically. ‘It frustrates me when people just go to one show. You get a much better experience if you spend time trying different things, watch a couple of operas, some performances in the foyer, and maybe have a bite to eat. One year we had two Miss Havisham operas, and by putting them next to each other they both became more interesting because they were so different – it was fascinating.’ But how does the innovation and experimentation of Tête à Tête relate to London’s mainstream opera companies? ‘I was reading recently that 40% of the Royal Opera’s audiences were under 45,’ says Bankes-Jones. ‘For us, it’s more like 80%. They are generally young and very adventurous in their tastes. A company like the Royal Opera or English National Opera are like Tesco – delivering opera in massive volume. We’re the funky, hippy corner shop with lots of hand-crafted stuff that isn’t institutionally driven.’ Founded in the same year as Tête à Tête, the Arcola Theatre’s Grimeborn Festival is closer in character. But while Grimeborn is dominated by re-workings and new stagings of classic repertoire, all of Tête à Tête’s shows are brand-new – both a thrill, and sometimes a risk, Bankes-Jones admits. ‘Sometimes the shows are a complete surprise to me. I sit down to watch and think, “Bloody hell, this isn’t at all what I was expecting.” But that’s what makes the festival so exciting – you just go with it.’ This year Tête à Tête is moving to the new St Pancras quarter, and will be splitting its time between Kings Place and University of the Arts London, Central Saint Martins, just across the road. For Bankes-Jones it’s an appealing challenge. ‘The two spaces are very different, and the festival’s three weeks will definitely have different characters shaped by those different environments. Kings Place has great foyers and Central has these fantastic outdoor spaces – the architects have conceived it so imaginatively. I’m excited by the possibilities for this new cultural quarter. What could it sound like? We’re hoping to be a big part of that.’ ‘What’s most thrilling for me this year is combining the creative identity Tête à Tête has already got with extraordinary spaces that we can grow into, the very vibrant and hungry classical music audiences at Kings Place, and the amazing array of skills at Central Saint Martins. If a composer suddenly decides he wants loads of laser-cut limestone for his show, or a team of actors, those skills are all now available on site.’ Tête a tête: The Opera Festival 2014 24 July–10 August Full programme details will soon be announced at tete-a-tete.org.uk and kingpslace.co.uk/tete-a-tete 

Bill Bankes-Jones

CONTEMPORARY TÊTE À TÊTE

We're the funky, hippy corner shop with lots of handcrafted stuff

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MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY ART LISTINGS CALENDAR

LISTINGS

54 59 65 72 76 78 79

JUICE VOCAL ENSEMBLE © DANNIE PRICE | SPACE F!GHT © SUPPLIED PHOTO

In the following pages, you will find details of our fantastic SpringSummer 2014 Season. From classical, jazz, folk and world music concerts to spoken word and comedy nights, with so many events to choose from and tickets going very quickly, book early to secure your seats!

SAVER SEATS £9.50 ONLINE kingsplace.co.uk Box Office 020 7520 1490

‘Virtuoso of the arts’ Matthew Sharp will perform as a cellist, baritone and actor during his three-day curation ‘RE:naissance’ (1–3 May 2014). See Listings pp65–66 for details. MATTHEW SHARP © Raphael Klatzko


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LISTINGS

54 LISTINGS

THIS WEEK's FOCUS CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 4

MARCH Sunday 16 March SUNDAY RETREAT

19 – 21 MARCH

Piano-Yoga® Retreat Spring Clean Your Piano Practice! INTERACT Russian virtuoso pianist GéNIA returns with a new Piano-Yoga® Retreats programme. Pianists from advancedbeginner to advanced level can transform their playing whilst enhancing their wellbeing with ‘the first entirely new piano technique to emerge in over 50 years’ (Yoga & Health Magazine). This is the first of two Spring retreats specifically designed to complement each other, providing unique and personalised content to each participant across a wide variety of topics. (The second retreat is on 18 May.)

OUT HEAR

Effy & Litha Efthymiou: Parting CONTEMPORARY Parting is a new multidisciplinary stage show directed and composed by twin sisters Effy and Litha Efthymiou. Contemporary art music, dance, theatre and film come together to create five ‘living-through’ experiences of psychosis. Developed in collaboration with a clinical psychologist and focused on the very essence of the psychotic experience (hearing voices, seeing imagined objects, having false beliefs), Parting is a multi-sensory, abstract stage show: a poetic look at what it feels like to live with psychosis. Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50

DAY PLAN: Nurturing Your Hands – The Art of Pedalling – Technique Session – BREAK – Learning to Unwind

Michael Collins

Please wear loose, comfortable clothing and be prepared to remove your shoes. No previous yoga experience is necessary. Participants are welcome to bring music (from a single bar to a set of pieces) to discuss its technique challenges. Every hour will be followed by a short break.

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Limehouse Room 12–7pm

Callino Quartet

Online Rates £100 £80 for Piano-Yoga® members

LCMS International Quartet Series – 5 (Ireland)

Multi-event offer: Book both events (16 March and 18 May) for discounted day rate £80 (or £64 for Piano-Yoga® members). To become a member, register at piano-yoga.com and then e-mail info@piano-yoga.com for your discount code.

Haydn String Quartet in G, Op. 77 No. 1 [Hob III:81] Shostakovich String Quartet No. 3 in F, Op. 73 Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 4 in E minor, Op. 44 No. 2 Sarah Sexton violin Tom Hankey violin Rebecca Jones viola Sarah McMahon cello

Michael collins joins the brodsky quartet for two heavenly clarinet quintets BY MOZART AND BRAHMS This Chamber Classics Unwrapped concert boasts two works which featured in your ‘Top 10’: Mozart’s serene quintet (No. 4), and Brahms’s autumnal utterance (No. 7), both inspired by clarinettists. Also this week, Thomas Gould plays Beethoven’s Spring and Kreutzer Sonatas, and the Fitzwilliam Quartet brings Sibelius’s haunting Voces intimae. See Chamber Classics Unwrapped highlight on pp08–09

Callino Quartet

CLASSICAL

Piano-Yoga® with GéNIA

ChamberStudio Masterclasses at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

The Callino Quartet performs one of Haydn’s last quartets and Shostakovich’s Third Quartet – composed in 1946, just after he had been attacked by the Soviet authorities for his Ninth Symphony. The concert ends with the second of Mendelssohn’s three Op. 44 quartets. Mendelssohn married 19-year-old Cécile Jeanrenaud in March 1837, and worked on this quartet during their honeymoon in the Black Forest. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50


Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking

LISTINGS 55 LISTINGS

March 2014

Monday 17 March WORDS ON MONDAY

Jonathan Fenby Will China dominate the 21st century?

MICHAEL COLLINS © ERIC RICHMOND | PIANO-YOGA © GÉNIA | FITZWILLIAM QUARTET © BENJAMIN HARTE | BRODSKY QUARTET © ERIC RICHMOND | AUSTENTATIOUS © IDILSUKAN | THOMAS GOULD © LAURA BODO LAJBER | CALLINO QUARTET, MARTIN CARTHY © SUPPLIED PHOTO

SPOKEN WORD A leading expert on the People’s Republic discusses the major challenges faced by China today, puncturing a number of myths along the way. Jonathan Fenby is a former editor of The Observer and The South China Morning Post and a founding partner and Managing Director of the Trusted Sources research service. He is the author of several popular books on China, including the acclaimed Tiger Head, Snake Tails (2013) and The Penguin History of Modern China (2009). ‘A smart, wise, well written essay which answers with much common sense and learning one of the biggest questions of our time.’ Chris Patten Hall Two 7pm Online Rates £9.50

Wednesday 19 March CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Fitzwilliam Quartet

Thursday 20 March CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Fitzwilliam Quartet Sibelius: Voces intimae Tchaikovsky String Quartet in B flat [unfinished] (1865) Delius Late Swallows (Movement III from String Quartet in E minor) Shostakovich String Quartet No. 13 in B flat minor, Op. 138 Sibelius String Quartet in D minor, Op. 56 Voces intimae (Voted No. 47) Lucy Russell violin Marcus Barcham-Stevens violin Alan George viola Heather Tuach cello CLASSICAL

Daniel Rowland violin Ian Belton violin Paul Cassidy viola Jacqueline Thomas cello Michael Collins clarinet

‘Helsinki is much closer to St Petersburg than is Moscow (and nearer to the Russian frontier than has been comfortable in times past), so it is not surprising to learn of the great admiration Sibelius had for Tchaikovsky. This influence was later passed back across the border to Shostakovich – especially in the 13th Quartet, whose central ostinato section recalls certain passages of Sibelius (perhaps Night-ride and Sunrise?). Sibelius and Delius must be considered two of the most sensitive of musical nature poets, so it is appropriate that the programme include Delius’s exquisite miniature tone poem Late Swallows’ Fitzwilliam Qt.

CLASSICAL

Hall One 7.30pm

‘We are delighted to be joined by our friend and recording colleague Michael Collins to perform these two giants of the repertoire for clarinet and string quartet. Both works are immense in structure and stature, and therefore constitute the entire programme. Though Brahms’s quintet is rather darker in mood, both works display a richness of texture. From the strings’ opening through the sublime slow movement to the set of variations finale, it is clear that Brahms was inspired by Mozart’s earlier masterpiece.’ Brodsky Qt

Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Brodsky Quartet with Michael Collins Mozart & Brahms: The Clarinet Quintets Mozart Clarinet Quintet in A, K581 (Voted No. 4) Brahms Clarinet Quintet in B minor, Op. 115 (Voted No. 7)

Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Austentatious An Improvised Jane Austen Novel COMEDY Following two sell-out runs at the Edinburgh Fringe, Austentatious: An Improvised Jane Austen Novel has become one of the most talked-about shows on the comedy circuit. Each night the cast present an entirely new hour-long comedy play, set in the inimitable style of Jane Austen and based entirely on audience suggestions. Previous show titles have included Pride and Predator, Strictly Come Darcy and Mansfield Shark. Performed in period costume with live cello accompaniment, Austentatious is a hilarious treat. Swooning guaranteed.

Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

Martin Carthy

Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Martin Carthy Friday 21 March CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Thomas Gould & Alasdair Beatson Beethoven: Spring & Kreutzer Sonatas Beethoven Violin Sonata No. 5 in F, Op. 24 Spring (Voted No. 37) John Adams Road Movies for violin and piano (1995) Beethoven Violin Sonata No. 9 in A, Op. 47 Kreutzer (Voted No. 14)

CLASSICAL

Brodsky Quartet

a similar boldness and individuality, John Adams too breaks boundaries. His Road Movies follows a three – movement ‘sonata’ structure, but in a language part minimalist, part jazz, its great intricacy takes players and audience on a novel and manically excited journey.’ Thomas Gould & Alasdair Beatson

‘A joy to behold … the laughs seldom stop’ 4* The Guardian ‘Supersmart and terrifically funny’ 4* The Scotsman

Thomas Gould violin Alasdair Beatson piano

Hall One 7.30pm

Thomas Gould

Austentatious

‘Beethoven’s much-loved Spring Sonata has an obvious appeal. Tuneful, inventive and fresh, its buoyancy of spirit seems infectious and inexhaustible. In contrast, the infamous Kreutzer makes for a less comfortable, though thrilling, ride. The fast outer movements are charged with a huge energy, whilst the extreme technical and emotional demands and the sonata’s vast scope revolutionised the idiom. With

FOLK For more than 40 years Martin Carthy has been one of folk music’s greatest innovators – and one of its best-loved, most enthusiastic and most quietly controversial figures. A ballad singer, a ground-breaking acoustic and electricguitarist and an authoritative interpreter of newly composed material, with his settings of traditional songs he has influenced a generation of artists on both sides of the Atlantic. Carthy’s skill, stage presence and natural charm have won him many admirers, within the folk scene and far beyond it. Trailblazing musical partnerships with, amongst others, Dave Swarbrick, Steeleye Span and his awardwinning wife (Norma Waterson) and daughter (Eliza Carthy) have resulted in more than 40 collaborative albums. There are also 10 solo albums, including the much-anticipated Waiting for Angels. ‘Arguably the greatest English folk-song performer, writer, collector and editor of them all’ Q Magazine Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

56 LISTINGS Claire Martin & the Montpellier Cello Qt

‘Is there a more enchanting actress on the British stage than Janie Dee?’ Benedict Nightingale, The Times Hall One 11.30am online rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee or tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink)

chaMBErSTUdIo

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS OUTLANDISH NIGHTS PRESENTED BY ALAN BEARMAN MUSIC 27 – 29 March

Public Masterclass with Shmuel ashkenasi SaTUrday 22 March ThE BaSE IN haLL oNE

claire Martin with the Montpellier cello Quartet JaZZ Claire Martin OBE brings her wealth of experience as a jazz vocalist into a brandnew arena with the Brighton-based Montpellier Cello Quartet (Dan James, Sarah Stevens, Joe Giddey and Siriol Hugh-Jones). This exciting new venture combines the Great American Songbook and popular classics with brand-new arrangements, especially commissioned for this project from internationally renowned composers Richard Rodney Bennett, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Django Bates. A chamber–jazz adventure unlike anything Claire has done before, this promises to be a magical fusion, adding a new perspective to the likes of Kurt Weill’s My Ship, Tom Waits’ Old Boyfriendʼs and Lennon & McCartney’s Sheʼs Leaving Home. Hall One 8pm online rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

SUNday 23 March coFFEE coNcErTS

Sunday Morning cabaret with Janie dee Part of the ‘Word/Play’ series devised by Lucy Parham caBarET One of the most versatile performers on the British stage, Janie Lee has devised a show that embraces jazz, pop and ballads, Broadway and musical theatre. Winner of two Olivier Awards and The Evening Standard and Critics’ Circle Best Actress Award, Janie has a parallel career as a star of intimate cabaret, performing at all the best cabaret rooms.

INTEracT cLaSSIcaL Outstanding young professional chamber groups, including The Busch Ensemble, explore the repertoire in detail in a ChamberStudio Public Masterclass with legendary Israeli violinist and pedagogue Shmuel Ashkenasi. Hailed as a ‘genuine talent and profoundly gifted’ (The Vienna Express), Ashkenasi was first violin in the Vermeer Quartet for the duration of the quartetʼs career, and is considered one of the worldʼs great chamber musicians. This is his third visit to ChamberStudio, following on from his inspirational Public Masterclasses at Kings Place in 2011 and 2012. Hall Two 11am | Lasts 4hrs with interval online rates £9.50

LoNdoN chaMBEr MUSIc SErIES

Florilegium Telemann Quartet in G for flute, oboe, violin & continuo, TWV 43:G2 Vivaldi Cello Sonata No. 5 in E minor, RV 40 Jc Bach Quintet in D for flute, oboe, violin, cello & harpsichord, Op. 22 No. 1 Vivaldi Concerto in G minor for violin, flute, oboe, bassoon & continuo, RV 107 Fasch Sonata for oboe, recorder, violin & continuo, FaWV N:B1 Telemann Concerto a Quattro in D minor, TWV 43:d3 Florilegium ashley Solomon flute, director cLaSSIcaL Wonderful music for lute, recorder, oboe, violin, cello and harpsichord, performed by the famous Florilegium ensemble. Fine Baroque sonatas and concert works sit alongside chamber concertos in a programme spanning most of the 18th century – from the early 1700s to a JC Bach quintet, published posthumously in 1785. Hall One 6.30pm online rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

The Furrow Collective

ALASDAIR ROBERTS AND EMILY PORTMAN COOK UP A FOLK FEAST, FEATURING THE FURROW COLLECTIVE & MOULETTES Co-curated by the award-winning Alasdair Roberts and singer-songwriter Emily Portman, Outlandish Nights presents the London debut of the Furrow Collective with Rachel Newton and Lucy Farrell, and special guest Marry Waterson, plus a late show from the idiosyncratic Moulettes, and Hirta Songs, remembering St Kilda. See Outlandish Nights feature pp38–40


Monday 24 March GUARDIAN REVIEW BOOK CLUB

Emma Donoghue

THE FURROW COLLECTIVE, EMILY PORTMAN TRIO © ELLY LUCAS | ALASDAIR ROBERTS & ROBIN ROBERTSON © STEVEN COLLINS | CLAIRE MARTIN & THE MONTPELLIER CELLO QUARTET, MARRY WATERSON, MOULETES, ALAN TITCHMARSH © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

SPOKEN WORD Emma Donoghue discusses her awardwinning novel, Room. To five-year-old Jack, Room is the world. He and his Ma, who was abducted at the age of 19, have been locked in a soundproofed 11x11 ft garden shed all his life. Access to the outside world are limited to the TV screen and nightly visits by their captor, ‘Old Nick’. His mother has heroically constructed a lively routine for him, involving exercise, singing and dancing. But after a dangerous encounter with Old Nick she devises a plan to escape. Widely praised by critics, the novel became a New York Times bestseller and was shortlisted for both the Man Booker and the Orange Prizes.

and history of the remote Hebridean archipelago of St Kilda, abandoned since the 1930s. Roberts’ distinctive Caledonian tenor and unique open-tuned finger-style guitar is backed by Rafe Fitzpatrick (fiddle) and Stevie Jones (upright bass). Alasdair also performs a set of his own material and Robin reads excerpts from his poetical work, including his 2013 TS Eliot Prize-shortlisted collection, Hill of Doors.

Outlandish Nights multi-event offer: Book all three 7.30pm events and save 30%. Book any two events and save 20%.

Alasdair Roberts & Robin Robertson

Meet Alan Titchmarsh Bring Me Home SPOKEN WORD

Thursday 27 March OUTLANDISH NIGHTS

Alasdair Roberts and Robin Robertson present ‘Hirta Songs’ Songs from the World’s Rim FOLK Acclaimed singer Alasdair Roberts and award-winning poet Robin Robertson perform Hirta Songs, their emotionally stirring suite of poems and songs exploring the lives, landscape, folklore

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 29 March Marry Waterson

Friday 28 March OUTLANDISH NIGHTS

The Furrow Collective + special guest Marry Waterson FOLK

WORDS ON MONDAY

Online Rates £9.50

Hall Two 10pm

Unearthed – Songs from the Archives & Netherworlds

Online Rates £9.50

Hall One 7.30pm

‘Among the frontrunners of the new British acoustic scene’ 4* The Guardian

Hall One 7.30pm

Hall Two 7pm

TV presenter and celebrity gardener Alan Titchmarsh has already penned eight top-ten best-selling novels, including Folly and The Haunting. Tonight he talks about his new book, Bring Me Home. Set in a castle on the banks of a Scottish loch, this is an enthralling story of espionage, deceit and death, with an involving family mystery at its heart. Alan Titchmarsh looks back on his successful career and discusses the art of writing fiction – and of course his passion for gardening.

string-rich arrangements in an offbeat and winsome set.

‘A deeply moving tale of hardship, privation and the awesome power of nature.’ MOJO

Online Rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

Alan Titchmarsh

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Storytellers’ Club Road Trip COMEDY A night of comedy tales from the road, as told by top comedians Bob Mills (In Bed With Medinner, BBC R4’s News Quiz, Bafta-nominated for Pierrepoint), Aisling Bea (winner of So You Think You’re Funny; as seen in Dead Boss, Cardinal Burns, Russell Howard’s Good News and more!), Sarah Bennetto (your host and narrator), James Dowdeswell (comedy storyteller in residence) and more! Expect to see top stand-ups telling true stories and sometimes revealing more than they planned! ‘A magical idea.’ The Metro Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

LISTINGS 57

March 2014

The Furrow Collective brings together Emily Portman, Alasdair Roberts, Lucy Farrell and Rachel Newton – four fine folk artists delving into an obscure world of balladry at its darkest and quirkiest. Their new album At Our Next Meeting is accessible, yet raw and uncompromising, bringing together traditional gems from both sides of the Anglo-Scottish border. Authentic voices are accompanied by harp, guitar, viola, concertina, banjo, fiddle and musical saw. From brooding gallows tales to epic ballads of disguise, trickery, true love and heartbreak, each vocalist offers their own style, with shining harmonies and rich arrangements. Special guest of the night is Marry Waterson, renowned for her distinctly English style, evocative imagery, enigma and charm. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

OUTLANDISH NIGHTS

Emily Portman Trio + special guests Mary Hampton & Debs Newbold Her Conjuring Voice FOLK Emily Portman is the current holder of BBC Radio 2’s Folk Award for best original song, an accolade that reflects her power to lure listeners into a complex and darkly surreal netherworld. Her ethereal voice and the trio’s enchanting harmonies belie a ‘brooding realm’ of cruel deeds and sordid city landscapes, part inspired by traditional balladry, part by rich literary sources. The trio (Emily, Lucy Farrell and Rachel Newton) bewitch audiences with their haunting arrangements for harp, concertina, banjo, strings and saw. Special guests are writer-singer Mary Hampton, whose style has its roots in mauve, turn-of-the-century European chamber music, and storyteller Debs Newbold, whose repertoire ranges from folktales and Shakespearean epics to urban myths and self-penned originals. ‘Less a set of songs than an entire looking-glass world’ 4* Financial Times Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50 Outlandish Nights multi-event offer: Book all three 7.30pm events and save 30%. Book any two events and save 20%.

Outlandish Nights multi-event offer: Book all three 7.30pm events and save 30%. Book any two events and save 20%.

FOLK UNION OUTLANDISH NIGHTS

The Late Show with Moulettes

Emily Portman Trio

FOLK Festival favourites Moulettes inject their idiosyncratic brand of acoustic music with lost-and-found elements from across the musical spectrum – from prog and altrock to folk, pop and classical. Charismatic harmony vocals combine with elaborate,

Moulettes

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

58 LISTINGS ThE BASE

Chaos Orchestra Island Mentality JAZZ Chaos Orchestra presents music from its debut album, Island Mentality. With its passion for new music this hard-hitting, cross-genre big band is making waves. Reminiscent of the 80s powerhouse Loose Tubes, it has a unique, everevolving identity of its own. The 20-piece line-up plays contemporary music by fine young composers and improvisers, including Laura Jurd, Elliot Galvin, Alex Roth and Simon Marsh. Something of a ‘secret weapon’ on the European music scene, the ensemble includes some of the UK’s most high-calibre young performers, all committed to creating a spectacle. ‘Hugely original and exciting ensemble, rich in orchestration and bold improvisational concepts, this group is sure to be the future of British Jazz.’ Mark Lockheart Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

ChAMBERSTudIO MASTERCLASSES at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

LONdON ChAMBER MuSIC SERIES

Rosamunde Trio

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS FAR, FAR AWAY... AURORA FAMILY CONCERTS 5 APRIL

Brahms Piano Trio in A, Op. posth. Peter Fribbins ‘Softly, in the dusk...’ dvoˇrák Piano Trio in E minor, Op. 90 Dumky Martino Tirimo piano Ben Sayevich violin daniel Veis cello CLASSICAL The celebrated Rosamunde Trio in a fascinating programme, opening with the Brahms A major Piano Trio – published posthumously, but almost certainly an early work dating from the 1850s. The evocative DH Lawrence-inspired Softly, in the dusk...’ by Peter Fribbins follows, and the concert ends with Dvoˇrák’s muchloved Dumky Piano Trio, named after a Ukrainian lament, a dumka. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

MONdAy 31 MARCh WORdS ON MONdAy Lucy Railton & Aisha Orazbayeva

damon Galgut SPOKEN WORd

SuNdAy 30 MARCh OuT hEAR

Lucy Railton & Aisha Orazbayeva LRAO Album Launch CONTEMPORARy Cellist Lucy Railton and violinist Aisha Orazbayeva launch their first studio album, LRAO and give the UK premiere of Jennifer Walshe’s Wash Me for violin and cello. This version of the album features music and video pieces by the duo, with live electronics exploring multiple sonic textures, using the violin and cello as objects as well as instruments, and sounds of everyday life which influence the duo’s activities. After the interval comes a rare opportunity to hear Luigi Nono’s last composition ʻHay que caminarʼ soñando (‘But we must go on, dreaming’) for two violins, with prizewinning violinist Eloisa-Fleur Thom. Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50

Celebrated South African writer Damon Galgut (Booker Prize shortlisted for The Good Doctor and In a Strange Room) talks about his new novel, Arctic Summer. It is a literary tour de force, in which the author evokes the life of EM Forster and his travels to India, exploring the mysterious alchemy of the creative process. Hall Two 7pm Online Rates £9.50

Damon Galgut

Aurora Family Concerts

DANCE WITH FLUTES, SING WITH LUTES, MAKE A GUINEA-PIG SNEEZE, MUNCH A SLICE OF THE MOON, CHASE A CROCODILE'S FLEAS... Gallop or cartwheel, or amble or trot... cast spells, hatch a plot, for magical, fizz-wheeling stories await. Uncurl your ears and Aurora will carry you far, far away... The trail-blazing Aurora Orchestra launch their first-ever ‘orchestral theatre’ concerts, engaging children (0–6+) and families with classical music through sensory journeys and story-telling. See Classical Highlights p12


APRIL Thursday 3 April OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

Double Bill: Colin Hoult ‘Work in Progress’ + Toby

Fay Hield

DAMON GAIGUT © NIGEL MAISTER | AURORA FAMILY CONCERTS © STANTON MEDIA | COLIN HOULT © EDWARD MOORE | FAY HIELD © DAVID ANGEL | EVAN PARKER © CAROLINE FORBES | LUCY RAILTON & AISHA ORAZBAYEVA, TOBY, ENSEMBLE AMORPHA © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

COMEDY Colin Hoult (Being Human, Life’s Too Short) presents a new show all about uninspiring people inspiring people by being uninspiring. This is the first show where he appears entirely as himself, telling stories of the great inspirations in his life: a Chinese beggar with half a head, his Uncle Keith, Showaddywaddy and the wisest person he ever knew – his late border collie Cassie. A funny, life-affirming show about death. Toby are sisters Sarah and Lizzie Daykin, who quickly became an underground cult hit with their 2010 Edinburgh debut, followed by Lucky in 2011. With this hotly anticipated third show, will the sisters finally be able to put their differences behind them? They’ve written and performed for Live at the Electric (BBC3) and have appeared in Chickens (Sky 1), Anna and Katy (C4), Dead Boss and For The Win (BBC3). Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Friday 4 April FOLK UNION

Fay Hield & The Hurricane Party FOLK

‘Fay Hield is a purist in the best sense of the word. She doesn’t seek to graft herself onto these songs; instead, and with considerable skill, she draws out from them new layers of wit, tenderness and melancholia’ BBC online

Online Rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 5 April CHILDREN’S CORNER

Far, Far Away... Toby

of earwigs and igloos, of King Pepper’s fate. Dance with flutes, sing with lutes, make a guinea-pig sneeze, munch a slice of the moon, chase a crocodile’s fleas. Wear boots or bare feet or red wellies or clogs, bring daydreams or fireworks or buckets of frogs, only uncurl your ears, loose those toes for a day and Aurora will carry you far, far away... Hall Two 10.15am; 11am; 11.45am (Lasts 30 mins; Ages 0–5) Hall One 1.30pm (Lasts 45 mins; Ages 6+) Online Rates £4.50 Kids | £6.50 Adults £16.50 Family of 4 | £19.50 Family of 5 Family tickets are for groups with at least 1 adult

Aurora Early Years Family Concerts 30-min immersive performance in the round for children aged 0–5 45-min family concert for children 6+

70th here at Kings Place on his actual birthday – and you can join him. Parker has been playing sax since he was 14. Over his long, innovative and sometimes controversial career, he has collaborated and formed long-term associations with many jazz greats, explored the use of ‘noise’, experimented with home-made instruments, co-founded the groundbreaking and hugely influential Incus label, and embraced sound processing and electronica. He is perhaps most recognised as the creator of a new solo saxophone language, extending the techniques and experiments started by John Coltrane and Albert Ayler, taking them into the realm of abstraction. His use of circular breathing techniques to create extended, complex, overlapping, repetitive and beautiful soundscapes is generally seen as the apex of saxophone virtuosity. Don’t miss out – book early. Hall One 8pm

They’ve only been around for 18 months, but Fay Hield & The Hurricane Party have already established themselves as leading proponents of traditional folk with fresh, original material rooted in centuriesold tradition. Fay feels a strong connection with these songs, and love and respect for the tradition shines through in her performance. For both showmanship and musicality this band are second to none. Featuring Bellowhead’s lead fiddle player Sam Sweeney, melodeon icon Andy Cutting, the finest English-concertina player in the world, Rob Harbron, and the legendary Roger Wilson on fiddle and guitar, The Hurricane Party will blow you away!

Hall Two 8pm

Colin Hoult

LISTINGS 59

April 2014

Online Rates £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 | Savers £9.50

Sunday 6 April OUT HEAR

Ensemble Amorpha: Play (After Beckett) CONTEMPORARY

Evan Parket

THE BASE IN HALL ONE

Evan Parker Special 70th Birthday Celebration Philipp Wachsmann, Alison Blunt Sylvia Hallett & Dylan Bates violin Aleksander Kolkowski viola, Stroh viola & wax cylinder recorder Benedict Taylor viola Hannah Marshall, Alice Eldridge & Marcio Mattos cello John Russell guitar John Edwards & David Leahy bass Django Bates piano and peck horn Percy Pursglove trumpet John Rangecroft clarinet Neil Metcalfe flute Evan Parker saxophones

FAMILY CLASSICAL

JAZZ

Gallop or cartwheel or amble or trot, steal teaspoons to get here, cast spells, hatch a plot, for magical, fizz-wheeling stories await

This is a unique and very special occasion which will see – with the help of some very special big-band guests including John Russell, Neil Metcalfe and Django Bates, to name but few – legendary saxophonist Evan Parker celebrate his

Luke Styles has composed four new musical works to be performed with actors. In each case a wordless duo of musician and performer inhabit the stage to interpret a score of minor gestures, where time and the body seem suspended. Play (After Beckett) continues Luke’s inquiry into how and where theatricality connects with music. Directed by Peter Cant. Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Ensemble Amorpha

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

60 LISTINGS ChamberStudio Masterclasses at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar La Mer Trio

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

La Mer Trio Bax Elegiac Trio for flute, viola & harp (1916) Telemann Trio Sonata in G minor, TWV 42:g9 Takemitsu And then I knew it was wind for flute, viola & harp (1992) Ravel (arr. Skaila Kanga) Sonatine for flute, viola and harp Thomas Oehler Triptyque de la lande (commissioned by the La Mer Trio) Leclair Trio Sonata Debussy Sonata for flute, viola & harp, L137

sentence of chronic pain, someone proposed a bizarre way out: sit still, they said, and breathe.’ Bedevilled by a crippling condition which nobody could explain or relieve, author Tim Parks confronts hard truths about the relationship between the mind and the body, the hectic modern world and his life as a writer. Teach Us to Sit Still is the thought-provoking and improbably entertaining story of Parks’ quest to overcome ill health.

CLASSICAL

Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

Monday 7 April WORDS ON MONDAY

Shelf Help Sessions: Tim Parks SPOKEN WORD ‘Just when the medical profession had given up on me and I on it, just when I seemed to be walled up in a life

10 – 12 APRIL

‘In a world dominated by cheap selfrevelation and quack self-help, I suspect that Teach Us to Sit Still may be the real thing: a work of genuine consolation that shows the way out of the dark wood of middle age in which everyone, at some time or another, will inevitably find themselves lost.’ Will Self, The Times Hall Two 7pm Online Rates £9.50

Renate Sokolovska flute Hannah Stone harp Maja Wegrzynowska viola Formed in 2010 by three award-winning London-based musicians, the La Mer Trio offers a wide-ranging programme for this most beautiful of instrumental ensemble combinations. The well-known Bax Trio and Debussy Sonata begin and end the concert: in between is a wide selection of pieces, ranging from the Baroque Telemann and Leclair to Ravel, Takemitsu and a work written especially for the trio by Thomas Oehler. Hannah Stone is Royal Harpist to HRH Prince of Wales.

This Week's Focus CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 5

Jon Ronson

Tuesday 8 April OFF WITH THEIR HEADS! HALL ONE SPECIAL

Jon Ronson’s Frank Story

Sonia Wieder-Atherton

COMEDY For three years in the late 80s Jon Ronson was the keyboard player with the Frank Sidebottom Oh Blimey Big Band. Frank wore a big papier-mâché head – nobody outside his inner circle knew his true identity – and the act involved oompah versions of pop classics like I Should Be So Lucky and Radio Ga Ga. Those were Frank’s zenith years. The band toured the UK, playing in sold-out venues. They rode high. And then it all went wrong... Now Jon presents Frank – a one-man show telling the true story behind a soon-to-be-released fictionalised movie that he co-wrote. Part funny memoir, part movie diary, this is a tribute to outsider artists too wonderfully strange to ever make it in the mainstream. Hall One 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

SONIA WIEDER-ATHERTON AND IMOGEN COOPER PLAY RACHMANINOV; Plus Beethoven's ‘Ghost’ & ‘Archduke’ trios Imogen Cooper brings her pearlescent touch to a special recital with Sonia Wieder-Atherton that includes Janáček’s Fairytale and Rachmaninov’s lavish Cello Sonata. Priya Mitchell and friends play Beethoven’s spell-binding Ghost Trio while the Phoenix Piano Trio preface the glorious Archduke with a tapestry of Bach and Schumann (27 Apr). See Classical Highlights pp8–9


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WEDNESDAY SPECIAL

Julie Fowlis

JON RONSON © Barney Poole | SONIA WIEDER-ATHERTON © JEAN-BAPTISTE MONDINO | PRIYA MITCHELL © SONIA MUELLER | IMOGEN COOPER © SUSSIE AHLBURG | SCHUMANN QUARTETT © Kaupo Kikkas | LA MER TRIO, ALY BAIN & PHIL CUNNINGHAM, IVO NEAME QUINTET © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

FOLK Julie Fowlis is a multi-award-winning singer-songwriter. The Daily Telegraph has called her ‘the first Scottish Gaelic crossover star’. Brought up in the Outer Hebrides, Fowlis has been a proud standard-bearer for Gaelic music and culture over the course of a career spanning three highly acclaimed studio albums. On the release of Uam, her last, MOJO wrote: ‘After two fine solo albums, a clutch of awards, unexpected inroads into the mainstream and a Scots Gaelic version of The Beatles’ Blackbird, this seductively inviting selection – exuding romance, beauty and sorrow – subtly expands her horizons… Elegant, evocative, unerringly classy.’ This concert will feature excerpts from these recordings (including tracks from the Pixar movie Brave) as well as brand-new material from an album to be released in March 2014.

memories of the dead friends to whom they are dedicated. Shostakovich’s trio was composed in memory of musicologist and critic Ivan Sollertinsky, and Arensky’s in tribute to Karl Davydov, a great cellist and Principal of the St Petersburg Conservatory. Another spectral presence in Shostakovich’s trio is that of the Jewish victims of Hitler, evoked by the ‘Dance of Death’ in the finale. The Ghost which gives the Beethoven trio its title appears in the uncanny central movement. In a letter, Beethoven’s friend Anton Diabelli guessed that it was the ghost of Hamlet’s father. He was right about its Shakespearean provenance, at least – a composition sketch bears comments relating the ideas to weird presences from Macbeth.’ Priya Mitchell Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham

Thursday 10 April CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Friday 11 April

Priya Mitchell, Bjørg Værnes Lewis & Katya Apekisheva

FOLK UNION HALL ONE SPECIAL

Beethoven Piano Trio in D, Op. 70 No. 1 Ghost (Voted No. 48) Arensky Piano Trio No. 1 in D, Op. 32 Shostakovich Piano Trio No. 2 in E minor, Op. 67 (Voted No. 46) Priya Mitchell violin Bjørg Værnes Lewis cello Katya Apekisheva piano CLASSICAL ‘All three works in this programme are haunted by ghosts. In the case of the Shostakovich and Arensky, the ghosts are

Aly Bain & Phil Cunningham Rare London appearance FOLK Aly Bain is Scotland’s supreme traditional fiddler. His playing is driven, impassioned and pure, with a vibrant, unmistakable tone that has earned him a following around the world. Phil Cunningham is a superb, innovative and masterful accordion player, not to mention a composer of the utmost versatility. Togetehr, this legendary, award-winning folk duo, both MBE recipients for their services to music, have played packed concert halls worldwide since 1988. They celebrated their 25th anniversary in 2013 with the special release Five and Twenty. Expect heart-tugging slow airs, breakneck-tempo jigs and reels and everything in between. ‘Simply the best traditional musicians you are ever likely to hear’ The Glasgow Herald Hall One 8pm

Priya Mitchell

Saturday 12 April CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Imogen Cooper & Sonia Wieder-Atherton

Online Rates £19.50 | Savers £9.50

uncompromising and brimming with energy. The set includes original works by Ivo Neame that the band has performed on the Caught in the Light of Day and Yatra albums. This gig will be recorded live. Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Rachmaninov: Cello Sonata Janáˇcek Pohádka (Fairy-Tale) for cello & piano, JW 7/5 Beethoven Cello Sonata No. 4 in C, Op. 102 No. 1 Webern Three Little Pieces, Op. 11 Shostakovich Three Preludes (from ‘24 Preludes, Op. 34’) Rachmaninov Sonata in G minor for cello and piano, Op. 19

CLASSICAL

Online Rates £10.50 £17.50 £24.50

Ivo Neame Quintet

Imogen Cooper

Sonia Wieder-Atherton cello Imogen Cooper piano

Hall One 8pm

Beethoven: Ghost Trio & Shostakovich: Piano Trio No. 2

LISTINGS

WEDNESday 9 April

LISTINGS 61

April 2014

Sonia Wieder-Atherton and Imogen Cooper share a very special partnership, captured in their subtly characterful recordings of Bach, Schubert, Brahms, Ravel and Rachmaninov. Here they have conjured a typically probing programme to preface Rachmaninov’s romantic masterpiece. They open with Janáˇcek’s ‘fairy-tale’ before diving into Beethoven’s concise, ebullient C major sonata, draw a breath in distilled Webern and Shostakovich, the perfect interlude before the fiery volatility and lavish piano writing of Rachmaninov’s cello sonata. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 | Savers £9.50

THE BASE

Sunday 13 April LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Schumann Quartett LCMS International Quartet Series – Concert 6 (Germany) Shostakovich String Quartet No. 1 in C, Op. 49 Haydn String Quartet in D, Op. 76 No. 5 [Hob. III:79] Schubert String Quartet No. 15 in G, D887 Erik Schumann violin Ken Schumann violin Liisa Randalu viola Mark Schumann cello CLASSICAL Rising stars amongst German string quartets, the prize-winning Schumann Quartett was founded in Cologne in 2007, and is made up of brothers Erik, Ken, and Mark Schumann, and Liisa Randalu on viola. They are performing Shostakovich’s first quartet, dating from 1938, a quartet from Haydn’s popular Op. 76 set, and Schubert’s sublime final quartet, composed in the summer of 1826. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

Ivo Neame Quintet Ivo Neame piano, accordion Jim Hart vibes Tori Freestone saxophone, flute Tom Farmer bass Dave Hamblett drums JAZZ The only London date in a nationwide tour. The quintet features some of the most original and creative musicians working in the UK. Their ability to improvise with subtlety and reckless abandon in equal measure results in music that is fresh,

Schumann Quartett

ChamberStudio Masterclasses at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

62 LISTINGS

THIS WEEK's FOCUS GLOBAL MUSIC FOUNDATION LONDON JAZZ WORKSHOP & FESTIVAL

PG Wodehouse: Poetry and Songs

17 – 21 APRIL

Poet in the City and the PG Wodehouse Society present…

Monday 14 April WORDS ON MONDAY

SPOKEN WORD Sparkling live performances bring Wodehouse’s immortal words to life. This special celebration of one of the greatest comic writers of the 20th century features a wealth of wit and acting talent from stage and screen. Delight in live readings of Wodehouse verse, revel in performances of his lyrics and glean fascinating insights into his life and work.

Somewhere Between was named after one of Haggard’s early songs. Bogguss dug deep into Haggard’s catalogue, choosing songs that resonated with her. The result is an acoustic record with vibe, featuring classics like ‘Silver Wings’, ‘The Bottle Let Me Down’, ‘If We Make It Through December’, ‘I Think I’ll Just Stay Here and Drink’ and many more. ‘Bogguss delivered in charm and talent. It was an irresistible combination that won her a standing ovation’ Chicago Tribune Hall One 8pm Online Rates £24.50 | Savers £9.50

Hall One 7pm Online Rates £9.50

Wednesday 16 April FOLK UNION AMERICANA HALL ONE SPECIAL

An Evening with Suzy Bogguss

Jeremy Pelt gets close to your heart with the global arts chamber orchestra PLUS A SPECIAL EVENING WITH RENé MARIE

Thursday 17 April

Album Launch: ‘Lucky’

GMF LONDON JAZZ

Suzy Bogguss vocals, guitar Charlie Chadwick bass, vocals Verlon Thompson guitar, vocals

Bruce Barth

AMERICANA

René Marie & Jeremy Pelt

Bruce Barth

American country singer and songwriter Suzy Bogguss shot to fame in the 1990s, releasing one platinum and three gold albums and six top-ten singles, and winning the Academy of Country Music’s award for Top New Female Vocalist and the Country Music Association’s Horizon Award. Her new 2014 album, Lucky, is a collection of songs from the pen of country music legend Merle Haggard. ‘He really is the poet of the common man,’ says Bogguss, whose debut album

This week the GMF is in residence at Kings Place, attracting a host of international jazz stars. Jeremy Pelt is joined by Bruce Barth and the cream of London’s string players for a night of classic songs. Also starring are Jim Mullen, Jean Toussaint, René Marie, Tina May & Guillermo Rozenthuler and the London Filmharmonic Orchestra.

Great Musicians of Our Time Bruce Barth piano Jean Toussaint saxophones Duncan Hopkins bass Stephen Keogh drums + Post-concert Jam Session hosted by Barry Green piano with Alex Davis bass and Ric Yarborough drums JAZZ This opening concert of the third GMF London Jazz Workshop and Music Festival features a true giant. Deeply rooted in the jazz tradition, Bruce Barth is without doubt one of the great jazz pianists of our time, and his music reflects the depth and breadth of his life and musical experiences. He has had extended collaborations with Tony Bennett, Terell Stafford, Luciana Souza, Steve Wilson and David Sánchez and was a member of the Terence Blanchard Quintet. In 1992, Bruce played piano on-screen in Spike Lee’s Malcolm X. He is joined tonight by ex-Jazz Messenger Jean Toussaint, and long-time musical collaborator Stephen Keogh (drums). After the set students can participate in a jam session. Hall Two 8pm | Jam Session 9.30pm

See Interact Highlights p28

Suzy Bogguss

Online Rates £12.50 £14.50 Savers £9.50


LISTINGS 63

April 2014

Sunday 20 April GMF LONDON JAZZ

CIT Cork School of Music Jazz Big Band

Friday 18 April GMF LONDON JAZZ

Double Bill: Jeremy Pelt & Global Arts Chamber Orchestra ‘Close to My Heart’

Tina May & Guillermo Rozenthuler with the London Filmharmonic

JEREMY PELT © GULNARA KHAMATOVA | SUZY BOGGUSS © AMY DICKERSON | BRUCE BARTH © JANIS WILKINS | RENÉ MARIE, MUSICA PARADISO, JIM MULLEN, PERICO SAMBEAT © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

‘Musica Paradiso’ – Songs and Stories from the Silver Screen ‘Close to My Heart’: Jeremy Pelt trumpet Bruce Barth piano Duncan Hopkins bass Stephen Keogh drums Global Arts Ensemble Chamber Orchestra | David O’Rourke conductor ‘Musica Paradiso’: Tina May, Guillermo Rozenthuler vocals Barry Green piano | Alex Davis bass Francesco Petreni drums London Filmharmonic Orchestra Raphael Hurwtiz conductor JAZZ WORLD A concert featuring firebrand trumpeter Jeremy Pelt’s best selling album Close to My Heart, tonight performed with London’s Global Arts Ensemble Chamber Orchestra playing the original sumptuous string arrangements, written by its conductor David O’Rourke. Pelt is a player who pushes the boundaries, and does so from a place of maturity. His recent work confirms that his innovative approach is rooted in a deep knowledge and respect for the history of the music and its players. ‘The most beautiful trumpet tone’ All About Jazz ‘Musico Paradiso’ celebrates some of the most seductive, alluring and captivating entertainment of the 20th century: the music and the movie stars that took us to a place where dreams come true before your eyes. In a pastiche of songs, themes and scenes that moved us all, we revisit the golden age of Hollywood. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Savers £9.50

Perico Sambeat

Jim Mullen

Musica Paradiso

GMF LONDON JAZZ

Festival Club: Jim Mullen & Friends Jim Mullen guitar | Barry Green piano Arnie Somogyi bass | Scott Duff drums JAZZ Glasgow-born Jim Mullen is a truly original voice in contemporary jazz guitar. In the 70s he worked with Pete Brown, Vinegar Joe, Brian Auger and Kokomo. In 1975 he met sax player Dick Morrissey, and they began their long association as legendary funk/fusion band Morrisey Mullen. Jim has also worked with vocalist Claire Martin and formed a series of quartets. He is twice winner of ‘Best Guitar’ in the BT jazz awards and won ‘Best Guitar’ in the 2000 British Jazz Awards. Most recently, Jim has recorded as part of The Allstars Collective on the album All About the Music, alongside Jocelyn Brown, Hamish Stuart and Angelo Starr. ‘With his unique mellow guitar sound (the result of using his thumb instead of a plectrum) and his ability to spin a seemingly effortless stream of melody, he never fails to keep your ears fully occupied.’ The Guardian Hall Two 10pm Online Rates £9.50 £12.50 £14.50

Saturday 19 April GMF LONDON JAZZ

René Marie Band feat. Perico Sambeat saxophone René Marie vocals Bruce Barth piano Arnie Somogyi bass Stephen Keogh drums JAZZ BLUES SOUL American singer René Marie refuses to be defined by genre. Jazz, soul, blues and gospel all feature in her stylistic palette. She has attracted a legion of fans worldwide with her powerful interpretations, electrifying delivery and impassioned vocals. It is hard to believe that she did not sing professionally until she was in her 40s, when her son urged her to take the plunge and pursue a career in music.

What followed was a whirlwind of success and great critical acclaim rarely seen in the jazz world, from the LA Times to the Washington Post, from the Miami Herald to the Chicago Tribune. She has received many awards, including Best International Jazz Vocalist, Académie du Jazz (Paris), and has graced the Billboard Charts multiple times, propelling her to headliner status at major festivals in the US and beyond. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 Savers £9.50

JAZZ This is a 25-member group made up of full-time students at Cork School of Music which performs regularly throughout Ireland. The Band has toured to Chicago, NYC, and continental Europe, and played with many distinguished soloists, including Jon Faddis, Bobby Shew and Bob Wilbur. Its programme will feature the music its players love best: new music by Irish composers, and a selection from the books of Buddy Rich, Gordon Goodwin and that of the most swinging band in history, the Count Basie Orchestra. Join them and musical director John O’Connor for a magical night of ‘atomic’ jazz. Hall One 6pm

GMF LONDON JAZZ

Festival Club: David O’Rourke & Guests David O’Rourke guitar Barry Green piano | Alex Davis bass Eddie Hick drums + special guests + Post-concert jam session hosted by Barry Green piano JAZZ BLUES

Online Rates £4.50

Monday 21 April GMF LONDON JAZZ

GMF Student Ensembles, Choir, and Samba Group in Concert JAZZ BLUES WORLD

David O’Rourke is a guitarist, composer, conductor and arranger. He is also a topclass performer. Tonight he showcases favourite songs, originals and standards with a superb band and a very special surprise guest or two. During his 30-year career David has played with many jazz legends (Tommy Flanagan Trio, Cedar Walton Trio, Jackie McLean, Billy Higgins, Curtis Fuller, James Spulding, Brother Jack McDuff and Seleno Clarke). Don’t miss this seriously great set, and remember that you are welcome to stay on for the jam session.

A performance by students attending the workshops during the festival. Each group performs the pieces it’s been working on with its tutors, and the concert also includes a large band playing specially written arrangements by David O’Rourke. The vocal groups contribute a colourful mix of pieces arranged by Pete Churchill, René Marie and Guillermo and the evening ends in carnival mood with an energetic performance by the samba group. Everyone is welcome to join in if the mood takes them. And believe us, it will!

Hall Two 9.15pm

Hall One 6pm

Online Rates £9.50 £12.50 £14.50

Online Rates £4.50

FREE FOYER EVENT

A Brush with Jazz Once again with the aim of bringing together people from the visual, aural and performing arts; painting and music, we will set up a space where musicians will play and painters will paint. Artists and public alike can explore and examine how the idea of improvisation on a theme might be used to make a collectively created painting or mural; and inspire

musicians and artists to paint or explore and practice other art mediums. Come along and enjoy listening to the music whilst observing how the painting develops during the afternoon. The artists joining us this year are Judy Breen, Paul Manners and Judith Glover and the music will be provided by some of London’s most talented music students. Friday & Saturday; 18–19 April Concert Level Foyer 1.30–3.30pm

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

64 LISTINGS Marc Copland and John Abercrombie

blend of melodic harp mastery, rootsy songs and sophisticated rhythmical drive. ‘Something very different. Exciting. Rousing. Pioneering.’ Irish Music Magazine Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 26 April THE BASE

Iain Ballamy: 50thBirthday Celebration Friday 25 April JAZZ IN HALL ONE

Marc Copland & John Abercrombie Speak To Me JAZZ Speak to Me is the CD premiere of a duo that has actually been in existence for some time. The recordings with guitarist John Abercrombie and pianist Marc Copland are classic examples of the quiet, calm art of communication practiced at the highest level. The musical meeting of these two contemporary jazz maestros has a wonderfully organic feel. It is comparable to the finest chamber music. The pieces shimmer with multifarious shades and meanings. They are small sound sculptures of artful transience. This is music from two of the most insightful players of jazz. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Rachel Hair Trio Rachel Hair harp Jenn Butterworth guitar, vocals James Lindsay double bass FOLK Already much praised for her solo recordings, young Ullapool-born harpist Rachel Hair broke new ground with the 2012 release of the first Rachel Hair Trio album, No More Wings. Her partnership with singer/guitarist Jenn Butterworth has established itself as a vibrant new force on today’s folk scene, opening up fresh horizons for Scotland’s oldest instrument. Rachel and Jenn’s boundless energy and infectious enthusiasm for their heritage crafts are underpinned by rock-solid double bass, presenting a thoroughly modern outfit. A sparkling

Presented by Julian Joseph and to be recorded for future broadcast BBC R3’s Jazz Line-Up Anorak Iain Ballamy tenor saxophone; composer Gareth Williams piano Steve Watts double bass Martin France drums

Sunday 27 April COFFEE CONCERTS

Lucy Parham & Henry Goodman: ‘Enoch Arden’ Part of the ‘Word/Play’ series devised by Lucy Parham CLASSICAL SPOKEN WORD In this special concert Richard Strauss’s melodrama for narrator and solo piano (based on Tennyson’s epic poem Enoch Arden) is read by acclaimed West End actor Henry Goodman. He is joined by pianist Lucy Parham, well known for her musical collaborations with actors. Hall One 11.30am Online Rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee or tea) | Savers £9.50

Anorak XL – with special guests Nathaniel Facey alto saxophone Reuben Fowler trumpet Kieran McLeod trombone

Lucy Parham

Henry Goodman

OUT HEAR

‘Sonorities’ in London Nicolas Collins & Jonathan Impett CONTEMPORARY Belfast’s longest-running festival of contemporary music breaks with tradition in 2014 by opening in London with this concert – the first in a series of initiatives linking it with other cities. This year’s theme is remembering and forgetting: exploring how far current technologies in music simulate these very human concerns. Today’s programme features Chicagobased Nic Collins (hardware-hacking guru and author of Handmade Electronic Music) in a duo with meta-trumpet virtuoso Jonathan Impett, and a new sound and video work by Dario Palermo.

Hall Two 8pm

Hall Two 4pm

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Iain Ballamy

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Phoenix Piano Trio Beethoven: Archduke Trio JS Bach Prelude & Fugue No. 1 in C, BWV 870 Violin Sonata in F minor, BWV 1018 (excerpt) Schumann (arr. Kirchner) 6 Studies in canonical form, Op. 56 Schumann Fugue in F, Op. 72 No. 4 Piano Trio No. 2 in F, Op. 80 Beethoven Piano Trio No. 7 in B flat, Op. 97 Archduke (Voted No. 15) Jonathan Stone violin Marie Macleod cello Sholto Kynoch piano CLASSICAL

JAZZ Iain Ballamy celebrates his 50th birthday on BBC R3 with an eagerly anticipated performance featuring his acclaimed quartet, Anorak, and the debut performance of a new supersized septet, Anorak XL, featuring three of the brightest graduates of the Royal Academy where Iain acts as a tutor and mentor. The repertoire will include his latest original works and recent arrangements of past classics. Ballamy came to international prominence as a member of 80s big band Loose Tubes, Bill Bruford’s Earthworks and Django Bates’ Human Chain. More recently he has consolidated his reputation with three releases on ECM, including Food, co-led with Thomas Strönen, and Quercus, by the award-winning trio of the same name he has formed with folk singer June Tabor and pianist Huw Warren. Expect to hear imaginative re-workings of classic jazz standards, occasional folk and classical themes, and original works with a strongly English pastoral feel.

ChamberStudio Masterclasses at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

Steve Richards

There’s something grandly serene about the spacious piano melody that opens Beethoven’s last gem-studded piano trio: perhaps it is the way it falls to the fourth chord that gives it such assured calm. The wonderful Phoenix Piano Trio present a fascinating and magical music journey through German music, via JS Bach and Schumann, culminating in Beethoven’s powerful Archduke Trio, composed in 1811 and dedicated to Archduke Rudolph of Austria, the composer’s willing pupil and one of his staunchest supporters. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

Monday 28 April WORDS ON MONDAY

Rock’n’Roll Politics with Steve Richards SPOKEN WORD In a brand-new show columnist and broadcaster Steve Richards takes you behind the scenes of British politics and the media. As the campaign for the European elections hots up and the general election looms, find out what is likely to happen to Cameron, Miliband, Clegg, Farage – and the country. (And come prepared. Who or what would you like to know more about? The audience decides one of the evening’s big topics.) Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £9.50


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LISTINGS 65

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS RE:NAISSANCE

May

CURATED BY MATTHEW SHARP

THUrSday 1 May

LISTINGS

May 2014

rE:NaISSaNCE

1 – 3 May

‘O Fool, I shall go mad’ Shakespeare by Strauss, rautavaara & James Francis Brown

MARC COPLAND & JOHN ABERCROMBIE © KONSTANTIN KERN | IAIN BALLAMY © DAVE MCKEAN | LUCY PARHAM © SVEN ARNSTEIN | HENRY GOODMAN © HUGO GLENDINNING | MATTHEW SHARP © RAPHAEL KLATZKO | CLARE HAMMOND © JULIE KIM | DAVID LE PAGE, ZRI © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

+ The devil’s Jukebox

Clare Hammond

in association with Opera North 1st half r Strauss ‘Nachtgang’, Op. 29 No. 3 ‘Befreit’, Op. 39 No. 4 Das Schloss am Meere, TrV 191 (melodrama for speaker and piano) Three Ophelia Songs, Op. 67 rautavaara Three Shakespeare Sonnets, Op. 14 James Francis Brown New work inspired by King Lear (world premiere) 2nd half Stephen deazley/Martin riley Faustus – a one-man Marlowe-inspired opera fantasy (London premiere) paganini Caprice No. 13 Devil’s Laughter Mussorgsky Song of the Flea Tartini Devil’s Trill Sonata robert Johnson Crossroad Blues piazzolla Romance del diablo Vayamos al Diablo Jeff Buckley (arr. d Le page) Grace

Matthew Sharp

Matthew Sharp baritone, speaker, cello, voice & actor rebecca Sharp soprano david Le page violin dominic Harlan piano Clare Hammond piano (New work) david Gordon piano, harpsichord sound sollective Tom Hammond conductor (New work) CLaSSICaL

RENAISSANCE MAN, MATTHEW SHARP WITH THE DEVIL'S JUKE-BOX, DEATH'S CABARET, A GYPSY BAND & A CONCERTO PREMIERE There’s something for everyone in Matthew Sharp’s RE:naissance week, during which he’ll will perform as cellist, baritone and actor. There are Shakespeare- and Marloweinspired theatrical pieces, a family concert of songs, a ravishing recital with percussion and the Sacconi Quartet and the London premiere of Errollyn Wallen’s Cello Concerto. See Renaissance Man feature p48

Song recital, ‘concert theatre’, the spirit of music hall – this event encompasses them all. Featuring some of the UK’s most compelling musicians and communicators (including members of the Sharp Family), it celebrates the alchemy of words and music and the spells it casts. Sung and spoken text intermingles with ravishing music, ranging from the searing lyricism of Strauss to the ‘concert-theatrical’ arena

David Le Page

of a new work by James Francis Brown to the London premiere of Deazley & Riley’s one-man opera fantasy Faustus. As always, the Devil has the last dance – Sharp is joined by David Le Page on violin and David Gordon on piano/harpsichord for a finale of famous ‘diabolic’ pieces, including Tartini’s Devil’s Trill. ‘Extraordinary cellist, virile baritone, compelling actor – Matthew Sharp’s astonishingly comprehensive versatility.’ The Daily Telegraph Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 | Savers £9.50

rE:NaISSaNCE

ZrI: Brahms and the Gypsy Ben Harlan clarinet Max Baillie violin Matthew Sharp cello Iris pissaride santouri Jon Banks accordion CLaSSICaL FOLK ZRI present a faithfully re-imagined version of Brahms’ Clarinet Quintet (one of his best-loved chamber music works) as a tavern ensemble of its day might have performed it. Rescoring the work for santouri and accordion to give the rich folk-band sounds that inspired the original, ZRI interweave gypsy and klezmer music to recreate an era when classical and folk music went hand in hand. Hall Two 10pm Online rates £9.50

ZRI


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

66 LISTINGS Dangerous, raw and intimate, this promises to be an unforgettable night! It’s the story of a man’s search for truth. Of all-consuming love for a dangerous woman. And the ultimate sacrifice... When life is in the balance, what will save you? Love, music or waking from the nightmare? Expect ground-breaking entertainment, compelling storytelling and virtuoso music-making.

Joby Burgess

‘Poignant, beautiful and strangely enchanting.’ The Scotsman The Askew Sisters

Online Rates Savers £9.50

FOLK UNION

Friday 2 May

Hall One 10pm

The Askew Sisters

RE:NAISSANCE

Undiscovered Country Golijov & Rautavaara

+ Renaissance Woman A celebration of Errollyn Wallen MBE Osvaldo Golijov Mariel Rautavaara String Quintet No. 2, Op. 12 Les Cieux inconnus Errollyn Wallen Dervish for cello and piano (2001) The Errollyn Wallen Songbook (2006) Cello Concerto (2007) (London premiere) Joby Burgess marimba (Mariel) Errollyn Wallen piano, voice Matthew Sharp cello Sacconi Quartet Arensky Chamber Orchestra William Kunhardt conductor

Album Launch: ‘In the Air or the Earth’ FOLK The launch of a new album by acclaimed English folk duo The Askew Sisters. Emily and Hazel have made a name for themshelves on the folk scene with their inspired arrangements of traditional music. From striking renditions of songs and ballads to dynamic interpretations of dance tunes, the sisters skilfully blend fiddle, melodeon and concertina with Hazel’s powerful vocals (which won her Best Female Singer in the 2011 Spiral Earth Awards). ‘Hazel’s rich gutsy voice and inventive melodeon-playing combined with the skill of Emily’s singing fiddle or soulful cello are a new force to be reckoned with.’ Stirrings Magazine

CLASSICAL

Hall Two 8pm

Percussion pioneer and virtuoso Joby Burgess and the ravishing Sacconi Quartet explore the sensual, other-worldly sounds of Golijov and Rautavaara. The second half of the programme celebrates the music of Errollyn Wallen, ‘Renaissance Woman of contemporary British music’ (The Observer) and winner of the Ivor Novello Award for Classical Music 2013. She is joined by the intrepid and virtuosic Arensky Chamber Orchestra.

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Sacconi Quartet

Online Rates £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 | Savers £9.50

RE:NAISSANCE

Death’s Cabaret: A Love Story Stephen Deazley composer Martin Riley writer Matthew Sharp cello, baritone, actor Sacconi Quartet CABARET In this cabaret concerto, commissioned for virtuoso cellist, baritone and storyteller Matthew Sharp, 19th-century concertos meet the grime and sensuality of cabaret.

Julian Siegel saxophones, clarinets Liam Noble piano, synthesiser Oli Hayhurst double bass Gene Calderazzo drums JAZZ Julian Siegel’s music combines thrilling, deep grooves with memorable, adventurous melodic lines and engaging textures. Unquestionably one of the UK’s most powerful and exciting ensembles, the group features the imaginative piano playing of Liam Noble, the urgent, mischievous and provocative drumming of Gene Calderazzo and the full-bodied sound and authority of bassist Oli Hayhurst. The set includes music from the award-winning Urban Theme Park album, and new pieces that will appear on their next album. Gigs from this all-star group will always be essential listening and their performance at Kings Place is sure to be unmissable. ‘When the Julian Siegel Quartet perform live it’s a fantastic ride’ Jazz on 3

Saturday 3 May

Hall Two 8pm

RE:NAISSANCE

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Family Concert: When Yesterday We Met An extraordinary concert for children, adults, families, anyone Dominic Harlan piano, presenter Rebecca Sharp soprano Matthew Sharp baritone CLASSICAL INTERACT

Hall One 7.30pm

Errolyn Wallen

Dominic Harlan in ‘When Yesterday We Met’

THE BASE

Julian Siegel Quartet

From fables and Greek myths to tales of the extraordinary and the everyday, songs have always been a supremely powerful way to tell stories. Pianist and presenter Dominic Harlan is joined by superb singers Rebecca and Matthew Sharp for a stunningly original concert that includes music by Schubert, Rachmaninov, Brahms and Ives. By turns hilarious, horrifying, moving and profound, the concert guides novices into the world of each song while challenging connoisseurs to find new and unexpected twists in familiar repertoire. When Yesterday we Met… is a thrilling, hands-on show that pays homage to classical music’s most notoriously under-represented genre. ‘I’d never, ever have believed that hardcore song repertoire could be conveyed so immediately, so powerfully and enjoyably to an audience of children. An unmitigated triumph of the imagination.��� Ian Bostridge Hall One 11.30am Online Rates £9.50 (adult) £4.50 (child)

ChamberStudio Masterclasses at Kings Place | 2.30 & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

Sunday 4 May LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Badke Quartet Haydn String Quartet in F, Op. 77 No. 2 [Hob. III:82] J Francis Brown String Quartet (2010) Beethoven String Quartet No. 15 in A minor, Op. 132 Charlotte Scott violin Emma Parker violin Jon Thorne viola Jonathan Byers cello CLASSICAL The famous Badke Quartet perform Haydn’s last completed string quartet and the wonderful quartet by English composer James Francis Brown – an LCMS commission from 2010. Their programme ends with one of Beethoven’s late great quartets – Op. 132, composed towards the end of his life in 1825. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £12.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50


LISTINGS 67

May 2014

their disposal. Their repertoire has emerged from post-Cage experimental music, which has at its core a joyful focus on sound, building music from simple and elementary means. The result is a table-top orchestra of possibilities – and unintentional theatre. For this programme Parkinson Saunders have asked several composers to give them new things to do. Hall Two 4pm Online Rates £9.50

Roddy Woomble

WEDNESday 7 May FOLK UNION IN HALL ONE

Roddy Woomble Band Exclusive London date FOLK Familiar to many thousands of music fans as the front man in Scottish rock band Idlewild, Roddy Woomble is also a celebrated songwriter and performer, whose naturally poetic writing and consistent touring have won huge numbers of fans all over the world. Packed with memorable melodies and powerful, artistic expression, his latest solo album, Listen to Keep (2013; Reveal Records), features 11 new songs written and recorded with his band at An Tobar on the Isle of Mull. The new band featuring Hannah Fisher (violin, vocals), Craig Ainslie (bass) and Sorren Maclean (guitar, vocals) help to create the perfect backdrop for Roddy’s poetic lyrics, adding touches of country and folk to a set of poignant songs. Come and see Roddy at this exclusive London date before he returns to Idlewild in 2015. ‘One of Britain’s most distinct and talented voices’ Kerrang ‘Tender and epic, enormous yet touching’ BBC Music

Kentish roots. A close-knit 7-piece band of family and friends, they have earned a reputation for fantastic live performances with an instrumental line-up that can include mandolin, banjo, acoustic and electric guitars, harmonica, violin, musical saw, flute and a unique blend of drums and percussion. Big festival favourites (Glastonbury, Cambridge, Green Man and Sidmouth) they’ve supported Mumford and Sons and Stealing Sheep, and count Laura Marling and Tom Robinson amongst their fans. ‘They are wonderful.’ 5* Maverick Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Emily Saunders

Saturday 10 May THE BASE

Emily Saunders ESB Album release: ‘Outsiders Insiders’ Support: Partikel JAZZ A buzzing, vibing night of music from stellar musicians of the London and international jazz scene. Emily Saunders’s new album Outsiders Insiders is presented in full, the follow-up to her critically acclaimed debut Cotton Skies. Vocalist and composer Saunders within her superb band mixes originals and Brazilian tunes, upbeat grooves and poetic chillout, to create an unusual, expansive soundscape. Sounds and influences include Hermeto Pascoal, Chick Corea and Portishead. Support set comes from Duncan Eagles’ trio Partikel. (‘Spectacular’ UK Jazz Radio) ‘Emerging vocal star Saunders ... a seductive, silky-smooth voice’ Time Out ‘Musicality, poise and ingenuity … Saunders is the real deal … a jazz vocalist with a big future.’ 4* The Guardian

Cocos Lovers

Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Hall One 8pm Online Rates £15.50 | Savers £9.50

Sunday 11 May

Friday 9 May

Parkinson Saunders

FOLK UNION

Things To Do

OUT HEAR

Cocos Lovers

CONTEMPORARY

FOLK Cocos Lovers (pronounced Co-Coss) blend influences from Africa, the US Deep South (and several other real and imagined corners of the globe) with their

Parkinson Saunders

ChamberStudio Masterclasses at Kings Place | 2.30pm & 4.30pm Free tickets (subject to availability) Details at chamberstudio.org/calendar

Composer-performers Tim Parkinson and James Saunders have performed at contemporary music festivals across Europe, and broadcast on BBC R3. They make music seated at two tables, using any sound-producing means at

Allegri Quartet

LONDON CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES

Allegri Quartet with Wajahat Khan Beethoven String Quartet No. 4 in C minor, Op. 18 No. 4 Wajahat Khan Evening Raga on sarod, with tabla and tanpura Wajahat Khan Raag Desh for sarod and string quartet Ofer Falk violin Rafael Todes violin Dorothea Vogel viola Vanessa Lucas-Smith cello Wajahat Khan sarod CLASSICAL A pioneering collaboration between two great classical music traditions – the Indian and Western – marries the rich heritage of the sarod with the string quartet. Beethoven’s famous C minor Quartet is followed by an Evening Raga based upon the Indian version of the same C minor scale. The traditions are then brought together in a work for sarod and string quartet composed by renowned sarod virtuoso Wajahat Khan. A magical east-meets-west concert. Wajahat Khan is from a famous 400-year-old Indian musical dynasty, and the celebrated Allegri String Quartet this year mark their 60th anniversary. Hall One 6.30pm Online Rates £16.50 | Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

JOBY BURGESS © CHRIS SCHMIDT | ERROLLYN WALLEN © CATHY MASSER | SACCONI QUARTET © VENETIA VAN HOORN ALKEMA | COCOS LOVERS © PETER COCKS | EMILY SAUNDERS © AMANDA SEARLE | ALLEGRI QUARTET © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | THE ASKEW SISTERS, DOMINIC HARLAN, RODDY WOOMBLE, PARKINSON SAUNDERS © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

68 LISTINGS

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 6

WEdNESday 14 May ChaMBEr CLaSSICS uNWraPPEd Val McDermid

14 – 17 May MONday 12 May WOrdS ON MONday

Connecting Conversations with Val Mcdermid SPOKEN WOrd Crime writer Val McDermid and group analyst Sue Einhorn explore the world of crime fiction, in which taboos of murder, incest and violence are broken and the human struggle with mortality is violently exposed. Award-winner Val McDermid is the founder and life force behind the Harrogate Crime Festival and is a powerful, fascinating presence in her own right. Her first novel was published in 1987. Today she is a number one bestseller, translated into more than 30 languages, with over two million books sold in the UK and over 10 million worldwide. She has already written 26 bestselling novels. Her latest, Cross and Burn, is the 27th.

CLaSSICaL

SPOKEN WOrd

Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

SPOKEN WOrd SPECIaL

Poetry and Sign

See Classical Highlights p08–09

Matthew denton violin Michelle Fleming violin Eoin Schmidt-Martin viola Emma denton cello with Katharine Gowers violin and Charles Owen piano

A unique celebration of poetry and its interpretation in sign language, featuring live poetry from Shakespeare to Tagore. Experts in sign language and interpretation will join deaf and partially hearing actors in a fascinating celebration of the power of words. This exciting event will explore broader questions around interpretation, performance and language, featuring poetry performed live in both BSL and spoken word. This event is part of Deaf Awareness Week, in partnership with Remark, the largest deaf-run company in the UK, specialising in all aspects of TV production, including programming for CBeebies. Come and experience some of the world’s greatest poetry as it is brought to life in new ways on stage and screen.

TuESday 13 May

Chamber Classics Unwrapped reaches its sixth week with a diverse array of repertoire, from Franck’s famous Violin Sonata, which Canadian virtuoso James Ehnes and Andrew Armstrong, Strauss and Leclair presented alongside to Bach’s Musical Offering with the OAE and Tchaikovsky’s sunsoaked Souvenir de Florence with the Aronowitz Ensemble.

haydn String Quartet in D, Op. 33 No. 6 [Hob. III: 42] Shostakovich Piano Quintet in G minor, Op. 57 (Voted No. 31) Chausson Concerto in D for violin, piano & string quartet, Op. 21

Poet in the City presents...

Online rates £9.50

JAMES EHNES PERFORMS FRANCK'S VIOLIN SONATA, PLUS THE ARONOWITZ ENSEMBLE BASK IN THE SOUVENIR DE FLORENCE

Shostakovich: Piano Quintet

‘The combination of these three masterly chamber works was inspired by the idea of the ever-expanding string quartet, with one, then two extra players joining the proceedings. Chausson’s unusual line-up of piano and violin soloists with a supporting quartet lends his luscious Concerto an epic, sweeping style that epitomises the spirit of Romantic chamber music. Distinctively French in its elegance and beauty, it is subtly coloured by the ecstatic music of Richard Wagner. By contrast the austere, powerful and at times sardonic world of Shostakovich’s Piano Quintet demonstrates the composer’s mastery of economical, taut ensemble writing. The evening opens in a suitably upbeat mood with one of Haydn’s most joyful works. He is the undisputed father of the string quartet.’ Carducci Quartet

Hall Two 7pm

James Ehnes

Carducci Quartet with Charles Owen & Katharine Gowers

Hall One 7.30pm Online rates £9.50

Charles Owen

Carducci Quartet


LISTINGS 69

May 2014

Robert Manasse flute Melanie Ragge oboe Neyire Ashworth clarinet Stephen Stirling horn Adam Mackenzie bassoon CLASSICAL FAMILY Megson

Aronowitz Ensemble

Thursday 15 May CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Aronowitz Ensemble Tchaikovsky: Souvenir de Florence Schubert Adagio and Rondo concertante in F for piano quartet, D487 Dohnányi Piano Quintet No. 1 in C minor, Op. 1 Tchaikovsky String Sextet in D minor, Op. 70 Souvenir de Florence (Voted No. 36) Magnus Johnston violin Nadia Wijzenbeek violin Lily Francis viola | Tom Hankey viola Guy Johnston cello | Marie Macleod cello Tom Poster piano

VAL MCDERMID © MIMSY MOLLER | CHARLES OWEN © JCK LIEBECK | CARDUCCU QUARTET © ANDY HOLDSWORTH | ARONOWITZ ENSEMBLE © SUSSIE AHLBURG | MEGSON © SUPPLIED PHOTO

CLASSICAL ‘Alongside Tchaikovsky’s Souvenir de Florence, one of the most universally loved chamber works, we’ve chosen two masterpieces which we feel deserve to be far better known. Schubert’s Adagio and Rondo concertante is like a smaller sibling of his Trout Quintet, ever fresh and brilliant, while Dohnányi’s First Piano Quintet is one of the most sumptuous, heroic chamber works in the repertoire, with a first movement that bears an uncanny resemblance to the Superman theme tune. Reviewing the quintet, Brahms said, ‘I could not have written it better myself.’ 2014 marks our 10th anniversary – we look forward to celebrating with you in this joyous and uplifting programme.’ Aronowitz Ensemble Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Friday 16 May CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment JS Bach: Musical Offering Handel Trio Sonata in B minor for flute, violin & basso continuo, HWV 386b Marais The Bells of St Genevieve (1723) for violin, viola da gamba & harpsichord

Telemann Paris Quartet (Quartet in E minor for flute, violin, viola da gamba & basso continuo, TWV 43:e1) CPE Bach Trio Sonata for flute, violin & basso continuo Rameau Pièces de clavecin en concerts No. 1 in C minor for flute, viola da gamba & harpsichord JS Bach Musical Offering, BWV 1079 (Voted No. 22) Principal Players of the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment CLASSICAL A perfect introduction for newcomers and a treat for fans of the era. ‘At its heart, the Musical Offering contains a sublime trio sonata for flute, violin and continuo. This exquisite combination opens the door to much other beautiful repertoire, and the joy at wanting to play certain pieces with my wonderful colleagues led us to initially suggesting a programme that would have lasted for four hours! This concert offers audiences the chance to hear classical A-Listers at their best. It’s a great opportunity to experience the sumptuous harmonies of Rameau and Marais, revel in the stylish virtuosity of CPE Bach and Telemann, and explore the contrapuntal mastery of Bach and Handel.’ OAE Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 £39.50 | Savers £9.50 OAE offer: Book both 16 May & 4 Oct OAE concerts and save 20%.

FOLK UNION

Megson

‘Simply brilliant!’ The Sunday Express ‘The most original duo on the British folk scene.’ The Guardian Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 17 May CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Study Day: French Chamber Music Dr Christopher Dingle, Stephen Johnson and the Ruisi Quartet from ChamberStudio at Kings Place CLASSICAL INTERACT From the dawn of the Belle Époque to WWII, this study day looks through the prism of chamber music at the evolving correlations and contradictions between ideas of French identity and the international artistic melting pot that was Paris. Dr Christopher Dingle (Birmingham Conservatoire, BBC Music Magazine writer, author of the acclaimed The Life of Messiaen) guides us on a cultural journey through the Parisian salons, from Saint-Saëns and Fauré to Poulenc and Messiaen. Debussy’s radical and beautiful String Quartet lies at the heart of this cultural journey, which Stephen Johnson will explore in a live Discovering Music presentation with the Ruisi Quartet, a recipient of ChamberStudio’s prestigious 13/14 Mentorships. St Pancras Room 10.30am–4pm (with break) Online Rates £39.50 (incl. tea/coffee)

Album Launch: ‘In A Box’ Stu Hanna vocals, octave mandola, banjo, guitar Debbie Hanna vocals, accordion, whistle FOLK Megson is husband-and-wife duo Stu and Debbie Hanna. Three times nominated in the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards and treble winners of the Spiral Earth Awards, they draw heavily on their Teesside heritage to create a truly unique brand of folk. Expect driving mandolas, lush harmonies and stunning musicianship. Tonight the duo will be launching a brand-new studio album, In A Box.

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

New London Chamber Ensemble: Telling Tales Musical Stories with Narration Berio Opus Number Zoo for speaker and wind quintet (1951/1970) Prokofiev Peter and The Wolf, Op. 67 for speaker and chamber ensemble Saint-Saëns (arr. Bussick) Carnival of the Animals Martin Butler Dirty Beasts (based on Roald Dahl’s poems)

A family-friendly programme full of animal fun. Saint-Saëns’ wonderful 19th-century classic is a kids’ favourite. The composer had to apologise to his publishers for the late delivery of his Third Symphony – writing Carnival of the Animals was simply ‘too much fun’! This arrangement uncovers new sounds in the familiar melodies, bringing to life elephants, kangaroos, tortoises and the elegant swan. Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf tells of a lonely boy outwitting a hungry wolf with the help of some animal friends. Each character has its own musical theme. There are more misbehaving animals in Berio’s Opus Number Zoo, where our musicians become fighting tomcats, a grumbling grey mouse and a silly chicken. Martin Butler’s interpretation of Dahl’s witty Dirty Beasts rounds off the afternoon. Hall One 3pm | Lasts approx. 60 mins Online Rates £14.50 adults £9.50 for 16-yo & under

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

James Ehnes & Andrew Armstrong Franck: Violin Sonata Leclair Violin Sonata in D, Op. 9 No. 3 R Strauss Violin Sonata in E flat, Op. 18 Allegretto in E for violin & piano, AV 149 Franck Violin Sonata in A, M8 (Voted No. 22) James Ehnes violin Andrew Armstrong piano CLASSICAL Canadian James Ehnes is acknowledged as one of the world’s greatest virtuosi, a violinist of exceptional soul, power and finesse, who is also a committed chamber player and leader of the Ehnes Quartet. He presents a programme of favourite works with pianist Andrew Armstrong, including Franck’s much-loved Sonata, which entered our Top 50 of which Ehnes has said: ‘It���s irreplaceable, nothing else has its particular range of extraordinary emotions, from the inward ambiguity of the opening, to the heights of drama and then to cathartic loveliness in the finale.’ ‘Ehnes confirms the prediction of Erick Friedman, eminent student of Heifetz: there is only one like him born every hundred years’ Diapason Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £19.50 £25.40 £29.50 £39.50 | Savers £9.50

LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

70 LISTINGS THE BASE

Kate Williams Septet Kate Williams piano Gareth Lockrane flutes Steve Fishwick trumpet Ben Somers tenor saxophone Alex Garnett tenor saxophone Oli Hayhurst double bass Tristan Maillot drums JAZZ Pianist-composer Kate Williams’s septet performs compositions from Kate’s critically acclaimed album Made Up, as well as new works specially written for this 2014 tour. The programme also includes pieces by legendary pianist/composer Mulgrew Miller.

Please wear loose, comfortable clothing and be prepared to remove your shoes. No previous yoga experience is necessary. Participants are welcome to bring music (from a single bar to a set of pieces) to discuss its technique challenges. Every hour will be followed by a short break. Limehouse Room 12–7pm Online Rates £100 £80 for Piano-Yoga® members Multi-event offer: Book both events (16 March and 18 May) for discounted day rate £80 (or £64 for Piano-Yoga® members). To become a member, register at piano-yoga.com and then e-mail info@piano-yoga.com for your discount code.

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Fiammetta Tarli and Ivo Varbanov + Friends The launch of a new music label

Alpha-ville presents Herman Kolgen’s ‘Inject’

OUT HEAR

Alpha-ville LIVE A special night with Herman Kolgen CONTEMPORARY

SUNDAY RETREAT

Alpha-ville LIVE is a series of events dedicated to exploring the relationship between sound, image and digital technologies. Tonight Alpha-ville presents a special evening with award-winning Canadian artist Herman Kolgen, widely recognised for his emotionally intense multimedia creations. Kolgen presents the London premiere of two of his most impressive audiovisual performances, ‘Dust’ and ‘Inject’. Inspired by Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray’s photograph Élevage de poussière, ‘Dust’ explores changes in the state of matter. ‘Inject’ illustrates the extreme relationship between human biology and emotion.

Invigorate Your Piano Practice! INTERACT The second of two new Piano-Yoga® spring retreats with Russian virtuoso pianist GéNIA designed to invigorate piano practice and performance. (The first retreat is on Sunday 16 March.) Described as ‘inspiring’ by Music Teacher Magazine and ‘refreshingly unusual’ by International Piano Magazine, these retreats are specifically designed to complement each other, providing unique and personalised content to each participant. DAY PLAN: Rejuvenate Your Body – The Art of Fingering – BREAK – Masterclass with GéNIA – Performance Nerves Tips

Hall One 8pm Online Rates £14.50 | Savers £9.50

Brahms Waltzes for piano four-hands, Op. 39 Piano Sonata in A, Op. 100 Liebeslieder Waltzes for piano four-hands, Op. 52 Cello Sonata No. 2 in F, Op. 99 Fiammetta Tarli piano Ivo Varbanov piano Ofer Falk violin Jozef Luptak cello CLASSICAL Celebrating the launch of a new record label, ICSM (Independent Creative Sounds and Music) Records – made by musicians for musicians... The first four recordings will be released in May 2014 in CD, LP and HD (Studio Master 192/24) format. The focus of the project is uncompromised quality in every aspect of the recording process, creating artistic statements that go beyond time and fashion. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50

Friday 23 May FOLK UNION

Monday 19 May WORDS ON MONDAY

INDEX on Censorship: Bem-vindos ao Brasil! SPOKEN WORD Piano-Yoga with GéNIA

Online Rates £9.50

ICSM RECORDS LAUNCH

Sunday 18 May

Piano-Yoga® Retreat

Hall Two 7pm

Wednesday 21 May

‘Made Up is a striking summation and reflection of Kate Williams’ singular gifts. With trio and quartet albums behind her, she stretches to a 7-piece for her fourth album and the expanded palette of sounds is a thrilling vehicle for her evolving and unusual musical imagination.’ 4* MOJO ‘Cogent, lively and insinuatingly memorable, Made Up provides, in spades, further evidence of a considerable composing (and bandleading) talent.’ London Jazz Hall Two 8pm

a scourge for human rights and free expression. Just before the 2014 World Cup kicks off and in the lead-up to the Rio 2016 Olympics, step onto the field with major cultural and political figures from both sides of the Atlantic. Shouting loud for freedom of expression across the world, Index on Censorship have worked with some of the most remarkable free-expression champions from around the globe – from Anna Politkovskaya to Daniel Barenboim and Ali Ferzat to Malala Yousafzai.

As Brazil steps onto the world stage, join us to ask whether the nation is a saint or

John Doyle

songwriter and interpreter of traditional Irish and English song have made him one of the most in-demand artists in Irish, Bluegrass, Americana and Folk over the last 20 years. ‘Doyle on guitar has risen to a level occupied by him alone... What are they putting in the potable water in County Sligo, where John now resides, that has made him so mind-vaultingly good?’ The Wall Street Journal Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 24 May THE BASE

Bad Ass Brass JAZZ Since forming in 2008, Bad Ass Brass has been thrilling audiences with its bold, funky music and high-adrenaline performances. The band is influenced by traditional New Orleans brass bands, but adds a twist with original material and its own take on the classics. It has performed to sell-out crowds at the RAH’s Elgar Room and Ronnie Scott’s and has been short-listed for a London Jazz Award. This performance will feature many new tracks written exclusively by or for the band, and will be celebrating the launch of its forthcoming new live album. ‘If you want to be blown away by British jazz this year then look no further than Bad Ass Brass.’ JazzFM.com Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

John Doyle FOLK Born in Dublin, John is a Grammy nominee. He has performed for President Obama at the White House, and received every accolade imaginable in Irish music. He is widely considered the finest Irish guitarist performing today his formidable talents as multi-instrumentalist, arranger, singer,

Bad Ass Brass


Sunday 25 May COFFEE CONCERTS

Tim Hugh & Edward Fox: Solo Inspiration Part of the ‘Word/Play’ series devised by Lucy Parham CLASSICAL SPOKEN WORD Tim Hugh, principal cellist of the London Symphony Orchestra and winner of the Tchaikovsky Competition Bach Prize, is joined by actor Edward Fox (Day of the Jackal, The Shooting Party, A Bridge Too Far) for this performance. Hugh performs a selection from the Bach Cello Suites, alongside readings by Fox (poems by TS Eliot, Robert Browning and more).

PIANO-YOGA © GÉNIA | BAD ASS BRASS © Tanya Brennand-Roper | JOHN DOYLE © Keith Wright | CHRISTOPH DENOTH © Sussie Ahlburg | POLLY AND THE BILLETS DOUX © BEN PERRY | ALPHA-VILLE, TIM GARLAND © SUPPLIED PHOTO

Hall One 11.30am Online Rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee or tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink)

Monday 26 May WORDS ON MONDAY

Seamus Heaney Tribute Poet in the City presents… SPOKEN WORD Poet in the City presents a special tribute to the work of Seamus Heaney, the much-loved Nobel-Prize-winning poet, who died in 2013. Widely regarded as one of the greatest contemporary poets in the world, Heaney created a body of work whose power and influence are set to endure. Featuring acclaimed poet Bernard O’Donoghue, this exciting event will bring together some of Heaney’s friends with experts on his poetry for a unique celebration of his life and work. It will feature live readings of many of his greatest poems, providing a fantastic insight into the universal relevance of this wonderful poet. Hall One 7pm Online Rates £9.50

Wednesday 28 May

of works by Dowland, Britten (Nocturnal after John Dowland), Sor and Villa-Lobos. His new album, Mister Dowland’s Midnight, will be launched at the concert. Denoth transcribed Dowland’s music for the golden sound of the guitar, encapsulated in this unique new album.

Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £19.50 £24.50 £29.50 | Savers £9.50 Polly and the Billets Doux

THE BASE ALBUM LAUNCH

Tim Garland’s Lighthouse Album Launch: ‘Songs to the North Sky’ featuring Jason Rebello, Asaf Sirkis & Cellophony JAZZ Grammy-winning British saxophonist and composer Tim Garland has been a luminary of the UK music scene for the last 20 years. He has worked regularly with Chick Corea, touring extensively. May 2014 sees the release of Songs to the North Sky, a major new album marking a decade of his Lighthouse project and a new chapter in his career. This music is a beautiful marriage of all that encompass Tim Garland’s unique playing and writing with power and lyricism in equal measure. At times cinematic and exuberant, it underlines the sheer scale, virtuosity and diversity of his talent. Featuring long-time collaborator Jason Rebello, Lighthouse’s regular percussionist Asaf Sirkis and the eight cello virtuosi who make up Cellophony. An event not to be missed! ‘His level of genius is rare.’ Chick Corea ‘Garland is quite simply a giant of our day.’ Jazz UK Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £20.50 | Savers £9.50

ALBUM LAUNCH

FOLK UNION

Polly and the Billets Doux Album lunch: ‘Money Tree’ FOLK Known for their flawless and energy-filled live performances, Polly and the Billets Doux are brilliantly different: a genius blend of folk, pop, rock’n’roll, country, soul, blues and even gospel. Their debut album Fiction, Half-Truths and Downright Lies had them topping many ‘ones to watch’ lists back in 2010, and the buzz hasn’t stopped since. They have embarked on eight headline tours of the UK and three busy festival seasons, stopping just long enough to write, record and release their Hold Fast EP. 2014 sees the quartet launching their eagerly awaited second album, touring extensively and maintaining their reputation as one of the hottest festival tickets of recent times. It’s a big year for this vibrant, exciting and hugely promising band. ‘An eclectic and inspired musical blend’ The Guardian Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 31 May CHILDREN’S CORNER

Far, Far Away...

Christoph Denoth Guitar Recital

Aurora Early Years Family Concerts 30-min immersive performance in the round for children aged 0–5 45-min family concert for children 6+

Dowland, Britten, Sor and Villa-Lobos SIGNUM RECORDS CD LAUNCH ‘Mister Dowland’s Midnight’ (Music by John Dowland)

INTERACT CLASSICAL

CLASSICAL Christoph Denoth, poet of the classical guitar, is back with an exciting programme

Tim Garland

‘A kaleidoscopic whirl of colour unfolds, creating a post-impressionistic Dowland that makes one giddy with the storm of agitation, turbulence and chiaroscuro’ Anthony Rooley, lutenist

Friday 30 May

Christoph Denoth

LISTINGS 71

May 2014

Gallop or cartwheel or amble or trot, steal teaspoons to get here, cast spells, hatch a plot,

for magical, fizz-wheeling stories await of earwigs and igloos, of King Pepper’s fate. Dance with flutes, sing with lutes, make a guinea-pig sneeze, munch a slice of the moon, chase a crocodile’s fleas. Wear boots or bare feet or red wellies or clogs, bring daydreams or fireworks or buckets of frogs, only uncurl your ears, loose those toes for a day and Aurora will carry you far, far away... Hall Two 10.15am; 11am; 11.45pm Lasts 30 mins (Ages 0–5). Hall One 1.30pm | Lasts 45 mins (Ages 6+) Online Rates £4.50 Kids | £6.50 Adults £16.50 Family of 4 | £19.50 Family of 5 Family tickets are for groups with at least 1 adult

CHARITY SPECIAL

Tanya Cristina in aid of Macmillan Cancer Support with Andrew Yeates piano Matt Whittington percussion Ruth Ginger guitar Simon Swan drums + backing vocals from Lisa Fell, Thérèse Leigh & Tolu Salako JAZZ British soul singer Tanya Cristina will perform original songs from her debut album, Small Woman, Big Voice, plus some by her favourite singers. Tanya and her band are declining payment to raise funds for Macmillan Cancer Support. With a background of soul, jazz, R&B and a love of women with powerful voices, Tanya will sing songs that ring out with passion, conviction and love as a tribute to her mother who passed away from cancer in 2013, and to honour her promise to raise money for this worthwhile cause. A petite woman who can fill any room with her generosity of spirit, beautiful smile and huge voice, Tanya is a passionate singer-songwriter with an astounding vocal range. Her love of soul comes across in every word she sings and every note she hits. Prepare to be moved and inspired by this small woman with a big, big voice. If you’ve been diagnosed with cancer, or a loved one has, you’ll want a team of people in your corner supporting you every step of the way. Macmillan Cancer Support provide practical, medical and financial support and push for better cancer care. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50

LISTINGS

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LISTINGS

72 LISTINGS THE BASE

E17 Large Ensemble Sketches of Anatolia Carlos Lopez-Real, Rachel Musson, Tori Freestone, Josh Kemp & Mick Foster saxophones Percy Pursglove, Tom Allan & Hugh Pascall trumpets Dave Manington double bass Nick Smalley drums Jez Franks guitar Brigitte Beraha voice John Turville piano, director JAZZ The E17 Large Ensemble was formed in 2009 by Carlos Lopez-Real and John Turville to bring together some of the huge creative energy in Walthamstow’s growing jazz scene. To open the inaugural Walthamstow Jazz Festival, the collective commissioned Liam Noble to write a new work for the band inspired by the writing of JG Ballard, Robert Creeley and George Russell, and its repertoire now also includes new work written especially for the band by Carlos Lopez-Real, John Turville, Dave Manington and Jonathan Taylor. Tonight’s concert includes a new commission by Hans Koller, which sees traditional Turkish music through the prism of western jazz, taking inspiration from Gil Evans’ masterpiece, Sketches of Spain. Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

JUNE Sunday 1 June

personal life, including the feverish Sonata in F sharp minor and brooding Intermezzo in B flat minor by Brahms; Schumann’s poetic ‘Why?’ and exuberant Novelette in D; the moonlit, dreamy Adagio from Chopin’s Op. 21 Concerto and Liebesträume (Dreams of Love) by Liszt.

This Week's Focus SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS FESTIVAL

‘A first-class musician who can sketch and colour with greatness.’ The Times ‘The versatility of his interpretative gifts is extraordinary.’ The Telegraph

5 – 7 JUNE

CURATED BY SONGLINES MAGAZINE & IKON ARTS MANAGEMENT

Hall One 11.30am Online Rates £14.50 (incl. cup of coffee or tea) | Savers £9.50 (without drink)

CHAMBERSTUDIO

Public Masterclass with Steven Isserlis Acclaimed international cellist Steven Isserlis coaches ensembles from ChamberStudio: Navarra Quartet, The Busch Ensemble and Trio Isimsiz CLASSICAL INTERACT Professional chamber groups explore the repertoire in detail in a Public Masterclass with Steven Isserlis, renowned British cellist, chamber musician, educator and author. As a chamber musician and recitalist Steven Isserlis has devised and performed programmes at many of the world’s most famous festivals and venues. As an educator he gives frequent masterclasses around the world. This is his first visit to ChamberStudio, a Kings Place partner organisation. ‘The music world – and music itself – is infinitely richer for the presence of Steven Isserlis.’ Gramophone Hall Two 2pm | Lasts 4hrs with interval

Anna Phoebe

Online Rates £9.50

COFFEE CONCERTS

Mistresses and Masterpieces

Steven Isserlis

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS SHOWCASES HANDPICKED ARTISTS FROM VENEZUELA, TURKEY, IRAN, west africa, romania and THE UK.

Part of the ‘Keyboard Conversations®’ series presented by Jeffrey Siegel CLASSICAL SPOKEN WORD Programme to include: Brahms Piano Sonata No. 2 in F sharp minor, Op. 2 Intermezzo in B flat minor Schumann ‘Warum?’ from Fantasiestücke, Op. 12 Novelette in D, Op. 21 No. 2 Chopin Adagio from Piano Concerto No. 2 in F minor, Op. 21 Liszt Liebesträume, S541

Jeffrey Siegel

Songlines Encounters goes from strength to strength, boasting a rare visit from celebrated Malian band leader Habib Koité, an explosive British-Romanian double bill featuring Anna Phoebe and Oana C˘at˘alina Chitu, plus the fascinating dialogues of Iranian kamancheh virtuoso Kayhan Kalhor and the Greek and Turkish songs of Çi˘gdem Aslan.

Jeffrey Siegel piano Jeffrey Siegel presents music inspired by ‘significant others’ in the composer’s

See Songlines feature p34


OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything – Live!

Pop Everything – LIVE! COMEDY

Family Atlantica

From the creators of The Complete Guide to Everything, a weekly podcast with over 6 million downloads worldwide, Pop Everything is a podcast covering American and British pop culture. Join Brooklynbased writers and comedians Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds in their first ever live Pop Everything, along with special guests, as they discuss the latest in TV, film, music and other things that are bad for your brain. Hall Two 8pm

Thursday 5 June

Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

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LISTINGS

˘ ˘ STEPHEN ISSERLIS © SATOSHI AOYAGI | LUZMIRA ZERPA (FAMILY ATLANTICA) © NICK WHITE | HABIB KOITÉ © FERENC KALMANDY | KAYHAN KALHOR © TODD ROSENBERG | Oana C˘atalina Chi˛tu ERIKA BORBÉLY HANSEN | ÇI˙ gdem Aslan © HANDAN EREK | JEFFREY SIEGEL, ANNA PHOEBE, Tom Reynolds & Tim Daniels © SUPPLIED PHOTOS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking

COMEDY Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds continue their quest to explore and explain every possible topic, providing the world with a complete resource of knowledge that isnʼt as stodgy and boring as an encyclopedia. Along the way, theyʼll share outrageous personal stories, concoct harebrained schemes, solve audience membersʼ personal problems, bicker with each other and crack jokes of varying taste-level. Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50 Çi˘gdem Aslan

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Family Atlantica + Habib Koité It all begins in Africa

Saturday 7 June

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Kayhan Kalhor & Ali Bahrami Fard + Çi˘gdem Aslan

Kayhan Kalhor Q&A

WORLD Featuring larger-than-life singer Luzmira Zerpa, Family Atlantica are an extended family of musicians from Venezuela, West Africa and East London. With a backing of thrilling West African percussion, the band is a product of the cultural vibrancy of this city. Family Atlantica’s debut album was a Songlines favourite and their music is a thrilling ida y vuelta (coming and going) between Africa, the Caribbean and Europe. Malian singer and guitarist Habib Koité is one of West Africa’s leading musicians and this is the first time he’s played in the UK for a decade. Like Oumou Sangaré, his musical roots are in the Wassoulou region characterised by the sound of the kamale ngoni (hunterʼs harp), but he has become a pan-Malian voice and a figure who has always tried to bring the different strands of the country together. He’s recently released his much-acclaimed fifth studio album, Soô. Habib Koité’s performance is in collaboration with Enchanted Tunes. Hall One 8pm Online Rates £14.50 £17.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50 Habib Koité

Tom Reynolds & Tim Daniels

Friday 6 June SONGLINES ENCOUNTERS

Anna Phoebe + Oana C˘at˘alina Chi˛tu A night of passion and romance WORLD Anna Phoebe delivers a power-packed punch of violin. Her charismatic energy has seen her working with Jethro Tull, Roxy Music and Oi Va Voi. In her new project, Between The Shadow & The Soul, co-written with guitarist Nicolas Rizzi, she mixes Eastern and Western influences, plus a touch of Gypsy, into her lyrical and fiery playing.

SPOKEN WORD WORLD Prior to his performance, Iranian kamancheh player Kayhan Kalhor talks to Simon Broughton about his music and events that have inspired it, as well as demostrating his specially commissioned instrument, the Shah Kaman. St Pancras Room 6.15pm FREE – but a ticket is required. Please call the Box Office on 020 7520 1490. Kayhan Kalhor

One of Songlines’ top albums last year was Divine Romanian singer Oana C˘at˘alina Chi˛tuʼs take on the music of Maria T˘anase (1913–63), the ‘Romanian Edith Piaf’. T˘anase took folk tunes from all over the country and performed them in nightclubs and on the radio. With her rich, smoky voice, Oana makes her UK debut bringing this repertoire back to life with a fabulous virtuoso band.

WORLD Iranian kamancheh (spike fiddle) player Kayhan Kalhor is renowned for his great musical partnerships, performing with Indian, Turkish, Kurdish and Iranian musicians. Tonight’s sublime pairing of bowed and struck strings features fellow Iranian Ali Bahrami Fard on a specially created bass santur, making music that is meditative and uplifting. TurkishKurdish vocalist Çi˘gdem Aslan is one of London’s best-kept secrets. Mortissa, her debut album of rebetiko (the melancholy Greek and Turkish songs of Asia Minor) has been attracting rave reviews. She’s gathered a superb band, some of them moonlighting from She’Koyokh, with whom Çi˘gdem also performs. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £17.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!

The Complete Guide to Everything – Live! COMEDY

Chi˛tu’s performance is kindly supported by the Romanian Cultural Institute London and the cimbalom is generously provided by the Embassy of Hungary in London..

Last night of The Complete Guide to Everything, hosted by writers and comedians Tim Daniels and Tom Reynolds. See above left for details.

Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £14.50 £17.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

Major talents from Asia Minor and beyond

Oana C˘at˘alina Chi˛tu

Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50


Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

74 LISTINGS

THIS WEEK'S FOCUS CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED WEEK 7 11 – 28 JUNe

WedNeSday 11 JUNe

THURSday 12 JUNe

CHaMBeR CLaSSICS UNWRaPPed

CHaMBeR CLaSSICS UNWRaPPed

Quatuor Mosaïques

Sacconi Quartet with Simon Crawford-Phillips

Schubert: Death and the Maiden Reicha Ouverture générale pour les séances des quatuors (1816) david String Quartet No. 3 in D minor (after 1869) Schubert String Quartet No. 14 in D minor, D810 Death and the Maiden (Voted No. 6) erich Höbarth violin andrea Bischof violin anita Mitterer viola Christophe Coin cello CLaSSICaL

Sacconi Quartet

DVORˇÁK'S RADIANT ‘AMERICAN’ FROM THE SACCONI QUARTET, ‘DEATH AND THE MAIDEN’ FROM THE MOSAÏQUES

‘This programme underlines differences between the works that we’ve selected. Reicha’s Ouverture is sheer comedy, even including musical slapstick. It begins, for instance, with the ʻʻlate arrivalʼʼ of the cellist, who then tunes up whilst playing. Schubert’s Death and the Maiden comes from a completely different world. Fate and death are not merely quoted and described, you find yourself enveloped by them. You feel in your own body and soul what it was that must have moved Schubert to write such music. Two works should never be juxtaposed ʻʻdirectlyʼʼ. This is why Félicien David’s D minor Quartet fills the gap between them. Though depth and gravity are present, a lighter dance-like and pleasurable feeling pervades the final movement – something that would be inconceivable in Death and the Maiden. A quote from David himself gives a deep insight into his world: “I wish to be a Romantic like Beethoven and Weber; in other words, as new, original and profound as they…”. In contrast, at death’s door, Schubert no longer merely “wished” for anything – he was “compelled”.’ Erich Höbarth (transl. by Gordon Murray)

dvoˇrák: American Quartet & Piano Quintet No. 2 Suk Meditation on the Old Czech Chorale ‘St Wenceslas’, Op. 35a dvoˇrák String Quartet No. 12 in F, Op. 96 American (Voted No. 9) dvoˇrák Piano Quintet No. 2 in A, Op. 81 (Voted No. 28) Ben Hancox violin Hannah dawson violin Robin ashwell viola Cara Berridge cello Simon Crawford-Phillips piano CLaSSICaL This concert presents two of Dvoˇrák’s most popular chamber works, and an intensely moving piece by his beloved student and then son-in-law Josef Suk. Dvoˇrák’s American Quartet, composed in rural America, evokes scenes of the New World with music inspired by the nature around him and by Negro spirituals. The Piano Quintet is a tantalising combination of Dvoˇrák’s inimitable lyricism, his rhythmic intensity and his own realisation of Czech folk music. The Sacconi Quartet is internationally celebrated for its virtuosic playing and innovative programming. Simon Crawford-Phillips is renowned for his imaginative playing and dynamic musicianship. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

FRIday 13 JUNe CHaMBeR CLaSSICS UNWRaPPed

aurora Orchestra

Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

A week of fabulous chamber music: the Sacconis take on Dvorˇák’s ebullient American Quartet; the wonderful Quatuor Mosaïques play Schubert’s coruscating Death and the Maiden while the Gould Trio perform his piano trios; and Aurora present some scintillating Ravel before launching into the ‘outdoor’ entertainment of Mozart’s Gran Partita.

Mozart: Gran Partita & Ravel: Introduction and Allegro Ravel Introduction and Allegro in G flat for harp, flute, clarinet & string quartet (Voted No. 29) Thomas adès The Four Quarters Mozart Serenade No. 10 in B flat for winds, K361/370a Gran Partita (Voted No. 23) aurora Orchestra (Kings Place Orchestra-in-Residence) Nicholas Collon conductor CLaSSICaL

See Classical Highlights on p08

Quatuor Mosaïques

Thomas Adès’s bold and mysterious Four Quarters for string quartet charts the dart


Saturday 14 June CHESS AT KINGS PLACE

2nd Kings Place Chess Festival First Prize: £1,000 CHESS INTERACT

SACCONI QUARTET © VENETIA VAN HOORN ALKEMA | QUATUOR MOSAïQUES © WOLFGANG KRAUTZER | NICHOLAS COLLON © BENJAMIN EALOVEGA | GOULD PIANO TRIO © SUPPLIED PHOTO

Nicholas Collon

and flow of time across its four movements: from the chattering dusk of ‘Nightfalls’ to the tick-tock droplets of ‘Morning Dew’, from the steady pulse of ‘Days’ to ‘The Twenty-Fifth Hour’ where time at last seeps beyond the measure of the clock face. A concert of depth and sparkle, the programme also includes the sumptuous Gran Partita in B flat, Mozart’s Serenade No. 10 for 12 wind instruments and a double bass. Ravel’s glittering Introduction and Allegro for an unusual septet owes its existence to intense competition between two Parisian instrument manufacturers. In response to Pleyel’s Debussy commission to showcase their new chromatic pedal harp, Erard asked Ravel to exploit the expressive potential of their new double-action pedal harp. The result is almost a harp concerto in miniature, complete with dazzling cadenza. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

Following the success of 2013ʼs inaugural tournament, the Kings Place Chess Festival is back, bringing together dozens of silent stratagems, serious contenders and young hopefuls at Kings Place. Last yearʼs thrilling tournament featured six grandmasters, 13 International Masters and a host of talented players battling it out for the £2000 1st prize in the Open – with live commentary by wellknown pundits Lawrence Trent and Julian Hodgson. Will Grandmasters Gawain Jones and David Howell return to battle it out this June? To enter the tournament, please call the Box Office on 020 7520 1490 or visit kingsplace.co.uk/chess2014 for the full programme. If you have any queries about the Chess Festival please email Adam Raoof at adamraoof@gmail.com. A copy of the tournament rules will be available on the day. All entries need to be submitted before the day. Limited availability. Early booking advised. Kings Place 10am–6pm Online Rates £25 entry to the tournament (£20 for under 16s) FREE tickets available to observers via Box Office. There will be four sections (Open, Major, Minor and Amateur). All entrants need to be ECF Silver members or above, or pay a £6 supplement.

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

FOLK UNION

Gould Piano Trio

Gilmore & Roberts

Schubert: The Piano Trios

FOLK BBC Radio 2 ‘Best Duo’ 2013 nominees Katriona Gilmore and Jamie Roberts combine astounding lap-tapping guitar, fiery fiddle and their trademark harmonies with considerable song-writing talent, making a truly distinctive sound. Since their debut album, Shadows & Half Light (‘One of the finest contemporary folk albums in recent memoryʼ Fish Records), they have been wowing audiences with their instrumental technique. Their finest album to date, The Innocent Left, demonstrates the duo’s remarkable scope – folk, bluegrass, country, pop and rock – while maintaining their distinctive roots in the storytelling tradition. Hall Two 8pm Online Rates £12.50 | Savers £9.50

Schubert Piano Trio No. 1 in B flat, (D898) (Voted No. 41) Schubert Piano Trio No. 2 in E flat, (D929) (Voted No. 50) Lucy Gould violin Alice Neary cello Benjamin Frith piano CLASSICAL The Gould Trio, described as an ensemble of the ‘highest commitment and deepest artistic insightʼ, take on Schubertʼs two exquisite late piano trios, some of the last music the composer ever wrote. While the B flat is well-loved for its luminous grace and simplicity, the E flat is a grand, unstable work with a Beethovenian intensity, riven with seismic changes of mood. Schubert employed a melancholy Swedish folksong, ‘See, the sun is sinking’, as the theme of the slow movement, and its use in

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Gould Piano Trio

numerous films, from Crimson Tide to The Piano Teacher, is testimony to its powerfully poignant tension. The beautiful song returns near the end, opening a window onto a distant memory of innocence. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

chamber music pieces? Is it because the emotional intensity of the music makes them happy, sends chills down their spines, or makes them cry? Beethoven was reduced to tears by the Cavatina from his Quartet, Op. 130, and Tolstoy famously wept at the slow movement of Tchaikovskyʼs First Quartet. Stephen Johnson (BBC R3 Discovering Music), neuroscientist Michael Trimble (Emeritus Professor of the Institute of Neurology), outstanding pianist Ian Brown, and other guest speakers, ask ‘What do these pieces have in common?’, ‘How is beauty registered in the brain?’, ‘Which keys make us happy, which keys make us sad?’. A day of illustrated talks, debate and open discussion. Hall Two 10.30am–4pm (with break) Online Rates £59.50 incl. tea/coffee

Wednesday 25 June THE PIANO BROTHERS

The Piano Brothers Live at Kings Place CLASSICAL CONTEMPORARY After several standing ovations across London, the critically acclaimed Piano Brothers unleash a tour de force in Hall One. The Piano Brothers are London's most exciting new piano duo: they are the UK’s Dominic Anthony Ferris and Indonesian Elwin Hendrijanto. Funky and cutting-edge, Ferris and Hendrijanto perform an eclectic programme featuring the music of Bernstein (West Side Story Symphonic Dances), alongside fiery arrangements of modern classics, from Adele to Muse.

CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Royal Academy of Music Bartók: Sonata for two pianos and percussion Bartók Seven pieces from Mikrokosmos for two pianos and piano four hands, Sz. 108 (arr. by the composer) Sonata for two pianos and percussion, Sz. 110 (Voted No. 40) Stravinsky The Soldier’s Tale (1918) [full version with narrators] Performers from the Royal Academy of Music | Simon Wright conductor CLASSICAL

In association with The Musical Brain® Professor Michael Trimble, Stephen Johnson, Ian Brown and other guests

These works are masterpieces of their genres, linked by common ancestry and written by composers living through destitute political and economic crises in their respective homelands. Stravinsky’s sharp, sassy and dark Faustian drama The Soldier’s Tale tells of a deserting soldier and the Devil, who eventually possesses his soul. With its themes of abstinence, loss, crushing desperation, regret and resolve it can be related to everyday life, a modern-day parable. Bartók wrote his sonata just before his tragic exile from Hungary. It was essential musical luggage, for him and his wife Ditta to perform. After the tumultuous first movement comes a nocturne full of almost imperceptible rustling. The two pianos dominate the free-wheeling dance-like rondo finale.

CLASSICAL INTERACT

Hall One 7.30pm

Why have so many music lovers placed these particular works in their top 50

Online Rates £12.50 £14.50 £19.50 | Savers £9.50

‘The Piano Brothers performance was so exciting, I didn't want it to end’ Craig Terry, Managing Director, Steinway & Sons Hall One 8pm Online Rates £13.50 £15.50 £19.50 £24.50 | Savers £9.50

Saturday 28 June CHAMBER CLASSICS UNWRAPPED

Study Day: Top 50 Chamber Classics and Why We Love Them

LISTINGS

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Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

LISTINGS

76 LISTINGS

THIS SEASON's FOCUS 2014 SUMMER SCHOOLs SPECIAL TÊTe À TÊTe OPERA FESTIVAL

Martin Taylor

SUNday 7 JuLY CHAMBERSTUDIO

ChamberStudio Mentorship Day CLASSICAL INTERACT

25 JULY – 10 AUGUST

A day of open rehearsals, masterclasses, Q&A sessions and performances with ChamberStudio. This will be the final day of the 13/14 Mentorship Groups’ year of coaching and support at ChamberStudio and the first chance to meet and hear the groups selected for 14/15. Performers will include ChamberStudio 13/14 Mentorship recipients The Busch Ensemble, Bernadel Quartet and Ruisi Quartet. Masterclasses: Halls One & Two 2–5pm Q&A: Hall One 5.30–6pm Concert: Hall One 6.30pm (with interval Online Rates £9.50 (incl. all events)

SATURDAy 26 JuLY IGF GUITAR SUMMIT 2014

Martin Taylor Support: Mike Dawes JAZZ

Juan Martín

FRIday 25 JuLY Summer Schools at Kings Place

IGF GUITAR SUMMIT 2014

Juan Martín WORLD

the busiest summer ever AT KINGS PLACE with GUITAR AND A CAPPELLA SCHOOLS PLUS A CONTEMPORARY Opera FESTIVAL Guitar legends Juan Martín, David Russell and Martin Taylor are among the star-studded line-up of the IGFʼs inaugural Guitar Summit (25 – 28 Jul); The Swingle Singers gather a cappella groups from around the world for the first London A Cappella International Summer School (1 – 4 Aug) and the Tête-à-tête Opera Festival arrives at its new home (7 – 10 Aug).

Voted one of the worldʼs top three guitarists (Guitar Player), Juan Martín learned his art in Andalucía, the home of flamenco. His original method, El Arte Flamenco de la Guitarra, is the ‘bibleʼ of flamenco guitar and has seen 10 reprints. He has recorded 18 albums including Musica Alhambra, The Andalucian Suites and Serenade, as well as several DVDs. Juan describes being asked by Sir Roland Penrose and Lee Miller to play for Picassoʼs 90th-birthday celebration as one of the great honours of his life. He has performed at international festivals around the world and his tours have taken him everywhere from Australia, America and Canada to the Middle and Far East. Hall One 7.30pm

See Interact Highlights on pp27–29; Tetê-à-Tetê feature on pp52–53

Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

Award-winning guitarist Martin Taylor has established a unique musical career as his inimitable style has seen him recognised as the world’s foremost exponent of solo jazz guitar playing. He is also a master concert performer, dazzling audiences with his shows, which combine virtuosity, emotion and humour with a strong stage presence. As well as his solo concerts and recordings, he has also collaborated with musicians from many different genres, including Stéphane Grappelli, Jeff Beck, George Harrison, Bill Wyman, Gary Burton, Dionne Warwick and Jamie Cullum. He spends much of the year touring internationally, and also presides over the innovative Martin Taylor Guitar Academy online. Support comes from Mike Dawes, who has been hailed as one of the world’s finest fingerstyle performers. Hall One 7.30pm Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

SUNDAY 27 JuLY IGF GUITAR SUMMIT 2014

David Russell CLASSICAL David Russell is one of the giants of the classical guitar today. In recognition of his international career, he was named a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music in 1997. His many recordings (released exclusively on Telarc since 1995) have met with tremendous acclaim and numerous awards, including a Grammy


July – August 2014

LISTINGS 77 LISTINGS

Book tickets now: www.kingsplace.co.uk  |  Prices shown are for online booking

Swingle Singers at London International A Cappella Summer School

David Russell

for his album Aire Latino. He is highly sought-after and tours continuously, appearing regularly at prestigious concert halls all around the world.

Online Rates £16.50 £21.50 £27.50 £34.50 | Savers £9.50

technique, a cappella arranging, scat singing and improvisation, beatboxing sessions, audio and visual recording and more. Registration is now open and early booking is strongly advised. Keep an eye on londonacappella.com/ summerschool and kingsplace.co.uk/ laciss2014 for further details coming soon.

JUAN MARTíN © NICK WHITE | MARTIN TAYLOR, DAVID RUSSELL © SUPPLIED PHOTOS | SWINGLE SINGERS © MAMUN HUMAYUN | McCaldin Arts: Vivienne (PAST PRODUCTION) © CLAIRE SHOVELTON

Hall One 7.30pm

MONDAY 28 JuLY

7–10 AUGUST

IGF GUITAR SUMMIT 2014

OPERA AT KINGS PLACE

IGF Guitar Summit Participants in Concert

Tête à Tête at Kings Place

CLASSICAL WORLD JAZZ

The world’s largest festival of new opera sees its eighth annual festival transform as it moves to King’s Cross. Over 80 performances of 35 new works will push the frontiers of opera and fill the area with sound, spectacle and an explosion of creativity over three long weekends. After the first two weeksʼ shows at neighbouring Central Saint Martins, the festival will continue at Kings Place for the last four days. Performances will also take place in the public spaces of King's Cross thoughout the festival period, involving the many partners who are changing the face of the neighbourhood. Full details will soon be announced at: kingsplace.co.uk/tete-a-tete

A performance by the students who have taken part in the workshops during the summit. The programme will include solo, duo and ensemble pieces they worked on with their tutors. Hall Two 5pm Online Rates £9.50

1–4 AUGUST A CAPPELLA AT KINGS PLACE

London A Cappella International Summer School

London Jazz Workshop & Music Festival 17 – 21 April 2014

CONTEMPORARY OPERA

featuring RenÉ Marie Jeremy Pelt Bruce Barth Jim Mullen London Filmharmonic and many more

CONTEMPORARY The much anticipated London A Cappella International Summer School arrives with workshops and performances from some of the finest a cappella performers and educators in the industry, including the world-famous five-time Grammy-winning vocal group the Swingle Singers. This intensive four-day course will help students harness and refine their a cappella potential. Workshops will include group and solo performance presentation, vocal hygiene and vocal

globalmusicfoundation.org kingsplace.co.uk/gmf2014 Tetê-à-Tetê Opera Festival 2014


82 FOLK

Book tickets now: 020 7520 1490

March — July 2014

Q & A SUZY BOGGUSS Based in Nashville, mentored by Chet Atkins, befriended by Dolly Parton, the award-winning Americana star Suzy Bogguss tells Colin Irwin she is looking forward to launching her new album at Kings Place this April

What memories do you have of Britain? I started coming to the UK in 1989. My first performance was at Wembley and I was blown away at the passion you folks have for lyrical music. Every time I come back I have to bone up on my own songs because if someone wants a particular song and I don’t at least know a verse and chorus, they will boldly stand up and sing it for me! What can audiences at Kings Place expect? Indulgence! I revel in ballads and horrible jokes! I am bringing two fantastic artists, Charlie Chadwick and Verlon Thompson, who bring out the best in me, ha! We will do an eclectic mix of old and new with gusto and hope to bring tears and laughter. What’s your favourite album of all time? Heart Like A Wheel (Linda Ronstadt).

We hope to bring tears and laughter… I revel in ballads and horrible jokes!

Who are your biggest musical influences? Well, I like guitar players a lot! I’m not a great player myself but I relate to the stringed instruments. Chet Atkins was a true mentor. As far as singers go, I first mimicked

my Mom, then Ella Fitzgerald, Linda Ronstadt and Emmylou Harris. And Merle Haggard was always on my dad’s car stereo. You gained a lot of early experience playing at Dolly Parton’s Dollywood… Yes, I was hired for the first season there. Dolly was very gracious. I got my contract with Capitol Records while there and she talked with me about some of the pitfalls in the business… like a big sister. Who are your favourite songwriters? Matraca Berg and Gretchen Peters! I also love Beth Nielsen

Chapman, Verlon Thompson, Tony Arata and, last but not least, Doug Crider, my hubby! Tell us about this new album you are launching, Lucky. I have been taking stock of my life lately. My audiences were always so knocked out when I’d perform Somewhere Between, an early Merle (Haggard) song and the title of my first Capitol album. It got me thinking about Merle and messing with some of his other songs, from a female perspective. He creates an amazing visual with his lyrics. He’s really a poet of the common man: when I hear his songs, I feel like I’m listening in on someone’s life.

If you hadn’t been a singer what would you have become? I have an art degree with a focus on metals, so I guess I would have been a jeweller, but I’m a pretty good barber too. Bogguss is an unusual name – do you know its derivation? It’s debated in my family. Some have traced it to Scotland. Others back to a derivative of Latvian. We have freckles... what do you think? An Evening with Suzy Bogguss 16 April See Listings p62 for details

CHRIS GARRICK © BOJAN STEPANCIC

Are you more a country or a folk singer? It depends on the song and arrangement. I interpret certain phrases from different standpoints. Sometimes I feel very universal, which I think is more folky. A country song’s lyrics feel more personal. Around that I tend to produce glimpses into a private world.

You recorded some classics on The American Folk Songbook. What is the appeal of those old songs? I grew up singing those songs in school and on camp-outs and I don’t want to see our young people deprived of them. Their simplicity and beauty always calm me and give me a break from our crazy world.


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DELIvERED TO YOUR DOOR APRIL–JULY 2011

DJANGO BATES PLAYS TRIBUTE TO CHARLIE PARKER Classical

‘Very 21st century’

Nico Muhly / Aurora Orchestra Mozart Unwrapped Shostakovich & Schnittke John Woolrich

Financial Times

‘Magnificent’

Wall Street Journal DJANGO BATES | FIDDLES ON FIRE | GOODBYE STALIN!

Contemporary London Sinfonietta with Matthew Bourne / Nils Økland

Folk Fiddles on Fire Arctic Circle Emily Barker

Photo Tom Bland

Jazz Orphy Robinson Dennis Rollins

World Darbar Songlines Encounters

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TICKETS AVAILABLE FROM JULY 2011

AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO Classical ORION QUARTET The Sixteen SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE Imogen Cooper PHILIP DUKES Mozart Unwrapped KATYA APEKISHEVA Jazz CHARLES OWEN Robert Glasper MIKHAIL RUDY Classic Songbooks: Joni Mitchell, IVO VARBANOV Bob Dylan and more

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marcus roberts 1982 trio

Spoken Word

notes & letters: Aurora Orchestra, Academy of Ancient amit Chaudhuri Music, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, London Sinfonietta, Orchestra of St John’s, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment, Oxford Philomusica, Royal Academy of Music

Baroque Orchestra, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, New College Choir, La Nuova Musica, Platinum Consort, The Sixteen, Swingle Singers, Apollo’s Fire, Chris Garrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, Gwilym Simcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, Onyx Brass, Respectable Groove, Wallfisch Band, Sophie Bevan, Robin Blaze, Allan Clayton, Iestyn Davies, Rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, Andrew Tortise, Elin Manahan Thomas, Sally Bruce-Payne, James Oxley, Jimmy Holliday,

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Katya Apekisheva, Avi Avital, Alasdair Beatson, Bine Katrine Bryndorf, Terence Charlston, Christoph Denoth, Kenneth Hamilton, Pekka Kuusisto, Robert D. Levin, Charles Owen, Daniel-Ben Pienaar, Rachel Podger, Christoph Richter, Maxim Rysanov, Ivor Setterfield, Jeffrey Siegel, Dmitry Sitkovetsky, Miki Skuta, Ashley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, Marcin Swiatkiewicz, Wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, Study Days, and more

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Girls in Airports Dave Stapleton

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WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2013

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Fretwork Schubert Ensemble Britten Centenary

Aurora Orchestra Wagner 200

Contemporary

Travel Festival with Michael Palin

Jazz

Jazz

Bobby Watson Hans Koller

Aurora Orchestra, Academy of Ancient Music, Academy of St Martin in the Fields, London Sinfonietta, Orchestra of St John’s, Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment,

Oxford Philomusica, Royal Academy of Music Baroque Orchestra, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, New College Choir, La Nuova Musica, The Sixteen, The Swingle Singers, Chris Garrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, Gwilym Simcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, Onyx Brass, Respectable Groove, Wallfisch Band, Sophie Bevan, Robin Blaze, Allan Clayton, Iestyn Davies, Rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, Andrew Tortise, Elin Manahan Thomas, Sally Bruce-Payne, James

CAROLYN SAMPSON STARS IN BACH UNWRAPPED YOUR FREE COPY

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Spoken Word

Spoken Word

Jewish Book Week: Amos Oz & Fania Oz-Salzberger Pat Barker

SLEEPERS AWAKE!

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WHAT’S ON APRIL – JUNE 2013

Classical

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Oxley, Jimmy Holliday, Katya Apekisheva, Avi Avital, Alasdair Beatson, Bine Katrine Bryndorf, Terence Charlston, Christoph Denoth, Kenneth Hamilton, Pekka Kuusisto, Robert D. Levin, Charles Owen, DanielBen Pienaar, Rachel Podger, Christoph Richter, Maxim Rysanov, Ivor Setterfield, Jeffrey Siegel, Dmitry Sitkovetsky, Miki Skuta, Ashley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, Marcin Swiatkiewicz, Wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, Study Days, and more

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| TRAVEL | JOHN| JEWISH | AURORA CAROLYN SAMPSON – BACH UNWRAPPED BOOK WEEK | ORCHESTRA BIRTWISTLES IN RESIDENCE MANU DELAGO FESTIVAL METCALFE

lAu | MARCuS ROBERTS | ElgAR

Classical

CAROLYN SAMPSON – BACH UNWRAPPED | JEWISH BOOK WEEK | BIRTWISTLES IN RESIDENCE

biosphere, deaf Center Cage rattling with the wire

Brahms Unwrapped Sibelius: Inner Voices Monteverdi’s L’Orfeo Music for a Monarch

The Epstein

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A Cappella Festival Lore Lixenberg Gravenhurst, Teitur

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Tim Minchin Lady Garden

APRIL – JUNE 2013 2013 JANUARY–MARCH

three men go wild in albion

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duotone maia

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BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER www.gemmalatimer.com

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BRAHMS UNWRAPPED ILLUSTRATION © GEMMA LATIMER www.gemmalatimer.com

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WELCOmE tO LAU-LAND...

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Francesco Tristano Percussions Claviers de Lyon

SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE Classical PHILIP DUKES Brahms Unwrapped Dante Quartet: Britten KATYA APEKISHEVA New Zealand in London KENNETH HAMILTON CHARLES OWEN Contemporary A Cappella Festival MIKHAIL RUDY Manu Delago JEFFREY SIEGEL Jazz IVO VARBANOV

BRODSKY’S SHOSTAKOVICH | SIBELIUS: INNER VOICES | SONGLINES

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The Labèque sisters LIFEM: Mari Boine

SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2012

aurora orchestra, academy of ancient music, academy of St martin in the Fields, london Sinfonietta, orchestra of St John’s, orchestra of the age of enlightenment, oxford Philomusica, royal academy of music baroque orchestra, Choir of King’s College, Cambridge, new College Choir, la nuova musica, Platinum Consort, the Sixteen, Swingle Singers, apollo’s Fire, Chris garrick Quartet, Florilegium, Fretwork, gwilym Simcock Quartet, Keller Quartet, onyx brass, respectable groove, wallfisch band, Sophie bevan, robin blaze, allan Clayton, iestyn davies, rosemary Joshua, Carolyn Sampson, andrew tortise, elin manahan thomas, Sally bruce-Payne, James oxley, Jimmy holliday, Katya apekisheva, avi avital, alasdair beatson, bine Katrine bryndorf, terence Charlston, Christoph denoth, Kenneth hamilton, Pekka Kuusisto, robert d. levin, Charles owen, daniel-ben Pienaar, rachel Podger, Christoph richter, maxim rysanov, ivor Setterfield, Jeffrey Siegel, dmitry Sitkovetsky, miki Skuta, ashley Solomon, Penelope Spencer, marcin Swiatkiewicz, wolfgang Zerer, Family Concerts, Study days, and more

WITH THE COMPLETE SHOSTAKOVICH CYCLE

THE SIXTEEN Jewish Book Week: PIANO TRIO Henry GoodmanGOULD on Ulysses Umberto Eco ORION STRING QUARTET Jonathan Safran Foer SUSAN TOMES WITH

Contemporary

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THE BRODSKYS ARE BACK!

Spoken Word NATALIE CLEIN

SIMON SCHAMA – JEWISH BOOK WEEK | BRAHMS UNWRAPPED | NEW ZEALAND IN LONDON

CLAUDIA AURORA – LIFEM | NOTES & LETTERS | SONGBOOKS

AND MANY MORE...

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WHAT’S ON APRIL–JUNE 2012

STARTING JANUARY 2012

Spoken Word

2012

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WHAT’S ON JANUARY–MARCH 2012

BANQUET OFOF BOOKS ACADEMY ST MARTIN THE FIELDS AT SIMONINSCHAMA AURORA ORCHESTRA JEWISHWITH BOOK WEEK MAXIM RYSANOV

Notes & Letters: Will Self Jonathan Coe Philip Ball Marina Warner

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APRIL–JUNE 2012

JANUARY–MARCH 2012

SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2011

ACADEMY OF ST MARTIN IN THE FIELDS AURORA ORCHESTRA WITH MAXIM RYSANOV THE SIXTEEN NATALIE CLEIN GOULD PIANO TRIO ORION QUARTET SCHUBERT ENSEMBLE PHILIP DUKES KATYA APEKISHEVA CHARLES OWEN MIKHAIL RUDY IVO VARBANOV

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WHAT’S ON SEPTEMBER–DECEMBER 2011 JANUARY 2012, SWEETSTARTING SORROW PERFORMERS INCLUDE: CLAUDIA AURORA, ACADEMY ST MARTIN NEW FACE OFOFFADO IN THE FIELDS

STARTING JANUARY 2012, PERFORMERS INCLUDE:

Django Bates Kenny Wheeler

Folk

Larkin Poe

World

Songlines Encounters

Contemporary

John Metcalfe’s Monomedia: Will Gregory, Thomas Dolby

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